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  • FACULTY OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

    Department of English and Language Studies

    GENERAL ENGLISH PROGRAMME

    General English General English and IELTS Preparation

  • STUDENT PROGRAMME HANDBOOK

    2013/2014 Map of Canterbury Christ Church University, North Holmes Campus ............. 4

    Welcome to Canterbury Christ Church University .......................................... 5

    Finding your way around the campus ................................................................................... 5 Lady Woottons Green ........................................................................................................... 5

    Your course .................................................................................................... 6

    Timetables .............................................................................................................................. 6 Example timetables................................................................................................................ 7 Levels and assessment criteria .............................................................................................. 8 Progression and changing your level ..................................................................................... 9 Changing your course dates ................................................................................................. 10 Attendance policy ................................................................................................................ 10 Tutorials ............................................................................................................................... 11 Mobile phones ..................................................................................................................... 11 Smoking, eating & drinking .................................................................................................. 11 Homework ............................................................................................................................ 11 Reports ................................................................................................................................. 11 Certificate of Attendance ..................................................................................................... 11 Security ................................................................................................................................ 11

    Learning outside the classroom ................................................................... 12

    Learning materials ............................................................................................................... 12 Dictionaries .......................................................................................................................... 12 Library .................................................................................................................................. 12 University Bookshop ............................................................................................................ 12 Computer Room ................................................................................................................... 12 E-mail & Computers ............................................................................................................. 12 CLIC Learn ............................................................................................................................. 12

    Examinations ............................................................................................... 13

    The IELTS Examination ......................................................................................................... 13 Other Examinations ............................................................................................................. 13

    University information to support your studies ........................................... 13

    International Student Advisor.............................................................................................. 13 Volunteering ........................................................................................................................ 14

  • 3

    i-zone .................................................................................................................................... 14 Student support ................................................................................................................... 14 Disabled students................................................................................................................. 15 Equality and diversity ........................................................................................................... 15 Students Union ................................................................................................................... 15 Future study and employment ............................................................................................ 15 Dealing with bullying and harassment ................................................................................. 15 Misconduct and disciplinary procedures ............................................................................. 16

    In the Event of a Fire General Evacuation Procedures ......... 16

    Have your say .............................................................................................. 17

    Student-Staff Liaison policy ................................................................................................. 17 Feedback at the beginning of the course ............................................................................ 17 End-of-course questionnaires .............................................................................................. 17 Comments and complaints .................................................................................................. 17

    Going Home? What can you do to continue learning English? ..................... 18

    Sample Student Report page 1 ..................................................................... 19

    Sample Student Report page 2 ..................................................................... 20

    Sample Student Tutorial form ...................................................................... 21

    Who to contact if you need help or advice about.. .................................... 22

    Student Charter Map of Canterbury Christ Church University, North Holmes Campus

  • 4

  • 5

    Welcome to Canterbury Christ Church University Canterbury Christ Church University is renowned for academic excellence, a warm welcoming atmosphere and a strong community spirit. The University is modern and friendly and has a wide range of taught programmes. The main Campus is situated close to the city centre and is about 60 miles from London, with easy access to Paris, Amsterdam and the continent via Eurostar or ferry.

    Finding your way around the campus

    Key to Teaching Buildings and Levels

    BUILDINGS LEVELS ROOM NUMBERS

    E = ERASMUS g = ground floor 01-40 H = HEPWORTH f = first floor I = INVICTA s = second floor J = JOHNSON t = third floor L = LAUD M = MOORE O = OLD SESSIONS HOUSE N = NEWTON P = POWELL R = RAMSEY W = LADY WOOTTONS GREEN

    Lady Woottons Green Our dedicated English language teaching centre complete with students common room and computer facilities is located next to the main campus, giving students easy access to all the study, sports and leisure facilities of the University and right in the centre of the historic city of Canterbury.

  • 6

    Your course Courses available under the General English Programme are General English (21hrs) and General English with IELTS Preparation (21hrs).

    Timetables Morning classes focus mainly on English language structures and accuracy, including grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary, with classes also focusing on putting your English skills to use, for example by giving presentations, writing blogs or investigating English-speaking cultures. Afternoon lessons are directed toward the separate language skills of Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening.

    09:00 -11:00 CORE LANGUAGE lessons These lessons are coursebook-led classes that communicatively teach grammar points and practise them for accuracy. Your teacher for this class will also be your personal tutor and will be your first point of contact if you want to discuss your learning. You will be set homework every day in this lesson.

    11:30-12:30 TOPIC-BASED LANGUAGE lessons These lessons will develop your confidence by using your expanding English knowledge to produce work in all the skills and will include the use of technology and university provided facilities. The classes will cover many different topics: sometimes you may have a DVD, or work with newspapers. You might also work on a project, which means finding information yourself. You will also usually be asked to give a presentation, which is a short talk to the class on a topic. This class is usually with your second teacher. You may also have homework from this class.

    13:30-15:00 (14:00-15:30 Summertime) LANGUAGE SKILLS lessons These lessons focus on the individual language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. You will be mixing with students from other classes of a similar level, and may have a choice of topics if you are on the General English course. Topics taught in these classes are chosen by the teacher and students together, so you can ask your teacher what you would like to learn about. Examples in the past have included topics such as: Business English; Film and Media; Pronunciation; Everyday Situational English; Current Affairs; and Communication Games.

    If you are on the General English with IELTS preparation course the lessons will focus on the four separate exam sections providing both preparation in exam skills and exam practice.

  • 7

    Example timetables Intensive General English (21hrs) and General English with IELTS preparation (21hrs) are shown below:

    General English example timetable - Intensive 21 hrs Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

    09:00 Integrated language skills with coursebook 11:00

    Break 11:30 Language skills in use 12:30 e.g. presentations, social diaries, blogs and English-speaking cultures

    Lunch 13:30 Vocabulary

    and reading Grammar and writing

    Listening to media

    Conversation/pronunciation

    self-study session 15:00

    General English with IELTS Preparation example timetable - Intensive 21 hrs Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

    09:00 Integrated language skills with coursebook 11:00

    Break 11:30 Language skills in use 12:30 e.g. presentations, social diaries, blogs and English-speaking cultures

    Lunch 13:30 IELTS reading

    Preparation IELTS writing Preparation

    IELTS listening Preparation

    IELTS speaking Preparation

    self-study session 15:00

  • 8

    Levels and assessment criteria When you arrive, you will take a placement test and be put into a class with other students of the same level of English. The level for each class depends on students overall English ability, as described below:

    Level Council of

    Europe Framework

    Assessment criteria

    Generally handles complex language well, and understands detailed reasoning.

    Can organise information and idea logically in speaking and in writing, spontaneously and precisely, using language flexibly and effectively for a wide range of purposes.

    Can understand and summarise information from a wide variety of English, including both colloquial language and abstract discussions. Can recognise implicit meaning, and interpret critically relatively demanding material

    Advanced C

    Has generally effective command of English, coping with overall meaning and some complex language in most situations. Arranges information and ideas coherently, and has a wide enough vocabulary to discuss both concrete and abstract topics at length and to make meaning clear. Uses a mix of simple and complex structures, rarely producing mistakes which lead to misunderstanding. Pronunciation is clearly intelligible, even if a foreign accent is sometimes evident.

    Can understand the main ideas of complex speech and written texts, even on abstract topics, including technical discussions in his / her field of expertise.

    Upper intermediate

    B2

    Can sustain a conversation competently on familiar topics, and convey basic meaning on unfamiliar topics. Can describe experiences and events, and briefly explain plans and opinions. Pronunciation is generally clear enough to be understood. Can produce connected texts with some organisation, using a limited range of vocabulary and some attempts at complex sentences. Errors occur, but it is generally clear what he / she is trying to express.

    Can understand the main points of spoken and written language regularly encountered at work, school, leisure etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where English is spoken.

    Intermediate B1

    Can convey personal information, and communicate in routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange on familiar matters. Can describe aspects of his / her background and environment, and needs of a concrete kind. Shows some control of word formation and spelling.

    Can understand straightforward factual information about common everyday or job related topics, identifying both the general message and specific details, provided speech is clearly articulated in a familiar accent. Is able to grasp the gist of a simple text, and to answer questions on the content.

    Pre-intermediate A2

  • 9

    Progression and changing your level During your stay, if your class level stays the same, this does not mean that you are not making progress! Within each level, students who work hard and practise always improve their English. Students make progress at different rates depending on their motivation, attendance and effort in class, and general attitude towards their studies inside and outside of the classroom. There is no time-scale to mark progress so you will not automatically move up a level after a certain time spent at one level.

    If you feel that you should move into a different class level, please look at the following flow-chart which describes the procedure for changing class level.

    Speak to your tutor - after a discussion and if your tutor

    agrees with you...

    you will be invited to an appointment

    with the Programme Director

    The PD will set you some language tasks to help to determine whether you

    are at a higher level than your current class

    The tasks may include extra written work, a

    grammar test and 100% effort and attendance for

    a week

    If the tasks are successfully

    completed you may be placed in a new

    class

    Speak to your tutor - after a discussion and if your tutor

    agrees with you...

    you will be invited to an appointment

    with the Programme Director

    The PD will talk to you about your level

    and language learning experience

    If you both agree you will be placed in a new class

    Moving up a level

    Moving down or across a level

  • 10

    Changing your course dates If you want to change your programme, take a break from your studies, extend your stay or leave early, you should contact the International Office. This is especially important if you are a non-European Economic Area (non-EEA) student with a Tier 4 visa.

    Attendance policy Attendance at classes at the University is compulsory. Students are required to attend all classes that you are enrolled on. If you are going to be absent from class, you must email the teacher of the class that you are going to miss to explain why you will be absent. If you are unwell you must also email the teacher of the class that you will miss due to sickness to tell them. Your emails are then attached to the school register as a record. If you do not email, you will be noted as absent and you attendance record will be affected.

    Students should arrive on time for classes. Late arrival causes disruption to other class members and is unfair to the teacher. This is particularly important in the mornings as the lessons start at 9:00. If you come to class more than ten minutes late, the teacher may not let you in and you will have to wait to join the next lesson at 11:30.

    If you frequently miss classes, the Programme Director will contact you to ask why you have been absent, and to invite you to discuss any problems you might be having. You may also be referred to a Student Support and Advice Officer who will then contact you and ask to see you.

    If you are frequently absent or late to class, this is recorded on your Student Report and Tutorial Record. If your attendance falls below 80%, you will not receive a Certificate.

    If you are a non-European Economic Area (non-EEA) student with a Tier 4 visa, and you miss classes for ten days in a row (consecutively), the University has a legal duty to report you to the UK Border Agency (UKBA). The University will have to report you to the UKBA, even if you interact with the University after this point. The University has no choice in this, it is the law.

    The University will also report you to the UKBA if it has information that you are breaching the conditions of your visa. If you are reported to the UKBA, this will have serious implications for your immigration status and your ability to remain in the UK. Being reported to the UKBA in this way will lead to the students automatic withdrawal from their programme and a withdrawal of the Universitys support for the students visa.

    Advice and support for students concerning visas and other matters is available from the International Student Adviser, Laura Spencer: [email protected], 01227 782675.

  • 11

    Tutorials Tutorials with your tutor happen once at the start of each term, and once towards the end of each term. Your personal tutor is your teacher in the 9:00-11:00 classes. Each tutorial will last about 10-15 minutes and during this appointment you and your tutor will discuss your learning experience and progress while completing a Tutorial Record.

    This is designed to encourage your self-reflection and awareness of your learning experience and to encourage you to take an active role in your own learning.

    It is also a chance for you to speak individually and confidentially to the teacher and establish an individualised learning plan based on your learning motivation and objectives.

    Mobile phones If you have a mobile phone, please turn it off during lessons. If you rely on your handset for a dictionary, please ask permission to use it in class from your teacher. If you are found to be using it in class for anything else you will be asked to turn it off during lessons, and not permitted to use it again in class.

    Smoking, eating & drinking There is a no smoking policy throughout the university. Students should not eat or drink (except water) during lessons.

    Homework Your teachers will give you homework to do after class. This will help you with the work you do in class. Please ask your teachers if you want to do extra homework, and they will provide additional work for your self-study sessions and free time.

    Reports At the end of term, or when you leave you will receive a report written by your teachers. An example report can be found at the back of this handbook, it is a two-page document which you can show to your university or sponsor.

    Certificate of Attendance At the end of your course, you will receive a certificate from the university which details the period of time you have spent studying with us and the level at which you studied in your main class. You will only receive a certificate if your attendance is above 80%.

    Security Please be careful with your bags and valuable items like mobile phones and cameras. Always take them with you when you are on the university campus and keep them secure when you are in the city. Please be careful with your bags and valuable items like mobile phones and cameras. Always take them with you when you are on the university campus and keep them secure when you are in the city.

  • 12

    Learning outside the classroom

    Learning materials For morning classes, learning materials are included in the price of your course. These may be either a coursebook or worksheets. For afternoon classes, books may be loaned to you. Please do not write in them. You must give them back at the end of the course. If you lose or damage a book, you must pay for it.

    Dictionaries It will be very useful for you to buy a medium sized English to English (monolingual) dictionary. You may find that electronic translators become less useful as your level improves, because direct translations are not always accurate at higher levels.

    Library You can study privately in the library in Augustine House. English-language books and readers are available to borrow. You will need your student card, which you receive from the International Office.

    You can find more information about the library here: www.canterbury.ac.uk/library

    University Bookshop

    The University Bookshop can supply recommended textbooks, coursebooks, self-study books and dictionaries, often at a discount.

    For more information see: www.canterbury.ac.uk/bookshop

    Computer Room Lady Woottons Green has a Computer Room, downstairs opposite the Student Common Room, which is open during the day. There are also books available for you to read, and films for you to borrow. Please ask a teacher if you need any help.

    E-mail & Computers In addition to the Computer Room in Lady Woottons Green, there are other Open Access computer rooms on the university campus and in the library. There is a map of student computer rooms on the wall next to Touchdown caf.

    CLIC Learn is the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) at Canterbury Christ Church University. It is one of the key systems you will be expected to use to support your studies. It provides access to information and learning materials specific to your programme, plus a means of communicating with tutors and other learners through e-mail groups and discussion boards. You will be shown how to access your particular programme from within CLIC Learn and how to use it by your programme staff. You can access CLIC Learn via CLIC http://clic.canterbury.ac.uk

    http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/libraryhttp://www.canterbury.ac.uk/bookshophttp://www.canterbury.ac.uk/bookshophttp://clic.canterbury.ac.uk/

  • 13

    Examinations

    The IELTS Examination

    IELTS examination scores You can ask your teacher for an estimated IELTS score for the skills of Speaking, Writing, Listening and Reading. However, this is an estimate, and does not guarantee that you will get any particular score if you take the examination.

    If you have taken the IELTS examination (or any other examination) already, and have official scores, we will take these scores into account when deciding on your class. However we will also take account of other evidence, including the placement test, your homework and the work you do in class.

    Taking the IELTS examination We offer a preparation course for the IELTS examination, but do not provide or organise for you to take the examination. There is a centre in Canterbury at Chaucer College and it is also possible to take the examination in London or in other places in the UK. To apply for an IELTS exam you need to decide on where and what month you want to take the examination then apply and pay online at http://www.ielts.org. This website will also tell you the current price for the IELTS exam.

    Other Examinations There are other EFL exams which are widely recognised and may be useful to you. Please ask your teacher or the Programme Director if you are interested in taking any of these, and they will provide you with advice and self-study materials. The most common are the Preliminary English Test (PET), First Certificate in English (FCE), Certificate in Advanced English (CAE), Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) and Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE).

    University information to support your studies This section of the handbook contains some important policies, procedures and guidance information that apply to all students studying on Canterbury Christ Church University programmes.

    International Student Advisor Laura Spencer is our International Student Advisor. Laura is able to offer advice and guidance on immigration and welfare matters, for example:

    http://www.ielts.org/

  • 14

    Immigration procedures for entry to the UK as a student.

    How to your renew your student visa.

    Important things to do on arrival in the UK.

    Opening a UK bank account.

    Travelling abroad during your studies.

    Healthcare.

    Working during your studies.

    Lost passports and ID cards.

    Police Registration procedures.

    Money problems.

    Volunteering To make the most of your time here why not become a volunteer and have your hard work accredited by us so you will have official certification of your activities, and something valuable to add to your CV. The amount and type of volunteering you can do will depend on your visa regulations and type, and also your language level. However, this is a valuable experience as it will involve contact and communication with many native speakers. There is a Volunteering Drop-In on Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:00-13:00 at Augustine House, in the Atrium caf where you can meet Judy Challis, the Volunteering Co-ordinator and find out how you can get involved. [email protected] Tel: 01227 782409

    [email protected]

    i-zone The i-zone is the first place that that students can go to, to make any enquiries about University services and it is the first point of contact for students needing help and advice. There is an i-zone desk opposite Touchdown caf in Laud, and the main i-zone desk is on the ground floor of the library, Augustine House. Where the i-zone cant answer your query immediately, they will ask our various professional service staff who will respond directly to you. For any enquiry about any of our services use the online ask the i-zone facility which can be accessed by registered students through CLIC, email [email protected] or telephone 01227 782222.

    Student support Ensure you get appropriate help and support, if you require it, to make the most of your time at Canterbury Christ Church University. We offer counselling, study skills and IT training, financial information, advice for international students and general welfare support. Find out more about our range of services and how to access them from www.canterbury.ac.uk/student-support

    mailto:[email protected]:[email protected]://www.canterbury.ac.uk/student-supporthttp://www.facebook.com/

  • 15

    Disabled students If you have a disability that may affect your ability to study, the Universitys Student Support Services can provide help to organise the support you need, and advice on how to make the most of the services available to you. The range of disabilities we support includes invisible disabilities such as dyslexia or depression, as well as those that are visible, such as a mobility difficulty. More information is available from the links at: www.canterbury.ac.uk/disability

    Equality and diversity The University is committed to providing a fair environment in which everyone is treated with dignity and respect. We take a proactive approach to promoting equality and are committed to a range of actions intended to create a welcoming and positive environment for all students, staff and stakeholders. The Equality and Diversity Unit represents and supports students, Home and International, as well as staff. We work closely with Christ Church Students' Union and Student Support and Guidance to promote equality and diversity. For more information or to get involved visit: www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/equality

    Students Union Christ Church Students Union (CCSU) is a charitable organisation and is independent of the University. It is here to represent all students - if you are a student here, you are automatically a member. You can get involved with the

    SU very easily by simply being part of a sports club, society or volunteer group. If you would like to get more involved then there are various different ways of doing so. You could become a Student Representative for your programme or help run a club or society. You could also stand for a position on Union Council and help make decisions about the organisation of the SU, also any student can stand to be elected as a Sabbatical Officer. The Student Union has its own Facebook account at www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=793105191 or you can follow it on twitter: @christchurchsu for more regular updates. For more information on the Students Union please go to http://ccsu.co.uk/

    Future study and employment You can visit www.canterbury.ac.uk/careers for advice and guidance on employment, and about further study in the UK. There are also drop in sessions, when you can visit and ask for advice, in the careers information area on the ground floor of Augustine House, opposite the Atrium cafe, every Monday to Friday 1-5pm.

    Dealing with bullying and harassment Bullying and harassment are behaviour which makes you feel frightened, upset or humiliated. The university takes such behaviour very seriously. If you feel that you have a problem with bullying or harassment, you should speak to a member of staff. You can also find information here: www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/bullying

    http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/disabilityhttp://www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/equalityhttp://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=793105191http://ccsu.co.uk/http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/careershttp://www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/bullying

  • 16

    Misconduct and disciplinary procedures All students at Canterbury Christ Church University are expected to follow the rules of the university, and to respect the rights and privacy of other students and staff. Misconduct is behaviour which damages the university or which interferes with proper university activities or with other students study. If a student does any of these things, he or she will be invited to talk to the Programme Director and may be given a warning. Examples of misconduct include obstructing university activities; violent, threatening or offensive behaviour or language (including emails); dangerous or damaging behaviour; possession or misuse of illegal drugs. In a serious case, the students behaviour will be investigated following university procedures (www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/student-procedures), and there may be a penalty, e.g. a fine, or the student may be required to leave their course of study.

    In the Event of a Fire General Evacuation Procedures

    What to do if you discover a fire 1. Sound the nearest fire alarm. 2. Only attempt to tackle a fire if you have been trained in the use of fire extinguishers and you feel confident to do so. Remember University policy is that you do not take personal risks. This is best summed up by the maxim In the event of a fire, get out and stay out! 3. Leave the building immediately and report to the assembly point. 4. Tell the person in charge what has happened.

    What to do if your hear the fire alarm sounding 1. Always assume there is a fire somewhere in the building! 2. Immediately commence evacuating the building. 3. Warn others in the vicinity if safe to do so, but do not delay! 4. Where possible close doors behind you (if you are the last to leave). 5. Report to the assembly point. 6. Do not re-enter the building until told to do so by a Responsible person such as a University Fire or Evacuation Marshal.

    When in an unfamiliar building on arrival do the following 1. Consult the Fire Action Notices which will be found at various locations such as at exits, in corridors, at doors leading to staircases and at fire alarm call points. 2. Locate the nearest fire alarm call point. 3. Identify your nearest means of escape along with any alternative escape route If in doubt follow the green fire exit signage to a place of safety outside the building. 4. If staying in University Accommodation read the fire plan on the rear of the bedroom door (or located adjacent to it). 5. Make yourself aware of the location of the assembly point.

    The assembly point for Lady Woottons Green is the car park at the back of the building.

    http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/student-procedures

  • 17

    Advice on all aspects of fire prevention may be obtained from the University Fire Safety Advisor, Lloyd Morgan extension 2873, email [email protected] .

    Have your say

    Student-Staff Liaison policy The University is keen to hear your views on your programme of study and programme delivery, and one of the ways this happens is through Student-Staff Liaison Meetings. Meetings normally take place once per term, and provide a chance for you to give feedback, to help staff to improve the quality of the student experience. Student representatives are elected to attend these meetings, to raise the views of fellow students and report back to their classmates. Matters relating to individual students are not discussed at Student-Staff Liaison Meetings. The full policy is here: www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/sslm

    Feedback at the beginning of the course After you have been with us for week we will check that everything is ok, and that you are comfortable and happy here in your new environment. Telling us about your arrival and how you feel at the start of your course is very important as it helps us to make you feel welcome and make sure there are no problems.

    End-of-course questionnaires At the end of your course you will be asked to complete a questionnaire so you can tell us about your experience studying here with us. You will be asked about your studies, your accommodation and your activities at the university. What you think about your experience is very important to us, as it helps us improve the student experience!

    Comments and complaints If you are unhappy about your experience or are dissatisfied about any aspect of the Universitys work, then it is important that we know about it.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please talk to your class teacher, the Programme Director, or someone at the International Office. If your concerns are not resolved informally then there are formal procedures, which are described here: www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/student-procedures. You can also make a complaint to the British Council: http://www.britishcouncil.org/accreditation-students-complaints.htm

    mailto:[email protected]://www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/sslmhttp://www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/student-procedureshttp://www.canterbury.ac.uk/handbook/student-procedureshttp://www.britishcouncil.org/accreditation-students-complaints.htm

  • 18

    Going Home? What can you do to continue learning English? When you go home it is very easy to forget the English you have learned. Here are some suggestions to help you keep the level of English you have now.

    Using the media: Watch videos in English and English films. Read internet sites about things that interest you. Look on English language web-sites for students, for example: www.flo-joe.co.uk (preparation for Cambridge ESOL examinations). www.learnenglish.org.uk (British Councils web-site for British Council students). Get an app for English language study for your mobile phone. Buy an English newspaper. Listen to BBC radio online. Buy some self-study CD-ROMs, for example: Murphys Essential Grammar in Use. E-mail your friends in English. Get an English magazine about something that interests you.

    Using institutions and other people: Study at a college or school in your town and set yourself the goal of an examination See if there is an English club and if there is, join it. Get together with a couple of friends for an English hour every week. Only speak English

    and perhaps set yourselves some homework. Find an English speaker in your town/city and have some conversation practice, perhaps

    you can exchange lessons - half in English and half in your language.

    Using English all around you: Read the labels on products you buy in the supermarket or the chemist. Read any parts of brochures in English Listen to English songs. Read the words on CDs. Visit any English bookshop you might have in your town.

    By yourself: Always have an English book, maybe some short stories or a childrens book, to read. Write your shopping list in English Describe the scene around you in English in your head Keep a diary in English.

    Remember it is better to spend ten minutes practising everyday than one hour every month.

    http://www.flo-joe.co.uk/http://www.learnenglish.org.uk/

  • 19

    Sample Student Report page 1 Student Id First

    Name Surname Programme Title Attendance

    SUR0000000 Sample Student General English with IELTS Preparation / General English

    %

    General report written by teachers covering language skills, attitude and level.

    Interim/ Final report compiled by

    Job Title Signature

    A Teacher EFL Lecturer

  • 20

    Sample Student Report page 2

    Level Council of

    Europe Framework

    Speaking

    Can speak at length without noticeable effort or loss of coherence, spontaneously and precisely, with little obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes, drawing on a variety of complex grammatical structures and a range of appropriate communication strategies.

    Advanced C

    Has a wide enough vocabulary to discuss both concrete and abstract topics at length and to make meaning clear. Uses a mix of simple and complex structures, not always accurately but rarely producing mistakes which lead to misunderstanding. Pronunciation is clearly intelligible, even if a foreign accent is sometimes evident.

    Upper intermediate B2

    Can sustain a conversation on familiar topics, and to convey basic meaning on unfamiliar topics. Can communicate

    in everyday situations reasonably fluently, using a narrow range of sentence structures. Can describe experiences and events, and briefly explain plans and opinions. Pronunciation is generally clear enough to be understood.

    Intermediate B1

    Can convey personal information, and communicate in routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange on familiar matters. Can describe aspects of his / her background and environment, and needs of a concrete kind. Pronunciation can be understood with some effort by listeners used to speakers of his / her language group.

    Pre-intermediate A2

    Writing

    Can use written English flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can organise information and ideas logically, and uses a variety of complex structures with good control and sufficient range of vocabulary to allow some flexibility and precision.

    Advanced C

    Can produce clear, detailed texts on a wide range of subjects, using an adequate range of vocabulary for the task. Arranges information and ideas coherently. Is generally accurate, and uses some complex sentence structures. Rarely makes mistakes which lead to misunderstanding.

    Upper intermediate B2

    Can produce connected texts with some organisation, and on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.

    Uses a limited range of vocabulary. Structures can tend to be repetitive, with some attempts at complex sentences. Errors occur, but it is generally clear what he / she is trying to express.

    Intermediate B1

    Can write straightforward connected texts on familiar subjects, drawing on a very limited range of structures and expressions. Shows some control of word formation and spelling. Pre-intermediate A2

    Listening

    Can understand a wide variety of English, including both colloquial language and abstract discussions. Can recognise implicit meaning, and can summarise information from different spoken sources. Advanced C

    Can understand the main ideas of complex speech, even on abstract topics, including technical discussions in his / her field of expertise. Upper intermediate B2

    Can understand the main points of spoken language regularly encountered at work, school, leisure etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where English is spoken. Intermediate B1

    Can understand straightforward factual information about common everyday or job related topics, identifying both the general message and specific details, provided speech is clearly articulated in a familiar accent. Pre-intermediate A2

    Reading

    Can summarise information from a range of written sources, including literary and non-literary texts. Can understand and interpret critically relatively demanding material, and recognise implicit meaning. Advanced C

    Can understand the main ideas of complex texts, even on abstract topics, including technical discussions in his / her field of expertise. Upper intermediate B2

    Can understand the main points of written language regularly encountered at work, school, leisure etc. Intermediate B1

    Is able to grasp the gist of a simple text, and to answer questions on the content. Pre-intermediate A2

  • Sample Student Tutorial form

    Department of English and Language Studies

    General English Programmes

    Student Tutorial Form

    Student Name: A Student Student ID: SUR00000000 Tutorial No: 00

    Date: **/**/** Tutor: A Lecturer Class level:

    Review of Lessons

    Core Lessons 9:00-11:00 Students comments Teachers assessment and comments Punctuality and Attendance Are you late? Have you missed any?

    Effort and Attitude Are you active in class?

    Extension and consolidation What extra activities do you do?

    Individual Learning Plan: Aims and Suggestions

    Short report of conversation and other points raised during the tutorial

    Student's signature: Teacher's signature:

    Topic Lessons 11:30-12:30 Students comments Teachers Assessment and comments Punctuality and Attendance Are you late? Have you missed any?

    Effort and Attitude Are you active in class?

    Extension and consolidation What extra activities do you do?

    Skills Lessons 13:30-15:00 Students comments Teachers Assessment and comments Punctuality and Attendance Are you late? Have you missed any?

    Effort and Attitude Are you active in class?

    Extension and consolidation What extra activities do you do?

    Skill focus Students comments Teachers suggestions Reading Writing Listening Speaking

  • 22

    Who to contact if you need help or advice about..

    your language lessons

    Speak to your class teacher, or email them or the Programme Director

    [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] 01227 782437 (internal 2437)

    paying fees contact the International Office [email protected] 01227 782473 (internal 2473)

    your visa contact the International Student Advisor or the International Office

    [email protected] 01227 782675 (internal 2675) [email protected] 01227 782473 (internal 2473)

    police registration

    contact the International Office [email protected] 01227 782473 (internal 2473)

    accommodation contact Anne Loveridge or Amanda Browne in the Accommodation Office

    [email protected] 01227 782677 (internal 2677) [email protected] [email protected]ury.ac.uk

    banking contact the International Office [email protected] 01227 782473 (internal 2473)

    health services contact the International Student Advisor or the International Office

    [email protected] 01227 782675 (internal 2675) [email protected] 01227 782473 (internal 2473)

    future studies at CCCU

    contact the International Office or the Programme Director

    [email protected] 01227 782473 (internal 2473) [email protected] 01227 782437 (internal 2437)

    volunteering contact Judy Challis by e-mail or through the i-zone by telephone

    [email protected] 01227 782409 (internal 2409) [email protected]

    emotional or mental health

    speak to your class teacher, the Programme Director or contact the student support service at CCCU directly

    Teachers emails above or [email protected] or [email protected] 01227 863056 (internal 3056)

    computer services

    contact the i-zone [email protected] 01227 782222 (internal 2222)

    library services contact Library Services [email protected] 01227 782222 (internal 2222)

    buying books contact the bookshop [email protected] 2256

    mailto:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]

  • 23

    in an emergency or for medical first aid

    999 Police/ fire /ambulance Need them NOW (9999 on internal phone) 112 Police/ fire/ ambulance Need them quickly

    01227 782111 for CCCU response in Lady Woottons Green or on the main campus (2111 on internal phone) 01227 782125 for CCCU response in Augustine House (2125 on internal phone)

    Student CharterMap of Canterbury Christ Church University, North Holmes CampusWelcome to Canterbury Christ Church UniversityFinding your way around the campusKey to Teaching Buildings and Levels

    Lady Woottons Green

    Your courseTimetables09:00 -11:00 CORE LANGUAGE lessons11:30-12:30 TOPIC-BASED LANGUAGE lessons13:30-15:00 (14:00-15:30 Summertime) LANGUAGE SKILLS lessons

    Example timetablesLevels and assessment criteriaProgression and changing your levelChanging your course datesAttendance policyTutorialsMobile phonesSmoking, eating & drinkingHomeworkReportsCertificate of AttendanceSecurity

    Learning outside the classroomLearning materialsDictionariesLibraryComputer RoomE-mail & Computers

    ExaminationsThe IELTS ExaminationIELTS examination scoresTaking the IELTS examination

    Other Examinations

    University information to support your studiesInternational Student AdvisorVolunteeringi-zoneStudent supportDisabled studentsEquality and diversityStudents UnionFuture study and employmentDealing with bullying and harassmentMisconduct and disciplinary procedures

    In the Event of a Fire General Evacuation ProceduresWhat to do if you discover a fireWhat to do if your hear the fire alarm soundingWhen in an unfamiliar building on arrival do the following

    Have your sayStudent-Staff Liaison policyFeedback at the beginning of the courseEnd-of-course questionnairesComments and complaints

    Going Home? What can you do to continue learning English?Using the media:Using institutions and other people:Using English all around you:By yourself:

    Sample Student Report page 1Sample Student Report page 2Sample Student Tutorial form