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Bright Futures: Oral Health in Childcare Joseli Alves-Dunkerson, DDS, MPH, MBA Peg Terp, MPH LeeAnn HoaglinCooper, BS, RDH

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Bright Futures: Oral Health in Childcare. Joseli Alves-Dunkerson, DDS, MPH, MBA Peg Terp, MPH LeeAnn HoaglinCooper, BS, RDH. BRIGHT FUTURES. National Perspective. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Bright Futures: Oral Health in ChildcareJoseli Alves-Dunkerson, DDS, MPH, MBAPeg Terp, MPHLeeAnn HoaglinCooper, BS, RDH

  • National PerspectiveBRIGHT FUTURES

  • We need to do a better job of weaving a safety net of understanding, appreciation and guidance in the family, in the community and school. We need to start thinking of health and education as interlocking spheres.

    C. Everett Koop, M.D. Former Surgeon General U.S. Public Health Service

  • Bright Futures SupportAmerican Academy of PediatricsAm. Academy of Pediatric DentistryAm. Dental Hygienists AssociationAmerican Dietetic AssociationNAPNAPAmerican Public Health AssociationAmerican School Health AssociationAmerican Nurses AssociationNational Center for Health EducationAssociation of MCH ProgramsNational Assembly for School-based Health CareNational Association of School NursesNational Association of WIC DirectorsNational Mental Health AssociationSociety of Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association and many more

  • What Is Bright Futures?Bright Futures is a: VisionPhilosophySet of Expert GuidelinesPractical Developmental Approach to Providing Health Supervision

  • Bright Futures is a VisionEvery child deserves to:be healthyexperience joyhave self-esteem have caring family & friendsbelieve s/he can succeed in lifea Bright Future

  • Bright Futures is a PhilosophyOptimal health for all children requires:Trusting relationships between health professionals, the family, and the childCollaborative community partnerships

  • Bright Futures Core ConceptsPrevention WorksFamilies MatterHealth is Everyones Business

  • Prevention WorksFluoridation SealantsChild Safety SeatsImmunizationBack to SleepBicycle HelmetsHome Safety

  • Families MatterPartnership with the FamilyFamilies as partnersFamilies as caregiversFamilies as teachersFamilies as resources

  • Community PartnershipsLocal health jurisdictions (LHJs)Local oral health coalitionsDental providersFamiliesCommunity CentersSchoolsEarly Childhood ProgramsChild Care

  • Bright Futures Materials for Professionals

  • State PerspectiveProvide consistent and effective oral health messages for local programs

  • Bright Futures Oral HealthBright Futures OHTooth TutorFoundationExpertiseLocal CoordinatorsCustomersMCH-related programsResultsFamilies getting the same OHmessages wherever they goCommunity reps on the samepage in terms of OHOH education fact sheetsavailable onlineReviewersDOH, UW, MCH programs, associations, parent groupsIncreased awareness oforal health

  • WA State BF OH Subgroups WICCSHCNFirst Steps/NPFHS/ECEAP/ChildcaresTooth Tutor/SchoolsAdolescentsChild Profile

  • Bright Futures Oral Health for Childcare Programs

    LeeAnn Cooper, RDHPeg Terp, MPH

  • Why Are We Here?We want childcare programs to promote effective, safe and healthy oral health practices at school and at home.

    We want children to be Cavity Free by Kindergarten!

  • What Are We Going To Do Today?Review basics in causes and prevention of tooth decay

    Develop an understanding of how oral health education can be integrated in childcare programs

    Share our guideline and materials to promote oral health

  • Is Tooth Decay a Problem? YES!Preschool children (HeadStart, 2000 SMILE Survey)

    41.5% have had cavities or fillings

    National goal: 11%

    2005/HP2010 Health Objectives

  • Key Principles

  • Plaque GermsSugar bugsTooth decay is a bacterial Infection

  • We get bacteria from our primary caregiver.Li Y, Caufield PW, J Dent Res 1995;74:681-5.

  • Plaque is the film that grows on our teeth.

    Contains different bacteria

    Can be reduced by toothbrushing

  • Nutrition

    Healthy food for healthy bodies and teeth!AmountTexture Frequency!

  • Regular meals and snacksRegular Meals

    Regular Meals plus GrazingProlonged bottle feeding, sippy cups, etc.

  • Breakdown and RepairEat carbohydrateTooth begins to break downFluoride isavailable in paste and waterFluoride combines with calciumRebuilds the toothRepairFluorides in caries prevention. Wright, Boston, 1991; p 295-323.

  • Fluoride Decreases the breakdown of teeth

    Increases the repair of the teeth

  • Fluoride works bestAvailable in small daily amounts

    drinking watertwice daily in toothpaste

  • Visits to the DentistStop decay BEFORE you see itHigh strength fluoridePreventive care, as neededFills holes and cavitiesReduce bacterial infectionEmergent care, if needed

  • New things to watch forXylitolChlorhexidineFluoride varnish

  • What Childcare Providers can do?

  • Bright FuturesGuide for Oral Health in Washington State

  • Review activities

    2. Oral Health Action Plan Example: We will record the name/phone of every childs dentist on our health record.

    Measure your current status Example: Count the number of children that have had a dental examination at the beginning of the year

    4. Oral Health Training for staff and families

    5. Routine Oral Health Activities 6. Repeat measures to evaluate outcomes. Example: Count the number of dental exams at the end of the year, and also from year to year.

  • Ask parents aboutPrevention:What they are doing to prevent tooth decay on their children?

    Access:Do families AND children have a dental provider?

  • Prevention: fluoride and risk assessmentFluoride:Do children have access to fluoridated water at home or school?

    History of decayDo parents or children have a history of tooth decay?

  • Prevention: Toothbrushing in ChildcareToothbrushesLabelingCleaning ReplacementStorageBuy it or make it

  • Prevention: Classroom Toothbrushing ManagementPassing out the brushesToothpasteDispensingTechniquesIntroductionSink MethodTable MethodSwishing and spittingRinsing and storage

  • Prevention: Nutrition PlanningTwo component snacksWater with meals and snacksThirsty? Offer water first!Sit down for meals and snacksFresh, frozen or canned fruits and vegetablesOthers

  • Access: Dental exams and Dental screeningDental HomesMobile Dental Programs

  • Access: insurance, dental providerRegistrationDentist?Insurance?Health (DENTAL) HistoryConsents

  • Access: Share Dental ResourcesDental homes Build a relationship with local providersLearn about available resourcesCHAPSnohomish County Dental ResourcesDOH Oral Health Program website: how to find dental care

  • Access: Track Dental Needs90 day enrollmentRecommended treatmentWatch for child behaviorsRecommended check ups for prevention1st dental checkups beginning at age one!

  • Access: Dental emergencies

    Post dental emergency proceduresToothachesFalls and bumpsCuts or bites(tongue)Knocked out permanent tooth

    Celebrate growing upLost baby tooth

  • Planning and Writing Your Oral Health Program

    A curriculum is a written plan for your program.

  • Structure for pre-schoolCircle TimeStory Time Book List/Song ListCenter TimeRoom EnvironmentSchool to Home

  • Topics/ConceptsVisiting the DentistKeeping Teeth HealthyPlaqueToothbrushingFluorideTooth decayImportance of Baby TeethNutrition and Oral Health

  • Resources

  • Discussion

    Purpose of this slide: to review the goals of the presentation and the history of Bright Futures.

    Welcome to an Introduction to Bright Futures!This slide show is prepared as an introduction to the Bright Futures concepts and materials.By the end of this presentation you will become familiar with: The history of Bright Futures The Core Principles of Bright Futures Each of the Bright Futures Materials

    HistoryBright Futures was initiated by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) in 1990, as a practical approach to health supervision and health promotion for children birth through 21. Bright Futures believes that every child deserves to be healthy, and that trusting relationships between health providers, the child, family and community are the critical building block. Since 1990, Bright Futures has developed a comprehensive set of materials which support health promotion in the areas of physical health, nutrition, oral health, physical activity, and mental health, and provide resources for both professionals and families. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) was awarded federal Bright Futures cooperative agreements from MCHB in 2002, and began the Bright Futures Education Center and the Bright Futures Pediatric Implementation Project. These activities are intended to promote training, continuing education, implementation, collaboration and evaluation of Bright Futures across the country.For more information, visit www.brightfutures.aap.org.

    Purpose of this slide: to review the goals of the presentation and the history of Bright Futures.

    Welcome to an Introduction to Bright Futures!This slide show is prepared as an introduction to the Bright Futures concepts and materials.By the end of this presentation you will become familiar with: The history of Bright Futures The Core Principles of Bright Futures Each of the Bright Futures Materials

    HistoryBright Futures was initiated by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) in 1990, as a practical approach to health supervision and health promotion for children birth through 21. Bright Futures believes that every child deserves to be healthy, and that trusting relationships between health providers, the child, family and community are the critical building block. Since 1990, Bright Futures has developed a comprehensive set of materials which support health promotion in the areas of physical health, nutrition, oral health, physical activity, and mental health, and provide resources for both professionals and families. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) was awarded federal Bright Futures cooperative agreements from MCHB in 2002, and began the Bright Futures Education Center and the Bright Futures Pediatric Implementation Project. These activities are intended to promote training, continuing education, implementation, collaboration and evaluation of Bright Futures across the country.For more information, visit www.brightfutures.aap.org.

    Purpose of this slide: Reinforce the connection between health and readiness to learn. Bright Futures concepts and materials help to develop a common language of health promotion for all partners.

    We need to do a better job of weaving a safety net of understanding, appreciation and guidance in the family, in the community and school. We need to start thinking of health and education as interlocking spheres. C. Everett Koop, M.D. Former Surgeon General U.S. Public Health Service

    Funding of Bright Futures Since its inception in 1990, Bright Futures has been funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under the direction of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Organizations That Support Bright FuturesBright Futures has enjoyed an overwhelmingly positive response from organizations representing medicine, public health, social services, education, and related fields.The Bright Futures guidelines are supported by more than 30 national organizations and associations, including:Ambulatory Pediatric Association, Ambulatory Pediatric Association, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Physician Assistants, American College of Nurse-Midwives, American Dental Hygienists' Association, American Dietetic Association, American Medical Association. American Medical Women's Association, American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc., American Public Health Association, American School Health Association, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Child Welfare League of America, Inc., CityMatCH, Family Voices, March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, National Association of County and City Health Officials, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, National Association of School Nurses, Inc., National Association of WIC Directors, National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, National Parent Network on Disabilities, National Perinatal Association, The National PTA, Society for Adolescent Medicine, Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Society of Pediatric Nurses, Zero to ThreePurpose of this slide: Bright Futures materials are professionally developed and well respected.

    Organizations That Support Bright FuturesThe Bright Futures materials have been, and continue to be, developed by multi-disciplinary panels of experts around the country. They are supported by more than 30 national organizations and associations.

    Purpose of this slide: Define Bright Futures. We will be talking about much more than just the materials. The next five slides review the Bright Futures vision and core concepts.

    Bright Futures is a Vision, that every child deserves to be healthy, have caring family and friends, and believe that he or she can succeed in life.

    Bright Futures is a Philosophy : To reach this vision of optimal health for all children requires:a trusting relationships between health professionals, the family, and the child.collaborative community partnerships to promote health.

    Bright Futures is a Set of Expert Guidelines: Bright Futures offers a series of professional health guidelines and parent tools.

    Bright Futures is a Practical Developmental Approach: Written Bright Futures materials cover birth through 21 years and take a developmental approach.

    The Bright Futures VisionTo further expand on the vision, Bright Futures promotes that every child deserves:to be born well, be physically fit, and achieve self-responsibility for good health habits.access to coordinated and comprehensive, health-promoting, medical, mental health, and dental care, best provided through a medical home, and including access to other levels of care when needed. nurturing and support from family and other significant personsto grow and develop in a safe home and school environment free of undue physical and psychological risk. satisfactory housing, good nutrition, quality education, adequate family income, supportive social network, and access to community resources. quality child carethe opportunity to develop ways to cope with stressful life experiences. the opportunity to be prepared for parenthood. the opportunity to develop positive values and become a responsible citizen in his community. to experience joy, self-esteem, have friends, acquire a sense of efficacy, and believe she can succeed in life. Bright Futures Core ConceptsBright Futures is based on these Core Concepts. The next three slides offer further explanation of each of the core concepts; prevention, families and community partnerships.Prevention Works!Bright Futures is based on knowledge that specific preventive and health promotion interventions improve childrens social, developmental, and learning, and health outcomes. Successful prevention interventions include: Child safety seats, Water fluoridation, Immunizations, The Back to Sleep campaign to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, Bike helmet and Home safety practices. Bright Futures materials provide prevention and health promotion strategies and approaches for all developmental ages, birth through 21, and for all the health promotion partners.

    Our Partnership with the Family is extremely important!

    Bright Futures guidelines are based on the belief that families matter.

    One of Bright Futures primary goals is to enhance parents abilities to:Communicate and partner with their health providersEstablish healthy habits for their familyProvide a safe home environmentServe as a resource to health providers

    The importance of the family is recognized throughout. Specific materials have also been developed for families, to further support their role in prevention and health promotion with their children.

    Health is Everyones Business

    Bright Futures supports the importance of community partnerships, and recognizes that we all can make an important contribution to health promotion, regardless of our role.A successful intervention often requires the coordinated effort of more than one setting and more than one discipline. Many components of health supervision, promotion and preventive services can be provided in many settings, with collaboration between a variety of organizations and disciplines. Families and children need medical homes that provide a continuing relationship with a health team, which includes a primary care provider, and may include, as well, a public health nurse, child care provider, early childhood educator, home visitor, social worker, nutritionist, and many others.

    Materials for professionals include:Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, Second EditionBright Futures in Practice: Physical ActivityBright Futures in Practice: Mental Health Practice GuideBright Futures in Practice: Mental Health Tool KitPocket Guides:Health Supervision GuidelinesNutritionOral Health

    The following slides take a look at each one.Lets begin.Use a combination of national, state, and local expertise and family input to develop such messages.

    Create a supportive environment for oral health by having professionals and families receiving the same information throughout the state.

    Local efforts are critical Messages are compared to Bright Futures Messages are compared with State and National GuidelinesCore messages identifiedCreate documents that highlight core messagesLocal experts consultedShare with you for feedback.

    We are sharing a new document, developed from our strong partnership with local HeadStart, ECEAP and childcare programs. We hope this document provides the core information necessary to promote effective oral health education within childcare programsand allows for creativity and flexibility to meet a wide range of program needs.