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SUPPORTED BY EMERGING TECHNOLOGY : TALENT SNAPSHOT

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  • SUPPORTED BY

    EMERGING TECHNOLOGY:TALENT SNAPSHOT

  • INTRODUCTIONThe remarkable story of the rise of the technology sector is the level of value created - not from physical resources but from the application of human skill and ingenuity. Startups are grown by smart and hardworking people that are able to take ideas and turn them into innovations which, in turn, provide valuable dividends to the community and economy at large.

    This snapshot explores talent through a variety of lenses - job creation of startups, supply and demand of skills, critical skills of the future and mechanisms for improving talent in the tech sector.

    Startups are an odd mix of a traditional business with a cutting edge technological component. While they have a significant place for business administration, operations, sales and marketing staff, our analysis of the local startup sector suggests over half of those working for a startup are doing so in a technical role. Our analysis of the job ads startups are posting shows a huge concentration of demand along the Eastern seaboard of Australia, as well as showing that while product roles have hit the mainstream, data and machine learning roles haven’t quite yet.

    Of course, having people equipped with the right skills is a critical component of the success of any startup, the job creator. But it’s also important for job seekers that the skills they’re learning are the ones valued by the marketplace. Australian data scientists in 2017 were most likely to be working in R, but in 2019 Coursera’s most popular data course was in Python, as the industry grows and changes.

    All of these insights and more are contained in this document. The Snapshot has been designed to be a data-rich overview of the talent picture in the Australian startup sector, shedding light on the interaction between human capital and the startups that depend on it.

  • Australian startups create jobs at a predictable rate. We mapped 21 Australian startups at different stages of growth on a plane to show both the level of funding they have raised and their number of employees.

    In median terms, for every US$300,000 of investment, startups created a brand new job. When applied to the sector as a whole, which raised roughly US$1.4bn last year, we estimate over 6,500 jobs were created by startups in 2018 alone.

    We see outliers in the data on both sides, particularly at the extremes of large raises. Yet the median investment dollars to total jobs ratio remains remarkably consistent for estimation - particularly for total raises of less than US$100 million, which comprise the vast majority of venture capital in Australian emerging technology.

    While it may be less visible than a new factory or mine, funds raised by startups are large scale job creation events. John Henderson of AirTree Ventures tallied the employment generation of the startups in which they had invested. Those 48 companies have created almost 4,000 jobs over the last five years. When expanding the research to the startups invested in by the top 10 Australian VC funds, that number increases to 12,500 created jobs over five years.1

    $50,000,000

    200

    400

    600

    800

    DOLLARS RAISED (USD)

    TOTA

    L EM

    PLO

    YEES

    $100,000,000 $150,000,000 $200,000,000

    STARTUPS ARE HIRING

    1 Change transition-of-economy narrative to one of job creation John Henderson, The Australian.

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/technology/change-transitionofeconomy-narrative-to-one-of-job-creation/news-story/956d5c5cd2996c72ff6c21d97a145eb2

  • THE EMPLOYEE STRUCTURE OF A STARTUP

    TOTAL OF 1806 EMPLOYEE RECORDS ANALYSED ACROSS 14 HIGH-GROWTH STARTUPS.

    Australian startups have consistently called for increased investment in STEM skills. A look at their typical employee structure sheds some light on why - over half the employees working at Australian startups have a technical role.

    38% fall broadly under the umbrella of software development. 13% of staff are working in a technical hybrid role in product and design, and a further 6% specialise in cutting edge startup roles, focusing on data and machine learning. The remaining 43% consists of traditional business roles, including sales and marketing, business administration and the executive. Operations and service delivery staff numbers tend to vary significantly, increasing in consumer-facing businesses.

    17.5% BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

    13.1% PRODUCT/ DESIGN

    38.0% SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    17.4% SALES, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS

    5.9% AI/ML /DATA

    8.1% OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY

  • JOBS MAP:B2C STARTUPS

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    40.0%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 59.6%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    16.2%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 43.8%

    PRODUCT/DESIGN 40.0%

    PRODUCT/DESIGN 12.3%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN

    12.4%

    STARTUP A: TWO WAY PHYSICAL MARKETPLACE

    STARTUP C: SAAS DIGITAL PRODUCTS

    STARTUP B: FINTECH DIGITAL PAYMENT PRODUCT

    STARTUP D: GIG ECONOMY PLATFORM

    PRODUCT/DESIGN 3.8%

    AI/ML/DATA 40.0%

    AI/ML/DATA 5.3%

    AI/ML/ DATA 5.7%

    AI/ML/DATA 5.2%

    BUSINESS | ADMINISTRATION 40.0%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

    8.8% BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

    19.0%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 22.9%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 40.0%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY

    35.7%

    SALES AND MARKETING

    40.0%

    SALES AND MARKETING 11.2%

    SALES AND MARKETING 10.5%

    SALES AND MARKETING

    16.2%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY

    2.7%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 8.6%

  • JOBS MAP: B2B STARTUPS

    STARTUP E: FINTECH INTERNATIONAL PRODUCT

    STARTUP G: WORKPLACE SOFTWARE ASSISTANCE

    STARTUP F: DISRUPTIVE FINANCIAL PRODUCTS

    STARTUP H: HUMAN RESOURCE SUPPORT SOFTWARE

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    46.5%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    41.7%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    42.8%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    19.0%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 16.9%

    PRODUCT/DESIGN 14.2%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 20.3%

    PRODUCT/DESIGN 6.39%

    AI/ML/DATA 5.0%

    AI/ML/DATA 10.2%

    AI/ML/DATA 14.6%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 18.3%

    BUSINESS AD-MINISTRATION 21.5%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 14.2%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 11.8%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 1.4% OPERATIONS AND

    SERVICE DELIVERY 9.3%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 14.2%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY

    2.7%

    SALES AND MARKETING

    16.9%

    SALES AND MARKETING

    10.8%

    SALES AND MARKETING

    12.3%

    SALES AND MARKETING

    29.3%

  • STARTUPS CAN OFFER COMPETITIVE SALARIES

    A startup’s ability to attract talent is in part based on whether they can offer competitive remuneration in the marketplace. Yet despite the stereotype of startups running on fumes and ramen, startups have proven that they will pay for high end talent, particularly once they’ve raised funding.

    Think & Grow’s salary survey compiles anonymous data on average salaries across thousands of roles in startups. We’ve taken a sample from each of our core categories and it is clear that while junior roles average at a respectable level across the board, there are strong salaries for senior staff. Additionally, equity is not included on this list, so there’s the potential for even more value on offer to prospective talent.

    EARL

    Y ST

    AGE

    STA

    RTU

    PLA

    TE S

    TAG

    E ST

    ART

    UP

    DATA SCIENTIST

    DATA SCIENTIST

    SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

    SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

    FINANCE

    FINANCE

    OPERATIONS

    OPERATIONS

    PRODUCT

    PRODUCT

    SALES

    SALES

    JUNIOR

    SENIOR

    $50,000 $100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 $300,000 $350,000 $400,000

  • Technology roles dominate the online job ads that startup post. Over half of the 14,000 job ads posted on major sites by startups in the last year were STEM roles, with 6,000 alone categorised as Information Technology positions. Of the remainder, traditional business roles in sales, admin and customer support all feature heavily.

    One category to note is Product - certainly highly in demand from startups, but in 2018 the StartupAUS Talent Gap report found that it had not yet entered mainstream consciousness. To see over 1,000 ads looking for talent in product shows it has started to crack the mainstream in a way that data science (169 ads) has yet to achieve. Despite that progress, it is not yet in parity with the actual representation of product roles in startups, so we would predict to see that number continue to grow over the next few years.

    I.T

    60002000 4000

    SALES

    ADMIN

    CUSTOMER SUPPORT

    PRODUCT

    MARKETING

    ACCOUNTING

    SCIENCE

    BANKING AND FINANCE

    DATA

    SENIOR MANAGEMENT

    MISC (UNDER 50 PLACES)

    SPORTS

    HEALTH AND MEDICAL

    MANUFACTURING

    HR

    6023

    2582

    1344

    1201

    1089

    872

    590

    177

    173

    169

    139

    113

    108

    76

    70

    56

    173

    WHO ARE STARTUPS LOOKING FOR?

  • Looking deeper into the advertisements for technical roles, the strongest focus is still on coding jobs - software engineers and developers. Classic IT roles in network engineering, security, systems analysis and technical writing continue to feature as well.

    More modern startup roles are traditionally sourced via recruiters and networking, but ads for roles in UX/UI, product and data all have over 100 incidences across the year, indicating a growing awareness in the market of these skills.

    WEB / UX / UI DESIGN

    1000 2000 3000

    SOFTWARE ARCHITECTS

    HARDWARE/NETWORK ENGINEERING

    SECURITY

    PRODUCT TESTINGAND QA

    TECHNICAL WRITERS

    HELPDESK/SUPPORT

    PRODUCT DEV, DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT

    BUSINESS / SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    SOFTWARE ENGINEER

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPER

    TECHNICAL DIRECTOR / CTO

    DATA ANALYSTS

    DATA SCIENTISTS

    TECHNICAL ROLES - A DEEPER LOOK

  • Startups are able to use large job marketplaces for their more traditional roles, but are still looking elsewhere to recruit specialised technical startup roles.

    Here we’ve grouped the job ads by the same categories as our job maps of Australian startups and compared our database of actual employees with the job ads that startups place.

    While we see a similar structure, it’s clear that many of the more specialised roles have been squeezed out by an increased share in software development (+5%), sales, marketing and communications (+6%) and operations/service delivery (+5%). This may indicate that for traditional business roles and software development the large online jobs sites are effective, but for specialist tech roles in artificial intelligence, machine learning and data (-5%) and product (-6%), startups are either unable to get the talent they need or are using specialist recruiters.

    ACTUAL RECORDED EMPLOYEES OF AUSTRALIAN STARTUPS

    JOB ADS PLACED BY AUSTRALIAN STARTUPS

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 8.1%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 12.8%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    38.0%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    40.9%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 13.1%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 7.2%

    AI/ML/DATA 5.9%

    AI/ML/DATA 1.1%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 17.5%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 14.6%

    SALES MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

    17.4%

    SALES MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

    23.4%

    ACTUAL JOBS VS ADVERTISED POSITION

  • When looking at the State in which the ad originates, we get a sense of how clustered the startup sector is around urban hubs. The two largest states dominate, with the two largest Australian cities housing the lion’s share of startup activity. To demonstrate the severity of the clustering, Queensland has roughly 62% of the population of NSW, yet has only 22% of the volume of startup job ads that NSW sees. Western Australia has 40% of the population of Victoria yet sees only 7% of volume of startup job ads.

    It is worth noting that this effect is only an analogue for startup activity and may be compounded by other variables. One such example may be that smaller states tend to have stronger networks in their startup ecosystems and so may be able to recruit via strong links with the community rather than job aggregation websites, decreasing their representation on this chart.

    The following page breaks down demand in each State across job roles.

    STATE-BY-STATE JOB AD TOTALS

    STATE-BY-STATE JOB TOTALS

    VIC 31.1%

    QLD7.8%

    SA 2.0%

    WA 2.2%

    ACT 1.5%

    NSW 54.9%

    DATA CONSISTS OF 14,782 TOTAL JOB ADS POSTED FOR ROLES IN STARTUPS OVER 1 YEAR

  • OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 10.8%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 14.7%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 10.1%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 18.4%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 11.8%

    OPERATIONS AND SERVICE DELIVERY 13.5%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    38.4%SOFTWARE

    DEVELOPERS 20.3%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    49.3%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    42.7%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    54.5%

    SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

    43.6%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 5.6%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 8.1%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 15.4%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 10.1%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 15.7%

    PRODUCT /DESIGN 9.8%

    AI/ML/DATA 1.2%

    AI/ML/DATA 1.5%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 18.2%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 14.2%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 14.7%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 6.1%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 18.4%

    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 5.8%

    SALES MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

    25.8% SALES MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

    35.0%

    SALES MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

    24.3%

    SALES MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

    4.7%SALES MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

    16.4%SALES MARKETING AND

    COMMUNICATION 21%

    NSW: 8118 TOTAL JOB ADS

    QLD: 1157 TOTAL JOB ADS

    WA: 330 TOTAL JOB ADS

    VIC: 4601 TOTAL JOB ADS

    SA: 296 TOTAL JOB ADS

    ACT: 221 TOTAL JOB ADS

    MOST IN-DEMAND ROLES: STATE BY STATE

  • GLOBAL WAR FOR TALENT

    HOW CHALLENGING IS IT TO FIND WORKERS WITH THE SKILLS NECESSARY TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS?

    WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES AFFECTING COMPANIES LIKE YOURS?

    EXTREMELYCHALLENGING

    ACCESS TO TALENT

    HEALTHCARE COSTS

    CYBERSECURITY

    CONSUMER PRIVACY

    CORPORATE TAXES

    INTERNATIONAL TRADE

    SOMEWHATCHALLENGING

    NOT VERY CHALLENGING9%

    62%

    29%63%

    44%

    40%

    33%

    22%

    22%

    Access to talent is not just an Australian concern. Digital technology is a relatively new field and a powerful force for economic growth, so talent is both limited in supply and highly sought after.

    Even in the US, which has the most mature technology sector and the strongest pool of talent available to it locally, sourcing the skills necessary for startups is a critical concern. Silicon Valley Bank’s 2019 US Startups Outlook report showed that right now talent is top of mind for US startup founders.2

    2 Silicon Valley Bank Startup US Startups Outlook 2019

    https://www.svb.com/globalassets/library/uploadedfiles/content/trends_and_insights/reports/startup_outlook_report/us/svb-suo-us-report-2019.pdf

  • DEMAND FROM OUTSIDE OF THE TECHNOLOGY SECTORIncreasing demand for technology skills outside of the tech sector has further exacerbated the high demand for talent from startups. While software has been busy eating the world, opportunity for mobile development, machine learning, smart hardware and all sorts of other modern innovation exists in many traditional industries.

    As an example, the World Economic Forum’s ‘Data Science in the New Economy’ looked at the difference in demand for data skills across sectors between 2013 and 2018. While ICT still has the highest demand for data roles in absolute terms, the financial services, non-profit and professional services sectors saw a greater increase in their respective demand and right across the economy use of data skills is growing.

    20182013

    INDUSTRY, PERCENTAGE GAIN IN DEMAND FOR DATA SKILLS3

    ICT, 59 %

    MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT, 50 %

    FIN. SERVICES & INVESTORS, 88 %

    PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, 69 %

    CHEM., ADV. MAT’LS. & BIOTECH, 83 %

    NON-PROFIT, 83 %

    CONSUMER, 50 %

    GOV’T. AND PUBLIC SECTOR, 67 %

    EDUCATION, 50 %

    MOBILITY, 0 %

    PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL WORKFORCE

    0.00% 0.7% 1.4% 2.1%

    3 WEF Data Science in the New Economy

    https://www.weforum.org/reports/data-science-in-the-new-economy-a-new-race-for-talent-in-the-fourth-industrial-revolution

  • INTERNATIONAL SKILL SUPPLY

    Australia must still target strong talent overseas. There’s no question that home grown talent is important to the medium-long term success of a startup ecosystem. Yet immigration plays an important role, as it offers short term relief of demand for skills and access to those with high levels of experience that are extremely rare in the local market.

    Nevertheless this is a sensitive political issue, so it’s worth asking if are we out of step with similar nations in terms of international recruiting.

    In the 2018 StartupAUS Startup Talent Gap report, we teamed up with LinkedIn to run some queries on its data. One of the questions we asked was what percentage of those working in startups were immigrants?

    Australia sits at roughly 6%, an average rate for peer nations. As one would expect, the more mature technology sectors like Israel and the US tend to require fewer international workers.

    GERMANY

    NEW ZEALAND

    SINGAPORE

    SWITZERLAND

    AUSTRALIA

    UNITED KINGDOM

    FINLAND

    ISRAEL

    UNITED STATES

    2.5% 5% 7.5%

  • AUSTRALIA’S GLOBAL TALENT VISA

    WHAT EMPLOYERS NEED TO DO:

    WHAT THE VISA APPLICANT NEEDS TO SHOW:

    BEST PARTS OF THE VISAAustralian startups looking for overseas talent have a new tool in their toolboxes. The Global Talent (Employer Sponsored) visa scheme is the most recent development for startups looking to recruit high value talent from overseas.

    GTES visas are designed to be faster and more flexible than the mainstream visa options, and all GTES visas are four year, permanent residency track visas - regardless of the position for which they are being hired.

    Startup founders interested in signing up to the Global Talent (Employer Sponsored) program can express their interest in doing so by emailing:

    [email protected]

    First you’ve got to demonstrate that you are genuine startup - a legitimate business in a digital or STEM field. Then you need to show that people coming in under the GTES will support job growth and skills transfer for Australians, and that you’re having trouble finding their skills locally.

    They need to meet certain visa requirements - things like health, character and security checks. They can’t be related to directors/shareholders of the business, and they need the qualifications and experience to back up their skills. You also need to be offering them a salary package of at least $80,000. That can include equity, but it’s got to have at least $53,900 in cash.

    The GTES is very flexible - you don’t need to have the occupation on an ANZCO list, and there are concessions around things like age restrictions and permanent residency. Finally, it’s fast - once you’re registered to the scheme and approved as a startup, your visa applications can be processed significantly faster than traditional routes.

    mailto:globaltalentscheme%40homeaffairs.gov.au?subject=Global%20Talent%20System%20expression%20of%20interest

  • COURSERA GLOBAL SKILLS INDEX

    TEC

    HN

    OLO

    GY CUT

    TIN

    G E

    DG

    E

    01. Argentina02. Czech Republic03. Austria04. Spain05. Poland06. Belarus07. Germany08. Sweden09. Belgium10. Finland11. Netherlands12. Hungary13. Norway14. Australia15. Switzerland

    100%98%97%95%93%92%90%88%86%85%83%81%80%78%76%

    COM

    PETI

    TIV

    E

    16. France17. New Zealand18. Russia19. Israel20. United Kingdom21. Italy22. Singapore23. United States24. Canada25. Denmark26. Portugal27. Costa Rica28. Ireland29. Hong Kong30. Brazil

    75%73%71%69%68%66%64%63%61%59%58%56%54%53%51%

    BUSI

    NES

    SC

    UTT

    ING

    ED

    GE

    01. Finland02. Switzerland03. Austria04. Netherlands05. Belgium06. New Zealand07. Germany08. Sweden09. Australia10. Canada11. Chile12. Denmark13. Norway14. United Kingdom15. Spain

    100%98%97%95%93%92%90%88%86%85%83%81%80%78%76%

    COM

    PETI

    TIV

    E

    16. Singapore17. France18. United States19. Israel20. Ireland21. Hong Kong22. Czech Republic23. Italy24. Portugal25. Argentina26. Hungary27. Poland28. Russia29. Costa Rica30. Colombia

    75%73%71%70%68%66%64%63%61%59%58%56%54%53%51%

    DAT

    A SC

    IEN

    CE CUT

    TIN

    G E

    DG

    E

    01. Israel02. Switzerland03. Belgium04. Austria05. Sweden06. Czech Republic07. Germany08. France09. United Kingdom10. Poland11. Finland12. Netherlands13. Hungary14. Canada15. Norway

    100%98%97%95%93%92%90%88%86%85%83%81%80%78%76%

    COM

    PETI

    TIV

    E

    16. United States17. Portugal18. Denmark19. New Zealand20. Singapore21. Australia22. Argentina23. Italy24. Hong Kong25. Russia26. Belarus27. Chile28. Spain29. Romania30. Ireland

    75%73%71%70%68%66%64%63%61%59%58%56%54%53%51%

    Despite the high demand for talent in Australia, our national skill level is performing solidly. Australia’s universities are given consistently high global ranks. Annual IT enrollments at our universities are 50% higher than a decade ago, reaching 36,335 in 2017.4

    Coursera’s Global Skills Index5 ranks Australia within the top 10 nations in business skills, falling slightly to 14th for technology and 21st for data.

    4 ACS Australia’s Digital Pulse 20195 Coursera Global Skills Index 2019

    https://www.acs.org.au/insightsandpublications/reports-publications/digital-pulse-2019.htmlhttps://www.coursera.org/gsi

  • THE TALENT OF STAYING RELEVANTExperience was once the mainstay of employment, now it’s relevance. Future skills expert Fiona Anson at the University of Technology Sydney discusses upskilling throughout your career and how to stay relevant in a world of change.

    Why is there an increasing emphasis on relevance over experience in careers?

    The future of work is changing every day. And especially in the startup sector, some roles are so new that how long someone has been doing the job can’t be the key metric anymore. Take for instance AI, natural language processing, machine learning, or cyber-security, longevity and experience isn’t something you can look for because these jobs haven’t existed for long enough.

    So how should new graduates and mid-career executives navigate a future of work landscape that is changing so fast?

    You could say the best defence is continued skills renewal. It’s about re-skilling and staying on top of what is current in your field. Change is leading the market in every area and employers are looking for how quickly you can adapt. You’ve got to stay on top of what’s going on right now, and especially for new graduates entering the workforce, their career is likely to switch track many times. They’ll be expected to seamlessly adapt

    to new technologies and techniques, or change professions as jobs are automated or possibly disappear.

    What roles do you see, especially in the startup sector, that might be in high demand now and might be threatened in the future?

    The number one is software developers, they are in really high demand right now. However, there’s a lot of work being done in artificial intelligence which could mean in the not too distant future you won’t need a developer, you’ll just tell the AI what you need and it will build the software. So while they’re in demand now, that’s a job down the track that we may see the demand for drop. Anything that can be automated is potentially under threat at the moment.

    So, if you are a software developer, what else should you be thinking about to stay relevant?

    One thing artificial intelligence can’t quite do is that real creative problem solving, so any up-skilling that focuses on solving problems in new ways is a great place to start. AI and automation is all about the rote work - things that can be repetitive. A software developer could think about moving sideways into software architecture or into a role requiring more critical thinking. They’re the roles that are growing in demand. To put it simply, it’s the jobs where you need to identify problems

    and think critically about how you’re going to solve them, not just what you’re going to do day-to-day, that will be in really high demand.

    How are universities such as UTS responding to offer smart and flexible options for anyone, at any time in their career, to up-skill or re-skill?

    UTS is already known for designing pioneering innovation and entrepreneurship degrees and for working side by side with industry. The startup ecosystem needs a pipeline to develop talent but also higher education partners to up-skill professionals throughout their career. This means universities need to adapt and offer new approaches to learning that are flexible and to personalise learning experiences. At UTS we talk about the importance of lifelong learning. That means offering a suite of new options from ‘stackable’ degrees to bite-sized microcredential courses to short courses. Think of it like a menu for ‘always on learning’. You can design learning to suit your needs or career path and to dip back into courses when you need to up-skill.

    Looking ahead, what advice do you have for startup founders about the talent they employ and nurture?

    Startups are all about change. They can disrupt something, change something or solve a problem. That’s an incredibly dynamic environment. At the end of the day, startups employ people, and people are looking for fulfilment. One of the ways they get fulfilment is by being challenged, and you can do that through learning opportunities. Startups need to embrace the commitment to helping their people continually learn. Career development opportunities attract talented staff. People also want to work in places that satisfy their curiosity and you do that by exposing people to learning and by encouraging people to learn.

    Fiona Anson leads Enterprise Learning at UTS Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    SPONSOR CONTENT

  • QUALIFICATIONS FOR THE FUTURE OF WORK UTS is known for its pipeline of highly talented students and graduates embedded in the startup ecosystem who live and breathe next generation businesses.

    The Master of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship (MBAe) at UTS is designed for entrepreneurs and innovators, and offers students a flexible and modular structure of study while developing their own entrepreneurial or innovation project. The integrated modules of the MBAe are also available as individual Graduate Certificates in Commercialisation, Entrepreneurship, and Venture Acceleration. Or, for anyone with any undergraduate degree who wants to spend a year developing a their own startup, UTS offers a unique one year Bachelor of Entrepreneurship (Honours).

    UTS also understands that gaining experience in organisations shaping the future of work can be transformative. Whether it’s through the Bachelor of Creative Intelligence (BCII) or the Diploma in Innovation or the UTS Startup Internship program, students are actively seeking experience within startups and scale-ups, and contributing to the change in the world they seek.

    STACKABLE AND PERSONALISED LEARNING

    New stackable degrees, microcredentials and short courses will allow you to design your learning to suit your needs.

    At UTS we want people to come to us with a problem in mind: be it a challenge for their organisation; or an issue needing technological disruption; or a global problem they want to address; and, then select or “stack” the curriculum that best helps them address it.

    In Autumn 2020, UTS will launch its first three stackable degrees: Master of Creative Intelligence and Strategic Innovation; Master of Technology; and Master of Professional Practice.

    GET CONNECTED

    entrepreneurship.uts.edu.au [email protected]

    @UTSInnovation

    SPONSOR CONTENT

  • TOP SKILLS OF IN DEMAND STARTUP ROLESA deeper look at LinkedIn profiles allows us to take aggregate global data for those performing key roles in startups and analyse the individual skills most common to each role.

    For those interested in the startup sector, investing in development of these skills, through traditional education or short course online work, may be a path towards increasing your value to startup founders.

    STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS

    SOLUTION SELLING STATISTICSTypeScript

    MANAGEMENT CONSULTING

    LEAD GENERATION RAngularJS

    BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION DIRECT SALES

    MACHINE LEARNINGRUBY ON RAILS

    BUSINESS ALLIANCES NEGOTIATION DATA MININGReact.JS

    P&L MANAGEMENT

    CONTRACT NEGOTIATION ALGORITHMSNode.JS

    PROGRAMME DELIVERY

    ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT LaTeXjQuery

    BUSINESS PROCESS RE-

    ENGINEERINGVDI MATLABASP.NET AJAX

    FINANCIAL PLANNING

    SALES PRESENTATIONS SASCodeIgniter

    BUSINESS STRATEGY COLD CALLING PYTHONPhoneGap

    SOLUTION SELLING

    MANAGED SERVICES

    COMPUTER SCIENCE

    MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT

    0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5

    CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER TOP SKILLS BY SKILL WEIGHT - 2017

    BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER TOP SKILLS BY SKILL WEIGHT - 2017

    FULL STACK ENGINEER TOP SKILLS BY SKILL WEIGHT - 2017

    DATA SCIENTISTTOP SKILLS BY SKILL WEIGHT - 2017

  • COURSERA 2019 GLOBAL TECH INDUSTRY ENROLMENTS

    BUSI

    NES

    S

    01. Design thinking02. Microsoft Excel03. Total quality management04. Logistics planning05. Business process mapping06. Transportation logistics07. Software production management08. Transportation management09. Logistics systems10. Systems thinking

    TEC

    HN

    OLO

    GY

    01. Apache Beam02. Cloud computing03. BigQuery04. Blockchain05. Dataflow06. Experience design07. Data structures08. SQL09. Web scraping10. Data model

    DAT

    A SC

    IEN

    CE

    01. Python02. Bigtable03. Data stream management system04. Support vector machine05. TensorFlow06. Artificial neural network07. Hyperparameter optimization08. Multi-task learning09. Word embedding10. Supervised learning

    For those already in the technology industry, short online courses offer the chance to add to their skillset. The following, from Coursera’s Global Skills Index report, shows the most popular enrolments for the technology sector in three areas for the platform.

    Python leading the data science categories suggests that R may be losing its dominance in the space. Trending topics in technology like cloud computing and blockchain gives and indication of where the sector is looking to develop now and in the coming years.

  • METHODOLOGYEmerging Technology: Talent Snapshot is a compilation of StartupAUS research and analysis, with bespoke data additions from Middle8 and Think & Grow.

    StartupAUS analysed the individual LinkedIn profiles of every staff member in 16 leading Australian scale-ups and verified the results with employee databases of two of the startups supplied directly. Our verification suggests that our analysis has an error margin of roughly 5% in total employees, with a proportional error rate across the categories.

    StartupAUS used data from Pitchbook to sum total funding raised in order to create the investment to employment scatter map and subsequent analysis, with employee numbers coming from publicly available LinkedIn data.

    Middle8 data is sourced from a proprietary list of jobs aggregator sites across Australia, using technology to read and analyse each post. Think & Grow’s data is supplied in advance of their upcoming Australian Startup Salary Guide 2019.

    We are grateful to the ACS, UTS, Middle8, Think & Grow, Coursera, LinkedIn, the World Economic Forum and Silicon Valley Bank for providing data cited in the report.

    We would also like to acknowledge Alexander Dellagiacoma, Suzy Myant and Qianqian Wang whose work analysing profiles and compiling records was instrumental to creating the original research shown the document.