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  • Vol. 128 No. 33 PHONE (912) 529-6624 Serving Montgomery County Since 1886 FAX (912) 529-5399 $1 Dollar May 27, 2015

    The MonTgoMery MoniTor

    The Montgomery Coun-ty Sheriff’s Office andEmergency ManagementAgency (EMA) will be host-ing a multi-agency full-scale response exercise inMt. Vernon on May 30 be-ginning at 9 a.m.

    This exercise will bebased on real events thathave occurred within thecounty and will utilizeevery unit responding tothe scene. This exercise isdesigned to: assess countycapabilities, plans, poli-cies and procedures; focuson decision-making, coor-dination, and integrationwith other response agen-cies during a large scaleevent; and identify addi-tional equipment andtraining needs for emer-

    gency responding agen-cies.

    “The Sheriff and I areexcited to host the eventfor emergency respon-ders,” said EMA DirectorAndy Leanza. “There hasbeen some really great co-ordination between agen-cies involved with theplanning and we look for-ward to training again inthe future.”

    It will be separated intothree separate 40 minuteexercises which will bebroken down by fire dis-trict and will include re-sponse scenarios for allemergency service agen-cies within the county, aswell as the MontgomeryCounty Board of Educa-tion.

    According to Leanza,this event will be the firstof the new county exerciseprogram, which will begeared to mitigating thespecific hazards identifiedin our county. It will notalways be a vehicle acci-dent. They plan to havebrush fire training, weath-er hazard response andwater rescue to name afew.

    “It is great to work withthis fantastic group of re-sponders,” Sheriff LadsonO’Conner said. “Mont-gomery has been know forhow dedicated our volun-teers are, and I am gladwe can all come togetherand train and learn to-gether. I look forward toworking with our respon-

    ders in the future in ournext events.”

    Lunch will be providedby Montgomery CountySheriff Ladson O’Connor.

    Any donations receivedwill go straight to the Vol-unteer Fire Departments.

    For those wanting toview this exercise, theyshould bring coolers, tow-els to cool down with,fans, safety equipment,cameras and any pop upshelters or tents.

    When to arrive: 7 a.m.Arrival of Staff and plan-ners; 7:30-8 Arrival ofParticipants and Sign in;8:15 Gates Open to View-ers; 8:30 Pre-op briefing; 9First Exercise.

    The event will takeplace at Mount Vernon

    Auto’s tow yard on Hwy.221 N. in Mt. Vernon, justnorth of Flash Foods onthe left.

    Parking of Emergency

    equipment will be stagedon scene.

    Viewer parking will belocated at T Birds acrossthe Street.

    Montgomery County agencies to participate inFull Scale Live Action Response Exercise

    Farewell MCHS Class of 2015

    On Friday evening, fami-

    ly and friends filled

    Brogdon Field as they

    watched the Mont-

    gomery County High

    School class of 2015 re-

    ceive their diplomas and

    become high school

    graduates. See more

    photos on 5a. (Photos by

    Jonathon Finley)

    Lobby of new MercerUniversity TattnallSquare Center for theArts named in honor ofCelia JoAnn Brewer

    MACON – Mercer Theatre’s first performances in thenewly completed Tattnall Square Center for the Arts – fea-turing William Shakespeare’s The Tempest – were heldApril 16-26 at 1096 College St. in Macon.

    The Center serves as a community theatre and artsvenue, as well as home to the University’s Theatre Depart-ment. What was once a historic church that stood sentryfor more than 100 years is now a carefully renovated mul-ti-purpose arts space. Sunday School classrooms havebeen transformed into state-of-the-art teaching studios, ascene shop with a two-story loft, costume shop and stor-age, and faculty offices. The Center accommodates visualand performing arts, lectures, film screenings and work-shops hosted by community arts organizations.

    “The new facility has greatly enhanced the quality oftheatre we can produce, as well as expanded the educa-tional value of our theatre program at Mercer,” said The-atre Director Scot Mann. “The cast of The Tempest includ-ed alumni, students and community members, as is fittingfor a space that is focused on expanding the reach of artsprogramming in the local community.”

    Mercer students and community members spent weekstransforming the N. Logan Lewis Theatre into a tempestu-ous sea for Shakespeare’s tale. In it, Prospero, the rightfulDuke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda toher rightful place using illusion and skillful manipulation.He conjures a storm, the eponymous tempest, to lure hisusurping brother to a remote island.

    A dedication ceremony was held prior to the inauguralperformance on April 16 and was attended by Ailey resi-dent Faye Brewer and family friend Cathy Snooks. Sheand her husband, Robert, made a generous gift to the fa-cility to name the lobby in honor of their late daughter,Celia JoAnn, and the rehearsal hall in honor of her belovedformer theatre director, Paul Oppy.

    Celia was a 1983 graduate of Mercer’s College of Liber-al Arts, where she majored in speech and dramatic arts.She was actively involved in theatre performances andplayed many roles at Mercer. She passed away in January2013.

    For more information on the Tattnall Square Center forthe Arts, please contact Arts Center Coordinator ChariseStephens at (478) 301-2974 or [email protected]

    Farmers Insurancerecognizes

    Allen Morris with Prestigious Blue

    Vase AwardFarmers Insurance Agency owner Allen Morris has been

    honored with the company’s Blue Vase award recognizingMorris for his outstanding commitment to serving cus-tomers and working with consumers to help them recog-nize the value of life insurance as an important part of afamily’s insurance portfolio.

    “Helping families get smarter about their insurance op-tions, especially about the vital role of life insurance, isone of the most gratifying aspects of being a Farmersagent,” said Morris. “To be recognized by Farmers with theprestigious Blue Vase award for helping my customerswith their insurance needs makes it all the more special.”

    The Blue Vase award is presented to a select group ofFarmers Insurance Agency Owners who demonstrate ex-ceptional service and sales in the area of life insurance.

    Morris is located in Vidalia, Ga. at 201 E. 1st St. His of-fice is open weekdays from 9 am – 5 pm, visit his websiteat www.farmersagent.com/dmorris1 or call (912) 537-3276 for more information.

  • The Montgomery Monitor — May 27, 2015 — Page 2a

    Funeral NoticesAnne L. Holton

    Mrs. Anne L. Holton, age88, of Byron died Monday,May 18, 2015.

    Mrs. Holton was born inBrunswick, GA and livedmost of her life in Sopertonuntil moving to Byrontwelve years ago. She waspreceded in death by herparents, John F. and AnnieElizabeth Swain Farmer,her husband, Zane DarrellHolton, Sr., and daughter,Cathy Holton. She was re-tired from J.P. StephensCo., East Dublin and was amember of Assembly atWarner Robins Church ofGod.

    Survivors include her

    children, Zane DarrellHolton, Jr. (Debbie) and JoyHolton Kaase (Larry), all ofBrunswick, Judy HoltonHampton (Randy) of Byron;eight grandchildren, severalgreat-grandchildren, andone great-great grandchild.

    Graveside services wereheld in Westview Cemetery,Soperton at 3 p.m. Thurs-day, May 21 with Mr. J.D.Selph officiating.

    Sammons Funeral Homewas in charge of arrange-ments.

    Register online atwww.sammonsfuneral-home.com.

    Doreen Spinn

    Mrs. Doreen Spinn, age58, of Mount Vernon, diedMonday, May 18, 2015 af-ter a sudden illness. Shewas a native of Hampden,Massachusetts but livedmost of her life in Spring-field, Massachusetts whereshe graduated from Min-nechaug Regional HighSchool. She was a home-maker and Lutheran byfaith. She was preceded indeath by her husband,Steven Spinn, and her par-ents, Doris and Jim Conery.

    Mrs. Spinn is survived byone son, C.J. Spinn andwife Becky of Tarrytown;

    one daughter, CourtneySpinn of Mount Vernon;

    one sister, Debbie Conery ofHampden, Massachusetts;four grandchildren, Caden,Christian, Cody, andJaleigh; one nephew, Con-ery Morse; and friend,Shannon Mosley of Ailey.

    The graveside funeralservice was held Friday,May 22nd at 2:00 p.m. inthe Sherwood MemorialPark and Mausoleum inJonesboro with ChristianSpinn officiating.

    Pallbearers were LukeOwens, Cody Spinn, ConeryMorse and Christian Spinn.

    Ronald V. Hall FuneralHome of Vidalia was incharge of the arrange-ments.

    Donald DeesMr. Donald Dees, age 76,

    died Thursday, May 21,2015 at Community Hos-pice of Vidalia after an ex-tended illness.

    He was a native ofToombs County, resided inAtlanta for some 35 years,returning back to Lyons in2005. Donald was a gradu-ate of Middle Georgia Col-lege and Atlanta LawSchool. He was a retired re-al estate broker, a memberof the Milligan Creek Ma-sonic and Lyons First Unit-ed Methodist Church, andalso a veteran of the UnitedStates Navy.

    Mr. Dees is survived byhis two sons: Chris Deesand Brent Dees; four broth-ers: Wayne Dees and DougDees, Al Dees and LarryDees; and three grandchil-dren.

    Funeral Services for Mr.Donald Dees will be heldSunday, May 24, 2015 at2:00 PM at Stewart-RosierFuneral Service VidaliaChapel with Reverend JimMorrow and Reverend Re-ece Mincey officiating.

    Stewart-Rosier FuneralService Vidalia Chapel is incharge of funeral arrange-ments.

    The Glenwood School Reunion will beheld Saturday, July 11 at11 a.m. at theGlenwood School Auditorium. Lunch willbe catered and served between 12 and12:30 p.m. This reunion is for anyone thatattended the Glenwood School. PleaseRSVP to DeLeon Rowland at 1-904-309-4540 by June 15.

    ---------------------------------------------Ruth’s Chapel United Methodist

    Church, Thompson Pond Road, Vidalia,will have Vacation Bible School June 1 –June 5 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pastor BrianDurden and congregation invite all to at-tend. Durden will teach adult classes. Foodwill be served each night.

    MOUNT VERNON— After a unanimous decision,Chairman of the Board of Trustees for Brewton-ParkerCollege, Ray Sullivan, publicly notified the Brewton-Parker College community late Tuesday evening that Dr.Steven Echols will become the seventeenth president ofBrewton-Parker College. “We are blessed to have Dr.Steve Echols leading Brewton-Parker College. He is aproven leader who not only understands and embracesBrewton-Parker’s mission, but also understands andembraces Georgia Baptists’ historical legacy.” Addition-ally, Sullivan indicated Echols’ obvious passion for see-ing students transformed by the gospel. “The trusteeslook with anticipation to a bright future for Brewton-Parker under the capable leadership of Dr. Echols.”

    The special trustee meeting was requested by thePresidential Search Committee which has been activelyseeking a candidate for president since February of thisyear. Before the meeting began, Chairperson for thesearch team, Lynda Yawn, appeared confident that theentire trustee body would find in their presidential nom-inee the exact conclusions to which the search team hadunanimously come; namely, Dr. Steven Echols, present-ly serving as President of Tennessee Temple Universityin Chattanooga, Tennessee, is and ought to be the nextPresident of Brewton-Parker College.

    “I am pleased to recommend Dr. Steve Echols to theBoard of Trustees as the Search Committee’s top candi-date for President of Brewton-Parker College. Dr. Echolshas the credentials, vast experience and a spiritualbackground that fully supports Brewton-Parker’s visionand mission. He and his wife have expressed a love forthe area and are familiar with the strengths and chal-lenges of a small Christian college in South Georgia. TheSearch Committee was unanimous in the decision torecommend Dr. Echols. We feel a strong support for himbased on our prayerful approach to the entire process.Dr. Echols has shared that he feels

    God’s call to Brewton-Parker and is excited about thefuture of the college.”

    Ms. Yawn’s confidence proved trustworthy. The entiretrustee body voted unanimously to extend the presiden-tial invitation to Dr. Echols.

    Steven Echols is no stranger to higher education inSouthern Baptist life. Having earned an undergraduatedegree from Mercer University, Echols then earned botha Master of Divinity and a Doctor of Philosophy degreefrom New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary(NOBTS). Furthermore, he earned not only a Doctor ofMinistry degree in leadership from Beeson DivinitySchool in Birmingham, Alabama, but also completed allcourse work except the project thesis for the Doctor ofEducational Ministry degree from New Orleans semi-nary. In addition, Brewton-Parker’s newly elected presi-dent holds a Master of Public and Private Managementdegree from Birmingham-Southern College.

    Since January 2012, Dr. Echols has served as presi-dent of Tennessee Temple University (TTU) in Chat-tanooga, Tennessee where, upon becoming president,immediately led the trustees to adopt the Baptist Faithand Message 2000 as the doctrinal statement of TTU, astatement all faculty members were required to sign.Due in large part to Dr. Echols’ convictional allegiance toSouthern Baptists’ theological heritage, TTU was af-firmed in a unanimous resolution of support at the Ten-

    nessee Baptist Convention in the fall of 2013. Dr. Echols noted his personal enthusiasm and heart-

    felt joy about becoming Brewton-Parker’s President-elect.

    “My wife and I feel privileged and very blessed to havethe opportunity to serve at Brewton-Parker College. Theschool has impacted so many lives for Christ and has aunique place as the only regionally accredited ChristianCollege in Georgia that is south of Macon. We are grate-ful to Georgia Baptists and the many friends and alum-ni who believe in and have supported the mission ofBrewton-Parker College. We believe the school has agreat future and are especially excited about partneringwith local Georgia Baptist Churches in carrying out theministry of our Lord Jesus Christ. “

    Prior to serving as president of TTU, Echols was As-sociate Regional Dean for the Alabama/Georgia NOBTSExtension Center System while simultaneously occupy-ing as Professor of Leadership the Nelson L. Price Chairof Leadership (2005-2011). In addition, before moving tonorth Georgia as dean and professor of leadership at theNOBTS extension, Dr. Echols served on the main NOBTScampus as Director and then Associate Dean of the Pro-fessional Doctoral Programs & Associate Professor ofLeadership (2001-2005). During this time the number ofstudents in the two doctoral degree programs more thandoubled to a total of 290 students becoming the largestin the Southern Baptist Convention. Indeed since 1991,Dr. Echols has served various roles in higher education,roles from adjunct professor at NOBTS’s extension inBirmingham, Alabama, Samford University (Birming-ham), and Beeson Divinity School (also in Birmingham)to field supervisor for doctor of ministry programs.

    Dr. Echols not only brings impressive credentials anda broad swath of leadership experience in higher educa-tion to the president’s office at Brewton-Parker College,he remains prolific in literary contributions for bothscholar and student. He has published articles in TheJournal of Baptist Theology and Ministry, The Journalof Religious Leadership, The Christian Post, Pastors To-day (Lifeway), and the Academy of Religious Leadershipas well as The Holman Bible Dictionary, Church Admin-istration: A Journal for Effectiveness, and the UnlimitedPartnership

    Leadership Manual. Echols also co-authored a bookwith Allen England on leadership during difficult timesentitled Catastrophic Crisis: Ministry Leadership in theMidst of Trial and Tragedy (BH, 2011).

    Gleaning from his extended resume, however, it wouldbe a mistake to conclude Dr. Echols’ academic life dis-tances him from the local church. Beginning in 1975,Echols served as a youth pastor in his home church,First Baptist Church, Mableton, Georgia. And, from1978 to 2001, he served as pastor of several churcheswhile also working in academia. Echols has preached inchurches ranging in attendance from less than 50 tomore than 3,000, including numerous retreats, revivals,denominational meetings, and state and national con-ferences.

    In response to Echols’ becoming Brewton-Parker Col-lege’s seventeenth president, Dr. Frank Cox, Senior Pas-tor at North Metro First Baptist Church inLawrenceville, Georgia expressed his excitement aboutthe trustee decision.

    “I am excited about the election of my friend Dr. SteveEchols as the President of Brewton- Parker College. Hebrings strategic leadership skills tempered by years ofpastoral experience as well the sharp mind of a scholar.He is seasoned as an academic administrator and iscommitted to the doctrines of Southern Baptist life.Steve is a proven Baptist and will bring that distinctionto the mission of Brewton-Parker. Georgia Baptists willbe proud of his selection.”

    Trustees, denominational executives, professors, andGeorgia pastors together stated their unqualified sup-port for Dr. Echols as Brewton-Parker’s new president.Dr. J. Robert White, Executive Director, Georgia BaptistConvention described Echols as “imminently qualified”to serve as Brewton-Parker’s next president. He furtherstated Dr. Echols was a “serious minded, conservativetheologian” who will offer “long term, stable leadership”to Brewton-Parker. Associate Professor of Psychologyand Counseling at Brewton-Parker, Vance Rhoades, ex-pressed that after “many weeks of prayer for God’s per-fect will to be done,” Dr. Echols surfaced as “God’s man,at God’s time, to accomplish God’s purpose.”

    According to BPC trustee and Georgia pastor, FredEvers, Steven Echols is both “academically qualified”and “spiritually gifted” to successfully lead BPC well in-to the 21st century. Southeast Georgia businessmanand BPC trustee, Tim Redding, agrees: “I believe he willbe clear in his direction, wise with his words, and swiftyet thoughtful in his decisions.” Bucky Kennedy, SeniorPastor of Vidalia First Baptist Church concluded “Dr.Echols’ presidential experience and strong Christiancharacter will undoubtedly bring great success to Brew-ton-Parker. His leadership has been tested and foundtrustworthy.”

    While Dr. Echols’ duties and responsibilities as Pres-ident are effective immediately, he does not anticipatebeing in the presidential office until June 1.

    Brewton-Parker College names new president

    Area news of interestDoes your child have a

    little “wild” in them? Letthem explore their wild-ness learning about wildlifeat a Charlie Elliott WildlifeCenter summer camp.Camps accommodate ages5-16 and offer everythingfrom birding and wildlifeactivities, to shooting, tolearning camping and sur-vival skills.

    Of the many offeredcamps, they are all target-ed to the age of the camper,so activities, hours of thecamp, and learning materi-

    als and information is ap-propriate in order to helpengage and educate thatparticular participant.

    Day camps for youngerkids include NatureScouts, Charlie’s Trackersand Wildlife Rangers.Overnight camps includeWILD Creatures of Georgia,Outdoor Adventure TeamChallenge and ShootingSports Camp. More infor-mation about activitiesthat take place at eachcamp found at www.geor-giawildlife.com/charlieel-

    liott/camps. To get to CEWC, take I-

    20 to Exit 98. Travel southon Highway 11, go throughMansfield and continuethree miles south to the en-trance at Marben FarmRoad on the left. Then fol-low the signs to the Discov-ery Area.  This event will beheld rain or shine.

    For more information,visitwww.georgiawildlife.com/CharlieElliott/camps , or call770-784-3059.  

    Still looking for summertimeactivities for the kids?

    If you’re reading this, so are yourcustomers. Advertise today!

    Call 529-6624

  • events to be held. The firstrace of the day was the4x100 meter relay. Theteam of Quincy Doyle,Bakari Woods, PaulLegrant, and Malik Lindersprinted their way to a 5thplace finish. The 400 meterdash was next up. Thefield of runners consistedof experienced seniors andjuniors, many of whomhave placed in the statemeet in years past. The on-ly exception was ClaytonHarvey, the lone freshmanin the event representingMCHS. Harvey gutted outa fine performance thatearned him a 5th placespot on the medal podium.Malik Linder was just re-turning from the medalpodium when he had torelace his shoes to run the100 meter dash. Lindercruised to a state runnerup finish in the 100 toearn his second medal inless than an hour. The Ea-gles began to jump up inthe team standings as theywere now sitting in 5th

    place overall. AntwonJones ran a flawless racethat netted personal besttime in the 110 meter hur-dles and earned him a 4thplace finish. Gamal Lawtonfollowed in the 800 meterrun with a personal bestand school record time inthe 800 meter run. Law-ton, also a state placer inwrestling, earned a spot onthe medal podium to beawarded his medal for fin-

    ishing 4th. The Eagleswere now sitting 3rd in theteam standings. The finalrace of the season wouldbe the 200 meter dashwith Malik Linder againearning a trip to the medalstand. Linder finished in4th place to gain his 3rdmedal of the day.

    The Eagles would haveto watch the next tworaces of the day to see ifthey would be able to

    maintain a top four spotand earn a team trophy.When the final race of theday was finished, the Ea-gles finished in 4th placeas a team. Linder andTroupe who were bothstate runner-ups in theirevents were presented withthe 4th place trophy. In allthe Eagles wrapped up the2015 state track meetearning a total of 12medals and a team trophy.

    MMMMuuuulllltttt iiii ----PPPPeeeerrrrssssoooonnnnSSSSaaaattttuuuurrrrddddaaaayyyyJJJJuuuunnnneeee 66667777 AAAAMMMM----1111 PPPPMMMMTTTTuuuummmmiiii DDDDiiiissssttttrrrr iiiibbbbuuuutttt iiiioooonnnnWWWWaaaarrrreeeehhhhoooouuuusssseeee PPPPaaaarrrrkkkkiiiinnnngggg LLLLooootttt2222555500001111 MMMMaaaatttttttthhhheeeewwwwssss IIIInnnndddduuuussssttttrrrr iiiiaaaallll CCCCiiii rrrrcccclllleeeeVVVViiiiddddaaaallll iiiiaaaa,,,, GGGGAAAA

    Big, Multi-Person Yard Sale to help raise money for DianeHerzog’s medical/prescription expenses. If you have any-thing you wish to donate or to make a monetary donation,please call Tina Weeks or Amy Maddox at 912-537-7852.Diane Herzog was an Associate of Tumi for 16 years whohad to resign from her job due to personal medical rea-sons and complications due to Cancer leaving her with-out medical insurance. Today, she is cancer free, butstill living everyday with the complications due to herCancer surgery and just had to have hip replacement.

    Area News

    The Montgomery Monitor — May 27, 2015 — Page 3a

    Eagles Track & Field places at State

    The MCHS boys track &field team wrapped one ofthe best seasons in schoolhistory at the 2015 GeorgiaOlympics held at MemorialStadium in Jefferson. The3 day meet was held fromMay 14th-16th. When thelast race was finished theEagles found themselveson the awards stand beingawarded a trophy for fin-ishing in 4th place in ClassA public. A 4th place finishmatches the highest finishan Eagles Track & Fieldteam has achieved at thestate meet. In 1972, theEagles were led by CurtisRyals and Willie Bakerthat collectively went on tosweep all of the sprintevents, with Rylas beingcrowned champ in the 100yard and 220 yard dashand Baker being crownedstate champ in the 440yard dash.

    On day 1 of the statemeet Brandon Carswelland Antanaron Troupeparticipated in the discusthrow and shot put respec-tively. Carswell was thefirst to earn team pointsfor the Eagles coming awaywith a 7th place finish.This is the second year in arow that Carswell hasmade it to the medal podi-um in the discus throw.Troupe entered the shot-

    put circle with one goal inmind, win a state title. Hecame very close to doingso. Each competitor re-ceived six attempts withthe best performance de-termining the finishing or-der. On his second throw,Troupe threw his personalbest and a new schoolrecord with a distance of47 feet and 2 inches. Heheld the best performanceall the way up to the finalthrow of the competitionwhen Keantae Terry of Ter-rell County released a putof 48 feet. Troupe wouldfinish as the state runnerup in the shotput for the2015 Georgia Olympics.

    On day 2 of competitionfor class A schools the on-ly event being contestedwas the 3200 meter run.Josue Ramirez, a sopho-more at MCHS, ran hisway to a 7th place finish.This would be the secondtime this school year thatJosue found himself on amedal podium as he placed10th at the state crosscountry meet back in thefall.

    Entering day 3 of themeet the Eagles were sit-ting in 11th place in theteam standings, but hadmany chances to scorepoints as they would berunning in 6 of the 8

    Above, the team is picturedwith their trophy. At right,Malik Linder receiving hisstate runner up medal.(Special photos)

    Antanarion Troupe is pictured with Coach Suttles. Troupewas the state runner up in the shotput. (Special photo)

    The first Summer Reading Program will be held onWednesday June 3 at 2 PM for Children (1-12) and at 4 PMfor Juveniles (10-18).

    Ranger Jodi will be presenting some live animals at thelibrary.  Plan to come out to the beginning of these won-derful programs.

    NEW BOOKS FOR CHILDREN AND JUVENILES ATMONTGOMERY COUNTY LIBRARY

    The Lonely BookOnce popular, an increasingly shabby library book

    grows lonely until a young girl rediscovers it, but when itbecomes lost again both the book and the girl wonder ifthey will have a happy ending.

    Pennies in a JarA young boy whose father is serving overseas during

    World War II struggles to overcome his fears, especially hisfear of the horses that pull trade wagons through hisneighborhood, as he works odd jobs for money to buy hisfather a birthday present.

    The polar bear who couldn’t, wouldn’t swim“Follow the journey of a young polar bear named Zeke

    who is afraid of the water and refuses to swim.  He leaves

    home in the search of other animals who do not swim, andends up finding that he can enjoy the water if he followsthe ABC and Ds of water safety, while learning a valuablelesson about facing his fears with a positive attitude.”

    Big Hero 7: the essential guideBig Hero 6 features brilliant robotics prodigy Hiro

    Hamada, who finds himself in the grips of a criminal plotthat threatens to destroy the fast-paced, high-tech city ofSan Fransokyo. With the help of his closest companion —a robot named Baymax — Hiro joins forces with a reluc-tant team of first-time crime fighters on a mission to savetheir city.    Packed full of fun facts, character profiles, andamazing stills from the movie, Big Hero 6: The EssentialGuide is the ultimate guide to Disney’s newest hit film.

    My Brother’s HeroBen Floyd has a lot on his mind. In only eighteen

    months he will be old enough to get a learner’s permit todrive, but that seems a lifetime away. Ben enjoys theclose-knit group of friends in his small neighborhood, butlately he has been longing for a taste of adventure. Keep-ing an eye on his younger brother Cody is getting to be abig responsibility. And he is confused by complicated feel-

    Library gears up for summer reading programNew books for children and juveniles arrive at library

    ings he has for his lifelong friend, Cass.I Survived True Stories:  Five Epic DisastersFrom a group of students surviving the 9.0 earthquake

    that set off a historic tsunami in Japan, to a boy nearlyfrozen on the prairie in 1888, these unforgettable kidslived to tell tales of unimaginable destruction — and,against all odds, survival.

    Wherever You Are My Love Will Find You.Love is the greatest gift we have to give our children. It’s

    the one thing they can carry with them each and everyday.    If love could take shape it might look something likethese heartfelt words and images from the inimitable Nan-cy Tillman. Here is a book to share with your loved ones,no matter how near or far, young or old, they are.

    Fishing together withyour child and family canbuild some powerful memo-ries, so make this a sum-mer to remember! Don’tknow how to fish? No prob-lem. There are plenty of on-site volunteers providingassistance at the manystatewide kids fishingevents scheduled thisspring and summer, ac-cording to the Georgia De-partment of Natural Re-sources’ Wildlife ResourcesDivision.

    “You could be the one

    that introduces a love forfishing for your child, andeven if you or they havenever fishing before, theyare sure to discover the joysof fishing at a kids fishingevent,” says John Biagi,chief of fisheries manage-ment. “These events takeplace in locations wherekids are likely to catch fishand are surrounded by peo-ple with like-minded inter-ests, which help reinforcethe positive experience.”

    Research shows that

    most people are introducedto fishing by a family mem-ber, and most consider afamily member to be theirbest fishing friend.

    Kids fishing events aresponsored across the stateand provide fishing lessonsto both children (under age16) and parents fromknowledgeable instructors.The Wildlife Resources Divi-sion co-sponsors manyevents by providing channelcatfish or trout to improvefishing, educational materi-als for participants and

    guidance for sponsors. How do you find more in-

    formation or local events?Visitwww.georgiawildlife.com/fishing/kids-fishing. Hereyou will find tips on fishingwith kids, recommendedplaces to go fish with chil-dren, a “kid’s first fish cer-tificate,” and a link to a cal-endar where you can findlocal events.

    For more information onfishing in Georgia, visitwww.gofishgeorgia.com/fishing .

    Free fishing events for children

  • Happy Memorial Day?On Monday we celebrate(d) Memorial Day. Or at least, we

    commemorate(d) it. Many of us have difficulty using the word“celebrate” for such a solemn occasion.

    There are two holidays that I often have difficulty with thesalutation of “happy”. They are Memorial Day and Easter.

    Easter is fairly easily reconciled. Good Friday is among thedarkest remembrances for those who consider ourselves Chris-tians. Easter, however, does not represent the death of our sav-ior but rather his triumph over it. When understood in its prop-er context, there can be little more that is indeed happy.

    Memorial Day is a bit more complex and difficult to reconcilein such a manner. It is not Veterans Day – a day we thank thosewho serve and have served their country in our armed forces.Rather, it is a day we set aside for a remembrance of those whoserved and gave the ultimate sacrifice.

    There’s little to be happy about in that. I’ll skip ahead a bitand tell you that I won’t have an answer for you by the end ofthis column. If anything the takeaway is that I’m going to workthrough this as if we’re talking it out together.

    If this to be a holiday that is to be celebrated, there has to bemore to it than the acts of commemoration and remembrance.They are necessary to keep any holiday from becoming morethan an excuse for mattress sales and three-day weekends. Ifyou’ve attended a Memorial Day ceremony you’ll understandthat you don’t leave by high fiving the folks next to you anddancing on the way out.

    They are essentially funerals for people that most of ushaven’t met. They are for people who died having not met us.They are to honor those who gave their life so that the idea of“us” could mean more than their life itself.

    So…how do we move from that to a day of celebration?We can celebrate the freedom that these men and women died

    to protect. But then we would have to ask ourselves if we’re do-ing all we can through our peaceful political processes to ensurethat these freedoms remain unfettered.

    We can celebrate that we’re a country of self-governance. Butthen we would have to recognize how few still participate in theprocess. We would have to realize how many fewer even still arewilling to have a meaningful conversation with those who do notagree with us. That fewer still will engage in a town square in-stead of public political meetings filled with those that providean echo chamber rather than a spirited debate.

    If these words sound pessimistic I apologize. I am at my hearta realist.

    When I compare the holidays of Easter and Memorial Day, Ican take solace in the message of “Happy Easter”. The spirit ofthat holiday, after all, is that all of my sins can be forgiven, evenwhen I have to account for them to my God face to face.

    But for this holiday we call Memorial Day, I do not look fond-ly on the eventual opportunity to explain to those who gave theirlives for our country what it is we as a citizenry do to demon-strate the value of their sacrifice.

    I don’t want to tell them about parades, and I don’t want totell them that a wreath was laid in their honor.

    I’d rather tell them that the people that they left behind intheir stead understood the responsibilities left to them. That weknew government by the people required the active participationof the people. That the country belonged to all those who callthemselves Americans, not just the ones who temporarily heldthe beliefs of the majority political party. That we still believedthat America was worth our time, our energy, and our focus.Even when that required interaction with those whom with wedisagree.

    If I knew I could tell them that, then I could say “HappyMemorial Day” indeed. It remains my hope as a bit of an opti-mist that one day I can.

    (USPS 361-220)

    Mt. Vernon, Georgia 30445Phone (912) 529-6624Fax (912) 529-5399

    E-mail: [email protected]

    Published Every Wednesday

    Official Organ of Montgomery County

    Griffin Lovett, PublisherDuBose Porter, Executive Editor

    Jonathon Finley, Editor

    Periodicals postage paid at the Post Officein Mt. Vernon, GA and at additional mailing

    offices.

    Published by The Herald Publishing Com-pany

    Local address for copy is Highway 280,Mt. Vernon, GA

    POSTMASTER: Send address changes toThe Montgomery Monitor,

    P. O. Box 527 - Soperton, Ga. 30457

    SUBSCRIPTION RATES

    One year in Montgomery County andadjoining counties $29.00

    Out of County $35.00

    Out of State $39.00

    Sales tax included in subscription price

    The Montgomery Monitor

    Viewpoint

    Dear Meby Joe Phillips

    Shameful. Yes, it is pretty bad, all we

    men take for granted. The Kansas Woman, who at

    this writing is in the hospital,called asking me to pick outsome little earrings to matchwhat she planned to wear forSunday afternoon visitors.

    “What color?”“I haven’t decided yet.”And on it goes. Days earlier, we hurriedly

    packed up things she thoughtshe’d need and I was trying tohelp out by making sugges-tions.

    I picked up a two-piece paja-ma set and set it beside thesmall suitcase.

    “No, that’s what old ladieswear,” she protested, “I wantsomething cute like ‘CareBears.’”

    I started to ask her why sheeven owned “old lady” pajamasif she wasn’t going to wear thembut decided not to get any fur-ther behind.

    Yesterday, she called askingme to bring a particular shirt. I

    thought I remembered the shirtand asked where I’d find it.

    “Where it always is, in thesecond drawer of the chest.”

    “Chest?”“Yes. You walk by it all the

    time.”“Which one, exactly?”“You don’t even know what

    I’m talking about. It’s the onebeside the bathroom door.”

    I could not conjure an imageof a chest of drawers beside thebathroom door. I went in-to our bedroom there was thechest of drawers right whereshe said it would be.

    “How long has that been sit-ting there?” I asked.

    I’m ashamed to tell you theanswer.

    During her hospital stay I’velearned a lot about wherethings live in this house.

    She has tons of stuff putaway in places I didn’t evenknow existed.

    We men don’t keep up withwoman stuff and don’t evenknow what some of it is.

    On the other hand wives

    know all about what we wear,where it is kept, whether it issomething we should, the lasttime we wore it.

    Last spring I missed my fa-vorite work shirt.

    The poor patched up oldthing was once red, faded to asort of pink with grease stains.

    “That thing is gone,” she al-lowed.

    I forgot about the shirt lastyear and since I hadn’t worn itshe first put it in the rag bag,then fished it out knowing I’deventually look there.

    “You hadn’t worn it in twoyears.”

    I don’t keep up with that kindof thing but I’m learning.

    This week I learned that if Ipull off my tee shirts and re-verse them so that they areright side out it saves me timeon laundry day when I foldthem.

    I’m slowly learning.She’s slowly healing. I think we’re about even.(She’s out of hospital and do-

    ing well. Thank you.)

    Email news and

    photos to:

    [email protected]

    gmail.com

    The Montgomery Monitor — May 27, 2015 — Page 4a

    What’s the best place to

    live for global warming?

    Dear EarthTalk: Where will be the best places to liveif global warming gets the best of us?

    — Cynthia McIntosh, Jasper, WY

    If temperatures around the globe continue to rise in the face of human-induced climate change as clima-tologists expect, some of the world’s most populous areas could become uninhabitable. Rising sea levels willflood out coastal areas, while increasing drought will make survival in already arid areas difficult at best.While we may have at least a few decades of runway to prepare ourselves for the worst, advance plannersmight want to think carefully about where to put down roots now.

    According to the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) that measures and ranks 175 countriesbased on vulnerability and readiness to adapt to climate change, Scandinavian countries—Norway, Sweden,Finland and Denmark—just might be the safest spot in the carbon-compromised world of the future.

    ND-Gain researchers stress that residents of just about any developed country (including the U.S., Cana-da, Australia, New Zealand, Russia, China and most of Europe) will likely be fine staying put given the factthat better-heeled governments are already gearing up to adapt to warmer temperatures, more intensestorms, rising sea levels and other expected changes. On the flip side, the worst places to be may be mid-lat-itude developing countries, including most of Africa and South Asia. The countries ND-GAIN predicts will behardest hit by climate change include Chad, Eritrea, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Cen-tral African Republic, Sudan, Niger, Haiti, Afghanistan and Guinie Bissau.

    Americans looking for the best place to live domestically as the world warms should also look north. Alas-ka and the Pacific Northwest, both blessed with plenty of water and plenty of terrain well above sea level, aregenerally acknowledged to be the best parts of the country to be in under a new climate regime. In fact, Uni-versity of Washington atmospheric science professor Cliff Mass believes the Pacific Northwest will be “a po-tential climate refuge” in coming decades. He writes in his popular weather blog that Washington State couldsoon become the nation’s premiere wine production region as California’s vineyards continue to be slammedby years and years of drought.

    Meanwhile, UCLA environmental economics professor, Matthew Kahn, says that otherwise fading citieslike Minneapolis, Milwaukee and Detroit will become more and more attractive as their counterparts to thesouth (Miami, Phoenix, Los Angeles, San Diego) take the brunt of global warming’s fury. In his 2010

    book, Climatopolis, Kahn predicts that Detroit will be one of the nation’s most desirable cities by 2100.Other climate change winners could include Vermont, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Colorado.

    Not everyone agrees that Detroit will be the golden city of our future world. Author Giles Slade contendsin his 2013 book, American Exodus, that we all may be heading for northern Canada when global warming’sfury really starts to kick in. “The safest places will be significant communities in the north that are not iso-lated, that have abundant water, that have the possibility of agricultural self-sufficiency, that have little im-mediate risk of forest fires, that are well elevated, and that are built on solid rock,” he writes. “Our northernlands are our Noah’s ark—a vital refuge against the moment of mankind’s greatest need.”

    CONTACTS: Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN), www.gain.org; Cliff Mass Weather Blog, cliff-mass.blogspot.com.

    EarthTalk® is produced by Doug Moss & Roddy Scheer and is a registered trademark of Earth Action Net-work Inc. View past columns at: www.earthtalk.org. Or e-mail us your question: [email protected]

  • Area News

    The Montgomery Monitor — May 27, 2015 — Page 5a

    Graduation ceremony held for MCHS Class of 2015

  • Nightingale Services is currently accepting applica-tions for the following positions: Registered Nurses,Certified Nursing Assistants, and Personal CareAides. Applicants must have the following: a validGeorgia driver’s license, social security card, proofof auto insurance, current Georgia RN License orCNA License, Current CPR/First Aide Certification,and a recent TB skin test. All applicants must applyin person. Nightingale Services is located at 230Savannah Avenue, Statesboro, GA 30458. Our tollfree phone number is 1-800-731-8003.

    Medicab TransportationDrivers Needed!

    Requirements: Clean MVR - Clean National CriminalHistory - Clean pre-employment drug screen

    Drive people to medical appointments inTreutlen/Montgomery and surrounding counties.

    877-275-7987 [email protected]

    DISPATCHERThe Montgomery County Sheriff’s Officeis now hiring for Dispatcher.• Must have a high schooldiploma/equivalent• Must be able to pass a backgroundcheckApplications can be picked up atMontgomery County Sheriff’s Officefrom 8 am-4 pm Monday-Friday.

    Soperton Sod6311 Ga Hwy 86Soperton, GA 30457

    Soperton Sod is seeking an OFFICE MANAGER.Applicant must require basic computer skills. Alsodispatch of trucks. Drug test and backgroundcheck is required. Applicant must possessexcellent communication and customer serviceskills. Compensation includes a quarterly bonusplan. Benefits include medical insurance, dental,paid vacation, and holidays.Apply in person at 6311 GA Hwy 86, Soperton,GA, or email resume to [email protected] inquiries can be made to (919)268-9653.

    Area News

    The Montgomery Monitor — May 27, 2015 — Page 6a

    We Rent Homes

    Meeting your home rentalneeds since 1969.

    Serving*Alamo *Glenwood

    *Mt. Vernon *VidaliaRodney and Dianne Brooks

    Owners

    Phone 912-523-5282

    Nurse PractitionerSend resume to

    P.O. Box 16339, Dublin, GA 31040

    Medical Office hiring

    CDL TRUCK DRIVERLooking for experienced drivers with clean MVR; TWIC card preferred.Ê

    Send resumes to or apply in

    person: 9474 Hwy 57 McIntyre, GA

    31054Tuesday-Friday between 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

    Southeastern Technical College has the following positions available at this time:

    Full-Time Associate of Science Degree in Nursing Instructor

    Full-Time Dental Hygiene Administrative Assistant

    Adjunct Commercial Truck DrivingInstructor

    Adjunct Nurse Aide Program InstructorPart-Time Child Enrichment Center

    AssistantPart-Time Child Enrichment Center

    NutritionistPart-Time Bookstore Assistant

    Adjunct Criminal Justice InstructorAdjunct Art Instructor

    Adjunct Music InstructorAdjunct Histroy Instructor

    Please visit the Employment page at www.southeasterntech.edu or call

    912-538-3147 for more information.STC is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

    Soperton Sod6311 Ga Hwy 86Soperton, GA 30457

    OFFICE PERSONNELNEEDED

    Buy Sod Turf Farm in Soperton GA in lookingfor Office Personnel. This is a full time yearround position. Duties would include keepingtrack of Purchase Orders, receipts, employeetime records & working with Logistics team ontrucking. Benefits are available for full timeemployees. Please submit your resume [email protected]

    Skin cancer awareness and preventionSummer is almost here in Middle

    Georgia, and we all know that withsummer come many hot, muggy daysthat lead many of us to beaches,pools, lakes, or other recreationalplaces where we can cool off andhave fun in the sun.  However, forsome, the sun can cause seriousproblems that may not be so fun.One of those problems is skin can-cer. 

    Skin cancer is the most commonform of cancer in the United States.The three main types of skin cancerare the basal cell, squamos cell andmalignant melanoma.  Both basalcell and squamos cell skin cancersare considered non-melanomas andare highly curable.   The malignantmelanoma is the much less commonbut far more serious form of the can-cer.  The American Cancer Society(ACS) estimates that in 2015, therewill be about 73,870 new cases ofmelanoma in the United States.  TheACS also estimates that 9,940 peoplewill die of the disease this year.There are cases in the South Central

    Health District that have helped con-tribute to these numbers. In 2013, 4people in our health district died ofskin cancer. 

    Exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet(UV) rays seems to be the key envi-ronmental factor involved in the de-velopment of skin cancer.  Whenused consistently, sun-protectivepractices can prevent skin cancer.UV rays from artificial sources, suchas tanning beds, are just as danger-ous as those from the sun andshould be avoided.  Although tanningand burning can increase a person’srisk of skin cancer, most Americansdo not consistently protect them-selves from the harmful UV rays. 

    The good news is that there aremany ways that you can protectyourself and your family from skincancer.  These practical, easy to fol-low steps include:

    1. Do not sunbathe.2. Avoid unnecessary sun expo-

    sure, especially between 10:00 a.m.and 4:00 p.m.

    3. When outdoors, use sunscreens

    that are rated SPF 30 or higher.  Ap-ply them liberally, uniformly, andfrequently.

    4. When exposed to sunlight, wearprotective clothing such as longpants, long-sleeved shirts, broad-brimmed hats, and UV-protectivesunglasses.

    5. Stay away from artificial tan-ning devices (i.e. tanning beds).

    6. Teach your children good sunprotection habits at an early age.The damage that leads to adult skincancer starts in childhood.

    7. Examine your skin, head to toe,at least once every three months forsuspicious spots.

    By following these simple steps,you can continue to enjoy having funin the hot, Georgia sun while at thesame time preventing one of the mostcommon forms of cancer in today’ssociety. 

    If you need more informationabout this or any other health-relat-ed topic, please contact the SouthCentral Health District at 478-275-6545. 

    Send news and photos to:

    [email protected]

    If you’re reading this, soare your customers.

    Advertise today! Call 529-6624

    The deadline fornews, photos and

    ads is Friday by 4 p.m.

    Advertisetoday, call529-6624

  • M15-24

    STATE OF GEORGIA

    COUNTY of MONTGOMERY

    NOTICE OF SALE UNDER

    POWER

    By virtue of the power of sale

    contained in that certain Deed to

    Secure Debt from DANIEL P.

    TAYLOR and ELIZABETH TAY-

    LOR to ASSOCIATES HOME

    EQUITY SERVICES, INC. dated

    February 29, 2000, filed for

    record May 23, 2000, and record-

    ed in Deed Book 143, Page 318,

    MONTGOMERY County, Georgia

    Records, as last transferred to

    CHRISTIANA TRUST, A DIVI-

    SION OF WILMINGTON SAV-

    INGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, AS

    TRUSTEE OF NORMANDY

    MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SE-

    RIES 2013-9 by assignment

    recorded in Deed Book 255, Page

    190, MONTGOMERY County,

    Georgia Records. Said Deed to

    Secure Debt having been given to

    secure a Note dated February 29,

    2000 in the original principal

    sum of FIFTY TWO THOUSAND

    FORTY EIGHT AND 97/100

    DOLLARS ($52,048.97), with in-

    terest from date at the rate stat-

    ed in said Note on the unpaid bal-

    ance until paid, there will be sold

    by the undersigned at public out-

    cry to the highest bidder for cash

    before the Courthouse door at

    MONTGOMERY County, Geor-

    gia, or at such place as has or

    may be lawfully designated as an

    alternative location, within the

    legal hours of sale on the first

    Tuesday in June, 2015, the fol-

    lowing described property:

    ALL THAT TRACT OF LAND

    IN THE 275TH G.M. DISTRICT

    OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,

    GEORGIA, CONTAINING ONE

    (1) ACRE TO PLAT OF SURVEY

    THEREOF MADE BY HUGHIE

    HALINGAN, REGISTERED

    SURVEYOR, DATED OCTOBER

    10, 1959 AND RECORDED IN

    THE DEED BOOK 48, PAGE 198

    IN THE OFFICE OF THE SUPE-

    RIOR COURT OF MONT-

    GOMERY COUNTY, GEORGIA

    WHICH PLAT IS BY REFER-

    ENCE INCORPORATED HERE-

    IN AND MADE A PART OF THIS

    DESCRIPTION; SAID TRACT

    FRONTS 208.7 FEET OF THE

    SOUTHWEST SIDE OF THE AI-

    LEY-SHARPESPUR PUBLIC

    ROAD, AND EXTENDS BACK

    IN AN EVEN WIDTH AS THE

    FRONT IN A SOUTHWESTER-

    LY DIRECTION FOR A DIS-

    TANCE OF 208.7 FEET AND IS

    BOUNDED NOW OR FORMER-

    LY AS FOLLOWS, TO WIT:

    NORTHEAST BY SAID AILEY-

    SHARPESPUR PUBLIC ROAD;

    SOUTHEAST BY LAND OF C.L.

    MOSLEY; AND SOUTHWEST

    AND NORTHWEST BY LANDS

    OF MRS B.R. SNOOKS, SR.

    THIS BEING ONE AND THE

    SAME PROPERTY AS FOL-

    LOWS:

    ALL THAT TRACT OR PAR-

    CEL OF LAND LYING IN THE

    275TH G.M. DISTRICT OF

    MONTGOMERY COUNTY, BE-

    ING ONE ACRE MORE OR

    LESS ACCORDING TO A PLAT

    OF SURVEY BY BRENT E. TAN-

    NER, G.R.L.S. NO. 3250, DATED

    2/13/15 AND RECORDED IN

    PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 248,

    MONTGOMERY COUNTY,

    GEORGIA RECORDS, SAID

    PLAT BEING INCORPORATED

    HEREIN BY REFERENCE FOR

    A MORE COMPLETE DESCRIP-

    TION. SAID PROPERTY BEING

    KNOWN AS 370 CARTRETTE

    ROAD, AILEY, GEORGIA BY

    THE CURRENT SYSTEM OF

    NUMBERING HOUSES IN THE

    AFORESAID COUNTY.

    To the best of the knowledge

    and belief of the undersigned, the

    party in possession of the proper-

    ty is DANIEL P. TAYLOR A/K/A

    DANIEL PAUL TAYLOR and

    ELIZABETH TAYLOR A/K/A

    ELIZABETH R. TAYLOR or a

    tenant or tenants. Said property

    may more commonly be known

    as: 370 CARTRETTE ROAD, AI-

    LEY, GA 30410.

    The debt secured by said Deed

    to Secure Debt has been and is

    hereby declared due because of,

    among other possible events of

    default, non-payment of the

    monthly installments on said

    loan. The debt remaining in de-

    fault, this sale will be made for

    the purpose of paying the same

    and all expenses of this sale, in-

    cluding attorney’s fees (notice of

    intent to collect attorney’s fees

    having been given).

    The individual or entity that

    has full authority to negotiate,

    amend, and modify all terms of

    the loan is SELENE FINANCE

    LP, 9990 RICHMOND AVENUE,

    SUITE 400 S, HOUSTON, TX

    77042; (877) 735-3637.

    Said property will be sold sub-

    ject to any outstanding ad val-

    orem taxes (including taxes

    which are a lien, whether or not

    now due and payable), the right

    of redemption of any taxing au-

    thority, any matters which might

    be disclosed by an accurate sur-

    vey and inspection of the proper-

    ty, any assessments, liens, en-

    cumbrances, zoning ordinances,

    restrictions, covenants, and mat-

    ters of record superior to the Se-

    curity Deed first set out above.

    The sale will be conducted

    subject (1) to confirmation that

    the sale is not prohibited under

    the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2)

    to final confirmation and audit of

    the status of the loan with the

    holder of the Security Deed. Pur-

    suant to O.C.G.A. Section 9-13-

    172.1, which allows for certain

    procedures regarding the rescis-

    sion of judicial and nonjudicial

    sales in the State of Georgia, the

    Deed Under Power and other

    foreclosure documents may not

    be provided until final confirma-

    tion and audit of the status of the

    loan as provided in the preceding

    paragraph.

    CHRISTIANA TRUST, A DI-

    VISION OF WILMINGTON SAV-

    INGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, AS

    TRUSTEE FOR NORMANDY

    MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SE-

    RIES 2013-9

    As Attorney-in-Fact for

    DANIEL P. TAYLOR A/K/A

    DANIEL PAUL TAYLOR

    ELIZABETH TAYLOR A/K/A

    ELIZABETH R. TAYLOR

    Phelan Hallinan Diamond &

    Jones, PLLC

    11675 Great Oaks Way, Suite

    375

    Alpharetta, GA 30022

    Telephone: 770-393-4300

    Fax: 770-393-4310

    PH # 23733

    This law firm is acting as a

    debt collector. Any information

    obtained will be used for that

    purpose.

    _________________________

    M15-25

    NOTICE OF SALE UNDER

    POWER

    GEORGIA, MONTGOMERY

    COUNTY

    THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO

    COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFOR-

    MATION OBTAINED WILL BE

    USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

    Under and by virtue of the

    Power of Sale contained in a Se-

    curity Deed given by Marian

    Nichols and Melinda Nichols to

    Mortgage Electronic Registration

    Systems, Inc. as nominee for Tay-

    lor, Bean, & Whitaker Mortgage

    Corp., its successors and assigns,

    dated January 29, 2009, recorded

    in Deed Book 219, Page 438,

    Montgomery County, Georgia

    Records, as last transferred to

    U.S. Bank National Association,

    not in its individual capacity but

    solely as Trustee on behalf of the

    OWS REMIC Trust 2013-2 by as-

    signment recorded in Deed Book

    267, Page 303, Montgomery

    County, Georgia Records, convey-

    ing the after-described property

    to secure a Note in the original

    principal amount of NINETY-SIX

    THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED

    THIRTY-FIVE AND 0/100 DOL-

    LARS ($96,635.00), with interest

    thereon as set forth therein,

    there will be sold at public outcry

    to the highest bidder for cash be-

    fore the courthouse door of Mont-

    gomery County, Georgia, or at

    such place as may be lawfully

    designated as an alternative,

    within the legal hours of sale on

    the first Tuesday in June, 2015,

    the following described property:

    SEE EXHIBIT “A” AT-

    TACHED HERETO AND MADE

    A PART HEREOF

    The debt secured by said Secu-

    rity Deed has been and is hereby

    declared due because of, among

    other possible events of default,

    failure to pay the indebtedness as

    and when due and in the manner

    provided in the Note and Securi-

    ty Deed. The debt remaining in

    default, this sale will be made for

    the purpose of paying the same

    and all expenses of this sale, as

    provided in Security Deed and by

    law, including attorney’s fees (no-

    tice of intent to collect attorney’s

    fees having been given).

    Said property will be sold sub-

    ject to any outstanding ad val-

    orem taxes (including taxes

    which are a lien, but not yet due

    and payable), any matters which

    might be disclosed by an accurate

    survey and inspection of the

    property, any assessments, liens,

    encumbrances, zoning ordi-

    nances, restrictions, covenants,

    and matters of record superior to

    the Security Deed first set out

    above. U.S. Bank National Asso-

    ciation, not in its individual ca-

    pacity but solely as Trustee on

    behalf of the OWS REMIC Trust

    2013-2 is the holder of the Secu-

    rity Deed to the property in ac-

    cordance with OCGA § 44-14-

    162.2. The entity that has full au-

    thority to negotiate, amend, and

    modify all terms of the mortgage

    with the debtor is: Shellpoint

    Mortgage Servicing, 55 Beattie

    Place, Suite 100, Greenville, SC

    29601 (800) 539-0267.

    To the best knowledge and be-

    lief of the undersigned, the party

    in possession of the property is

    Marian T. Nichols or a tenant or

    tenants and said property is more

    commonly known as 139 Meadow

    Lark Lane, Vidalia, Georgia

    30474.

    The sale will be conducted

    subject (1) to confirmation that

    the sale is not prohibited under

    the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2)

    to final confirmation and audit of

    the status of the loan with the

    holder of the security deed.

    U.S. Bank National Associa-

    tion, not in its individual capaci-

    ty but solely as Trustee on behalf

    of the OWS REMIC Trust 2013-2

    as Attorney in Fact for Marian

    Nichols and Melinda Nichols

    McCalla Raymer, LLC

    1544 Old Alabama Road

    Roswell, Georgia 30076

    www.foreclosurehotline.net

    EXHIBIT “A”

    All that certain lot or parcel of

    land, together with improve-

    ments thereon, lying, situate,

    and being in the 1567th G.M.

    District, Montgomery County,

    Georgia, being designated as Lot

    No. 31, Regency Hill Subdivision,

    and being more fully shown upon

    a plat of said subdivision pre-

    pared by Billy Flanders, Survey-

    or, dated October 20, 1997,

    recorded in at Book 6, Page 267,

    Montgomery County, Georgia

    Records, specific reference to

    which is made a part of this de-

    scription. Said Lot is known as

    139 Meadowlark Lane, Vidalia,

    Georgia, 30474. Also: One 2006

    Fleetwood Carriage Motor Mobile

    Home, 32’X80’ approximately

    2280 Sq. ft., VIN

    #GAFL675AB78095-AV21, HUD

    Label GEO1445161 and

    GEO1445162, located upon and

    permanently attached to and

    made part of the aforesaid real

    estate.

    MR/th4 6/2/15

    Our file no. 52701110 - FT8

    _________________________

    M15-26

    STATE OF GEORGIA

    COUNTY OF MONT-

    GOMERY

    NOTICE TO DEBTORS AND

    CREDITORS

    IN RE: The Estate of Paul

    Blondell Jones, deceased.

    All creditors of the Estate of

    PAUL BLONDELL JONES, de-

    ceased, late of Montgomery

    County, are hereby notified to

    render their demands to the un-

    dersigned according to law, and

    all persons indebted to said es-

    tate are to make immediate pay-

    ment to me.

    This 28th day of April, 2015.

    Shirley G. Roberson, Executor

    Estate of Paul Blondell Jones

    P. O. Box 7

    Alston, GA 30412

    _________________________

    M15-27

    IN THE PROBATE COURT

    COUNTY OF MONT-

    GOMERY

    STATE OF GEORGIA

    IN RE: Estate of MILDRED

    W. HILTON, Deceased

    Estate No. 2004-PS-116

    PETITION FOR LETTERS

    OF ADMINISTRATION

    NOTICE

    John B. Barton has petitioned

    to be appointed Administrator of

    the estate of MILDRED W.

    HILTON deceased, of said Coun-

    ty. The Petitioner has also ap-

    plied for grant of certain powers

    contained in O.C.G.A. §53-12-

    261. All interested parties are

    hereby notified to show cause

    why said petition should not be

    granted. All objections to the pe-

    tition must be in writing, setting

    forth the grounds of any such ob-

    jections, and must be filed with

    the court on or before June 1,

    2015. All pleadings/objections

    must be signed under oath before

    a notary public or before a pro-

    bate court clerk, and filing fees

    must be tendered with your

    pleadings/objections, unless you

    quality to file as an indigent par-

    ty. Contact probate court person-

    nel at the following address/tele-

    phone number for the required

    amount of filing fees. If any ob-

    jections are filed, a hearing will

    be scheduled at a later date. If no

    objections are filed, the petition

    may be granted without a hear-

    ing.

    Rubie Nell Sanders

    Judge of the Probate Court

    P. O. Box 444

    Mt. Vernon, GA 30445

    912-583-2681

    _________________________

    M15-28

    Notice is given that articles of

    incorporation which will incorpo-

    rate MONTGOMERY ENVIRON-

    MENTAL, INC. will be delivered

    to the Secretary of State for filing

    in accordance with the Georgia

    Business Corporation Code. The

    initial registered office of the cor-

    poration will be located at 575

    Conner Rd., Uvalda, Ga. 30473

    and its initial registered agent at

    such address is Pennie Downie

    Moses.

    By: Massie McIntyre, P.C., At-

    torney for Incorporator.

    _________________________

    M15-29

    NOTICE

    (For Discharge from Office

    and all Liability)

    Probate Court of Montgomery

    County

    RE: Petition of Dorothy M.

    Barrett for Discharge as Admin-

    istrator of the Estate of BILLIE

    EDGE MEEK, Deceased

    TO: whom it may concern:

    This is to notify you to file ob-

    jection, if there is any, to the

    above referenced petition, in this

    Court on or before June 8, 2015.

    BE NOTIFIED FURTHER: All

    objections to the petition must be

    in writing, setting forth the

    grounds of any such objections.

    All pleadings/objections must be

    signed before a notary public or

    before a probate court clerk, and

    filing fees must be tendered with

    your pleadings/objections, unless

    you quality to file as an indigent

    party. Contact probate court per-

    sonnel at the following

    address/telephone number for the

    required amount of filing fees. If

    any objections are filed, a hearing

    will be scheduled at a later date.

    If no objections are filed, the peti-

    tion may be granted without a

    hearing.

    Rubie Nell Sanders

    Probate Judge

    P. O. Box 444

    Mt. Vernon, GA 30445

    912-583-2681

    _________________________

    M15-30

    NOTICE TO DEBTORS AND

    CREDITORS:

    All creditors of the Estate of

    FANIBEL M. WARNOCK, de-

    ceased, late of Montgomery

    County, are hereby notified to

    render their demands to the un-

    dersigned, according to law, and

    all persons indebted to said es-

    tate are required to make imme-

    diate payment to me.

    This 21st day of May, 2015.

    JILL WARNOCK, Executrix of

    the

    Estate of Fanibel M. Warnock,

    Deceased

    P. O. Box 146

    Tarrytown, GA 30470

    JAN WARNOCK-MOORE, Ex-

    ecutrix of the

    Estate of Fanibel M. Warnock,

    Deceased

    529 Warnock Pond Road

    Tarrytown, GA 30470

    RUSSELL L. CLARK

    Attorney for Executor

    P. O. Box 645

    Alamo, GA 30411

    _________________________

    M15-31

    NOTICE TO DEBTORS AND

    CREDITORS:

    All creditors of the Estate of

    FLORENCE W. OVERSTREET,

    deceased, late of Montgomery

    County, are hereby notified to

    render their demands to the un-

    dersigned, according to law, and

    all persons indebted to said es-

    tate are required to make imme-

    diate payment to me.

    This 21st day of May, 2015.

    JILL WARNOCK, Executrix of

    the

    Estate of Florence W. Over-

    street, Deceased

    P. O. Box 146

    Tarrytown, GA 30470

    RUSSELL L. CLARK

    Attorney for Executor

    P. O. Box 645

    Alamo, GA 30411

    Classified Ads and Public Notices

    The Montgomery Monitor — May 27, 2015 — Page 7a

    Legal Notices

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  • Family Fun PageThe Montgomery Monitor — May 27, 2015 — Page 8a

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