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ACF email ACF website 1 of 9 Anti-counterfeit guide for corporate customers The HP Anti Counterfeiting and Fraud (ACF) Programme for channel partner and customer protection in EMEA March 2019 Table of contents ›››››› Fake products and risks of counterfeiting ›››››› Avoiding fake cartridges ›››››› Avoiding fake computing products ›››››› Reporting possible counterfeits ›››››› Actions for corporate customers ›››››› Overview of security labels on HP ink cartridges Counterfeit cartridges and computing products pose considerable risks to enterprises and public institutions. Make use of the following helpful tips to protect your organisation from fraudsters and their illegal schemes. Fake products and risks of counterfeiting Across EMEA, counterfeiters are trying to exploit the good reputation of original HP products by designing their illegal fakes in a way that confuses customers into believing that they are buying genuine goods. Often, fraudsters specifically target corporations and large customers such as government organisations, banks and universities with their criminal activities. While counterfeits may look like genuine HP products, they are usually of low quality and using them can entail significant risks. These include for example: Complaints towards purchase/ IT departments. Unwitting dealings with criminals and need for a new tendering process. Poor printouts that taint your organisation’s image. Severe health and safety risks, e.g. due to hazardous wiring in fake computing products. Printer downtime and interruption of workflows. Invalidation of hardware warranty and costs to repair damaged printers.

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  • ACF email ACF website 1 of 9

    Anti-counterfeit guide for corporate customersThe HP Anti Counterfeiting and Fraud (ACF) Programme for channel partner and customer protection in EMEAMarch 2019

    Table of contents

    ›››››› Fake products and risks of counterfeiting

    ›››››› Avoiding fake cartridges

    ›››››› Avoiding fake computing products

    ›››››› Reporting possible counterfeits

    ›››››› Actions for corporate customers

    ›››››› Overview of security labels on HP ink cartridges

    Counterfeit cartridges and computing products pose considerable risks to enterprises and public institutions. Make use of the following helpful tips to protect your organisation from fraudsters and their illegal schemes.

    Fake products and risks of counterfeitingAcross EMEA, counterfeiters are trying to exploit the good reputation of original HP products by designing their illegal fakes in a way that confuses customers into believing that they are buying genuine goods. Often, fraudsters specifically target corporations and large customers such as government organisations, banks and universities with their criminal activities.

    While counterfeits may look like genuine HP products, they are usually of low quality and using them can entail significant risks. These include for example:

    Complaints towards purchase/ IT departments.

    Unwitting dealings with criminals and need for a new

    tendering process.

    Poor printouts that taint your organisation’s image.

    Severe health and safety risks, e.g. due to hazardous wiring in fake computing products.

    Printer downtime and interruption of workflows.

    Invalidation of hardware warranty and costs to repair damaged printers.

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    Get details on how to check Samsung-branded printing supplies

    for signs of counterfeiting; these products are distributed by HP as of November 2017.

    Avoiding fake cartridgesOriginal HP printing supplies are particularly at risk of being counterfeited.1 Please carefully follow each of the steps outlined below for examining suspicious products.

    Check the security label Security labels should correctly exhibit all applicable security featuresExamine the HP security label’s holographic features (click on fig. 1 to see the label in motion).

    • Tilt the box from front to back: the ‘OK’ and ‘’ symbols on the label should move in opposite directions.

    • Tilt the box from right to left: the ‘OK’ and ‘‘ symbols on the label should move in the same direction. fig. 1

    If you have a smartphone, you can also validate the label’s unique code (fig. 2).

    Download HP’s free SureSupply app to easily check HP security labels with its included QR code reader.

    • Simply capture the Quick Response (QR) code printed on the label with any QR code reader.

    • Get an immediate response from HP.

    A number of free QR code readers or the reader included with the HP SureSupply app (where available) can be used. Alternatively, you can go to the HP Mobile Authentication website displayed on current security labels (hp.com/go/ok) and enter the label’s serial number manually for verification.

    fig. 2

    All original HP toner cartridges have a security label. The label is stuck across the tear strip of the box (fig. 3). If you notice any HP toner cartridges without a security label, you have reason to be suspicious. fig. 3

    Selected original HP inkjet cartridges carry a security label in EMEA. If present, the HP security label can either be found in the upper right corner of the hang tab or on the left or right panel of the box (fig. 4). Please cross-check with the overview of security labels on HP ink cartridges – if a security label is missing although it should be present, this can be indicative of counterfeiting.

    fig. 4

    Original HP PageWide cartridges generally carry a security label. The label, which is of the same design as the one applied to HP ink cartridges, is usually found on the right panel of the box (fig. 5). If you notice HP PageWide cartridges without a security label, you have reason to be suspicious. fig. 5

    Original HP large format printing supplies generally feature a security label when delivered in HP’s current packaging. If present, the label can either be found in the upper right corner of the hang tab or on the left or right panel of the box (fig. 6). Please note that former versions of large format printing supplies packaging may not have a security label. fig. 6

    http://www.hp.com/go/anticounterfeithttp://www.hp.com/go/anticounterfeithttp://h20195.www2.hp.com/v2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=c06076182http://h20195.www2.hp.com/v2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=c06076182http://h20195.www2.hp.com/v2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=c06201705

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    Latest toner security labels feature a barcode. This barcode supports the serialisation of HP toner cartridges.

    Be aware of the different variations of the security label. Some older versions of HP’s security labels may still be in circulation; they generally have an image-shifting feature that can be checked in a similar way as described above.

    • The latest version of the security label features a toner or ink icon, respectively (see fig. 7).

    • Former versions of the security label (fig. 8) include toner labels that combine the toner icon with the word ’toner’ printed underneath; as well as ink and toner versions that feature a mobile phone icon instead.

    With security label versions that indicate whether they are intended for toner or ink products, please check that the label correctly corresponds with the product. An ink label on a toner cartridge is suspicious, and vice versa.

    Current security labels Previous security labels

    (toner) (ink)fig. 7

    (toner)(toner) (toner) (toner) (ink)fig. 8

    Check the dates/codes Dates/codes on box and cartridge matchOriginal HP cartridges feature specific dates or codes on the box as well as on the cartridge it contains. If they do not match as described below, you have reason to be suspicious.

    • All original HP ink, PageWide, and large format printing supplies feature the same ‘End of Warranty’ date on the box as on the cartridge itself (fig. 9).

    • All original HP toner cartridges have a code on both the box and the cartridge itself, of which the first five characters match (fig. 10). Please ignore all date specifications present.

    Same dates

    fig. 9

    First five characters match

    fig. 10

    Look at the packaging

    Please note that HP offers so-called contractual cartridges (‘C-SKUs’, ‘MPS SKUs’, or ‘MC-SKUs’) that are particularly for specific deals with selected HP partners or are part of HP Managed Print Services (MPS). These cartridges come in deviating packaging.

    Fraudsters might use this difference in packaging to conceal counterfeits and explain suspicious pricing. Please contact us and request a Customer Delivery Inspection (CDI) if suspicious about a delivery of contractual supplies.

    All packaging should be top qualityBoxes and packaging materials used for original HP cartridges are of consistent and premium quality (fig. 11). HP does not knowingly authorise the sale of packaging which is damaged or poor quality. Also, there should be no printing mistakes or signs of opening and re-sealing. HP generally recommends only accepting HP cartridges in unopened original packaging.

    fig. 11

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    Examine the cartridge The cartridge itself has to look clean and brand newOriginal HP cartridges are always delivered unused (fig. 12). There should be no damage, ink or toner leakage, scratches, or any signs of previous use on the cartridge itself.

    fig. 12

    Refrain from dubious offers

    Please refrain from any offers to buy back or take back empty cartridge boxes, as such boxes might be illegally re-used to disguise counterfeit cartridges.

    HP sales practices are consistent and reliableTo avoid fakes, you should refrain from accepting any suspicious sales offers, such as:

    • Insistence on placing orders immediately to ‘beat the price increase’ or ‘reserve the last few in stock’.

    • Offers to send someone over to pick up payment or insistence on ‘cash-on-delivery’ shipment.

    • Bulk sales of allegedly original HP cartridges on online auction sites.

    • Allegedly new ‘HP’ products offered exclusively by the salesperson’s company.

    • Offers for alleged ‘grey market’ or ‘parallel imported’ printing supplies, which could be used as a pretext for selling counterfeit goods.

    • Internet or unsolicited email offers (spam) incorporating any of these indicators or with incomplete contact information of the seller.

    HP sells printing supplies through contracted sales channelsIf an offer sounds ‘too good to be true’, it probably is. To avoid counterfeit cartridges, HP generally recommends to only buy from trustworthy vendors such as HP resale partners. For a list of contracted supplies resellers in your country, please go to the HP website.

    HP resale partners can provide reliable sources of original HP products.

    If you are suspicious about a product or offer

    If you think that a product might be counterfeit or if you have any suspicions regarding the manufacturing or sale of possible counterfeits, please report to HP’s anti-counterfeiting experts as described below.

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    Avoiding fake computing productsComputing products which are particularly at risk of being counterfeited include laptop power adapters and batteries, USB flash drives, and memory cards. However, a wide range of other accessories or even entire PCs and laptops are also faked. To avoid illicit computing goods, please follow the steps outlined below.

    Examine the packaging HP uses premium packaging Genuine HP products should generally arrive in high-quality, HP-branded boxes or blister packs (fig. 13). Packaging that does not fit this company policy, for example due to poor quality or damage, can be considered suspicious.

    Further potential indicators for counterfeiting can also include blurry text and images, incorrect HP logos, product photos that deviate from the item you are purchasing, or spelling mistakes on the packaging. In addition, HP does not knowingly authorise the sale of loose items or products packed only in plastic or paper wrappings.

    fig. 13

    Check the products Genuine HP computing products are of high quality Original HP products are always manufactured according to HP’s strict quality standards. They generally bear distinct HP logos as well as a sticker that displays the product information in high-resolution print (fig. 14).

    Goods that show signs of damage, scratches, or wear and tear upon arrival therefore could potentially be fake. Furthermore, any product sticker that features spelling or punctuation errors or which seems to have been carelessly stuck on should be cause for doubt, just as much as incorrect HP logo labels.

    fig. 14

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    Refrain from dubious offers HP sales practices are consistent and reliableTo avoid fakes, you should refrain from accepting any suspicious sales offers, such as:

    • Computing goods offered at suspiciously low prices.

    • Sales of allegedly original HP products featuring descriptions like ‘factory tested/factory testing’, ‘bulk packaging’, ‘new retail’, ‘factory-sealed retail packaging’ or ‘grade A cell’.

    • Alleged ‘grey market’ or ‘parallel imported’ goods; these descriptions can serve as a pretext for explaining discounted prices of fake products.

    • Urging to place orders immediately to ‘beat the price increase’ or ‘reserve the last few in stock’ or highlighting ‘high quality and lower prices than standard HP products’.

    • Offers with photos showing mass manufacturing or packaging processes or showing internal components.

    • Sellers claiming to be a manufacturer associated with or endorsed by HP.

    • Bulk sales of allegedly original HP products on online auction sites.

    • Internet or unsolicited email offers (spam) incorporating any of these indicators or with incomplete contact information of the seller.

    HP sells computing products through contracted sales channelsIf an offer sounds ‘too good to be true’, it probably is. To avoid counterfeit products, HP generally recommends to only buy from trustworthy vendors such as HP resale partners.

    HP resale partners can provide reliable sources of original HP products.

    If you are suspicious about a product or offer

    If you think that a product might be counterfeit or if you have any suspicions regarding the manufacturing or sale of possible counterfeits, please report to HP’s anti-counterfeiting experts as described below.

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    Reporting possible counterfeitsIf your suspicions have become concrete through completing the above checks, please read the following points carefully.

    What to keep in mind before reporting to HPPlease keep the product, its packaging and any documents relating to the product, such as invoices, offer letters, etc. For your own safety, HP generally recommends not telling the trader who sold the goods to you about your suspicion.

    HP is committed to protecting your privacy (visit the HP Online Privacy Statement to learn more). We will use the information you report to act against counterfeiting as and if appropriate. We may also contact you about your report, e.g. for follow-up questions. All the information you provide to us will be kept confidential to the extent permitted by law and will only be shared on a need-to-know basis.

    Choose your reporting channel You can send your report in any language via one of the following channels:

    Email Web Further ways

    Send your report to: [email protected]

    Visit hp.com/go/anticounterfeit and click on ‘Report counterfeit’

    Find a local hotline or contact us via mail.

    State basic facts This is what we need to know in order to follow up on a counterfeiting suspicion:

    • Explain the reason(s) for your suspicion (e.g. suspiciously low price, worn packaging)1.

    • Provide the name and contact details of the seller, if available to you.

    • Please indicate your contact details for potential follow-up questions – of course, you can also remain anonymous if you prefer, e.g. by reporting via the web.

    Attach photos Please follow these guidelines for providing pictures to HP’s ACF experts:

    • Include sharp digital photos of all six sides of the product’s packaging as well as a sharp, legible close-up of the security label (if present) and a picture of the product itself, if possible.

    • Make sure that the photo file size is around 500 KB each.

    • Wherever possible, please use daylight or a well-lit room, and refrain from using a camera flash.

    Submit your report • Send your information to our ACF experts, who will review your report and take appropriate follow up action.

    • Potential follow-up actions can include related enquiries, assisting enforcement authorities during raid actions, or e.g. raising civil and criminal cases, if/as appropriate.

    Requesting a Customer Delivery InspectionIf you are suspicious about a large/mid-sized cartridge delivery or a tender bid, you can request a free Customer Delivery Inspection (CDI). If granted, an HP ACF expert will visit you and check the delivered products for counterfeiting and fraud. To learn more, have a look at our CDI User Guide, available in Arabic, Czech, English, French, German, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Turkish.

    Do not confuse counterfeiting Please mind the difference between counterfeiting and grey marketing or misrepresentation:

    • Grey market products are original HP products that have been diverted from authorised distribution channels or have been imported into another country or region without consent and knowledge of HP as the brand owner. Grey marketing is unlawful in many countries such as the European Union/EEA2 and entails severe risks, such as unwittingly buying counterfeits, as fraudsters might use grey marketing as a pretext to sell fakes as it conveniently explains lower prices.

    • Misrepresentation refers to offers that mislead or might mislead customers into thinking that they are purchasing original, brand-new HP products when in reality they are not.1 This may involve misuse of HP’s IP, such as trademark and imagery, and often affects online sales.

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    Actions for corporate customersStay ahead of fraudsters and protect your organisation from risky fakes by implementing the following simple steps in your daily business:

    Ask for HP originals• When ordering printing supplies, always request ‘original

    HP products’ and specify which exact cartridges you want.

    • Do not use the term ‘equivalent’ as this allows the vendor to freely define what an ‘equivalent’ cartridge is.

    Ask for references• Request references from the vendor, such as an HP partner

    certificate or their HP ACF audit letter that they receive if they pass an HP Channel Partner Protection Audit (CPPA).

    Make ACF part of contracts and tender terms• In printing supplies contracts, request the vendor to certify in

    writing that all delivered products for HP printers are genuine HP.

    • Emphasise that the vendor must not deliver any substitutions without written consent of the ordering party.

    • Stress that products found to be fake will be brought to the attention of the authorities and may be subject to confiscation and non-payment.

    Update yourself• Use the HP ACF web pages to access the latest anti-counterfeiting

    information and forward the link hp.com/go/anticounterfeit to your colleagues.

    Report suspicions• Report any counterfeiting suspicions as described above and

    encourage your colleagues to do the same.

    • In addition, you can contact your local HP partner in case of any suspicions.

    Request a Customer Delivery Inspection (CDI)• Make use of HP’s free product checks if you suspect a printing

    supplies delivery you received to contain counterfeits.

    • Get the CDI User Guide to learn the details and easily request a free check by HP.

  • ACF email ACF website

    © Copyright 2019 HP Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

    EMEA = Europe, the Middle East and Africa

    Learn more at hp.com/go/anticounterfeit

    Overview of security labels on HP ink cartridgesThe table below summarises which original HP inkjet cartridges come with a label, relating to the language option and selectability number on the box. You may have reason to be suspicious if a security label is missing from products listed in the blue sections.

    Language option

    Languages on box Selectability numbers Label (Y/N)

    BA3 English, Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak 300, 300XL, 301, 301XL, 302, 302XL, 304, 304XL, 336, 337, 338, 339, 342, 343, 344, 350, 350XL, 351, 351XL, 363, 363XL, 364, 364XL

    YES

    UUQ English, Russian, French, Polish, Czech, Hungarian

    21, 21XL, 22, 22XL, 27, 28, 56, 57, 303, 901, 901XL

    YES

    BGX/BGY BGX: English, German, French, Italian, Dutch, Russian

    BGY: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech

    903, 903XL, 907XL, 920, 920XL, 932, 932XL, 933XL, 934, 935, 950, 950XL, 951, 951XL, 953, 953XL, 957XL

    YES

    AR4 English, Turkish 900 YESBFW Russian, Turkish, English, French, Arabic 21b, 46*, 300b YES445 English, Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak,

    Slovenian, Russian, Turkish703, 704 YES

    BHK/BHL BHK: English, Russian, Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak

    BHL: English, French, Arabic, Greek, Turkish, Portuguese

    650, 651, 651XL, 652, 652XL, 655 YES

    CISMEA multilingual

    English, French, Russian 121, 122, 122XL, 123, 123XL, 129, 130, 131, 132, 134, 135, 136, 138, 140, 140XL, 141, 141XL, 177**, 177XL**, 178

    YES

    CISMEA multilingual

    English, Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Turkish, Arabic

    GT51XL, GT52 YES

    European multilingual

    English, German, French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian

    30, 31 YES

    European multilingual

    English, German, French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Polish, Czech, Russian

    15(DE), 17, 23(D), 45, 78, 78(D), 913A, 970, 970XL, 971, 971XL, 973X

    YES

    10, 11, 88XL, 110, 348, 940, 940XL NO

    ABE/UUS ABE: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian (sometimes also Turkish and Greek)

    UUS: English, German, French, Dutch, Italian, Danish

    21, 21XL, 22, 22XL, 27, 28, 56, 57, 62*, 62XL*, 901, 901XL

    NO

    300, 300XL, 301, 301XL, 302, 302XL, 303, 303XL, 304, 304XL, 336, 337, 338, 339, 342, 343, 344, 350, 350XL, 351, 351XL, 363, 363XL, 364, 364XL

    NO

    BA1 German, French, Italian, Dutch 363, 363XL, 364, 364XL NO

    European combo packaging

    English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Dutch, Polish, Czech, Russian

    21/22, 56/57, 300/300, 302, 303, 303XL, 304, 364, 338/343, 350/351, 903XL, 932/933, 950/951, 953XL

    NO

    Worldwide multilingual

    US English, Canadian French, Latin American Spanish, German, Chinese, simplified Chinese, Brazilian Portuguese

    38, 70 (printheads) NO

    Where to find selectability numbers and language options on original HP ink cartridge boxes in EMEA:(caution: cartridge boxes with multilingual options, instead of language options, have no indication on the box)

    Selectability number

    C4902BA3

    Language option

    * Only available in selected countries; Languages on the box may differ.

    ** Due to space restrictions, the security label on HP 177 cartridge boxes obscures the artwork. This unusual positioning is intentional and, thus, no reason to be suspicious.

    This overview is subject to regular updates. Please access the current version via hp.com

    1 For printing supplies, please note that ‘refilled’, ‘remanufactured’, ‘clone’ or ‘compatible’ cartridges are legitimate, as long as they do not infringe HP’s or other third party intellectual property rights. However, it is illegal to package or sell such products in a way that confuses or potentially confuses customers into believing that they are buying a brand new genuine HP product, or a product that is associated with or endorsed by but not manufactured by HP, or in the event that a product is using HP’s intellectual property without HP’s consent.2 EEA = European Economic Area (European Union + Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway)

    http://www.hp.com/go/getupdatedhttp://www.hp.com/go/anticounterfeit

    ACF SharePoint 17: Seite 1: OffSeite 21: OffSeite 32: OffSeite 43: OffSeite 54: OffSeite 65: OffSeite 76: OffSeite 87: Off

    ACF website 10: Seite 1: OffSeite 21: OffSeite 32: OffSeite 43: OffSeite 54: OffSeite 65: OffSeite 76: OffSeite 87: Off

    E-mail-address 24: Seite 1: OffSeite 21: OffSeite 32: OffSeite 43: OffSeite 54: OffSeite 65: OffSeite 76: OffSeite 87: Off

    E-mail-address 25: Seite 1: OffSeite 21: OffSeite 32: OffSeite 43: OffSeite 54: OffSeite 65: OffSeite 76: OffSeite 87: Off

    Security label table 28: Security label table 30: Security label table 32: Security label table 33: Security label table 34: Security label table 36: Security label table 37: Schaltfläche 1013: Security label table 38: Security label table 39: Schaltfläche 102: Schaltfläche 103: Security label table 7: Schaltfläche 1010: Schaltfläche 1011: Security label table 40: Security label table 41: Security label table 48: Security label table 49: Security label table 42: Security label table 50: Security label table 51: Schaltfläche 108: Security label table 12: Security label table 19: Rollover Auslöser: Security label table 13: Security label table 14: Security label table 16: Security label table 18: Security label table 53: Security label table 56: Security label table 57: Security label table 58: Security label table 59: Security label table 60: Security label table 61: Security label table 62: Security label table 63: Security label table 64: Security label table 65: Box_Mail: Schaltfläche 109: SP 11: SP 15: SP 12: SP 13: SP 14: Schaltfläche 106: Seite 9: Off

    E-mail-address 26: Seite 9: Off

    E-mail-address 27: Seite 9: Off

    Security label table 20: