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“Cleaner Air Sooner” South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Bureau of Air Quality

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“Cleaner Air Sooner”. South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. Bureau of Air Quality. SC Air Quality Status…. …Attainment. Potential non-attainment areas for South Carolina. 0.087. 0.090. 0.084. 0.085. 0.085. 0.081. 0.084. 0.088. 0.086. 0.085. 0.093. 0.083. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Cleaner Air SoonerSouth Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control

    Bureau of Air Quality

  • SC Air Quality StatusAttainment

  • Potential non-attainment areas for South Carolina* Potential areas of violation for the 8-hour ozone standard based upon unvalidated data for years 2000-2002. Due to rounding allowance, a violation is not triggered until 0.085 ppm.Near the standard (0.080 0.084 ppm)Above the standard (>0.084 ppm)0.0860.0930.0850.0850.0880.0850.0900.0870.0880.0830.0830.0810.0840.0840.0810.0740.0730.073

  • Groundlevel OzoneWhy is it a problem?Increasing population with increasing respiratory illnessesMore cars, sprawl, etc.More industryMore stringent federal regulations

  • Formation of Ground-level Ozone

    Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx)

    Ozone (O3)

    Strong Spring or Summer Sun (with low RH & light winds)

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    =>

    - AND -

    =>

  • Asthma In South CarolinaAnnually about 204,000 adults and 77,000 children suffer from asthma in SC.In 2000, 1.2% (5,995) of ALL hospitalizations were due to asthma. More than 27% of all those hospitalizations were among children.Information from SC DHEC Bureau of Epidemiology

  • Asthma In The UpstateGreenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Pickens, Cherokee, Oconee, And AbbevilleAbout 52,835 (6.6%) adults in the upstate suffer annually from asthma.In 2000, there were 1,252 hospitalizations due to asthma for all ages.In 2000, there were 518 asthma hospitalizations of children under the age of 18. 2,007 children under the age of 18 visited the Emergency Room due to asthma.

    Information from SC DHEC Bureau of Epidemiology

  • Asthma In Lexington And RichlandApproximately 34,145 (8.5%) adults in Lexington and Richland Counties suffer annually from asthma.In 2000, there were 723 hospitalizations due to asthma (for all ages).In 2000, there were 338 asthma hospitalizations of children under the age of 18. 1060 children under the age of 18 visited the Emergency Room due to asthma.

    Information from SC DHEC Bureau of Epidemiology

  • Asthma Aiken, Edgefield, And BarnwellAbout 12,784 (9.0%) adults suffer annually from asthma.In 2000, there were 147 hospitalizations due to asthma for all ages.In 2000, there were 52 asthma hospitalizations of children under the age of 18. 366 children under the age of 18 visited the Emergency Room due to asthma.

    Information from SC DHEC Bureau of Epidemiology

  • Asthma In Florence And DarlingtonAbout 7,416 (5.2%) adults suffer annually from asthma.In 2000, there were 590 hospitalizations due to asthma for all ages.In 2000, there were 206 asthma hospitalizations of children under the age of 18. 598 children under the age of 18 visited the Emergency Room due to asthma.

    Information from SC DHEC Bureau of Epidemiology

  • Asthma In York, Lancaster, Union, And ChesterAbout 10,881 (5.1%) adults suffer annually from asthma.In 2000, there were 432 hospitalizations due to asthma for all ages.In 2000, there were 210 asthma hospitalizations of children under the age of 18. 465 children under the age of 18 visited the Emergency Room due to asthma.

    Information from SC DHEC Bureau of Epidemiology

  • Asthma In Charleston, Berkeley, Dorchester, And ColletonAbout 25,807 (5.9%) adults suffer annually from asthma.In 2000, there were 784 hospitalizations due to asthma for all ages.In 2000, there were 286 asthma hospitalizations of children under the age of 18. 1,443 children under the age of 18 visited the Emergency Room due to asthma.

    Information from SC DHEC Bureau of Epidemiology

  • Chart1

    000

    0.03498038560.03366314390.0088095081

    0.08540331660.06333385130.0249147243

    0.0878029050.07485132340.0424092503

    0.10358967110.09188431180.0543146086

    0.14062542440.11231562160.0647105604

    0.17592463340.14306815050.0740599164

    0.22262188750.18354524990.0835929319

    0.25176425770.1801807090.0946189503

    0.31000543120.18931412010.109608149

    0.35489193630.22263312490.1102762949

    0.39830879080.30203510810.123599669

    0.46346998050.37477092580.1751904333

    Vehicle Miles Traveled in SC

    Annual Vehicle Registration

    Population Growth in SC

    Calendar Year

    % Increase from 1988

    Vehicle Use in Relation to Growth in SC

    Sheet1

    1988198919901991199219931994199519961997199819992000

    Population3,413,9253,444,0003,498,9823,558,7073,599,3513,634,8423,666,7603,699,3053,736,9473,788,1193,790,4003,835,8854,012,012

    Registered vehicles2,368,2282,447,9502,518,2172,545,4932,585,8312,634,2172,707,0462,802,9052,794,9372,816,5672,895,4743,083,5163,255,771

    Statewide VMT31,672,097,80532,780,000,00034,377,000,00034,453,000,00034,953,000,00036,126,000,00037,244,000,00038,723,000,00039,646,000,00041,490,620,14342,912,269,92244,287,372,78446,351,164,356

    1988198919901991199219931994199519961997199819992000

    Population0%0.88%2.49%4.24%5.43%6.47%7.41%8.36%9.46%10.96%11.03%12.36%17.52%

    Annual Vehicle Registration0%3.37%6.33%7.49%9.19%11.23%14.31%18.35%18.02%18.93%22.26%30.20%37.48%

    Vehicle Miles Traveled in SC0%3.50%8.54%8.78%10.36%14.06%17.59%22.26%25.18%31.00%35.49%39.83%46.35%

    1988 is used as a baseline year and all increases are derived from that year.

    Last Update: January, 16, 2001

    Sources: Population growth, www.skiway.net/statistics and 2000 U.S. Census data

    VMT from DOT, Office of Traffic Counts.

    Sheet1

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    000

    Vehicle Miles Traveled in SC

    Annual Vehicle Registration

    Population Growth in SC

    Calendar Year

    % Increase from 1988

    Vehicle Use in Relation to Growth in SC

    Sheet2

    Sheet3

  • Sources of NOx(Oxides of Nitrogen)Lexington and Richland Counties

  • Sources of VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds)Lexington and Richland Counties

  • Sources of NOx(Oxides of Nitrogen)Abbeville, Anderson, Cherokee, Greenville, Oconee, Pickens, Spartanburg

  • Sources of VOC(Volatile Organic Compounds)Abbeville, Anderson, Cherokee, Greenville, Oconee, Pickens, Spartanburg

  • Sources of NOx (Oxides of Nitrogen)Florence and Darlington

  • Sources of VOC(Volatile Organic Compounds)Florence and Darlington

  • Sources of NOxOxides of NitrogenYork, Chester, Lancaster, Union

  • Sources of VOC(Volatile Organic Compounds)York, Lancaster, Chester, Union

  • Sources of NOx(Oxides of Nitrogen)Aiken, Barnwell, Edgefield

  • Sources of VOC(Volatile Organic Compounds)Aiken, Barnwell, Edgefield

  • Sources of NOx(Oxides of Nitrogen)Charleston, Berkeley, Dorchester, Colleton

  • Sources of VOC(Volatile Organic Compounds)Charleston, Berkeley, Dorchester, Colleton

  • What Can We Do?Sit back and wait for federal requirements to activate.A wait and see attitude is not protective of public health and may be more costly!Create an Early Action SIP to provide South Carolina with Cleaner Air Sooner.Address the potential problems of tomorrow with common sense today!

  • Benefits Of An Early Action SIPPositive impact on public health and environmentPartnerships implementing local strategies to maintain clean air and provide public health protectionPositive public reaction for voluntarily addressing air pollution problems ahead of federal requirementsDeferral of effective date of non-attainment designation (Non-Attainment NSR, Conformity)

  • Drawbacks to ParticipatingMay not work as well as we expect

    Unnecessary use of resources (time, money)

    Clean Air Act does not allow

  • *Assumes designations made November 2004 as currently being indicated by EPAApproach Comparison

  • What Are The Next Steps?Meet with local groups Identify local and state controls/strategiesSubmit a letter of intent to EPA with an Early Action Compact by December 31, 2002Include milestonesCompletion of emissions inventories and modelingAdoption of control strategies that demonstrate attainmentCompletion and adoption of the early action SIP revisions (Dec. 31, 2004)Attainment not later than Dec. 31, 2007Post-attainment demonstration and plan updates

  • Next StepscontinuedLocal Early Action Plan completed by August 2003Incorporate local Early Action Plans into State Early Action PlanState Early Action Plan to South Carolina Legislature (December 2003)Include statewide controlsSubmit Early Action State Implementation Plan to EPA (December 31, 2004)Implement controls by April 2005Attainment December 31, 2007

  • Steps To Early Action SIPNotice of Drafting August 23, 2002Public ForumsCreate stakeholder groupsTargeted local areas likely to be designated and areas with potential problemsDevelop a Protocol to be used as a guideline for local Early Action Compacts

  • Principles of the Early Action CompactEarly planning, implementation & emissions reductionsBroad-based public inputState support within the local early action planFormal incorporation of the early action plan into the early action SIP revisionDeferral of the effective date of non-attainmentSafeguards to return areas to traditional SIP requirements if terms and/or milestones not met

  • Basic Requirements Of The Early Action CompactMilestonesEmissions InventoryModelingMaintenance for GrowthPublic InvolvementControl Strategies

  • EPA CommitmentsRecognize commitments of state and localsReview and approve Early Action SIPDefer effective date of non-attainment designationDesignate area as attainment and impose no additional requirements provided monitors reflect attainment December 31, 2007

  • State CommitmentsSign and adopt Early Action Compact by March 31, 2003Develop and implement State Early Action PlanEmission inventories, modeling processControl strategiesProvide technical support and guidance to locals

  • Local CommitmentsSign and adopt Early Action Compact March 31, 2003Develop and implement local Early Action PlanLocal measures to reduce emissionsSubmit local EAP for incorporation into State EAP by August 31, 2003Assist in collecting emissions dataSupport state efforts

  • NationalTier II phase-in 2004, complete 2007 (Tailpipe standards for passenger cars)Low Sulfur Gasoline phase-in 2004, complete 2007NOx SIP Call reductions

  • Statewide Control ExamplesState Government (leading by example)Statewide - Best Available Control Technology (BACT)Cleaner fuelsBan Open Burning

  • Local Control ExamplesMass TransitCommute OptionsFleets\FuelsSmart GrowthBan Open Burning

  • For More InformationContact:Henry Phillips (803) [email protected]

    Or Visit:http://www.scdhec.net/baq/eap.html

    For the one hour standard.Air pollution (Ozone) is a trigger of asthma.Annually about 204,000 adults and 77,000 children suffer from asthma in SC.In 2000, 1.2% (5,995) of ALL hospitalizations were due to asthma. More than 27% of all those hospitalizations were among children.Annually about 204,000 adults and 77,000 children suffer from asthma in SC.In 2000, 1.2% (5,995) of ALL hospitalizations were due to asthma. More than 27% of all those hospitalizations were among children.

    Annually about 204,000 adults and 77,000 children suffer from asthma in SC.In 2000, 1.2% (5,995) of ALL hospitalizations were due to asthma. More than 27% of all those hospitalizations were among children.Annually about 204,000 adults and 77,000 children suffer from asthma in SC.In 2000, 1.2% (5,995) of ALL hospitalizations were due to asthma. More than 27% of all those hospitalizations were among children.Annually about 204,000 adults and 77,000 children suffer from asthma in SC.In 2000, 1.2% (5,995) of ALL hospitalizations were due to asthma. More than 27% of all those hospitalizations were among children.Annually about 204,000 adults and 77,000 children suffer from asthma in SC.In 2000, 1.2% (5,995) of ALL hospitalizations were due to asthma. More than 27% of all those hospitalizations were among children.Population 3,498,982 (1990) 4,012,012 (2000)Reg. Veh. 2,518,217 (1990) 3,255,771 (2000)SC VMT 34,377,000,000 (1990) 46,351,164,356 (2000)EPA offered us an option.Explain Non-Attainment NSR and ConformityLocal strategies looking at what works best for the particular area STRESS that this requires local participation and buy-in.

    Working on DRAFT Early Action Compact similar to a Memorandum of Agreement outlines duties/responsibilities of participants and milestones; includes signatures of participantsOnce local plan received; incorporated into State Early Action PlanIf adopting state-wide controls through regulations - must follow Administrative Procedures for adopting new regulations. Necessary to obtain approval during 2004 Legislative Session for required submittal of Early Action SIP by December 31, 2004.

    VERY Aggressive schedule.however has benefits.

    Used Texas Protocol as a modelThe Protocol is the guidelines for creating the local CompactsCreate stakeholder group of local, state, and federal government as well as business, citizens, and public interest groups

    Principles outlined in the Protocol

    -Early planning, implementation, and emission reductions leading to expeditious attainment and maintenance of the 8-hour ozone standard

    -Broad based public input on measures to be employed both from a state and local level

    -State support to ensure technical integrity of controls within the local early action plan

    -Formal incorporation of the early action plan into the early action SIP revision

    -Deferral of the effective date of non-attainment designation and related requirements so long as all Compact terms and milestones are met

    -Safeguards to return areas to traditional SIP requirements should Compact terms and/or milestones be unfulfilled, with appropriate credit given for emission reduction measures implemented in the early action SIPMilestones (mentioned earlier or later????)

    Emissions Inventory 1998 episode reflective of a typical ozone season exceedance; use Mobile 6 data

    Modeling using emissions inventories, develop modeling episodes, including base case and future case (December 31, 2007)

    Control Strategies national, state and/or local; must be specific, quantified, and enforceable; implemented by April 1, 2005

    Maintenance for Growth - must Public Involvement

    Brief description of local commitments

    NOTE If at any time the area does not meet all the terms of the Compact, including meeting agreed-upon milestones, then it will forfeit its participations and be designated non-attainment according to EPAs 8-hour ozone implementation guidelines.