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  • THE BEST PRACTICE GUIDE TO: Arc Flash Labeling A Graphic Products Library Resource 877.534.5157 | DuraLabel.com | GraphicProducts.com
  • 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it
  • ARC FLASH LABELING The following pages help explain how to label your facility for arc ash hazard safety and compliance. The goal is to ensure arc ash labeling provides maximum safety for workers, emergency responders, and others who must enter your facility. The standards described come from a combination of NFPA 70E-2012, IEEE 1584-2002 and ANSI Z535-2011 standards. We encourage readers to research these standards for further information. TOOLS ......................................................................................................................pg 1 Learn what labeling tools are required for arc ash labeling and about other tools that will aid in compliance. DEFINITIONS...................................................................................................... pg 3 Learn what an arc ash is and what potential hazards it may pose to employees and bystanders. What is an Arc Flash? Denitions of Terms EVALUATION - FACILITY INSPECTION ....................................... pg 5 Find out what needs to be evaluated in a facility. Elements of an Inspection Qualifying Electrical Equipment 23 pg LABEL CREATION ........................................................................................... pg 7 Why is it important to know what an arc ash is? Learn what is required on labels, when to use a Danger label instead of a Warning label, and how to print arc ash labels. Signal Word Usage Required Information Arc Flash Label Elements Canadian Arc Flash Labeling Understanding Arc Flash PPE Necessary Equipment and Supplies Label Creation Steps LABEL PLACEMENT .................................................................................. pg 12 Proper placement of arc ash labels will increase worker safety and improve overall workow. Placement of Labels Removing Old Labels LABEL MAINTENANCE ............................................................................ pg 13 Learn how to extend the life of arc ash labels. TAGOUT............................................................................................................... pg 15 Procedures for proper arc ash tagout. pg 7 When should a DANGER label be used? When should a WARNING label be used? ARC FLASH INFORMATION GUIDE ................................................. pg 16 A brief overview of the data that is required on arc ash labels for NFPA 70E compliance. The information presented in this document was obtained from sources that we deem reliable; Graphic Products, Inc. has made every effort to ensure this information is correct. However, we do not guarantee accuracy or completeness. Graphic Products, Inc. makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied. Information in this document is subject to change without notice. Graphic Products, Inc. disclaims liability for injury, damages, or loss of any kind arising from the use of this document whether in contract, tort, under statute, or otherwise. No reliance should be placed on information contained in, implied by or inferred from this document. Users of this document should consult municipal, state, and federal code and/or verify all information with the appropriate regulatory agency.
  • TOOLS The recommended tools and equipment involved with Arc Flash labeling projects include: Technical or safety information regarding equipment to be labeled Computer with Windows 2000 or newer For mobile printing use DuraLabel Toro, or a laptop or DuraLabel MPS 150 XL with a DuraLabel PRO Series printer and battery Word processing software or DuraSuite Software (included free with DuraLabel desktop printers) DuraLabel symbol and template library DuraLabel desktop printer (visit DuraLabel.com for a complete list of label printers) DuraLabel arc ash labeling supplies (many label sizes available) Die-cut preprinted DANGER header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted WARNING header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted CAUTION header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Optional language preprinted header supplies in Spanish or French: Die-cut preprinted PELIGRO header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted ADVERTENCIA header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Die-cut preprinted AVERTISSEMENT header labels (up to 8.8" x 12.8") Two-color striped vinyl (up to 9" tall) DuraLabel premium thermal transfer ribbon Supplies and equipment to clean/prepare surfaces for labeling Putty knife or razor blade Isopropyl alcohol Graphic Products is one of the few to provide NFPA 70E-2012 compliant software with DuraLabel desktop printers. 1 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • Printing arc ash labels with the DuraLabel PRO 300 is a huge time saver and a real joy over the way we used to do it. MICHAEL, Electrical Engineer, Engineering Design Firm DuraLabel PRO 300 Safety Label & Sign System m From energy to aerospace, from military to transportation, thousands of sportation, facilities trust DuraLabel for safety labels and signs. igns. Increase efciency, improve safety, maintain compliance, and save money money mpliance, n with DuraLabel. Property Tags Pipe Markers IIAR Pipe Markers SAVE RTK Labels with the Arc Flash DUO Kit print on 1/2" to 9" tape widths with this kit Lean Manufacturing & 5S Labels Facility Labels Tag Labels Cable Markers Call to nd out how you can get a DuraLabel PRO 300 & DuraLabel 9000 at an incredible discounted price! 877.534.5157 | DuraLabel.com Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it Waynding
  • DEFINITIONS To know the risks, its helpful to know the language. Here are some widely used terms used in communicating arc ash hazards. What is an Arc Flash? An arc ash is a rapid, explosive discharge of electrical energy that usually results from a short circuit fault. Metal vaporized by the 5,000+ degree temperatures of an arc ash produces a high-temperature plasma. A shockwave blast can propel metal shrapnel at high velocities in many directions. An arc ash can occur in very little time. Explosions have been known to occur in as little as 1/1000 of a second. The event is unexpected, violent, and deadly. The potential for injury can be reduced using various electrical safety tools and techniques. Remote breaker racking, remote door opening and closing, and wearing the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) all offer improved safety. A key element in any arc ash safety program is good visual communication. Using labels and signs to warn workers, emergency responders, and others of a potential arc ash hazard is critical safety information and saves lives. Ensure your facility follows the latest standards to provide maximum safety around equipment and other electrical hazards. 3 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • DEFINITIONS Denitions of Terms (from NFPA 70E, 2012 Edition) The following terms are frequently found on arc ash labels and signs. Nominal System Voltage (NSV): The NSV is normally the voltage required by the largest loads in a system. Common industrial values are 120, 208, 220, and 480 volts. This measurement can be VAC or VDC and required by 2012 NFPA 70E (130.5(C)) to be displayed on arc ash labeling. Arc Flash Boundary: The arc ash boundary is the distance at which a person is likely to receive a second degree burn if an arc ash were to occur. The onset of a second degree burn is possible when the skin receives 1.2 cal/cm2 of incident energy. (Calculations based on 2012 NFPA 70E Annex D.7.5.) This measurement is required by 2012 NFPA 70E (130.5(C)) to be displayed on arc ash labeling. Available Incident Energy at a Working Distance: This is the energy per unit area on a surface located at the normal working distance from the potential arc fault. The incident energy is most commonly measured in units of calories per square centimeter. Second degree burns occur at an energy level of approximately 1.2 cal/cm2. Required Level of PPE: The Personal Protective Equipment required is dependent on the incident energy at every point a person may perform work on energized equipment. An electrical engineer or other qualied person should cover all parts of the body that may be exposed to an arc ash. This could include boots, gloves, ameresistant clothing, safety glasses, etc. Hazard Risk Category (HRC): A general classication of hazard involved in performing specied tasks. HRC typically ranges from zero to four, with zero denoting minimum-risk activities and four denoting high-risk activities. NFPA provides a recommended list of PPE for each HRC in Table 130.7. HRC levels are not associated with a specic measurement of cal/cm2 by NFPA, but rather a dened list of PPE. Shock Protection Boundary (Not Required): Limited Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.1 and C.1.2.2) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person. An unqualied person, wearing appropriate PPE may cross if accompanied by a qualied person. Becoming qualied requires special training. Restricted Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.2.3) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person that has a documented plan approved by authorized management and uses adequate shock prevention equipment and techniques. Prohibited Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.2.4) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person that has the same level of protection required for direct contact with live parts. Arc Flash Boundary Limited Approach Boundary Limited Space Restricted Approach Boundary Restricted Space Any point on an exposed, energized electrical conductor or circuit part Prohibited Space Prohibited Approach Boundary Limits of approach (NFPA 70E-2012) As the distance between a person and the exposed energized conductors or circuit parts decreases, the potential for electrical accidents increases. The NFPA denes four boundaries around an arc ash fault. DuraLabel.com 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it 4
  • EVALUATION FACILITY INSPECTION Conduct an inspection of your facility to determine the need for new and replacement arc ash labels. Elements of an Inspection General facility inspections are not just voluntary, OSHA requires employers to assess hazards in the workplace. When evaluating your facility, pay attention to: Existing labels Are they still legible? (Damaged, deteriorated, etc.) Are they accurate? (Proper calculations, boundaries, PPE, etc.) Equipment without labels New equipment Does the new equipment pose an arc ash danger? Have boundaries been calculated? Areas where maintenance has been performed Trafc areas OSHA 29 CFR 1910.132(d)(2) The employer shall verify that the required workplace hazard assessment has been performed through a written certication that identies the workplace evaluated; the person certifying that the evaluation has been performed; the date(s) of the hazard assessment; and, which identies the document as a certication of hazard assessment. Recording the information listed will help you meet this OSHA requirement in your facility. Areas from which people should be excluded because of arc ash hazard Also be sure to note the date of your last arc ash analysis. NFPA 70E Article 130.5 states you must re-evaluate an arc ash analysis at least every ve years or whenever a major modication or renovation occurs. If you discover a change during your re-evaluation, a new analysis must be performed and your labels will need to be changed to reect the new measurements. There are a number of calculation methods available to help you determine arc ash boundaries. IEEE 15842002 and NFPA 70E-2012 are the most popularly used. IEEE 1584 is generally accepted as the recommended method for most arc ash analysis calculations because of its comprehensiveness. The NFPA 70E version is easier to use and offers quick references to predened articles and tables. Having both guides to reference, however, is always going to be the best option. This way you have the largest number of options available to suit individual needs. Incident energy is a calculation that determines the radiated heat falling on the surface, produced by an arcing fault. Although no single method can fully calculate an arc ash hazard, it is recommended that IEEE 1584-2002 be used as the primary calculation method, especially for determining ash protection boundaries. IEEE 1584, Guide For Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculations, provides the equations and methods used to calculate the incident energy level a worker could be exposed to in a measurement of cal/cm2. If IEEE 1584 is not available in your facility, then the NFPA 70E-2012 is the next best option. Tables 130.7(C)(15)(a) and 130.7(C)(16) from NFPA 70E-2012 are popular references for determining exposure levels and required PPE. However, these tables are based on assumptions using engineering principles about electrical systems. Each table includes notes to help you determine whether an electrical system falls within the engineering principles described. At a minimum, electrical equipment carrying 50 volts or higher should always display a label with OSHA-required information. OSHA 29 CFR1910.303 requires employers to mark electrical equipment with descriptive markings, including the equipments voltage, current, wattage, or other ratings as necessary. NOTE: Arc ash calculation is not an exact science. Always use caution and multiple methods to verify results. 5 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • EVALUATION Qualifying Electrical Equipment IEEE 1584-2002 IEEE 1584 states that, Equipment with less than 240 volts need not be considered unless it involves at least one 125 kVA (kilo-volt-amps) or a larger lowimpedance transformer in its immediate power supply. The same guide also states that an arc-ash hazard need only be considered for large 208 volt systems. Systems fed by transformers smaller than 125 kVA should not be a concern. The prevailing interpretation of IEEE 1584: An arc ash analysis shall be performed on equipment with 208 volts or greater and fed by a transformer with 125 kVA and greater. Keep in mind, these standards are considered the bare minimum for facility safety and many organizations supersede IEEE 1584 standards. Commonly used, self-imposed standards, require analyzing and labeling equipment with 208 volts or greater and fed by a transformer with 75 kVA and greater. NFPA 70E-2012 The 2012 NFPA 70E standards identify ve specic types of electrical equipment requiring arc ash labeling. The equipment identied is not located in dwellings, meets the minimum IEEE 1584 requirements for an arc ash analysis and is likely to require examination, at the very least, while energized. Newly specied pieces of electrical equipment include: Switches Equipment Research Always wear the highest level of PPE your equipment may potentially require while researching equipment. For many facilities, this means wearing a 40-calorie arc rated suit, hearing protection, and arc rated gloves while performing examinations. Start by photographing each potential piece of equipment that is a candidate for an analysis. Then document its voltage and facility location onto a copy of your facilitys blueprints or map. If a piece of equipment isnt labeled with voltage, the primary voltage may be labeled on the back or elsewhere on the equipment. If the voltage isnt provided on the equipment, research your facilitys single-line-drawings and other electrical documentation. Many times, this information will tell you what voltage each piece of equipment is carrying. Once you know the primary voltage for each piece of equipment, you can eliminate equipment carrying less than 208 volts from your list. To determine a transformers size, examine the nameplate on the transformers housing. If a nameplate is not visible, you will need to contact the transformer manufacturer or seek the assistance of a qualied electrical professional. The transformer manufacturer will often be able to identify the exact transformer size by supplying them with a picture of the transformer and its dimensions. Attempting to reverse-engineer a transformer installation can be difcult work. The original engineer probably incorporated many variables into the system design. Simple inspections and calculations may not account for all of these unknowns. Only a qualied electrical professional should research a transformer with no nameplate or manufacturer identication. Switchboards Panelboards Industrial control panels Meter socket enclosures Motor control centers The equipment listed in the NFPA 70E-2012 is provided as an example of commonly used electrical equipment. Similar pieces of equipment meeting the NFPA/IEEE qualications would require the same treatment. Nameplates provide transformer size and voltage information to help qualify equipment for analysis and labeling. DuraLabel.com 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it 6
  • LABEL CREATION 2012 NFPA 70E now requires arc ash labels to display a list of dened information. These new requirements help bring uniformity to arc ash labeling so similar information is used to describe this hazard throughout the U.S. Signal Word Usage In most arc ash labeling, a Danger or Warning signal word is used to describe this hazard. Exceptions are when an overriding federal, state or local code, standard, regulation, or guideline species a different signal word from what ANSI species. ANSI denes how each word should be used (ANSI Z535.4-20114.14.2 and 4.14.3). The Danger signal word is reserved for, ... a hazardous situation that, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury. The signal word is to be limited to the most extreme situations. The Warning signal word is reserved for, a hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury. Generally, arc ash locations presenting a hazardous situation that, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury, are also locations where no known PPE exists to safely work while equipment is energized. Organizations may wish to use the maximum level of PPE available, generally greater than 40 calories, to set this as their cut-off for Danger. As an example, if a facility can only provide workers with PPE rated for a maximum of 50 calories, that would be the cut-off. Danger labels, in this example, would be reserved for use at arc ash locations where greater than 50 calories of incident energy are possible. The Warning signal word would then only be used at arc ash locations where 50 calories or less are possible. The Caution signal word is also an option, but should only be used where an arc ash analysis determined there is no risk of death. Therefore, Caution signs should only be displayed at locations where an arc ash is not possible. Each signal word uses a specic color scheme when displayed on an arc ash label. The Danger signal word is white on a red background. Warning is black on an orange background and Caution is black on a yellow background. ANSI Z535 The NFPA relies on many of the same design standards as OSHA and similar agencies for safety labeling. ANSI Z535 sets these standards to bring uniformity to all labeling and improve recognition by workers, emergency responders, and anyone else who must easily identify what a label means from a safe distance. Required Information Arc ash labels should alert workers to the seriousness of the hazard and clearly state the information necessary to safely work inside and around an arc ash boundary. Use the appropriate signal word in the labels signal word panel when identifying equipment meeting IEEE 1584 analysis requirements. 2012 NFPA 70E requires labels to display the following: 1. Nominal system voltage 2. Arc ash boundary 3. At least one of the following: a. Available incident energy and the corresponding working distance b. Minimum arc rating of clothing c. Required level of PPE d. Highest Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) for the equipment NOTE: Labels applied prior to September 30, 2011, are acceptable if they contain the available incident energy or required level of PPE. 7 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • LABEL CREATION Arc Flash Label Elements In addition to signal word requirements, ANSI Z535.4 sets standards for general label design elements used in arc ash Danger, Warning, and Caution labeling. The following design elements are required by ANSI Z535.4 standards: Safety Alert Symbol The triangle/exclamation point symbol. The safety alert symbol must precede the signal word and the base shall be on the same horizontal line as the base of signal word letters. The height of the symbol shall be equal to or exceed the signal word letter height. For Danger, the triangle shall be lled with white and have a red exclamation mark inside. The triangle on a Warning label shall be lled with black and contain an orange exclamation mark. Caution labels shall have an all black triangle with a yellow exclamation mark. DANGER Non-Compliant Arc Flash Label Design Since a message panel is required, all red Danger signs and tags and all orange Warning signs and tags are no longer compliant with NFPA and ANSI standards.* * ANSI.4-2011, 7.3 Signal Word Panel Signal Word Safety Alert Symbol Message Panel Signal Word Panel The signal word panel is the colored panel the signal word appears on. This panel always appears horizontally across the top of the label. For Danger labels the panel shall be red. For Warning the panel should be orange, and Caution labels should have a yellow panel. The position of the Safety Alert Symbol must be aligned with the base of the Signal Word. The height of the symbol should be equal to or exceed the letter height of the associated Signal Word. Both the Safety Alert Symbol and Signal Word should then be centered. Message Panel The message panel is the white or black background beneath the signal word panel. The message panel in an arc ash label is where the safety message, analysis information, and PPE requirements are printed. The message panel can be either black with white text or white with black text. The white message panel is recommended for most arc ash applications, since it is generally easiest to see. DuraLabel.com An example of a non-compliant, all orange Warning arc ash label. Canadian Arc Flash Labeling (2012 CSA-Z462) The Canadian Standards Association (CSA) bases many of its own standards on the 2012 NFPA 70E. For the most part, the two are very similar. The only difference in labeling requirements is an additional requirement to display the date of analysis. This means you only need to include all of the required NFPA 70E-2012 labeling information and the date of analysis to comply in Canada. Although date of analysis is commonly displayed on arc ash labels used in the U.S., it is not required by the NFPA. The benet of including this date on U.S. arc ash labels is to inform workers how long its been since an analysis has been completed. Workers can then conrm the validity of the analysis by researching facility electrical documentation and history, before exposing themselves to the hazard. 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it 8
  • LABEL CREATION Understanding Arc Flash PPE One of the most important factors in arc ash labeling is its relationship with arc ash PPE. Practically everything now required by the NFPA 70E-2012 on labeling relates to PPE selection. Ensure your facility has adequate PPE to safely work on or around the equipment that must be analyzed. As an employer, you have legal responsibilities to fulll: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.95(a) Protective equipment, including personal protective equipment for eyes, face, head, and the extremities, protective clothing, respiratory devices, and protective shields and barriers, shall be provided, used, and maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition wherever it is necessary by reason of hazards of processes or environment, chemical hazards, radiological hazards, or mechanical irritants encountered in a manner capable of causing injury or impairment in the function of any part of the body through absorption, inhalation, or physical contact. OSHA 29 1926.416(a)(1) No employer shall permit an employee to work in such proximity to any part of an electric power circuit that the employee could contact the electric power circuit in the course of work, unless the employee is protected against electric shock by de-energizing the circuit and grounding it or by guarding it effectively by insulation or other means. Layering PPE is a method the NFPA often promotes to increase the protective resistance a piece of clothing has against incident energy. Arc rated clothing can be grouped by displaying multiple arc rated pieces on a label. As an example, one of the most popularly used PPE in electrical work is the 40 calorie suit. Layering additional pieces of arc rated clothing under this suit helps increase its protective resistance so higher calorie equipment can be safely worked on or around. DuraLabel arc ash labels and DuraSuite software make compliance simple. 9 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • LABEL CREATION Necessary Equipment and Supplies There are several options for obtaining needed arc ash labels. If only a small number of labels are needed, they can be ordered online at GraphicProducts.com/cls. If more than a few labels are needed, it is more economical to use a DuraLabel label printer and supplies. DuraLabel PRO 300 offers an Arc Flash Package providing commonly used arc ash labeling materials. The DuraLabel Arc Flash Package includes: DuraLabel PRO 300 Printer and software package 2" Orange 3.0 mil Premium Vinyl Tape This is a standard Arc Flash package. Package may be customized. Call 877.534.5157 for details. 4" x 6" DANGER Arc Flash Die-Cuts (4 rolls) 4" x 6" WARNING Arc Flash Die-Cuts (4 rolls) 4.3" Black Standard Resin Ribbon (2 rolls) In addition to 4" x 6" die-cuts, the following are available for larger DuraLabel printers: Substitute with indoor or outdoor grade: 6.8" x 10.5" DANGER Arc Flash Die-Cuts 4" x 6" DANGER Arc Flash Die-Cuts 6.8" x 10.5" WARNING Arc Flash Die-Cuts 4" x 6" WARNING Arc Flash Die-Cuts 8.8" x 12.8" DANGER Arc Flash Die-Cuts Spanish 4" x 6" DANGER Arc Flash Die-Cuts 8.8" x 12.8" WARNING Arc Flash Die-Cuts Spanish 4" x 6" WARNING Arc Flash Die-Cuts French 4" x 6" WARNING Arc Flash Die-Cuts 6.8" x 10.5" label 4" x 6" label Use large labels when visibility from a distance is needed to keep workers at a safe distance when entering a room or servicing equipment. DuraLabel.com 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it 10
  • LABEL CREATION Label Creation Steps (DuraLabel printers) There are three options for printing arc ash labels with a DuraLabel printer. First, you can use the free DuraSuite software, bundled with any DuraLabel desktop printer. DuraSuite makes it easy to ensure all NFPA 70E-2012 required information appears on your label. (A brief overview of DuraSuite is shown at right.) Second, you may wish to use third-party software with your DuraLabel printerDuraLabel printers offer compatibility with SKM, ETAP, EasyPower and many others. If you are considering purchasing third-party software to use with a DuraLabel printer, contact us rst to see if we have tested it. We are continually testing new third-party software with our printers. As a third option, you can create an entirely custom arc ash label design using DuraSuite or your own software. Your custom design can be printed to DuraLabel Two-Color Vinyl Tape. These tapes are available in each of the ANSI Z535.4 specied colors (Danger - Red signal word stripe, Warning - Orange signal word stripe, Caution - Yellow signal word stripe). DuraLabel sign and label printers use industrial-grade supplies, which are specically designed to provide lasting service in harsh conditions for either indoor or outdoor applications. DuraLabel Outdoor die-cuts have been specically engineered to withstand outdoor environments, including UV rays. Call a DuraLabel representative at 877.534.5157 to nd out more. DuraSuite Software: Quickly and easily print NFPA 70E-2012 compliant arc ash labels with DuraLabels comprehensive arc ash software. Label Creation Using Die-Cut Labels 1. Open the DuraSuite Labeling Software. 2. Select the Arc Flash module. 3. Select the label size you would like to create. 4. Fill in the data elds with your analysis information. 5. Load the appropriate size of label supply with desired signal word. 6. Click the Print button. Label Creation Using Continuous Vinyl 1. Open word processor. 2. Load the DuraLabel PRO 300 arc ash template. This will format the page to the appropriate size. 3. Modify the template to include information that is specic to this label such as boundary distance, energy, and necessary PPE. DuraLabel Two-Color striped vinyl comes in various widths. Custom sizes are available. Call 877.534.5157. 4. Load the appropriate size of label supply with desired signal word. 5. Print the label(s). 11 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • LABEL PLACEMENT It is critical labels are placed appropriately to be seen from normal approach and applied correctly for longevity. Placement of Labels knife. However, with strong adhesive labels such as those provided by DuraLabel, this can be a labor intensive process. Try using a heat gun to speed up the process. Labels should be placed: On or close to the appropriate system or equipment. To be visible from the point of normal approach. Removing Old Labels When removing labels, use extreme caution. Labels may be removed by carefully scraping them off with a putty For some applications, a razor blade can be used to quickly remove labels. The use of these types of tools must take into consideration the type of surface the label is applied to and whether that surface will be damaged. Labels should be placed on or close to the appropriate system or equipment. DuraLabel.com 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it 12
  • LABEL MAINTENANCE Labels should be properly maintained to ensure legibility and readability. Under normal conditions labels will last ve to seven years. Environmental conditions can result in a variance of label life-span. Labels should be inspected periodically and replaced if they are missing or have deteriorated beyond legibility. Accumulation of debris, grease, oil, or other materials should be cleaned off. Labels are only useful if they are visible. DuraLabel offers a wide selection of chemical-resistant supplies, therefore solvents and cleaning agents may be used when necessary to clean off dirt, grime, oil, etc. If cleaning is not possible and the label is not readable, replace the existing label. Set up a schedule to reevaluate your facility. Refer to the section Evaluation Facility Inspection of this guide for help. The DuraLabel PRO 300 is an economical high-speed thermal transfer printer that quickly and efciently prints the arc ash labels you need! Call 877.534.5157 or visit DuraLabel.com Die-cut Warning Labels Die-cut vinyl labels are preprinted with an ANSIcompliant orange Warning signal word. DuraLabel proprietary software is designed for use with these labels. Spanish or French labels available. Signal Word Stripe Die-cut Danger Labels Two-color vinyl features an ANSI-compliant stripe for printing arc ash labels. Warning labels use an orange stripe, Danger uses a red stripe and Caution uses a yellow stripe. 13 Die-cut vinyl labels are preprinted with a red Danger signal word. DuraLabel proprietary software is designed for use with these labels. Spanish or French labels available. 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it
  • TAGOUT Tagging out arc ash hazards is one of the most effective safety measures you can use to protect workers and others from accidental injuries. The tagout example procedure below is to be used as a reference only. Use this procedure example to develop your own version. Tagout example procedure* (lockout elements not included): 1. Provide all employees, and others who might be in the area, with tagout safety instruction and explain its signicance. All persons installing tagout shall sign their names and provide a date on the tag. 2. Inspect current diagrams, tags, labels and signs. Identify and locate all circuit breakers and switches to determine if power is interrupted by a physical break and not de-energized by a circuit interlock. Create a list of each to be tagged. 3. Inspect circuit breakers and switches to determine adequacy of their interrupting ability. Determine if it will be possible to verify a visible open point, or if other precautions will be necessary. 4. Inspect other work activity to identify where and how other personnel might be exposed to sources of electrical energy hazards. Review other energy sources in the physical area to determine employee exposure to sources of other types of energy. Establish energy control methods for control of other hazardous energy sources in the area. 5. Test each phase conductor or circuit part with an adequately rated voltage detector to verify they are deenergized. Test the voltage detector to ensure proper operation. 6. Where the possibility of induced voltage or stored electrical energy exists, create labels that call for grounding the phase conductors or circuit parts before touching them. Post these labels at visible locations wherever this hazard exists. Where it could be reasonably anticipated that contact with other exposed energized conductors or circuit parts is possible, create labels that call for applying ground connecting devices. Post these labels at locations wherever this hazard exists. 7. Notify employees a tagout system is going to be implemented and explain the reason. A qualied employee should lead this implementation. The leader should be knowledgeable of the circuit breaker and switches for all sources of electrical energy and the location of all sources of stored energy as well as hazards associated with electrical energy. 8. If the electrical supply is energized, the implementation leader shall de-energize and disconnect the electrical supply and relieve all stored energy. 9. Tagout all disconnecting means with tagout devices. Open, block or remove any additional circuit elements. 10. Use a voltage-detecting instrument. Verify the instrument is properly functioning before and after testing for absence of voltage. 11. Where required, install a grounding device on the phase conductors or circuit parts to eliminate induced voltage or stored energy before touching them. Apply devices rated for the available fault duty. 12. The equipment, electrical source or both are now tagged out. When tagouts are ready for removal: 1. Visually verify the job or task is complete. Remove all tools, equipment and unused materials. 2. Notify all personnel involved that a tagout is complete and the electrical supply is being restored. All workers must stay clear of the equipment during startup. 3. Perform quality control tests or checks on repairs. The person who installed the tagouts should then remove tagouts. NOTE: Employers must develop their own procedure based on the needs of their specic application. * Elements of this procedure are based on the NFPAs minimum requirements (NFPA article 120.2) for electrical energy lockout/tagout procedure. 20112013 Graphic Products, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 15 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it DuraLabel.com
  • ARC FLASH INFORMATION GUIDE Requirements for Arc Flash Label Compliance The 2012 edition of NFPA 70E requires labels used for specic applications to include standardized information Electrical equipment such as switches, switchboards, panelboards, industrial control panels, meter socket enclosures, and motor control centers that are in other than dwelling units and are likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized must contain: Requirement 1: Nominal system voltage Requirement 2: Arc ash boundary Requirement 3: At least one of the following: a. Available incident energy and the corresponding working distance b. Minimum arc rating of clothing c. Required level of PPE d. Highest Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) for the equipment Method for calculating analysis data shall be documented. NOTE: Labels applied prior to September 30, 2011, are acceptable if they contain the available incident energy or required level of PPE. Nominal System Voltage (NSV) The NSV is normally the voltage required by the largest loads in a system. Common industrial values are 120, 208, 220, and 480 volts. This measurement can be VAC or VDC and is required by 2012 NFPA 70E (130.5(C)) to be displayed on arc ash labeling. Arc Flash Boundary The arc ash boundary is the distance at which a person is likely to receive a second-degree burn. The onset of a second-degree burn is possible when the skin receives 1.2 cal/cm2 of incident energy. Calculations based on 2012 NFPA 70E Annex D.7.5. This measurement is required by 2012 NFPA 70E (130.5(C)) to be displayed on arc ash labeling. Available Incident Energy at a Working Distance This is the energy-per-unit area on a surface located at the normal working distance from the potential arc fault. The incident energy is most commonly measured in units of calories per square centimeter. Second-degree burns occur at an energy level of approximately 1.2 cal/cm2. You have the option to display available incident energy at a working distance to fulll the third 2012 NFPA 70E labeling requirement (130.5(C)), as indicated at top. Minimum Arc Rating for Clothing This measurement provides workers with the minimum PPE protection necessary to perform work near an arc ash fault. The measurement is provided in calories so a worker can easily match or exceed the arc rating (calories) displayed on a piece of PPE or a combination of PPE (layering). The arc rating for a particular piece of PPE clothing can be obtained from a tag on the clothing or from the manufacturer. You have the option to display minimum arc rating for clothing to fulll the third 2012 NFPA 70E labeling requirement (130.5(C)), as indicated at top. Common practice is to avoid using this in combination with HRC. Label example displays all elds available. Required Level of PPE The Personal Protective Equipment required is dependent on the incident energy at every point a person may perform work on energized equipment. An electrical engineer or other qualied person should perform the calculations that determine the incident energy. The appropriate PPE should cover all parts of the body that may be exposed to an arc ash. If HRC is used, list the clothing as described in Table 130.7(C)(16). Otherwise, refer to Article 130.7. You have the option to display required level of PPE to fulll the third 2012 NFPA 70E labeling requirement (130.5(C)), as indicated at top. Common practice is to avoid using this in combination with Minimum Arc Rating for Clothing. Hazard Risk Category (HRC) A general classication of hazard involved in performing specied tasks. HRC typically ranges from zero to four, with zero denoting minimum-risk activities and four denoting high-risk activities. The NFPA provides a recommended list of PPE for each HRC in Table 130.7. HRC levels are not associated with a specic measurement of cal/cm2 by the NFPA, but rather a dened list of PPE. You have the option to display hazard risk category to fulll the third 2012 NFPA 70E labeling requirement (130.5(C)), as indicated at top. Shock Protection Boundary (Not Required) Limited Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.1 and C.1.2.2) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person. An unqualied person, wearing appropriate PPE, may cross if accompanied by a qualied person. Becoming qualied requires special training. Restricted Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.2.3) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person that has a documented plan approved by authorized management and uses adequate shock prevention equipment and techniques. Prohibited Approach Boundary (Annex C.1.2.4) This boundary may only be crossed by a qualied person that has the same level of protection required for direct contact with live parts. NFPA 70E Article 130.5 states that an arc ash hazard analysis must be reviewed every ve years or whenever a major modication or renovation occurs. This guide is for general information purposes only. It is not a substitute for review of applicable standards. 2005, 2008-2013 Graphic Products, Inc. Over 50 supplies available to meet your labeling needs! DuraLabel sign and label printers are perfect for printing any labels or signs you need for your facility! DuraLabel.com 877.534.5157 Informazioni: [email protected] Web: www.rebosystems.it 16
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