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  • 8/16/2019 Canadian Geographic - Best Wildlife Photography 2014

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    Images from Canadian Geographic’s Photo Club

    SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION

          B       E       S       T

    WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 20

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    PHOTOCLUB

     

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    EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK 5 BY TYRONE BURKE 

    INTRODUCTION 7 BY MICHELLE VALBERG 

    ON THE PROWL 8

    THINGS WITH WINGS 40

    WHAT’S IN THE WATER 68

    JUNIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS 92

    BEST  WILDLIFE

    PHOTOGRAPHY 2014

    8

    40

    68

    92   F   R    O    N    T    C    O    V    E    R   :    J    O    H    N    Z    I   M    M    E    R    M    A    N   ;    B    A    C    K    C    O    V    E    R   :    D    A    V    I   D    W    H    I   T    E

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    Explore. Discover. Learn. Celebrate.

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  • 8/16/2019 Canadian Geographic - Best Wildlife Photography 2014

    5/100CANADIAN  GEOGRAPHIC

    Worth the wait Sorting through the year’s best wildlife photography is one of the privi- leges of working at Canadian Geographic. Every year I marvel at the calibre of the images we receive through our contests. Not only am I impressed by the photographic skill, I’m blown away by the patience it takes to get so close to breaching humpbacks and tiny tree frogs.

    I have wide-eyed admiration for wildlife photographers. Even though the genre has always been my favourite type of photography to look at, I’ve had lile success actually producing any. Never the most

    patient (or light-footed) person, I frighten off animals long before I get a decent shot.

    Yet, with our photo club members as inspiration, I finally got into a wildlife blind this spring and waited it out. Hours before dawn, I seled in next to hundreds of thousands of sandhill cranes, which were pass- ing through Nebraska’s Plae River Valley as they migrated toward Canada’s Far North for the summer.

    Each minute I shivered in the darkness, I gained yet more respect for the toughness of wildlife photographers. Then the sun finally crested the horizon, and thousands of cranes stirred and swooped. When a hunting eagle zoomed in and sent the cranes scaering,

    I suddenly understood where wildlife photographers find their patience.There’s no spectacle on Earth that can match nature in action. It’s worth waiting for.

    Tyrone Burke

    Sorting throuorti thro leges of workile calibre of thecali I impressed b II esse I it takes to getget

    I have wideI ide the enre haenre

    ESIDENT AND PUBLISHER  André Préfontaine

    E-PRESIDENT, CONTENT CREATION  Gilles Gagnier

    OJECT EDITOR  Tyrone Burke NIOR EDITOR  Aaron Kylie EATIVE DIRECTOR  Suzanne Morin STOM PUBLISHING MANAGER  Mike Elston

    SOCIATE EDITOR Harry Wilson SISTANT  EDITOR  Nick Walker W MEDIA EDITOR  Heather Yundt CIAL MEDIA EDITOR  Sabrina Doyle STOM PUBLISHING EDITOR  Michel a Rosano

    NSULTANTS  Roger Bird, Canadian Museum of Nature, Royal Ontario seum

    OTO EDITOR  Laura Stanley APHIC DESIGNER  Ksenia Nigmanova ODUCTION COORDINATOR  Kendra Stieler W MEDIA DEVELOPER  Paul Politis LOUR TECHNICIAN  Glenn Campbell

    ERNS  Brendan McConnell, Siobhan McClelland, Justin Nalepa, my Thomson

    CULATION MANAGER  Nathalie Cuerrier

    ECTOR, FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION  Michael Edwards, CA COUNTING MANAGER  Cather ine Frame COUNTING ASSISTANT  Ashley Rovito ECUTIVE ASSISTANT   Sandra Smith CEPTIONIST/OFFICE COORDINATOR  Diane Séguin

    GISTICS COORDINATOR  Emma Viel-Horler ENT COORDINATOR  Rachel Jobson

    E-PRESIDENT, ADVERTISING SALES  Pamela MacKinnon one (416) 360-4151 ext. 378 ail: mackinnon@canadiangeographic.ca

    TIONAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER  Valerie Hall Daigle one (416) 360-4151 ext. 380 ail: halldaigle@canadiangeographic.ca

    VENTURES/CLASSIFIED Li sa Duncan Brown one (905) 702-0899 or toll-free (888) 445-0052 x (905) 702-0887 email: classified@ca nadiangeogra phic.ca

    ITAL REPRESENTATION Marc Thomas, Suite 66 one (416) 848-9444 or toll-free (866) 779-3486 x (416) 628-5561 email : mthomas@suite6 6.com

    6 Lesmill Road, North York, ON M3B 2T5 one (416) 360-4151 Fax (416) 360-1526

    nadian Geographic Best Wildlife Photography 2014 is published by nadian Geographic Enterprises on behalf of The Royal Canadian ographical Society

    TORIAL OFFICE

    5 Lola Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K1K 4C1

    one: (613) 745-4629 Fax: (613) 744-0947 bsite: canadiangeographic.ca

    BN 978-0-9867516-0-8. No part of this publication may be roduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form by any means, without the prior written consent of the publisher a licence from The Canadian Copyright Licensing Agency cess Copyright). For an Access Copyright licence, visit

    cesscopyright.ca or call toll-free (800) 893-5777.

    te of issue: September 2013 Copyright ©2013. All rights reserved.

    nadian Geographic  and design are registered trademarks. Marque déposée.

    ounded in 1929, the Society is a non-profit educational organization. Its object is to advance geographical knowledge and, in particular,

    o stimulate awareness of the significance of geography in Canada’s velopment, well-being and culture. In short, the aim is to make Canada

    better known to Canadians and to the world.

    PRESIDENT

    Dr. Paul Ruest, PhD, Winnipeg

    VICE-PRESIDENTS

    Mr. Bruce Amos, Ottawa; Mr. Gavin Fitch, Calgary

    SECRETARY

    Ms. Beth Dye, Kamloops, B.C.

    TREASURER

    Mr. Keith Exelby, Ottawa

    CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

    John G. Geiger

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    education.canadiangeographic.ca

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    Animal insinc From aop a small cliff, I could see clumps of walruses gruning and wrihing en masse on he beachfron. I was a grea vanage poin, bu I waned o ge closer. Much closer.

    Led by my guide, I crep up slowly, unil I was wihin a mere of he herd. The firs hing ha hi me was he smell: an overpowering scen of 10,000 we animals, like a feid beachfron barnyard. I was amazing o be so close.

    Under he fla ligh of cloud cover, I sho close-ups of hewalruses’ leahery, ancien-looking skin, bulbous eyes and whiskers. Jus as I decided i was ime o go and urned away, here was a hunderous sound — he herd was on he move. I fired off a few shos, bu I wasn’ even sure if my camera was in focus. My senses old me just shoot .

    The dus kicked up by he walruses creaed an ehereal mis, illuminaed by he sun as i peeked hrough he clouds. In ha momen, everyhing came ogeher. I go “he sho.”

    When phoographing wildlife I ry o be atenive, o anicipae wha an animal will do nex. Even a sligh change can ransform an

    ordinary phoo ino somehing exraordinary, bu you can overhinkhings oo. Someimes a phoographer’s mos valuable ool is insinc. Michelle Valberg

    I wasn’t even sureif my camera was in focus. My senses told me ‘just shoot.’ 

    From aop a IFrom ao a I wrihing en Iw I bu I wanedb I

    Led by m I II I he herd. Th scen of 10, Is I amazin oa

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    8/100BEST  WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2014 ON THE PROWL8

    ON THE PROW

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    A wild animal never knows if its most

    recent meal was its last. There are no

    guarantees that the next hunt will be

    fruitful. With ears perked and claws

    drawn, predators need to be constantly alert. When the time comes to make

    the kill, there is lile room for error. An

    animal needs to eat, or it will eventually

    be eaten itself.

     wild animal nevd ani

    recent mea was ien ea

    guarantees t at tuar t

    fruitful. ith earfr e

    rawn re atorsors

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