educating the marketplace to support successful diabetes product launches report summary

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  1. 1. BEST PRACTICES,LL1Copyright Best Practices, LLCEducating the Marketplace toSupport Successful DiabetesProduct Launches
  2. 2. BEST PRACTICES,LL2Copyright Best Practices, LLCKey Study ObjectivesResearch Objective and MethodologyStudy Objective & MethodologyThis field research and benchmarkingstudy probed the broad array of medicaleducation and marketing practicesconducted two to three years prior tolaunch that best inform and shape themarketplace.A quantitative survey harvested currentbest practices and emerging trends ineducating the marketplace to supportsuccessful product launches. In addition,deep-dive executive interviews wereconducted with selected participants toprovide qualitative insights and emergingtrends.Identify key education tactics forthought leaders, physicians, patients,and payersAssess key market-educationpractices, including thought leaderservices, MedEd, scientificpublications, patient advocacy &education, clinical trials & payereducationIdentify key timing factors &education mixDescribe critical market entry pitfallsand future trendsThis study explores best practices in educating, informing and preparing themarketplace for new products through Physician, Patient, and Payer education,publications, advocacy and communication strategies.
  3. 3. BEST PRACTICES,LL3Copyright Best Practices, LLC10 Steps To Excellence: Key Themes from Market Education ResearchBrand, medical and market education leaders describe various best practices foreducating and shaping the market for new bio-pharma products. These practices can bedistilled into 10 key areas that articulate a blueprint for market education excellence.MARKETMARKETEDUCATIONEDUCATIONEXCELLENCEEXCELLENCE1. DevelopIntegratedContinuousThought LeaderStrategies2. ManageClinical Trials ToWin HighlyRegardedInvestigators &TLs3. Data DisclosuresInform MedicalCommunity of YourProgress &Commitment7. Start PayerEducation Early;Focus On Cost& HealthOutcomes4. CommunicateClinical ScienceThru Journals &Congresses5. Use Multi-Channel Med.Ed. To InformHealth CareProviders8. Use PR & NewTechnologies ForLeveraged Reach toPatients, Physicians,& Payers10. AllocateMarket Ed Mix ToReflect T.A. &CompetitiveLandscape6. InformPatients ThruEducation &Advocacy GroupCollaborations9. OrchestrateMed Ed TimingTo Reach RightConstituenciesAt Right TimesI think its going toboil down to beingable to actually identifyby individual customerwhat channel theywant information fromand how youre goingto reach them mostefficiently, and almostgoing through adecision tree thatlooks at effectivenessand cost . . ..-Senior Vice President, MarketingI think its going toboil down to beingable to actually identifyby individual customerwhat channel theywant information fromand how youre goingto reach them mostefficiently, and almostgoing through adecision tree thatlooks at effectivenessand cost . . ..-Senior Vice President, Marketing
  4. 4. BEST PRACTICES,LL4Copyright Best Practices, LLCUniverse of Learning: 26 Companies EngagedResearch participants included 34 executives and managers from 26 leadingpharmaceutical, biotech and medical device companies.Participating Companies
  5. 5. BEST PRACTICES,LL5Copyright Best Practices, LLCUniverse of Learning: Job Titles and Executive InterviewsInterview Class Executive Director,Global Marketing Associate BrandDirector Senior Manager,New ProductCommercialization National SalesManager Manager, ClinicalResearch Senior ProductManager/PayerMarketing Senior Manager,Health CareSolutions Medical Adviser Senior VP, CommercialOperations Senior VP, Marketing Executive Director,Commercial Operations Head Clinical & MedicalServices Vice President, Marketing Senior Director, Director, CommercialAnalysis Senior Manager, Marketing Manager, Market Research Senior Director, Diabetes Group Sales & BrandManager Senior Manager,Commercial DevelopmentJob TitlesResearch participants roles ranged from senior leaders of commercial operations tomanagers of Diabetes brand teams and therapeutic franchise groups. Lessons learnedexecutive interviews were conducted with select companies.
  6. 6. BEST PRACTICES,LL6Copyright Best Practices, LLCDiabetes/Cardiovascular Segment: 11 Participants EngagedDiabetes/Cardiovascular research participants included 11 executives/managers at 8companies. Three cardiovascular respondents were integrated with 8 Diabetesrespondents because of similar structural therapeutic area requirements for marketentry and common safety factors now under review by the FDA.Benchmark Partners Diabetes/CardiovascularParticipant Titles Diabetes/Cardiovascular Senior VP, Commercial Operations VP, Marketing Executive Director, Global Marketing Associate Brand Director Senior Manager, New ProductCommercialization National Sales Manager Manager, Clinical Research Senior Product Manager/Payer Marketing Senior Manager, Health Care Solutions Medical Adviser Group Sales & Brand Manager
  7. 7. BEST PRACTICES,LL7Copyright Best Practices, LLCDiabetes Thought Leader Education Mirrors Benchmark(n=11)Developing Diabetes Thought Leaders: Please check when you should start each activity foreducating thought leaders.DiabetesDevelopingIntegratedThought LeaderStrategiesConductingAdvisory BoardsProvidingMedicalScienceLiaisonServicesEngagingThoughtLeaders &KeyInvestigatorsin ClinicalTrial ProtocolDevelopmentCommunicatingCriticalInformation andSharing ResearchInsightsPre-Clinical 9% 0% 0% 18% 9%Phase I 9% 18% 18% 18% 0%Phase II 55% 36% 9% 36% 36%Phase III-3 Years 18% 18% 18% 9% 18%Phase III-2 Years 9% 0% 9% 9% 18%Phase III-1 Year 0% 18% 36% 0% 9%NDA thru Launch Year 0% 9% 9% 9% 9%The Diabetes marketplace is well developed and populated with many well-established products. Thisperhaps explains why the Diabetes product teams seem to closely reflect the multi-therapeutic areasbenchmarks. Most thought leader services commence in Phase II. Medical Science Liaison servicesusually commence in Phase III about one year prior to launch.
  8. 8. BEST PRACTICES,LL8Copyright Best Practices, LLCGet KOLs In at Phase II to Create OwnershipYou have to let them think theyre designingthe development program. So you involvethem from Phase II onward and they help youwrite the protocols, and by the time theyvegone through that, its their baby just as much asit is yours Global Head of Clinical and MedicalServicesYou have to let them think theyre designingthe development program. So you involvethem from Phase II onward and they help youwrite the protocols, and by the time theyvegone through that, its their baby just as much asit is yours Global Head of Clinical and MedicalServicesIf your compound doesnt have a novel Method of Action or its not a first-in-class, it can be difficult to bringKOLs into your development program. One approach is to get the KOL involved in the planning of thedevelopment program so that they develop a feeling of ownership.Wed let doctors have raw substance samples so that they could get their Ph.D. studentsplaying with it and some of the pre-clinical publications would come out from their own labs.We control that quite tightly, but other companies I worked with used to use that as a way ofengaging key opinion leaders and generating extra useful data. It really got the guysinvolved. They could play with it in their own hands and do what they want with it and designsome of their own studies. That really gave them a feeling of ownership. Global Head of Clinical and Medical ServicesWed let doctors have raw substance samples so that they could get their Ph.D. studentsplaying with it and some of the pre-clinical publications would come out from their own labs.We control that quite tightly, but other companies I worked with used to use that as a way ofengaging key opinion leaders and generating extra useful data. It really got the guysinvolved. They could play with it in their own hands and do what they want with it and designsome of their own studies. That really gave them a feeling of ownership. Global Head of Clinical and Medical Services
  9. 9. BEST PRACTICES,LL9Copyright Best Practices, LLCInvestigator Segmentation Systems Help Tailor OutreachSegment investigators to understand their motivations and objectives and to fine-tuneyour recruitment and relationship plan to reflect investigator motivation profile.DrugDevelop-ersBusinessMindedCareerClimbersPublishersThoughtLeadersScienceMotivatedHealersIts not clear that each investigatorIts not clear that each investigatoris just one segment. There is ais just one segment. There is apredominant motivation and apredominant motivation and asecond and third motivation.second and third motivation.Money is not usually the primaryMoney is not usually the primarydriver. They dont want to godriver. They dont want to gobankrupt. When you ask them, theybankrupt. When you ask them, theytell you money is third or fourthtell you money is third or fourthlevel of importance.level of importance.-- Senior Director, Clinical Operations,-- Senior Director, Clinical Operations,Pharmaceutical CompanyPharmaceutical CompanyPhysician Motivation SegmentsPhysician Motivation Segments
  10. 10. BEST PRACTICES,LL10Copyright Best Practices, LLCDiabetes IISs Occur But Later in Phase III or Post-LaunchClinical Trial Tactics: Please check all stages during which you conduct investigator-initiatedstudies (non-registration studies)Total Benchmark Class83%53%57%43%17%17%0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%Post LaunchLaunch1 year pre-launch (Ph III)2 years pre-launch (Ph III)3 years pre-launch (Ph III)Phase IIDiabetes Segment88%38%63%25%13%0%0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%Post LaunchLaunch1 year pre-launch (Ph III)2 years pre-launch (Ph III)3 years pre-launch (Ph III)Phase II(n=30) (n=8)The Diabetes segment uses Investigator-Initiated Clinical Studies (IISs) more cautiously than the largerbenchmark class. Early-stage IISs are less frequent than in the o