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Engaging Highly Active Children in the Classroom Sensorimotor Strategies to Support Children and Teachers Cindy Clark MS, OTR/L, BCP, CIMI/L Sarah A. Prowak, MS, OTR/L

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  • Engaging Highly Active Children in

    the Classroom

    Sensorimotor Strategies to Support Children and Teachers

    Cindy Clark MS, OTR/L, BCP, CIMI/L

    Sarah A. Prowak, MS, OTR/L

  • Introduction

    ▪ All about you ▪ All about us ▪ What are your questions?

  • Agenda

    ▪ Definition of Sensory Processing ▪ Brain Development ▪ Sensory Input and Development ▪ Who is Highly Active? ▪ Classroom Observations ▪ Sensory Strategies ▪ Resources

  • Definition

    Sensory Processing is the way that our bodies receive input from our senses and create a reliable picture of the world, our place in the world, and how to interact with people and the world around us.

  • Sensory Processing

  • Developmental Perspective

    Touch Hearing Vestibular Taste

    Smell Vision Proprioception

  • Brain Structures

    ▪ Brainstem ▪ Limbic system

    ▪ Amygdala ▪ Hippocampus

    ▪ Cortex ▪ Autonomic

    nervous System

  • Touch

    ▪ Sensory receptors are in the skin ▪ Initially protective ▪ Important for bonding

  • Hearing

    ▪ Sensory receptors are in the ears ▪ Closely related to vestibular system ▪ Both protective and discriminatory

  • Vestibular

    ▪ Sensory receptors are in the inner ear

    ▪ Detect movement in all different directions

    ▪ Important for the development of balance and integration of primitive reflexes

  • Taste

    ▪ Salt, Sweet, Sour, Bitter

  • Proprioception

    ▪ Sensory receptors are in joints and muscles

    ▪ Important for the development of balance and body awareness

    ▪ Very organizing to the nervous system

  • Smell

    ▪ Goes directly to the limbic system

    ▪ Protective ▪ Strongly tied to

    emotions through production of oxytocin

  • Vision

    ▪ Peripheral vision is protective

    ▪ Central vision is discriminative

  • Developmental Perspective

    Self-regulation

    Touch Hearing Vestibular Taste

    Smell Vision Proprioception

  • Self-regulation

    Our internal process of attaining or maintaining body-mind balance in the face of external and environmental demands.

  • Developmental Perspective

    Attention Balance Body Awareness

    Eye Hand Coordination

    Self-regulation

    Touch Hearing Vestibular Taste

    Smell Vision Proprioception

  • Attention

    ▪ Alert ▪ Shift ▪ Maintain

  • Balance

    ▪ Requires ▪ Vision ▪ Vestibular ▪ Proprioception

  • Body Awareness

    ▪ Non-conscious ▪ Proprioception ▪ Awareness of

    midline ▪ Awareness of two

    sides of the body

  • Eye Hand Coordination

    ▪ Visual perceptual skills

    ▪ Rhythm and timing ▪ Spatial

    relationships

  • Developmental Perspective

  • Who is highly active?

    SPD

    ADHD ASD

    Highly Active

  • Sensory Needs Continuum

    TOO LOW

    JUST RIGHT

    TOO HIGH

  • Highly Active Infants/Toddlers May… ▪ Have difficulty consoling self; is unusually fussy ▪ Be slow to roll over, creep, sit, or stand ▪ Have difficulty tolerating being on his or her

    stomach ▪ Resist being held or becomes tense when

    held; dislikes being cuddled ▪ Be unable to settle down; has sleep difficulties ▪ Have difficulty sucking

  • Highly Active Preschoolers May… ▪ Be clumsy; fall frequently ▪ Have difficulty focusing attention or over-focuses

    and is unable to shift to the next task ▪ Overreact to touch, taste, sounds, or odors ▪ Seek out movement-based activities on

    playground ▪ Have difficulty transitioning from playground

    activities ▪ Have delayed language, fine motor, social

    development ▪ Demonstrate fleeting eye contact

  • Raising Self-Awareness ▪ Assess your own needs ▪ Recognizing and responding to childrens’

    needs ▪ Teaching children to recognize and

    respond to their own needs ▪ How does your engine run?

    ▪ HIGH ▪ JUST RIGHT ▪ LOW ** USE WITH ALL CHILDREN

  • Visual Supports

  • Circle Time ▪ Engine Check-In ▪ Great time for whole group activities: ▪ Egg rock/Puppy rock ▪ Weighted bean bag pass ▪ Sniff bottles ▪ Core activation ▪ Yoga picture cards

  • Transitions

    ▪ Visual cues ▪ Movements that challenge the

    body (stop and think) ▪ Animal walks ▪ Pulling/pushing or carrying

    heavy objects ▪ Make a mountain ▪ Cross crawls

  • Meal Time

    ▪ Assist in set-up/clean-up ▪ Preparing our bodies to eat: ▪ Waiting hands/twiddle thumbs ▪ Arm lengthening

  • Nap Time ▪ Environment ▪ Set a calming example ▪ Turning our bodies off

    to rest: ▪ Monster faces ▪ Deep belly breathing ▪ Spinal walking ▪ Jello eyeballs ▪ Visualization stories

  • Resources

    ▪ www.spdfoundation.net ▪ http://sensorysmarts.com/index.html ▪ www.brainrules.com ▪ www.movementbasedlearning.com/ ▪ www.superduperinc.com/ ▪ www.FunandFunction.com ▪ www.autismcommunitystore.com

  • Resources ▪ Kranowitz, C. S. (2006). The Out-of-

    Sync Child. New York: Perigee Books. ▪ Biel, L. & Peske, N. (2005). Raising a

    Sensory Smart Child. New York: Penguin Books.

    ▪ Brizendine, L. (2008) The Male Brain. New York: Broadway Books.

  • Resources ▪ Hong, A. (2010) little kids, BIG

    WORRIES. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing.

    ▪ Heller, S. (2002) too loud too bright too fast too tight. New York: Harper-Collins.

    ▪ Koester, C with Gail E. Dennison. (2010, 1998) I Am the Child: Using Brain Gym with Children Who Have Special Needs. Reno, NV: Movement Based Learning, Inc.

  • Thank You!

    Cindy Clark MS, OTR/L, BCP, CIMI/L Sarah A. Prowak, MS, OTR/L

    Amaryllis Therapy Network, Inc. 2680 18th St. Suite 150A

    Denver, CO 80211 303-433-0852

    www.AmaryllisTherapy.net

    Engaging Highly Active Children in the Classroom�IntroductionAgendaDefinitionSensory ProcessingDevelopmental PerspectiveBrain StructuresTouchHearingVestibularTasteProprioceptionSmellVisionDevelopmental PerspectiveSelf-regulationDevelopmental PerspectiveAttentionBalanceBody AwarenessEye Hand CoordinationDevelopmental PerspectiveWho is highly active?Sensory Needs ContinuumHighly Active�Infants/Toddlers May…Highly Active Preschoolers May…Raising Self-AwarenessVisual SupportsCircle TimeTransitionsMeal TimeNap TimeResourcesResourcesResourcesThank You!