final report, tzu ji charity house (ipoh)

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  • BACHELORS OF HONOURS ARCHITECTUREMETHOD 1215 METHODS OF DOCUMENTATION AND MEASURED DRAWINGS

    TZE CHI BUDDHIST MERITS SOCIETY HOUSENO. 47, JALAN RAJA DR NAZRIN SHAH, 30250 IPOH, PERAK

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

    I

    ABSTRACT

    The purpose of this project was to identify the types of architectural historical structure and the importance of conserving the historical heritage. This report contains the overall research and information, some of which was ob-tained from the site at No. 47, Jalan Raja Dr. Nazrin Shah (Jalan Gopeng), 30250 Ipoh, Perak, while others from arti-cles, interviews, photos and etc.

    Built since the British colonization around the turn of 19th century, the design and concept of the house was in-fluenced by both the Malay kampong houses and British style architecture. The design of the house was a fusion of vernacular and western neoclassical styles. The architec-tural influence was one of Ipohs architectural style icons during the British and Japanese colonization. However, due to the rising development of different foreign architec-tural styles of malls, shop lots etc. In the late 20th century, the House that was once an architectural icon has been declining in its influence over Ipoh today.

    Although renovations and different changes were made to the house to suit the different owners over the years, the house no longer holds value in its architectural influence to-day. Hence, in order to conserve the architectural and histor-ical value of the house, different methods of documentation were used. As a non-renewable resource, Cultural Heritage should be conserve so that the image of humanity is defined for now and for the future.

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

    II

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    Our group would like to acknowledge and express our ap-preciation to the following people and organizations that have helped in contributing the information, support and help needed to complete this project. Below are the lists of people to whom we owe our deepest gratitude for.

    Mr. Hoi Jung Wai, our lecturer for his patience in guiding and providing us with feedbacks throughout the execution of the measured drawings and report.

    Mr. Lim, current owner of the Gopeng Road Old house for his permission in allowing us to measure the historical building on site as well as documenting it.

    Mr.Wong Chong Win, the current president of Tzu-Chi Bud-dhist Charity House In Ipoh as well as a contractor, who did all the construction work for the House and providing us with information through the interviews.

    Mr. Lee Teik Huat, Vice president of Tzu-Chi Buddhist Charity house of Ipoh for providing us with information and also vre-sponsible for finding the current owner, Mr. Lim to buy over the property of the house.

    Ms. Hu Yoke Wan and Mr. Sim Kuan Hin, residents and mem-bers from the Tzu-Chi Buddhist Charity house of Ipoh who provided us with the information needed through the interview as well.

    Other members of the Tzu-Chi Buddhist Charity house of Ipoh, current residents of the house for extending their hopitality to-wards us during our measurement activity on site as well as providing us with lunch on the last day.

    Mr. Kenny Chan, the son of the previous owner, Mr. Chan Chee Keong for allowing us the time to interview him as well as providing us with information needed to complete the re-port.

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

    III

    DECLARATION

    Name of the house: Tze Chi Merit HouseAddress: No. 47, Jalan Raja Dr Nazrin Shah, 30250 Ipoh, Perak.

    This report is submitted for the subject ARC 1215 Methods of Documentation and Measured Drawings to the School of Architecture, Building and Design Taylors University Lakeside Campus to obtain 5 credits in Praticum 1.

    A Group Work by:

    Name Student I.D.Johan Syahriz bin Muhaiyar (Leader) 0316115 Meera A/P B. Satheesh (Leader) 0317062 Chia Wee Min 0315186Einas Adel Ahmed Maizran 0316350Farah Farhanah binti Kassim Kushairi 0317534Gennieve Lee Phick Choo 0311622 Ibrahim Adhnan 0314694 Imran Suhaimi bin Muhammad Ali 0311624 Ivan Ling Chyi Rui 0313583 Joshua Ting Sing Rong 0311461 Kelvin Ng 0315081 Khor Xin Suan 0316230

    Bachelor of Science (Honours) (Architecture)January 2015Taylors University

    Lee Yi Feng 0315750Lee Yi Na 0318211 Nicholas Lai Ken Hong 0317435 Nicolas Wong Xiao En 0314377 Nur Aiman Mohamad Shakir 0311759 Nur Syazleen Sies 0321260 Poh Ziyang 0807P68823 Ricky Wong Yii 0313785 Tan Shing Yeou 0314850 Tan Wei How 0310707 Visagan A/L P. Arudeselvan 0313710 Yap Zhi Jun 0310738

    Supervised by:Mr. Hoi Jung Wai

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

    IV

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT DECLARATION TABLE OF CONTENTSLIST OF FIGURES

    CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH1 . 1 OBJECTIVES OR AIMS1 . 2 SCOOP1 . 3 LIMITATION1 . 4 METHODOLOGY1 . 5 SIGNIFICANCE OF STUDY1 . 6 EQUIPMENT

    CHAPTER 2: INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH2 . 1 SITE CONTEXT

    CHAPTER 3: HISTORICAL BACKGROUND3 . 1 IPOH, PERAK 3 . 1 . 1 BRITISH COLONIZATION 3 . 1 . 2 JAPANESE COLONIZATION 3 . 1 . 3 INDEPENDENCE 3 . 1 . 4 HISTORY TIMELINE

    3 . 2 TZE CHI BUDDHIST MERIT SOCIETY HOUSE 3 . 2 .1 TZE CHI BUDDHIST MERIT SOCIETY HOUSE OWNERSHIP TIMELINE

    CHAPTER 4: ARCHITECTURAL DEVELOPMENT4 . 1 ARCHITECTURAL INFLUENCES 4 . 1 . 1 VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE 4 . 1 . 2 NEW STRAITS ECLECTIC STYLE4 . 2 BUILDING EXTENSION4 . 3 BUILDING RENOVATION4 . 4 BUIDLING CHRONOLOGY

    CHAPTER 5: CULTURE AND ACTIVITY5 . 1 SPACE PLANNING 5 . 1 . 1 FAMILY STRUCTURE 5 . 1 . 2 ASSOCIATION STRUCTURE

    CHAPTER 6: BUILDING SUSTAINABILITY 6 . 1 BUILDING ORIENTATION6 . 2 CLIMATE 6 . 2 . 1 TEMPERTURE AND HUMIDITY 6 . 2 . 2 SUN PATH 6 . 2 . 3 WIND ANALYSIS

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

    V

    CHAPTER 7: MATERIAL AND CONSTRUCTION DETAILS7 . 1 MATERIALS7 . 2 SKELETAL FRAMING 7 . 2 . 1 COLUMN AND BEAM 7 . 2 . 2 FOOTING

    7 . 3 BUILDING 7 . 3 .1 SLAB 7 . 3 . 2 JOINTS 7 . 3 . 3 FLOOR, WALL AND ROOF JUNCTION

    7 . 4 BUILDING 7 . 4 . 1 ROOF 7 . 4 . 2 DOORS 7 . 4 . 3 WINDOWS 7 . 4 . 4 STAIRCASE AND HANDRAIL 7 . 4 . 5 FINISHES

    CHAPTER 8: CONCLUSION

    REFERENCEAPPENDIXGLOSSARYSCALE DRAWINGS

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

    VI

    LIST OF FIGURES

    Figure 1.1 Measuring TapeFigure 1.2 Open ReelFigure 1.3 Digital Laser Measuring TapeFigure 1.4 Steel RulerFigure 1.5 Adjustable Set SquareFigure 1.6 LadderFigure 1.7 DSLR CameraFigure 1.8 Butter PaperFigure 1.9 LaptopFigure 1.10 Printer

    Figure 2.1 Key plan of the site

    Figure 3.1 New Town and Old Town with Kinta Valley in the middleFigure 3.2 Tin Mine (1906)Figure 3.3 Standard Chartered Bank of IndiaFigure 3.4 Ipoh Railway Station c. 1930Figure 3.5 St. Michaels Institution (Clayton Road)Figure 3.6 Bridge at the Kinta River

    Figure 4.1.1 Malay Kampong HouseFigure 4.1.2 Top view of the Traditional Malay Kampong Figure 4.1.3 Spatial Organization of Malay Kampong houseFigure 4.1.4 The Front Entrance of the Main BuidingFigure 4.1.5 Timber Embelishment on the AnjungFigure 4.1.6 Anjung of the Main Building Figure 4.1.7 Vents on Timber WallFigure 4.1.8 Open Vents on the Roof Figure 4.1.9 Greek and Roman columnsFigure 4.1.10 Footings of the House

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

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    Figure 4.1.11 The Roof of the HouseFigure 4.1.12 The Front Elevation of the HouseFigure 4.1.13 Traditional Fanlight WindowFigure 4.1.14 Arch Windows and Jalousie WindowsFigure 4.1.15 Jalousie Window and Geometical Figure 4.1.16 Chinese Influence Airholes Figure 4.1.17 Retractable Security DoorFigure 4.1.18 Geometrical Colored Floor TilesFigure 4.1.19 Ceramic Tiles for Kitchen Table TopFigure 4.1.20 Geometrical Patterned Grilles Figure 4.1.21 Back View of the HouseFigure 4.1.22 Bedroom in the Extended buildingFigure 4.2.1 Layout of the Building Before RenovationFigure 4.2.2 Services Block in the Primary BuildingFigure 4.2.3 Storage under the Elevated Figure 4.2.4 Services Pipes and Junks in the Store RoomFigure 4.2.5 Living Room Connecting all the BedroomsFigure 4.2.6 Kitchen in the Extended BuildingFigure 4.2.7 Bedroom in the Extended BuildingFigure 4.2.8 Rear Court and Services BlocksFigure 4.2.9 The Living Hall Connecting from the Primary Building to Secondary BuildingFigure 4.2.10 The Storage Room Near the CourtyardFigure 4.2.11 The Storage Room Near the KitchenFigure 4.3.1 Old Concrete Staircase used by Mr. Chans FamilyFigure 4.3.2 New Timber Staircase Built by Tze Chi Figure 4.3.3 The Old Carpet Floor in the Main BuildingFigure 4.3.4 The New Timber FlooringFigure 4.3.5 The Old Wall with Vents on TopFigure 4.3.6 The Newly Painted Plasterboard wall

  • TAYLOR S UNIVERISTYSCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN

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    Figure 4.3.7 The Foldable Timber Door with Metal GrilleFigure 4.3.8 Double Hung Timber Door Figure 4.3.8 Double Hung Timber DoorFigure 4.3.9 Casement Window with Metal Mesh used in Primary BuildingFigure 4.3.10 Jalousie Window with Metal GrilleFigure 4.4.1 Front Elevation of the Old House Figure 4.4.2 Side Elevation of the Secondary BuildingFigure 4.4.3 Front Elevation of the HouseFigure 4.4.4 Meeting RoomFigure 4.4.5 Front Elevation of the Newly Renovated HouseFigure 4.4.6 Exterior Hallway Leading to the Kitchen

    Figure 5.1.1 Typical Spatial