39.2 november 2011 courier

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39.2 November 2011 Courier

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  • The theater department prepares to put on the fall production of Peter Pan.

    PAGE 10

    Concussions plague student-athletes and pose a serious risk to their health.

    PAGE 8

    Senior Kristi Ayre represents students as one of 15 state students representatives.

    PAGE 3

    COURIERCOLUMBINE HIGH SCHOOL

    INNEWS

    THE

    63,(5&(67/,77/(721&2&2/80%,1(+6:(%#*0$,/&20

    92/12129(0%(5

    INSPORTS

    INCULTURE

    www.bully.comWith the growth of social networking,

    students are experiencing increasinglevels of online harassment,

    or cyberbullying.

    see story on page 2

    story by Danielle Sheehan, photo by Sevan Strait

  • NEWS NOVEMBER 20112

    The thing that I see happening more frequently this year is cy-berbullying, Principal Frank DeAngelis said. In recent years, DeAngelis has noticed an increase in cyber-bullying because of the rise of social networking. He and the counseling center have been working this year to raise aware-ness and deal with this issue. It seems like I have had record numbers of Safe to Tell alerts that I get on students who are harassing or bullying students through Facebook and through cell phone text messages and things of that nature, DeAngelis said. Safe to Tell is just one of the ways students can report harass-ment through an anonymous phone line. Another is Mr. Des Tip Box, where students can slip a note in the box outside of the counseling offi ce anonymously. Some examples of the tips DeAngelis receives are of girls saying inappropriate things to each other, inappropriate pictures that have being shared or posted, and the more recent cases of students hacking into other students Facebook posting information that is not true about the per-son. My biggest con-cern is that I dont think people understand the seriousness of being in-volved with social net-working, DeAngelis said. Kids are at times very naive, because they think that no one can see it other than their friends but there are so many people who have access to Facebook.

    Columbines efforts to deal with cyberbullying are refl ective of heightened national awareness of the issue. According to a 2010 poll of over 4,000 students by the Cyberbullying Research Center, 20.8% reported being the target of some form of cyber-bullying. The students reported they had been the target of some form of harassment in the past 30 days, from having mean or hurtful comments or pictures posted about or of them, to threats given via a cell phone text, to someone pretending to be them online. Although social networking is one the leading causes of bul-lying, it is not the only one. A few more of them are name-call-ing, fi st fi ghts, making fun of, and just plain picking on someone for the fun of it. If we are able to spread awareness of cyberbullying at our school then it might open peoples eyes to how people can be

    affected by this, Peer Counselor Kendra La-Fonte said. Cyberbully-ing is a symptom of the larger problem of bullying as a whole. To address this, DeAn-gelis gave a very pas-sionate speech at this years Homecoming assembly about treat-ing everyone the way each person would want to be treated. I think what

    inspired the speech is something that I be-

    lieve very passionately that as principal of CHS. I want every student and every staff member and every person who enters this building at Columbine to feel welcome and not be left out or isolated, DeAngelis said. There were many notes that were put in my tip box that talked about not having that atmosphere here at Columbine, and that bothers me. DeAngelis has made a huge effort in trying to make everyone feel at home at CHS. One of the ways is by giving every fresh-man a link, or carabineer, on their fi rst day of high school and hanging those connected links in the main hallway to symbolize that everyone is in this high school journey together. I realize at every high school there are cliques and groups hanging out, but when those cliques are mean to each other, that bothers me, DeAngelis said. In our lives we have every op-portunity to agree to disagree, but that does not give me the per-mission to be mean to you or to others because youre not my friend. There are many opportunities to report or even get help with bullying or harassment at CHS. One of the most common ways to get help is through Peer Counseling. Peer counselors are ju-niors and seniors who are in the counseling offi ce every period of the day available to listen and guide other students. For example, Senior Tori Kelly, a peer counselor, said, We have this new student come in, its not [harsh] bullying, but she just feels like people arent super friendly to her because she is new, and we are trained to help her out and give her more self-confi dence. People dont understand the importance of a simple gesture, as far as a wave or smiling. They dont see the difference that can make in someones life, DeAngelis said, and I want to create an environment where people are saddened by leaving Columbine. I want them to be happy to be moving on to the next phase in their life, but sad because theyre leaving CHS.

    comments? dsheehan.pub@gmail.com

    Digital Bullying Raises Challenges

    Danielle Sheehan

    Students work to deal with harassment in texting and social networking environments

    students hacking into other students Facebook posting information that is not true about the per-

    My biggest con-cern is that I dont think people understand the seriousness of being in-volved with social net-working, DeAngelis said. Kids are at times very naive, because they think that no one can see it other than their friends but there

    affected by this, Peer Counselor Kendra La-Fonte said. Cyberbully-ing is a symptom of the larger problem of bullying as a whole. To address this, DeAn-gelis gave a very pas-sionate speech at this years Homecoming assembly about treat-ing everyone the way each person would want to be treated. I think what

    CYBERBULLYING Glossary

    Flaming: Online fi ghts using electronic mes-sages with angry and vulgar language.

    Harassment: Repeatedly sending offensive, rude and insulting messages.

    Cyberstalking: Repeatedly sending mes-sage that include threats of harm or are highly intimidating; engaging in other online activities that make a person afraid for his or her safety.

    Denigration: Dissing someone online. Sending or posting cruel gossip or rumors

    about a person to damage his or her reputa-tion or friendships.

    Exclusion: Intentionally excluding someone from an online group, like a buddy list or

    a game.

    Trolling: Intentionally posting provocative messages about sensitive subjects to create confl ict, upset people, and bait them into fl aming or fi ghting.

    Impersonation: Breaking into someones account, posing as that person and send-ing messages to make the person look bad, get that person in trouble or danger, or damage that persons reputation or friendships.

    Outing and trickery: Sharing someones secrets or embarrassing information online. Tricking someone into revealing secrets or embarrassing information, which is then shared online.

    from Nancy Willards An Educators Guide to Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats, 2008.

    She sits at her computer, afraid of what kind of notifi cation shell next see on her Facebook wall. Already feeling heart-broken because she and her boyfriend broke up, she sees he has posted a video on her wall saying, I wish I never met you. He repeatedly keeps posting mean things like, Put it in my mouth. She decides to call this guy she used to be close to and talk to him about what is happening, and all he does is ignore her, no doubt because he knows its her by her caller ID. So she texts him instead and tells him to stop being so immature. She then posts something along the lines of grow up on her own wall. Her ex sees this and comments rude messages on it, and all of his friends then comment on it, only making the situation worse. After that he texts her over and over, saying rude and hurtful things. There isnt anything she can do to stop him.

    Mr. Lentini and the counseling staff keep their doors open for students who need help with issues, including cyberbullying. The Counseling Center also houses Peer Counselors, who have been trained to help students with a variety of problems. photo by Sevan Strait

  • 3NOVEMBER 2011 NEWS

    At Columbine, we stress the aspect of family and the idea that were all Rebels, no matter what grade youre in or wheth-er you do football or debate. This was the central idea behind the speech Senior Sen-ator Kristi Ayre delivered at the CHSAA Fall Leadership Conference on October 21 and 22, in which she suggested ways that student senators can make their schools feel more like family. In eight different round table discussions, Ayre addressed a total of 48 student senators who represented high schools from across Colorado. My topic [was] called We Are . . . Family, and [I talked] to them about how to make their school feel like a family and feel more united, because our school is kind of unique in that way, Ayre said. Ive talked to a lot of other people all over the state and their schools do not resemble [Col-umbine] at all. Eight student senators from Columbine as well as senators from over 50 Colorado high

    schools attended the confer-ence at Fossil Ridge High School in Fort Collins. Ayre was one of several round table presenters at the conference who led discussions and gave advice on how to improve stu-dent senates at individual high schools. Like all the other round table presenters, I really con-nected with some people and they absolutely loved my ideas, while others thought my ideas would be too diffi cult for their school because [their schools] are so small, Ayre said. Ayre is one of