forced japanese receiver's - university of hawaiivol. 18. no. 18. lihue, kauai, territory of hawaii,...

of 8/8
f: 'St I S. W. WILCOX 1 fin i y.j ; .f V .. '.i. - '.:':f r ft; ESTABLISHED 1904. VOL. 18. NO. 18. LIHUE, KAUAI, TERRITORY OF HAWAII, TUESDAY. MAY 2, 1922 SUBSCRIPTION RATES, $2.50 PER YEAR 5 CENTS PER COPY ;JPoor Rock Slows Up Work on the New Breakwater ittilln tlin wnrk In nrnifrnflfltno "&afiUy at" tho Nawlllwlli breakwat- - epiri8 not getting along so rapidly as it did for some time duo to tho fact that tho ledgo of rock that was furnishing the stones for . the breakwutcr Is playing out.' After the outside layer wore taken away a great deal of soft, unsatisfactory stono was found on the interior of tho hill. Tho falling oft of this closest sourco of supply Is slowing up the work. It is necessary to dig more to get tho stones and the large cap stones aro not much in evldonce as they once woro. Rock will have to bo obtained from the further ridges, making more 'track and a longer haul necessary. How long it will take to complete this work Is not known. It will d very largely upon tho ease of getting the rock. And when tho breakwater is all finished, the prob- lem of facilitating Kauai's shipping by the use of it will have been only started. The putting up of wharves and tho dredging of the harbor will be work of great magnitude. The dredging of the harbor will requlro from one half million to one million dollars, after tho breakwater Is all completed. This money will have to bo appropriated by congress and so far there has been no action taken on it. There is no appropria- tion yet for the preliminary surveys for tbe dredging or for the erection of the wharves. The work of erecting tho break- water is being done by the U. S. En- gineers. But the work of dreding tho harbor and the erection of the wharves will come under the terri- torial board of harbor commlsloners. TO IMPROVE LIHUE ARMORY IS PLAN OF KAUAI LEGION Kauai Post No. 2 of 'the American Legion held their regular monthly meeting at the court house on Sat- urday evening. After the regular routine of business the recommenda- tion of the athletic committee to start a campaign to raise the root of tho Llhuo armory so that the building may really be used as a cotumuity center, wqs acted upon. It was decided that the post should get behind the plan to tho full ex- - tont of Its powers and carry the project thru to success. The deft nlte plan for financing the project has not been completed, but mdm bers of tho post ure working out the details. The plans for Improving the build ing call for tbe oliinination of tho cefutcr row of posts and the sub utitutlon of ono complete truss In stead of two as is used to support the roof at present. Tho present armory has two 30 foot trusses with a 12 foot height to the rafters. Tho now plan calls for one. GO foot truss and about a 25 foot celling at least. This would give Kauai a communl ty center second to' nouo In tho Is- lands, as it would havo a floor 60 by 100 and could bo used for any 3' Indoor sport giving a maximum of pla"lng space for any Indoor gamo, Those who played or attended tho indoor baseball games last winter will recall that the players wore handicapped by the ball continually hitting tho rafters and that the p!uy lng space was cut down duo to tho center row of posts. Basketball players wero also handicapped duo to tho sumo reasons. Tho post will announco In a short tlmo Its definite plans In regard to financing the proposition and thoro jf Is no doubt that the Legion will car- ry tlio project thru to a successful conclusion, as tho Legion hns yet to make a failure of anything they have undertaken. An unexpected request camo from Oih pageant commltteo of tho Ori- ental dance 'for tho party that took tho pillows that graced the queen's throno, to kindly return tho sumo, as tho ownor was kicking. All tho post amateur sleuths are working on the case, Auto Club Holds Successful Run The initial outing of tho Kauai Automobile Club was a signal suc- cess, which outran oven tho most confident expectations of Its pro- moters. They Gather In From Far and Near In accordance with tho program, carloads of happy outers from all sections of the island began to roll Into Hanalei about 10 o'clock, and camo thick and fast, and .in bucH numbers that finally parking apnea was at a premium. Ide,al Hosts Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Sanborn plac ed their beach house nt tho disposnl of the party, which was a very wel-com- o convenience, and thoy them- selves made most genial and kindly hosts. Hanalei at Its Best Tho day was phenomenally beau tiful, and Hanalei was at its best. The sea was most inviting, with quite enough surf running to glvo zip and zest to tho swimming and It soon became .ovidont that there was plenty of both, oven close In- shore, while farthor out there was qulto of splco of danger. .Most of the young people, and some who wero not so young, went In, whllo there was a good sized old folks row lined up on tho beach to enjoy it as spectators. On to Hanalei, and the Beauties on the Way Rather reticently thoy heard tho call of tho outing leader, "All aboard for lunch at Haenn!" The trip thither along the coast, overlooking tho tumbling waves and rock-boun- d reefs and sandy reaches below, is one of the finest that can bo seen in Hawaii, or, indeed, any- where else, and' was at its very best on this occasion. A Romantic Spot for Lunch The Dry Cave of Manlnlhola was the selected spot for luch, and prov- ed a most delightful place for that purpose. It is in front of tho great cave, with its dark and cavernous depths, and under the fine grove of kukul trees, which have grown up there, with the precipitous beet- ling cliffs overhead, and glimpses of the blue sea out through the trees. There Is plenty room there for the largest outing party that will ever lunch there, but it could be very much improved by clearing off loose rock. The crowd broke up into groups according to affinity and lunch arrangement and devoted themselves very assiduously to tho toothsome viands they had brought, for the space of half an hour or so. An Old Hawaiian Story They were then rounded up to ono central point, and Mr. Lydgato gave, them a Hawaiian story about the three outstanding rocks near by, which were ancient demi-god- Pohakuloa nnd Kauwa, who swam In one night, all tho way from Kahlkl, In the South Seas, bound forWalalenle. but who wero overtaken, just as thoy landed, by tho breaking day, and Hko Lot's wife of old, wero turned to stono. To the Wet Caves Tho next number on the program was tho Wet Caves at Kanaloa and Waiakapalai, a couple of miles or so farthor along and beyond tho' reach of automobiles. A goodly number, some 25 or 30, lined up under tlie leadership of tho Heloloa leader, (Continued on Pago Six) TWENTY-FIFT- ANNIVERSARY Lihue Union church will celebrato tho 25th anniversary of English speaking serrices next Sunday morn- ing at 11 o'clock. Mrs. Win. Hyde Rice will narrato concerning tho first Irregular services over conduct- ed in Llhuo for tho Knglish speak- ing people-'- , which dated back to 1855 and continued until May lRt, 189G. Beginning with tho latter date j Rov. J. M. Lydgato will dcscrlbo In detail tho growth anil progress or j tho community and church llfo dur- ing tho 24 years of his pastorate. This promises to bo a servlco very I rich in historic value to the student of community advancement. Ka- - malnas will greatly appreciate tho j recital of familiar scenes and ex- periences, while tho same will be I great educational value to tho young-- ' or gonorution. All will bo welcome. RALPH W. BAYLESS, Minister. Poisoning Wipes Out Entire Japanese Family An entire Jnprfcieso family was wiped out last week In Puhl camp thru a form of poisoning called bot- ulism, which thoy contracted from eating- from salmon eggs that wore preserved, In a fashion peculiar to tho Uapaneso, according to authori- ties that aro investigating tho case. The dead nroi Mntsujlra Shlbuya. aged 40, the father of tho family, Suye Shlbuya aged 28, tho mother and Kolchi, aged 5, nnd Makoto aged 3, the two sons. The salmon eggs woro purchased at a local sto'ro on tho 21st of tho mouth. None woro eaten however until tho 24th when they woro par- taken of freely by tho father nnd the two sons. The mother took a little or none of the eggs but ate some food out of a lunch tin that had had tho salmon eggs in It. Shlbuya went to work as usual that morning but was taken ill in the 'fields about 11 n. in. He left his work and spent tho day at a friend's house, returning to his own home that evening. Dr. Kuhns was called on Wednosdny morning to treat the sick man. This form of poisoning Is ex- tremely virulent and though heroic measures were used by Dr. Kuhns and his assistants, Shlbuya dlod the following evening at about 11:30. Kolchi, tho older boy was strick- en at about a. m. on Tuesday morn- ing and failed very rnpidly, dying at G p. m. that same evening. The younger boy, Makoto, was taken ill at about the same time but lived un- til the next evening about S o'clock. The mother was taken to the Li- hue hospital on Wednesday where she lingered until Saturday morn- ing. Although several 'other parties had purchased salmon eggs from tho very same tub that tho Shlbuya family had bought theirs, there has been no report of anyone suffering from any illness that carries symptoms peculiar to botulism. A specimen of the salmon eggs were sent to tho territorial labora- tories in Honolulu nnd It was first announced that the salmon eggs were negative, but the next day a wiro came to disregard tho first re- port as a guinea pig that had ..been lnnoculatcd had died within 24 hours. Mr. Cook, the territorial board of health inspector had confiscated the tub of eggs just as soon as- - it was suspected of being tho cause of the tragedy, to prevent any further spread of the poisoning. Botulism Is an acute poisoning that Is caused by the action of a form of bacteria. Tho Infection is said to bo an accidental happening, that might occur to any canned or preserved goods. It will be remem- bered that tho country was startled a few years ago by a wholesale poisoning which was a form of bot- ulism and it was finally traced down to a brand of canned olives. Authorities aro carefully watch- ing all those thnt are suspected of being In danger of any poisoning from having eateh the contaminated salmon eggs. P. Schultz, deputy territorial food commissioner, arrived this morning to conduct tho investigation. Accord- ing to Mr. Schultz this. Is tho first caso on record of botulism In the territory. .j. MOKIHANA CLUB TO HAVE INTERESTING MEETING Tho Moklhana Club will meet next Wednesday afternoon, May 3, at Lihue Social hall. An Interesting afternoon Is promised by tho com- mittee in charge. Mrs. Ray Allen will give a pro- gram mado up of piano numbers selected from different composors. Mrs. Katheriuo Wood will talk on tho development of tho sonata. Tho hostesses for tho afternoon will be Mrs. W. II. Rico Jr., Miss Rowo, Mrs. Kuhlmaun, Mrs. Wedo-moye- Mrs. Trowbridge, Miss Young, Miss King nnd Miss Colbert. Gaylord P. Wilcox, of tho Ameri- can Factors, camo over from Hono- lulu this morning. F. Schultz, of tho territorial board of health, arrived from Honolulu this morning on official business. Plan County Fair At Lihue Armory Plans aro being fomulatod for a county fair that will be held at tho Llhuo county lot and armory on May 27th. Tho plans call for ex- hibits and concessions by nil the local organizations such as the ' Hale o Nalil, the Moklhana Club, the ' Y. W. C. A. tind tho Kauai schools. , The Halo o Nalll will present a Hawaiian village, which will include a luau, hula dancing, and singing of ancient meles. Tho Kuual schools will furnish ex- hibits of the work or tho school ' children along vocational lines as I well as other departments of school work. This exhibit will bo under tile direction of Prank S. Pugh, vo- cational director for tho Kauai schools. Tho Moklhana Club, the Y. "W. C. A and tho Waliuca club will all have boriths and concessions. An added, feature will bo a special prize for tho longest piece of sugar cano of any variety that will bo placed on exhibition. There will al- so bo prizes for tho longest plocos of each variety. Tho prize will go to tho section luna in whoso section it was grown. In tho evening In addition to the' regular concessions thoro will bo a dance In the armory, tho music to bo furnished by Alapaki Smith's Jazz band. The proceeds from the fair will bo spent in buying now chairs for tho armory and also putting In show- er baths for thoso of the athletes that use the armory ns a gym. Information In regard to conces- sions and exhibits may bo secured from Sheriff Rico. .$. SOCIAL SERVICE ASSN. WILL MEET SATURDAY The Social Service Association of Kauai will meet at Moklhana ' Hall in Lihue, on Saturday, May G, ut 2:30 p. m. Reports will bo heard from members who attended tho second territorial conference of so- cial work in Honolulu last month. Mrs. A. H. Watorhouse will speak on "Outstanding Impressions of tho Conference," Miss Hanson will tell of tho nutritional work as discussed and carried on in some of the city schools. Mrs. Susan Dunn is to re- port on tho health program; Miss Roe, on Dr. Porteus' scries of psycho-a- nalytical lectures; and Miss Mabel Wilcox on juxenilo and matters. A cordial invita- tion to attend this meeting Is ex- tended tl nnyono Interested. This is tho annual meeting and tho election of officers for tho coming year will take place. VAN GIESEN REMOVED FROM DISTRICT COURT PRACTICE Judgo William C. Achi Jr., has handed down a decision In tho dis- barment case of Henry Van Olesen, tho Kapaa attorney charged with un- professional conduct. Tho Judgo rul- ed that Van Glesen's name be stricken from tho roll of thoso quali- fied to practice in tho district courts of Kauai. Van Glesen Is charged with using unprofessional language in referr- ing to Judgo Von Ekekela, when tho latter gave a declsjon against a cli- ent of Van dleson. It is alleged that Van Glesen called tho Judgo a "lamo leg' 'and a "crook." It is said to bo understood that tho disbarmout of Van Glesen Is merely a suspension until such tlmo as he can hold his tongue when decisions are given against him. -- j. KAUAI POSTMASTER IS GIVEN PRISON TERM Win. E. Smith, former postmaster at Koloa, was sentenced to two nnd a half years in Oahu prison by Judgo Poindextor In tho federal court, according to news rocolved this morning. Smith plod guilty to embezzling $9,400,22 In monoy or-do- from tho Koloa post offlco. Ho will bo taken to prison todny, Tho shortage of Smith was discover- ed early in January of this year. Pollowlng his arrest tho former post- master attempted to commltt suicide by drinking Iodine, Opening of Parish House Set for May i The opening of the Llhuo Mem- orial Parish Houbo will take place-o- Pridny, May lilth. A short dedl cation service Is j ho hold in the afternoon, at which tho address will be given by Dr. A. W. Palmer, of Honolulu. In tho evening a child- ren's performance of Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream," under tho direction of Miss Ethel Damon and Mrs. Katerlno Cox of Honolulu, will completo tho opening of tho houso to tho community at large. Miss Margaret Clarke, of Honolulu, will direct three fairy songs which she has composed for this perform- ance. Mendelssohn's music for the Midsummer N'lght's Dream will be given as an overturn and between the acts by the Pasmoro Trio of tiie Punahou Music school. A cordial In- vitation is extended to all to at- tend these opening exorcises. 4. .,. PERSONALS . Judge Lyle A. Dickey returned from Honolulu Wednesdny morning, whero ho spent tho week attending tho annual meeting of tho Hawaiian Mission Children's Society, of which ho Is the treasurer. Supervisor John I. Sllva, of Elo-el- paid a business visit to tho metropolis last week. H. P. Faye returned last Wednes- day morning from a visit to Ho- nolulu. W. F. Schtmmelfenntg, ot Koloa, was among the passengers return- ing Irom Honolulu last Wednesday morning. Misses Elsie and Mabel Wilcox returned Wednesday morning from attending tho welfaro workers' at Honolulu. E. S. Swan, of Grovo Parm plan- tation mado a brief visit to Honolu- lu last week. Ho returned Wednes- day morning. Mrs. Lyman, of Grovo Parm, who has been visiting In Honolulu, re- turned by tho Kinau last Wednes day morning. Mrs. H. Brandt, of Koloa, return- ed Wednesday morning from a vis- it to Honolulu. Miss E. Hansen, welfaro worker for Grovo Parm plantation, returned Wednesday from tho conference in Honolulu. Jas. D. Davidson, manager of Ilof-gaard- store, Waimea, returned on Wednesday morning from a week's visit In Honolulu. Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Hutton, of Ll- huo, returned last Wednesday from Honolulu. "Sandy" looks as though ho had very rocently gone thru a very trying ordenl. "Jack" Coney returned from Ho- nolulu last Wednesday morning. 'where ho went to gloat over tho un-- j fortunatcs who recently traversed tho Hot Sands. Mr. and Mrs. Jas. W. Plckard of Nawlllwlli, returned Prlday morning from a brief visit to Honolulu. Miss Ethel Damon of Honolulu ar- rived Prlday morning to visit friends in Llhuo. A. F. Robinson of Makawell re- turned from Honolulu Prlday morn- ing. W. M. GIfford was an arrival Irom Honolulu Inst Prlday morning. Claude F. Sutton, territorial bank examiner, Is on Kauai this week looking into tho affairs ot tho de- funct branch of tho' Hawaii Bank of Commerce. Earl McTagoart, student assistant of the H. S. 1'. A. experiment station who hns been on Kauai for tho past two months, returned to Honolulu last Wednosdny afternoon. Artor graduating In Juno Mr. McTnggart will probably bo employed as n luna .at tho Ewa Sugar Co. Sam B. Goss, contractor, returned this morning from a business trip to Honolulu. Barney H. Attwood, of tho cub-turn- s offlco, Honolulu, was an ar- - I rlvnl by tho Claudlno this morning. Kauai Bank Forced Into Receiver's Hands Last Week Following a somewhat stormy and checkered nrwc of about two years' duratlnn, the Kauai branch of tho Hawaii Bank of Commerce, formerly the Bank or Kami!, clos- ed its doors Thusday morning. And It closed then so hard nnd tight that the bang caused Its mother In- stitution in Hono ulu to shut up shop too. Tho Bank of Knpna was founded by tho people who so unsuccessful- ly guided tho aifalrs of i.he Peo- ple's Bank or Hllo. Somowhat over two years ago, Herbert Tnmlow, then cashier of tho People's I'.cnk Fred l'attorson, formerly of Kauai, nnd Senator James Russell, nlso connected with the bank and with the Security Trust Co., visited the Garden Island to Interest local cap- ital in a now bank on this Island. A good many men, mostly thoso with snmowhnt limited capital, bought stock in the enterprise. A number of others who had consid ered tho proposition balked when they found that the control of the place would really bo In Hllo, not In tho hands of local business men. The institution was started under favorable auspices. It was tho time of high sugar and high bonuses. Tho first hundred thousand dollars de- posits was leached In a remarkably short time. Business seemed to be very flourishing nnd the bank, as many other Institutions tho country over, expanded quickly. It erected its own building. Soon It also put up a building for a drug store, a clothing storo and a doctor's office. Tho bank advanced considerable monoy for tho furnishing of the var- ious stores. It was not very long until tho clothing storo proved a losing prop- osition. The proprietor left and tho bank held tho bag. Tho drug store managed to keep going for a much longer time. Tho proprietor loft Kauai only a few months ago to work in ono of tho Honolulu drug stores. But ho left a clerk In charge and attempted to keep tho store open. But, It too, was forced to close Its doors a few weeks ago and again tho bank ' was somewhat "polio." At tho tlmo of tho opening of tho Hawaii Bank of Commerce about three and a half months ngo, tho Kauai bank was turned over to that institution. Tho People's Bank of Hilo is said to have sold' 'its In- terest in tho local Institution to tho Ilnwaii Bank of Commerce at par. But thoro wero a good many loans that could not bo collected. The value of tho bank property and of other buildings erected had decided- ly depreciated. Altogether n loss of about 140,000 was sustained by tho Honolulu institution in taking ovor tho Kauai bank. Tho loss caused Is tho greatest cause of tho closing of the Hawaii Bank of Commerce and the Com mercial Trust Co., according to Del- - bort E. Metzger, president and man- ager. But thoro aro hopes for a re- organization as tho assets of tho companies, are said to bo about $75,-00- 0 in excess of tho liabilities. Tho Watorhouso Trust Co.. has been nppolnted as tho receiver for tho two institutions and for the Ka- uai branch of tho bank. While thero Is a possibility ot a reopening ot all institutions, tho straightening out of the affairs will take somo tlmo and It is not a certainty that thoy will bo permitted to reopen. But tho excess assets ar6 a fairly certain guarantee that tho depositors of tho banks will receive all their money back nt somo future date. Tho first cashier ot tho Bank of Kauai was Karl B. Morgan, tho sec- ond Walter V. Loe. The cashier of tho bank aftor It was made n branch or tho Hawaii Bank of Commerce was K. M, Ahann. Tho directors of tho Hawaii Bank of Commerce nro J. E. Rice, II. A. Asch. D. E. Metzger, K. C. Ahana nnd Manuel Aguiar Jr. ! 4. 4. KAUAI BASEBALL LEAGUE OPENS NEXT SUNDAY At Lihue 4. Makee vs. Lihue At Makawell McBryde vs. Makawell

Post on 28-Feb-2020

1 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • f: 'St IS. W. WILCOX 1

    fin i y.j ;.f V .. '.i. -

    '.:':f r

    ft; ESTABLISHED 1904. VOL. 18. NO. 18. LIHUE, KAUAI, TERRITORY OF HAWAII, TUESDAY. MAY 2, 1922 SUBSCRIPTION RATES, $2.50 PER YEAR 5 CENTS PER COPY

    ;JPoor Rock Slows

    Up Work on the

    New Breakwater

    ittilln tlin wnrk In nrnifrnflfltno"&afiUy at" tho Nawlllwlli breakwat- -

    epiri8 not getting along so rapidlyas it did for some time duo to thofact that tho ledgo of rock that

    was furnishing the stones for . thebreakwutcr Is playing out.' After theoutside layer wore taken away agreat deal of soft, unsatisfactorystono was found on the interior oftho hill.

    Tho falling oft of this closestsourco of supply Is slowing up thework. It is necessary to dig moreto get tho stones and the large capstones aro not much in evldonce asthey once woro. Rock will have tobo obtained from the further ridges,making more 'track and a longerhaul necessary.

    How long it will take to completethis work Is not known. It will d

    very largely upon tho ease ofgetting the rock. And when thobreakwater is all finished, the prob-lem of facilitating Kauai's shippingby the use of it will have been onlystarted. The putting up of wharvesand tho dredging of the harbor willbe work of great magnitude.

    The dredging of the harbor willrequlro from one half million to onemillion dollars, after tho breakwaterIs all completed. This money willhave to bo appropriated by congressand so far there has been no actiontaken on it. There is no appropria-tion yet for the preliminary surveysfor tbe dredging or for the erectionof the wharves.

    The work of erecting tho break-water is being done by the U. S. En-gineers. But the work of dredingtho harbor and the erection of thewharves will come under the terri-torial board of harbor commlsloners.

    TO IMPROVE LIHUE ARMORY

    IS PLAN OF KAUAI LEGION

    Kauai Post No. 2 of 'the AmericanLegion held their regular monthlymeeting at the court house on Sat-urday evening. After the regularroutine of business the recommenda-tion of the athletic committee tostart a campaign to raise the rootof tho Llhuo armory so that thebuilding may really be used as acotumuity center, wqs acted upon.

    It was decided that the post shouldget behind the plan to tho full ex- -tont of Its powers and carry theproject thru to success. The deftnlte plan for financing the projecthas not been completed, but mdmbers of tho post ure working out thedetails.

    The plans for Improving the building call for tbe oliinination of thocefutcr row of posts and the subutitutlon of ono complete truss Instead of two as is used to supportthe roof at present.

    Tho present armory has two 30foot trusses with a 12 foot heightto the rafters. Tho now plan callsfor one. GO foot truss and about a25 foot celling at least.

    This would give Kauai a communlty center second to' nouo In tho Is-lands, as it would havo a floor 60by 100 and could bo used for any

    3' Indoor sport giving a maximum ofpla"lng space for any Indoor gamo,

    Those who played or attended thoindoor baseball games last winterwill recall that the players worehandicapped by the ball continuallyhitting tho rafters and that the p!uylng space was cut down duo to thocenter row of posts. Basketballplayers wero also handicapped duoto tho sumo reasons.

    Tho post will announco In a shorttlmo Its definite plans In regard tofinancing the proposition and thoro

    jf Is no doubt that the Legion will car-ry tlio project thru to a successfulconclusion, as tho Legion hns yetto make a failure of anything theyhave undertaken.

    An unexpected request camo fromOih pageant commltteo of tho Ori-ental dance 'for tho party that tooktho pillows that graced the queen'sthrono, to kindly return tho sumo,as tho ownor was kicking. All thopost amateur sleuths are workingon the case,

    Auto Club Holds

    Successful Run

    The initial outing of tho KauaiAutomobile Club was a signal suc-cess, which outran oven tho mostconfident expectations of Its pro-moters.They Gather In From Far and Near

    In accordance with tho program,carloads of happy outers from allsections of the island began to rollInto Hanalei about 10 o'clock, andcamo thick and fast, and .in bucHnumbers that finally parking apneawas at a premium.Ide,al Hosts

    Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Sanborn placed their beach house nt tho disposnlof the party, which was a very wel-com- o

    convenience, and thoy them-selves made most genial and kindlyhosts.Hanalei at Its Best

    Tho day was phenomenally beautiful, and Hanalei was at its best.The sea was most inviting, withquite enough surf running to glvozip and zest to tho swimming andIt soon became .ovidont that therewas plenty of both, oven close In-shore, while farthor out there wasqulto of splco of danger.

    .Most of the young people, andsome who wero not so young, wentIn, whllo there was a good sizedold folks row lined up on tho beachto enjoy it as spectators.On to Hanalei, and the

    Beauties on the WayRather reticently thoy heard tho

    call of tho outing leader, "All aboardfor lunch at Haenn!"

    The trip thither along the coast,overlooking tho tumbling waves androck-boun- d reefs and sandy reachesbelow, is one of the finest that canbo seen in Hawaii, or, indeed, any-where else, and' was at its very beston this occasion.A Romantic Spot for Lunch

    The Dry Cave of Manlnlhola wasthe selected spot for luch, and prov-ed a most delightful place for thatpurpose. It is in front of tho greatcave, with its dark and cavernousdepths, and under the fine groveof kukul trees, which have grownup there, with the precipitous beet-ling cliffs overhead, and glimpsesof the blue sea out through thetrees.

    There Is plenty room there forthe largest outing party that willever lunch there, but it could bevery much improved by clearing offloose rock. The crowd broke upinto groups according to affinityand lunch arrangement and devotedthemselves very assiduously to thotoothsome viands they had brought,for the space of half an hour or so.An Old Hawaiian Story

    They were then rounded up to onocentral point, and Mr. Lydgato gave,them a Hawaiian story about thethree outstanding rocks near by,which were ancient demi-god-

    Pohakuloa nnd Kauwa,who swam In one night, all tho wayfrom Kahlkl, In the South Seas,bound forWalalenle. but who weroovertaken, just as thoy landed, bytho breaking day, and Hko Lot'swife of old, wero turned to stono.To the Wet Caves

    Tho next number on the programwas tho Wet Caves at Kanaloa andWaiakapalai, a couple of miles or sofarthor along and beyond tho' reachof automobiles. A goodly number,some 25 or 30, lined up under tlieleadership of tho Heloloa leader,

    (Continued on Pago Six)

    TWENTY-FIFT- ANNIVERSARY

    Lihue Union church will celebratotho 25th anniversary of Englishspeaking serrices next Sunday morn-ing at 11 o'clock. Mrs. Win. HydeRice will narrato concerning thofirst Irregular services over conduct-ed in Llhuo for tho Knglish speak-ing people-'-, which dated back to1855 and continued until May lRt,189G. Beginning with tho latter date

    j Rov. J. M. Lydgato will dcscrlbo Indetail tho growth anil progress or

    j tho community and church llfo dur-ing tho 24 years of his pastorate.This promises to bo a servlco very

    I rich in historic value to the studentof community advancement. Ka- -malnas will greatly appreciate tho

    j recital of familiar scenes and ex-periences, while tho same will be

    I great educational value to tho young-- 'or gonorution. All will bo welcome.

    RALPH W. BAYLESS,Minister.

    Poisoning Wipes Out

    Entire Japanese Family

    An entire Jnprfcieso family waswiped out last week In Puhl campthru a form of poisoning called bot-ulism, which thoy contracted fromeating- from salmon eggs that worepreserved, In a fashion peculiar totho Uapaneso, according to authori-ties that aro investigating tho case.

    The dead nroi Mntsujlra Shlbuya.aged 40, the father of tho family,Suye Shlbuya aged 28, tho motherand Kolchi, aged 5, nnd Makoto aged3, the two sons.

    The salmon eggs woro purchasedat a local sto'ro on tho 21st of thomouth. None woro eaten howeveruntil tho 24th when they woro par-taken of freely by tho father nndthe two sons. The mother took alittle or none of the eggs but atesome food out of a lunch tin thathad had tho salmon eggs in It.

    Shlbuya went to work as usualthat morning but was taken ill inthe 'fields about 11 n. in. He lefthis work and spent tho day at afriend's house, returning to his ownhome that evening. Dr. Kuhns wascalled on Wednosdny morning totreat the sick man.

    This form of poisoning Is ex-tremely virulent and though heroicmeasures were used by Dr. Kuhnsand his assistants, Shlbuya dlod thefollowing evening at about 11:30.

    Kolchi, tho older boy was strick-en at about a. m. on Tuesday morn-ing and failed very rnpidly, dyingat G p. m. that same evening. Theyounger boy, Makoto, was taken illat about the same time but lived un-til the next evening about S o'clock.

    The mother was taken to the Li-hue hospital on Wednesday whereshe lingered until Saturday morn-ing.

    Although several 'other parties hadpurchased salmon eggs from tho verysame tub that tho Shlbuya familyhad bought theirs, there has beenno report of anyone suffering fromany illness that carries symptomspeculiar to botulism.

    A specimen of the salmon eggswere sent to tho territorial labora-tories in Honolulu nnd It was firstannounced that the salmon eggswere negative, but the next day awiro came to disregard tho first re-port as a guinea pig that had ..beenlnnoculatcd had died within 24 hours.

    Mr. Cook, the territorial board ofhealth inspector had confiscated thetub of eggs just as soon as- - it wassuspected of being tho cause of thetragedy, to prevent any furtherspread of the poisoning.

    Botulism Is an acute poisoningthat Is caused by the action of aform of bacteria. Tho Infection issaid to bo an accidental happening,that might occur to any canned orpreserved goods. It will be remem-bered that tho country was startleda few years ago by a wholesalepoisoning which was a form of bot-ulism and it was finally traced downto a brand of canned olives.

    Authorities aro carefully watch-ing all those thnt are suspected ofbeing In danger of any poisoningfrom having eateh the contaminatedsalmon eggs.

    P. Schultz, deputy territorial foodcommissioner, arrived this morningto conduct tho investigation. Accord-ing to Mr. Schultz this. Is tho firstcaso on record of botulism In theterritory.

    .j.

    MOKIHANA CLUB TO HAVE

    INTERESTING MEETING

    Tho Moklhana Club will meetnext Wednesday afternoon, May 3,at Lihue Social hall. An Interestingafternoon Is promised by tho com-mittee in charge.

    Mrs. Ray Allen will give a pro-gram mado up of piano numbersselected from different composors.Mrs. Katheriuo Wood will talk ontho development of tho sonata.

    Tho hostesses for tho afternoonwill be Mrs. W. II. Rico Jr., MissRowo, Mrs. Kuhlmaun, Mrs. Wedo-moye-

    Mrs. Trowbridge, Miss Young,Miss King nnd Miss Colbert.

    Gaylord P. Wilcox, of tho Ameri-can Factors, camo over from Hono-lulu this morning.

    F. Schultz, of tho territorial boardof health, arrived from Honoluluthis morning on official business.

    Plan County Fair

    At Lihue Armory

    Plans aro being fomulatod for acounty fair that will be held at thoLlhuo county lot and armory onMay 27th. Tho plans call for ex-hibits and concessions by nil thelocal organizations such as the

    ' Hale o Nalil, the Moklhana Club, the' Y. W. C. A. tind tho Kauai schools., The Halo o Nalll will present aHawaiian village, which will includea luau, hula dancing, and singingof ancient meles.

    Tho Kuual schools will furnish ex-hibits of the work or tho school

    ' children along vocational lines asI well as other departments of school

    work. This exhibit will bo undertile direction of Prank S. Pugh, vo-cational director for tho Kauaischools.

    Tho Moklhana Club, the Y. "W. C.A and tho Waliuca club will allhave boriths and concessions.

    An added, feature will bo a specialprize for tho longest piece of sugarcano of any variety that will boplaced on exhibition. There will al-so bo prizes for tho longest plocosof each variety.

    Tho prize will go to tho sectionluna in whoso section it was grown.

    In tho evening In addition to the'regular concessions thoro will bo adance In the armory, tho music tobo furnished by Alapaki Smith'sJazz band.

    The proceeds from the fair willbo spent in buying now chairs fortho armory and also putting In show-er baths for thoso of the athletesthat use the armory ns a gym.

    Information In regard to conces-sions and exhibits may bo securedfrom Sheriff Rico.

    .$.

    SOCIAL SERVICE ASSN.

    WILL MEET SATURDAY

    The Social Service Association ofKauai will meet at Moklhana ' Hallin Lihue, on Saturday, May G, ut2:30 p. m. Reports will bo heardfrom members who attended thosecond territorial conference of so-cial work in Honolulu last month.Mrs. A. H. Watorhouse will speakon "Outstanding Impressions of thoConference," Miss Hanson will tellof tho nutritional work as discussedand carried on in some of the cityschools. Mrs. Susan Dunn is to re-port on tho health program; MissRoe, on Dr. Porteus' scries of psycho-a-nalytical lectures; and MissMabel Wilcox on juxenilo and

    matters. A cordial invita-tion to attend this meeting Is ex-tended tl nnyono Interested.

    This is tho annual meeting and thoelection of officers for tho comingyear will take place.

    VAN GIESEN REMOVED

    FROM DISTRICTCOURT PRACTICE

    Judgo William C. Achi Jr., hashanded down a decision In tho dis-barment case of Henry Van Olesen,tho Kapaa attorney charged with un-professional conduct. Tho Judgo rul-ed that Van Glesen's name bestricken from tho roll of thoso quali-fied to practice in tho district courtsof Kauai.

    Van Glesen Is charged with usingunprofessional language in referr-ing to Judgo Von Ekekela, when tholatter gave a declsjon against a cli-ent of Van dleson. It is alleged thatVan Glesen called tho Judgo a "lamoleg' 'and a "crook."

    It is said to bo understood thattho disbarmout of Van Glesen Ismerely a suspension until such tlmoas he can hold his tongue whendecisions are given against him.

    --j.

    KAUAI POSTMASTER ISGIVEN PRISON TERM

    Win. E. Smith, former postmasterat Koloa, was sentenced to two nnda half years in Oahu prison byJudgo Poindextor In tho federalcourt, according to news rocolvedthis morning. Smith plod guilty toembezzling $9,400,22 In monoy or-do-

    from tho Koloa post offlco. Howill bo taken to prison todny,Tho shortage of Smith was discover-

    ed early in January of this year.Pollowlng his arrest tho former post-master attempted to commltt suicideby drinking Iodine,

    Opening of Parish

    House Set for Mayi

    The opening of the Llhuo Mem-orial Parish Houbo will take place-o-

    Pridny, May lilth. A short dedlcation service Is j ho hold in theafternoon, at which tho address willbe given by Dr. A. W. Palmer, ofHonolulu. In tho evening a child-ren's performance of Shakespeare's"Midsummer Night's Dream," undertho direction of Miss Ethel Damonand Mrs. Katerlno Cox of Honolulu,will completo tho opening of thohouso to tho community at large.Miss Margaret Clarke, of Honolulu,will direct three fairy songs whichshe has composed for this perform-ance. Mendelssohn's music for theMidsummer N'lght's Dream will begiven as an overturn and betweenthe acts by the Pasmoro Trio of tiiePunahou Music school. A cordial In-vitation is extended to all to at-tend these opening exorcises.

    4..,.

    PERSONALS.

    Judge Lyle A. Dickey returnedfrom Honolulu Wednesdny morning,whero ho spent tho week attendingtho annual meeting of tho HawaiianMission Children's Society, of whichho Is the treasurer.

    Supervisor John I. Sllva, of Elo-el-paid a business visit to tho

    metropolis last week.

    H. P. Faye returned last Wednes-day morning from a visit to Ho-nolulu.

    W. F. Schtmmelfenntg, ot Koloa,was among the passengers return-ing Irom Honolulu last Wednesdaymorning.

    Misses Elsie and Mabel Wilcoxreturned Wednesday morning fromattending tho welfaro workers'

    at Honolulu.

    E. S. Swan, of Grovo Parm plan-tation mado a brief visit to Honolu-lu last week. Ho returned Wednes-day morning.

    Mrs. Lyman, of Grovo Parm, whohas been visiting In Honolulu, re-turned by tho Kinau last Wednesday morning.

    Mrs. H. Brandt, of Koloa, return-ed Wednesday morning from a vis-it to Honolulu.

    Miss E. Hansen, welfaro workerfor Grovo Parm plantation, returnedWednesday from tho conference inHonolulu.

    Jas. D. Davidson, manager of Ilof-gaard-store, Waimea, returned on

    Wednesday morning from a week'svisit In Honolulu.

    Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Hutton, of Ll-huo, returned last Wednesday fromHonolulu. "Sandy" looks as thoughho had very rocently gone thru avery trying ordenl.

    "Jack" Coney returned from Ho-nolulu last Wednesday morning.

    'where ho went to gloat over tho un-- jfortunatcs who recently traversedtho Hot Sands.

    Mr. and Mrs. Jas. W. Plckard ofNawlllwlli, returned Prlday morningfrom a brief visit to Honolulu.

    Miss Ethel Damon of Honolulu ar-rived Prlday morning to visit friendsin Llhuo.

    A. F. Robinson of Makawell re-turned from Honolulu Prlday morn-ing.

    W. M. GIfford was an arrival IromHonolulu Inst Prlday morning.

    Claude F. Sutton, territorial bankexaminer, Is on Kauai this weeklooking into tho affairs ot tho de-funct branch of tho' Hawaii Bankof Commerce.

    Earl McTagoart, student assistantof the H. S. 1'. A. experiment stationwho hns been on Kauai for tho pasttwo months, returned to Honolululast Wednosdny afternoon. Artorgraduating In Juno Mr. McTnggartwill probably bo employed as n luna.at tho Ewa Sugar Co.

    Sam B. Goss, contractor, returnedthis morning from a business tripto Honolulu.

    Barney H. Attwood, of tho cub-turn- sofflco, Honolulu, was an ar- -

    I rlvnl by tho Claudlno this morning.

    Kauai Bank Forced

    Into Receiver'sHands Last Week

    Following a somewhat stormy andcheckered nrwc of about twoyears' duratlnn, the Kauai branchof tho Hawaii Bank of Commerce,formerly the Bank or Kami!, clos-ed its doors Thusday morning. AndIt closed then so hard nnd tightthat the bang caused Its mother In-stitution in Hono ulu to shut upshop too.

    Tho Bank of Knpna was foundedby tho people who so unsuccessful-ly guided tho aifalrs of i.he Peo-ple's Bank or Hllo. Somowhat overtwo years ago, Herbert Tnmlow,then cashier of tho People's I'.cnkFred l'attorson, formerly of Kauai,nnd Senator James Russell, nlsoconnected with the bank and withthe Security Trust Co., visited theGarden Island to Interest local cap-ital in a now bank on this Island.A good many men, mostly thosowith snmowhnt limited capital,bought stock in the enterprise. Anumber of others who had considered tho proposition balked whenthey found that the control of theplace would really bo In Hllo, notIn tho hands of local business men.

    The institution was started underfavorable auspices. It was tho timeof high sugar and high bonuses. Thofirst hundred thousand dollars de-posits was leached In a remarkablyshort time. Business seemed to bevery flourishing nnd the bank, asmany other Institutions tho countryover, expanded quickly. It erectedits own building. Soon It also putup a building for a drug store, aclothing storo and a doctor's office.Tho bank advanced considerablemonoy for tho furnishing of the var-ious stores.

    It was not very long until thoclothing storo proved a losing prop-osition. The proprietor left and thobank held tho bag. Tho drug storemanaged to keep going for a muchlonger time. Tho proprietor loftKauai only a few months ago towork in ono of tho Honolulu drugstores. But ho left a clerk In chargeand attempted to keep tho storeopen. But, It too, was forced to closeIts doors a few weeks ago and againtho bank ' was somewhat "polio."

    At tho tlmo of tho opening of thoHawaii Bank of Commerce aboutthree and a half months ngo, thoKauai bank was turned over tothat institution. Tho People's Bankof Hilo is said to have sold' 'its In-terest in tho local Institution to thoIlnwaii Bank of Commerce at par.But thoro wero a good many loansthat could not bo collected. Thevalue of tho bank property and ofother buildings erected had decided-ly depreciated. Altogether n loss ofabout 140,000 was sustained by thoHonolulu institution in taking ovortho Kauai bank.

    Tho loss caused Is tho greatestcause of tho closing of the HawaiiBank of Commerce and the Commercial Trust Co., according to Del- -bort E. Metzger, president and man-ager. But thoro aro hopes for a re-organization as tho assets of thocompanies, are said to bo about $75,-00- 0

    in excess of tho liabilities.Tho Watorhouso Trust Co.. has

    been nppolnted as tho receiver fortho two institutions and for the Ka-uai branch of tho bank. While theroIs a possibility ot a reopening otall institutions, tho straightening outof the affairs will take somo tlmoand It is not a certainty that thoywill bo permitted to reopen. Buttho excess assets ar6 a fairly certainguarantee that tho depositors of thobanks will receive all their moneyback nt somo future date.

    Tho first cashier ot tho Bank ofKauai was Karl B. Morgan, tho sec-ond Walter V. Loe. The cashier oftho bank aftor It was made n branchor tho Hawaii Bank of Commercewas K. M, Ahann. Tho directors oftho Hawaii Bank of Commerce nroJ. E. Rice, II. A. Asch. D. E. Metzger,K. C. Ahana nnd Manuel Aguiar Jr.

    ! 4. 4.KAUAI BASEBALL LEAGUE

    OPENS NEXT SUNDAY

    At Lihue 4.Makee vs. Lihue

    At MakawellMcBryde vs. Makawell

  • THE UNIVERSAL CAR

    Price. F. O. B. Kauai

    RunaboutTouring

    $668.43$698.43

    Prices Include Starterand Demountable Wheels

    Never BeforeA Value Like This

    Why should you buy any car buta Ford ? Prices lowest, parts low-est, operating and upkeep expenselowest, yet a Ford car will take youany place any car will go. Theseare sensible, not extravagant times,and a Ford is the most sensible carfor anyone to own. Terms if

    We successfully send by PARCEL

    POST to all the Islands: Bread,Rolls, Snails, Cakes, Cookies and

    Candies.

    Prices Upon Application

    ALEXANDER YOUNG CAFEHONOLULU

    11 rifi X

    fti Distributors t '

    vIa TERRIT0RY 0F HAWAII If ' m

    READ THE GARDEN ISLAND

    i!

    --Vis

    THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, MAY 2, 1922 '

    SOCIALMRS. CHA3. A. RICE AND MISS

    EDITH RICE HAVE ASWIM AND TEA

    Mrs. Charles A. Rice and MissEdith Itlce were the charming hos-tesses at a very delightful swim andtea party last Thursday afternoonat their beautiful beach home atKalapakl.

    It was a perfect day and a per-fect setting for such a party. Theladies who did not swim sat on thecool shady lawn and lanui enjoyingthe beautiful scenery and a socialchat. At 4:30, tea, coffee and de-licious refreshments were served,which completed a very pleasant af-ternoon, i

    Those who enjoyed the afternoonwere Mrs. Wm. Hyde Rice, Mrs. S.W. Wilcox, Mrs. C. H. Bishop, Mrs.Miller Mrs. Rogers, Mrs. Ralph

    Mrs. C. H. Gates, Mrs.John MIdkiff, Mrs. J. II. Moragne,Mrs. Elliot Wood, Mrs. E. S. Swan,Mrs. N. Locke, Mrs. Lyman, Mrs.H. D. Sloggett, Mrs. F. Carter, Mrs.Kenneth Hopper, M,rs. I. J. Hogg,Mrs. Ashton Hogg, Mrs. R. Wilcox.Mrs. E. H. W. Broadbent, Mrs. R.W. Bayless, Mrs. Doyle, Mrs. Wm.Stewart, Mrs. R. D. Moler, Mrs. C.M. V. Forster, Mrs. Philip Rice,Mrs. Paul Isenberg, Mrs. W. H. Rice,Mrs. Frank Crawford, the MissesHmldleston, Horn, Reed, Lindsey,(Jnderhill, ' Marston, King, Knight,Young, Jacobs, Wakefield, Barker,Colbert and Anthony.

    MRS. ADRIAN ENGLEHARD GIVESUNIQUE PARTY

    Mrs. Adrian Englehard gave avery unique party on Friday after-noon to a few of her friends. It wasa mending party, each guest camewith her mending and they didn'tbring their smallest work bag, eith-er. Miss Mary Knight happened tobe setting on the lucky chair underwhich wan a lovely darning bagfully equipped. Mrs. Will Crawforddrew the lucky number which wasthirteen, the prize being a sack ofgreen peas. ThoHe present were Mrs.Will Crawford, Miss 'Florence Mon-creet-

    Mrs. Campbell, Mrs. C. L.Lane, Mrs. T. E. Longstreth, MissMary Kiiight, Miss Lyndall Jacobs,Miss Opal Colbert, Miss Helen King,Mrs. J. H. Midkiff, Mrs. Sam Carter,Miss Edith Rice, Mrs. T. E. Mor-- .gun, Mrs. R. F. Middleton and Mrs.Hobby.

    MRS. PHILIP RICE IS HOSTESSAT SWIMMING PARTY

    Mrs. Philip Rice was hostess onSaturday, April 29, at one of themost' successful and delightful picnics of the season. The beautifulbeach home, of Mr. and Mrs. Wm.Hyde Rice at Haena was the meccato which over 75 fuir guests wend-ed their way, enjoying to the fullthe wonderful and beautiful scen-ery on the way. The weather' god-dess had opened wide her paint boxund the resulting blues and greensof ocean, land and sky were nilthat the beauty lover could defiire.

    Upon arrival at Haena the ma-jority of the guests enjoyed a dipin the sparkling waters, after whichluncheon wus served under the coclhala trees, overlooking the sea.

    Water melon was the grand cli-max to the delicious meal, afterwhich the guests enjoyed to thefull the delightful shade of the treeschatting, sewing, some Indulging inbridge, and yet others In a seconddip in the ocean. All too soon camethe time to depart for home, thosefrom Waimea and Kekaha, perforcehaving to leave first, and all joinedin expressing to their hostess theirappreciation of. the delightful dav.

    MRS. ROBERT MOLER GIVES ASHOWER FOR MISS MARSTEN

    Mrs. Robert Moler waa hostess onWednesday at a shower party inhonor of Miss Vera Marston, whois soon to be married and makeher home in Hilo. Miss Mirtiton byher gracious and capable ways hasquite won her way into the heartsof Lihue people, who all desire towish her all the happlnoss thatDame Fortune can shower up.n her.Wednesday's shower of pleasantthings consisted or handkerchiefsand stockings, and the guests viedwith euch other in attempting topin the gifts, blindfolded, upon apainted picture of Miss Marston,nurse's satchel and all. Miss Dalewus the successful contestant andwus herself favored with a souvenirof the occasion in an ittruciivehandkerchief.

    Delicious refreshments weo serv-ed coiiHlstlug of Ice cream and cake.

    NOrESMRS. E. 8. SWAN IS HOSTESS

    BRIDGE TEA

    Mrs. E. S. Swan gave a delight-ful bridge tea last 'Monday after-noon. The room In which the guestsplayed was most effectively decor-ated with beautiful bouquets of Af-rican daisies, dahlias and gladioli.

    Those who played bridge wereMrs. T. L. Morgan, Mrs. R. Middle-ton- ,

    Mrs. J. II. Midkiff and theMisses Lyndall Jacobs, Mary Knight,Helen King, Lucile Wakefield, OpalColbert, Alice Young, Anthony, Al-ma Barker, Edith Rica, Lola Hud-dlesto- n

    and Horn. High scores wereheld by Miss Edith Rice and MissHorn. Those coming for tea wereMrs. Charles Rice, Mrs. C. M. V.Forster and Mrs. F. Crawford.

    MRS. BRAUE AND MRS. HASTIEENTERTAIN

    Mrs. A. B. Braue and Mrs. Hus-tle of Eleelo entertained a numberof friends at a very delightful bridgetea last Thursday afternoon at thehome of Mrs. Draue. The roomswere beautifully decorated for theoccasion with choice flowers andferns.

    After several interesting rubberswere played, refreshments were serv-ed and a social hour enjoyed.

    MR. AND MRS. E. LIVESEY GIVECHOP SUEY DINNER

    Last Sunday Mr. and Mrs. E. Liv-ese- yentertained a number of their

    friends and relatives at their home-stead home with a chop suey diner.The table decorations, place cardsand dishes hud a chinesey effect.Following the dinner, noisemakerscomprising watermelons and fire-crackers were served. Melon seedswere flying everywhere und the fire-crackers were busting In the mostunexpected places.

    The guests were Miss Lindsay,Miss Osborne, Mr. Markwell, Mr.and Mrs. R. E. Israel, Mrs. Shel-hame- r,

    Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Israel,Josephine Israel, Mrs. Cheathamand her three sons, Hales, Orme andEdward, and Glenn Hopper.

    BILLIE AND IDA MAY GROTEHAVE BIRTHDAY PARTY

    Billie and Ida May Grote werehost and hostess at a joint birthdayparty last Saturday afternoon. About25 of their friends were present.

    As soon as the last little guesthad arrived, the dining room wasthrown open, disclosing two beau-tifully appointed birthday tables withbirthday cakes on each. The colorscheme was carried out in pink" andwhile in the table decorutions, thedainty refreshments and place fav-ors.

    Tea was served to the grown folksand Jolly games were played untiltime to go home.

    MRS. WM. HYDE RICE IS MAYDAY HOSTESS

    Mrs. Win. Hyde Rice was thecharming hostess yesterday after-noon at a picturesque May Day par-ty. About 50 of her friends werepresent, mainly little girls, all dress-ed in white, and their mothers.

    The beautiful lawn of the old homeblooming with flowers and dottedwith the dainty colored gowns ofthe guests, presented a picture thatwill remain long in memory. Eachlady was presented upon arrivalwith a corsage bouquet in pastelshades.

    A Maypole with varicolored stream-ers had been erected on the lawnand seats for the guests surround-ed this. After drawing lots, held byMother Rice, the honor of Queenof the May fell to Dora Rice. Shewas then crowned queen by hersubjects and read a fitting poem.

    Anna Scott and Margaret Sloggettsang a duet very sweetly, MarjorieWaterhouse recited.

    Euch little girl was then adornedwith a beautiful flower lei and tooktheir places for the Maypole dunce.They were led and instructed inthis dunce by coy little Miss "Rosie-Posle- "

    Bodrero. After this the girls"over sixteen" wound thru the intri-cate maze of the beautiful old dance.Cooling refreshments were then serv-ed to all.

    Upon bidding farewell to theirhostess, each little girl wus pre-sented with a dainty basket ofcandy.

    Mrs. Rice was assisted in the en-tertaining by her daughters, Mrs.P.' L. Rice, and Mrs. Ralph Wilc ox.

    FOR RENTTwo bedroom house on main road

    adjoining Wailua river, lately oc-cupied by W. E. Eklund; withsmall building for garage, and ser-vants nilHrters Fnrniuhcl Rii uT.,month. Apply to Lyle A. Dic key,Tip Top Building, Lihue. M21tf!

    CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH ' CIRCUITTERRITORY OF HAWAII

    Estate of William Werner, Late ofHanalel, Kauai, Deceased.

    NOTICE TO CREDITORSAll creditors of said deceased are

    hereby notified to present theirclaims with proper vouchers or dulyauthenticated copies thereof, even Ifthe claim In secured by mortgageupon real estate, to the undersigned, the duly appointed, 'and quailfied, Administrator of the estate ofsaid deceased, at his office at Wainlha, Hanalel,. Kauai, within sixmonths from the date of the firstpublication of this notice, t:May 2nd, 1922, in the Garden Islandnewspaper, or they will be foreverbarred. And all persons indebted tosaid estate are hereby demandedto make immediate payment to saidAdministrator at the above address.

    Wainiha, Hanalel, Kauai, May 2nd1922.

    A. MENEFOGLIO,Administrator of the Estateof William Werner, Deceased.

    J. Mahiai Kaneakua,Attorney for Estate.

    DECREE

    IN THE MATTER OF TUB PETITION OF J1NKICHI KAI FOR

    CHANGE OF NAME

    On consideration of the petitionof JINKICHI KAI, for a decreechanging his name to JINKICHIOKADA, and there appearing to meto be good reasons for granting thesame:

    NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue ofthe authority in me by law vestedand thereunto enabling, I, W. R.

    Governor of the TerrI'tory of Hawaii, do hereby order anddecree that the name of JINKICHI KAIbe and hereby Is changed to JINKICHI OKADA. and that a copy ofthis decree be published for at leastfour consecutive weeks, in "THEGARDEN ISLAND," a newspaper ofgeneral circulation in the Territoryof Hawaii, published at Lihue, Kauai, in said Territory.

    Dated, March 16th, A. D. 1922, atHonolulu, Territory of Hawaii.

    W. R. FARRINGTON,(Seal) Governor of Hawaii.April

    NOTICE TO CREDITORS

    The undersigned, F. E. THOMP-SON, Administrator of the Estateof TAM WOODS (also known asTom Woods or Tom Wood), deceased, hereby gives notice to allpersons having claims against theestate of said Tarn Woods, deceased, to present such claims duly au-thenticated, and with proper vouch'era or duly authenticated copiesthereof, even though such claims besecured by mortgage upon real es(ate, to the undersigned at the offices of his attorneys, Messrs,Thompson, Cathart & Ulrich.Campbell Block, Honolulu, withintlx months from the date hereof,or such claims will be forever barred.

    And all persons indebted to saidK.stato are hereby notified to makeImmediate settlement with the undersigned, Administrator, as aforesaid.

    Dated, Lihuo, Kauai, T. H April11, 1922.

    F. E. THOMPSON,Administrator

    of the Estate of TarnWoods, Deceased.

    (April

    NOTICE TO CREDITORS

    The undersigned has been appoint-ed as administrator of the estate ofRetiicbi Nugata, deceased, late ofPakala, in the Dibtrict of Wuiiuea,County of Kauai, all persons arehereby notified, having any claimagainst said estate to file them with-in six months after the first publi-cation of this notice, the 2ndday of May, 1922, at his officoin Waimea, Kauai, or the same willbe forever burred; and all those in-debted to said estate to make pay-ment without fail.

    WILLIAM O. CROWELL,Administrator,

    Estate of Ronlchl Nagata,deceased.

    Lihue, May 2, 1922.(May2-9-16-23- )

    BUSINESS PROPERTY FOR SALEThe business property of the M.

    S. Tomas Co., at Kapaa, Is for sale.This porperty, consisting of a lot75 x 100, a two story store build-ing, a residence and a garage, it lo-cated on the main business thcroughfare of Kapaa und at about thecenter of the town. For further particulars sex

    M. S. HENRIQUESTrustee M. S. Tomas Co., Creditors(tf)

    FOR SALEThoroughbred Rhode Island Red

    roosters. Alexander, II. S. Engl-Ueers- ,Lihue.

    TENDER FOR GRADING THE EROAD and MACADAM-

    IZING A SECTION THEREOF.

    The Board of Supervisors of the

    County of Kauai will receive bids

    up to 10 o'clock of May 3rd, 1922,

    for furnishing all material, labor,

    tools and machinery, necessary for

    the grading of approximately 10 2Smiles of the Puu-ka-pel- e road, to-

    gether with the macadamizing of

    the first mile.

    Bids will be received for the Wholework and In parts as shown In theproposal; each to constitute a sep-

    arate bid and the, Board of Super-visors reserves the right to rejectany or all bids. -

    Each bid to be accompanied by acertified check for 5 per cent ofamount bid.

    The successful bidder, if any, willbe required to furnish bond to theamount of 60 per cent.

    Plans, specifications and blankproposal may be obtained by prospect-ive bidders upon application to theundersigned.

    ' R. F. MIDDLETON,County Engineer.

    (AprlU8-25-May2.- )

    TENDER FOR MATERIALLIHUE SCHOOL UNIT8

    The Board of Supervisors of theCounty of Kauai, will receive bidsup to 10 o'clock of May 25th, 1922,for furnishing all material neededIn the construction of:

    (1) 6 Units of 3 classrooms each.(2) 8 Units of 3 classrooms each,

    on the Lihue Grammar School newgrounds.

    Each of the above to constitute aseparate bid and the Board of Su-pervisors reserves the right to re-ject any or all bids.

    A full list of material in bid formmay be obtained upon applicationto the undersigned.

    R. F. MIDDLETON.County Engineer.

    (April

    TENDER FOR CONSTRUCTION OFLIHUE SCHOOL UNIT8

    The Board of Supervisors of theCounty of Kauai will receive . bids Mup to 10 o'clock of June 7th, 1922,for furnishing all 'labor, and toolsnecessary for the construction andfull completion of:

    (1) 6 Units, of 3 classrooms each,(2) 8 Units, of 3 classrooms each,

    on the Lihue Grammar School newgrounds.

    Each of the above to constitutea separate bid and the Board ofSupervisors reserves the right toreject any or all bids.'

    Each, bid to be accompanied by i Acertified check of G per cent ofamount bid.

    Plans and specifications may beobtained by prospective bidders up-on application to the undersigned.

    R. F. MIDDLETON.County Engineer.

    (April 25 May2-- 16 23-80-

    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THEFIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,

    TERRITORY OF HAWAIIAt Chambers. in Probate

    In the Matter of the Anulioatlnnof GEORGE KAHEANA KAIAWEand KEAIH MAKANANI KAIAWE.his wife, for leave to adopt

    MALU FRANCIS WALKER andKANEHEKILA WALKER, Mi-nor Children.

    SUMMONS

    THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII,To J. E. WALKER, father of th

    above-name- minors, Greeting:, iou are hereby summoned, tn n.

    pear on Friday, the 23rd dav of Jnn1922, at 9:30 o'clock A. M., at thecourtroom of the above entitledcourt, in the County Building, inLihue, County of Kauai, Territoryof Hawaii, to answer or respond toan application and petition herein,filed by GEORGE KAHEANA KAIa"WE and KEAHI MAKANANI KAIA-WE- ,

    his wife, for leave tn rin,MALU FRANCIS WALKER, and1VAIMUHEKILA WALKER, vm.r mii..or children;

    And you are hereby notified thnyou may then and there, at the timeand place aforesaid, show cause, ifany you have, why the uower nf mpetition should not be granted andan order be made bv aai,i rnrtdaring that, from that date, to all"s" uieius ana purposes, sucWchildren are the chlldreu ofpetitioners and that their names bethereby changed to MALU FRANCISKAIAWE, and KANEIIEKILA KA- -i.vi!i, respectively.

    WITNESS the Honorable wmi.C. Aehi, Jr., Judge of the CircuitCourt of the Fifth fludii?ii rir..uat Lihue. Territory of Hawaii, thismm aay or April, 1922.

    (Sgd.) J. C. CULLEW(Seal) c,erk(April 11-1- 8 25 May 1C22)

  • Y. M. C. A.

    DOUBLE ORGANIZATION, KOOLAUReports of the good times being

    enjoyed by the boys and young menin other communities, thru the pro-grams of the county Y. M. C. A. resuited In the organization of twoY clubs at Koolnu last ' Saturdaynight. Owing to the more scatteredpopulation, membership material isnot as plentiful as in some otherlocalities. However twenty youngmen and boys were on hund earlyto meet the county secretary. Afterthe general plan and purpose of thework had been described. It was deelded the best results could be obtalned by having separate organiza-tions for the older and youngerfellows.

    The Bchool boys then proceededto ballot for officers. Junichl No-mura was chosen president; SeichiNakakura, vice president; MltsuyaNlshlda, secretary, Walter Comes,treasurer.

    The electors were Nobu Morlyama, Gregara Napolis, Yoshio Saka-hara- ,

    Tomotsu Moriyama, Seichi Kagawa, Hisetoshl Genko, Nobu lla-ma.

    The older fellows present wereHarry Kapule, Henry Kapule, Chas.Paioa, Kiicbl Moriyama, ShunichiMorlyawa, George Montgomery.

    Henry Kapule was' elected presi-dent, Charles Paloa, secretary andtreasurer.

    After the election of officers andthe discussion of necessary detailsfor future programs, the desks werepushed back, and a number ofgames, new to the players, were in-dulged In. 0

    Hurdle and the centipede race hmlevery fellow on his toes, part of thetime and on the other fellows toesthe rest. Skin the Hun was admin-istered with equivalent spirit to theboys on the other side. The devinmo nr. ts oliniiiA.1 4 Tin fnllnuru In-i- tuiuiiauaiii'ji Diiunm 1110 icnunn iiu.it was possible to have quite ormuch and more for everybody took'part, fun in the simple non-equi- p

    i TIP

    NOTES

    ment games as In the more highlyorganized and equipped ones. Watchus go, is the Koolnu motto.. . ,

    MANA THREE-- CLUB ACTIVEVacation or other school schedule

    disturbances have not caused anyinterruption In the weekly meetingsof our Three-- club.

    Some matters of business regard-ing the future plans or program abrought up each week. This is g

    the boys parliamentary eand business like methods.

    We huve had stories and talks of.1 different nature trying to give thoboys Ideas of subjects outside ofthe regular school work.

    Games have a part in nearly ev-jr-meeting's program. Basketball

    standards and nets have lntoly beeninstalled and the boys are enjoyinggood throwing practice.

    We hope we will be abl to havea delegation from our club at theY. M. C. A. summer camp at Has-na- .

    We know this would mean ngreat deal to the boys and all othcriiwho attend. The fellows arj begin-ning to Bave their money uo theycan go. George Kekouoha, leader.

    FULL ATTENDANCE ATTHE LIHUE Hl--

    The roll call showed all memberspresent at the regular meeting ofthe Lihue Hl-- club last Fridaynight. The presentation of the topic"Where We Got Our Bible" by twoof the fellows, disclosed some inter-esting matters of historical and lit-erary nature. Mr. Crawford supple-mented the reports of tho fellowsby personal experiences In the pre-sentation of the subject matter ofthe Bible to those not familiar withit.

    County Secretary Locke droppedin and told the fellows a littleabout the summer camp the Y. M.C. A. expects to hold at Haena afterschool is out. He also reminded usthat service Is the key note of our

    work and suggested the possibilityof IU-- menilfrrs sharing some oftheir gntnes, talgs, etc, with someyounger groups of fellows who haveno leadership in these matters. Thedetails for doing this work were leftin the hands of the chairman of theBervice committee, William Morag-ne- .

    The challenge of the dormitoryHl-- for a game of volleyball nextTuesday was accepted.

    These Hl-- meetings are bringingto the fellows different lines ofthought and activities than theyare getting any place else. The Hl--challenges fellows to worth-whil- ethinking and doing. High school fel-lows like that kind of a challenge.

    Frank Thomas, Secretary.

    HANALEI THREE-- HOLDA BEACH MEETING

    The regular meeting of the Hana-le- iThree-- Club was hold on the

    beach below the wharf lust Friday.The game committee had prepareda lively line of games and athletics.Races, jumps, stunts and mass gam-es kept the bunch busy until kou-ko- u

    was announced. The inner crav-ings were amply supplied. PresidentWilliam Stevens, due to a slightstone bruise on his left hind foot,stopped at "ten mangoes and 14 cakesas his portion of the dessert. MissCook, an ardent advocate of SafetyFirst and humane treatment of

    arbitrarily legislatedthat any eating longer than 45minutes would have to do four ex-amples in short division of not lessthan five ' figures. A big bonfire,games, stories, discussion and morekaukau made it an event of plea-sure and pleasant memories.

    FROM THE OTHER ISLANDS

    IS CHARGED

    WITHA warrant for the arrest of Tho-

    mas T. Farish, charging him withthe embezzlement of $700 from thePacific Guano & Fertilizer Co. (for-merly the Hawaiian Fertilizer Co.)for which he had been bookeeperand cashier for several years, wasissued last Thursday ut the instance

    MAY 2. 1922

    HAWAIIAN BORNt JAPANESE MEETINGS

    During the past week more than3(10 of Kauai's finest Hawaiian bornJapanese young ladles and youngmen responded to the Invitation ofF. S. Scudder, R. G. Hall and R. W.Bayless and meet at various placeson tho island for free, frank dis-cussions of tho problems which aredistinctly theirs. Among some of thetopics discussed were "Dual Citizen-ship," and the of birthcertificates. These two seemed tobe giving tho young people the great-est thought and concern. Young e

    of all faiths and of nonejoined freely in these and other dis-cussions. It was strongly manifest-ed. In practically every meeting thatthese young people possess a ferventloyalty to the land of their birthand not to that of their ancestry.Many declarations were made in re-nunciation of their allegiance to Ja-pan and of their undivided loyaltyto America, the land of freedom,liberty and equality.

    of C. G. Owen, manager of the con-cern, acording to the Star-Hulleti-

    Farish Is nt present in the terri-torial sanitarium for alcoholics, inKalihl, having been committed tothe institution by Judge J. B. Light- -foot last Friday. This will not inter-fere with the serving of the war-rant immediately, but before Farishmay be released his case must bepassed upon by the commissionersof insanity, who have jurisdictionover the institution.

    While the warrant names the spe-cific sum of 700, information plac-ed in the hands ot the city andcounty attorney byof the company early this week wasthat the alleged shortage wouldreach about $1400. This informationwas also to the effect that the mon-ey had been obtained thru pndingthe payroll. Farish having secured,for Instance, $1,100 for the officepayroll und paid out only $1000, itwas charged. It was further statedto the city attorney's office that Far-ish was suspected of manipulatingthe books and juggling the cash ac-counts to cover up the alleged short-ages. Farish was dismissed from the

    TOP THEATRE

    Prince Kuhioof

    Rites and

    The only

    Reserved 40c

    BOOKKEEPEREMBEZZLEMENT

    Complete Moving Pictures

    Showing Ancient Customs

    General

    TUESDAY.

    acquisition

    representatives

    t

    Ba i

    EDDY FERNANDEZBRINGS ATTRACTION

    Kddy Fernandez, the amusementpromoter, arrived Friday morningwith what lie claims to be the great-est variety of novel attractions everbrought to the islands.

    Among the principal attractions,of the show, ure Delno Fritz, theworld's greatest sword swallower,who defies .the medical world byswallowing swords and bayonets 24Inches long. Pro. Odur, the manwith the Iron stomach and his troupof trained dogs. Chubby Lemons, themidget fire eater, and Arthur Hchar-man- ,

    the smallest man in the world.The show is on the grounds next

    the Lihue armory and will showthere up to and including Saturdaynight.

    employ of the company last week.George K. French, w ho has been

    attorney for Farish, declared UnitFarish would fight the charge. JudgeJ. A. Matthewson has also been re-tained by Farish, It Is understood.

    LEMEN IS ARRAIGNED,PLEADS NOT GUILTY

    W. C. Lemen, one of the organiz-ers and promoters of the O. K. PinesCo., Ltd., and also vice presidentand munager of that corporation,who was indicted recently by theterritorial grand Jury on a chargeof embezzlement, pleaded not guiltyin Circuit Judge Frank Andrade'scourt lust Thursday afternoon inHonolulu. He was represented byK. J. Uotts. The case was placed onthe calendar to be set for trial.

    f ,

    MILE'S PLEA DEFERRED

    Owing to the fact that the copiesof the indictment had not been re-ceived by tho attorneys of the de-fendants, the case of William K.Miles, charged with embezzling ap-proximately $800 from the munici-pal market, In Honolulu, was set forplea at 1! o'clock next Thursday

    by Judge Frank Andrade.Brown, Crisey & Davis are repre-

    senting Miles.

    55

    THURSDAYMAY 11TH

    Kalanianaole's FuneralAlso Scenes of Kauai

    VA

    Children ISc

    chance you will have to see this wonderful pageant. Reserve your seatearly at Lihue Store.

    Seats 30cll

    THUMB PRINTS MAYCATCH BOOTLEGGERS

    I'se of the Bertilllon tstem ofthumb and finger pi hits for the de-tection of violators of the prohibitionlaws may lead bootleggori to weargloves or carefully to wine ho;ilwith a dump .:U n before deliveringto consumers says the Miiui News.Lse of the to find tho rn?.'!;ct the seller on bottles is sugrtMedby the siccets Sheriff C'rowtll i.asmade in dele tin a house breakerfrom a tin, n,t print .mi a pane ofglass at 1'a'a. If a thumb print Isleft so dUti':'ly on a window panvhy not aNo "li glass b.il'.l.-i- : Ir thquestion asked and which may be"tried out.

    Since tho Ini null), ti. n of the l!"itsystein of detection l.y thumb

    prints and measurmetits on Maui.Sheriff Cveiv ill nas used it success-fully on iii' occasions. The fiitai 1 1. ma win- - e he identified a safebreaker who uv, 1 the .Tana s!cii'mid stole a ..rii if money 'h-- ? I urglar left .he mark of hid thuml 01.the door of the saf:. Prints of thethumbs of suspects were taken audone corresponded with the print ontho metal door of the safe. The cul-prit came thru with a confession.

    Next there was a case at Lahainawhere a cash box was robbed. Therewas a thumb mark on the box. Againsuspects were subjected to the testsand one print corresponded to themark left on the box. Once more,when confronted with the two markstho offender admitted his crime.

    Most recently, following the enter-ing of a house at Paia Sheriff Crow-el- l

    found that glass Is one of thebest curriers of identification marks.Looking for clues at the house thathad been entered the sheriff founda thumb murk In the lower cornerof a pane of glass In the window thethief had opened to effect an en-trance. There was one tiny straightline that was identical with a lineon a print of the thumb of a sus-pect. Crowell confronted this manwith the pane of glass and askedhim if he had seen It before. A hes-itating admission followed. Where?At Paia! and Julian Ortez confessedand involved Aniiilo San Juan asun accomplice. He also admittedburglaries at Waihee and Walehuwhich had previously baffled thepolice.

    So the county's invest men t In theBertillion outfit is proving a goodInvestment and promises to be theterror of evil-doer-

    JAS. F. MORGAN

    Company, LimitedREAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE

    STOCKS, BONDS,

    No. 125131 Merchant 8tP. O. Box No. 694 Honolulu

    Alexander&

    BaldwinLimitedt

    Sugar Factors

    Commission Merchants- Insurance Agents

    AGENTS FOBHawaiian Commercial & Sugar

    Company.Haiku Sugar Company.Paia Plantation.Maui Agricultural Company.Hawaiian Sugar Company.Kahuku Plantation Company.McBryde Sugar Company.Honolua Ranch.Kauai llallroud Company.Kahului Railroad Company.Kauai Fruit & Land Company.

    Don t Lose Sight!

    of llio fact that 1 have aqualified

    Eyesight Specialistat your wrvice

    My personal guarantee goeswilh all the work done, hackedup by a reputation, gainedduring i." years on the islands,for a KA1K AND SQUAHKJH'AL.

    If your eyes trouble you,or you need to change yourglasses, coiue and consult me.

    For appointments, writeS. K. U CASOPTICIAN

    Kapaa, Kauai

  • TH E GARDENIssued Every Tuesday

    KENNETH C. UOITEU

    TUESDAY

    COTTAGES AT VVVKAPELE

    There is now, ami there lias been fop sometime past, a groat need at l'uukapele amiKoUee for some sort of public cottages. Oneof the finest park and camp sites in the ter-

    ritory is located tlicre. Hut there is no placefor anyone, except those favored few who

    own cottages, to stay.Under the present couditioss it is neces-

    sary for the people to go to Kokee and re-

    turn in the same day. A few have carriedtents along and have camped in them. Butthat, at host, is a difficult and unsatisfac-tory thing to do.

    .1. 11. Moragno made a suggestion theother day, that would in a" measure, solvethe housing problem up there. Mr. Mot-agu-

    says the thing to do is for the county super-visors to donate the school cottages at Ma-kawe- li

    to the park.A fine big school is just being complet-

    ed at Makaweli. There are a number of cot-tages, almost a dozen, at the old schoolgrounds. Some of these will be moved to thenew site. Others will not be moved becausethere is no need for them.

    It would be a fine thing if the countyof Kauai would donate those surplus cot-tages to the ruukapole park and move themup Ihere. Then there would be some placefor people to go and stay when they wantedmore than a day's mountain air.

    l'uukapele is one of Kauai's best scenicassets. But heretofore, we have not cashed inon that asset as we could or should. Wecan get much more pleasure and we candraw more tourists to our island if we willjudiciously use the natural scenic resourceswhich we have.

    We can advantageously put a caretakerand wife in charge of that park. He couldlook after the park, police it, and keep it incondition. There are times in the summerwhen the grass is so dry that one matchcarelessly thrown away would set the wholecountry on fire if there was no one there towatch it and stop it. The caretaker couldkeep a little supply store and sell provisionsto campers up there. All this would addgreatly to the place.

    This is a good time for the county totake steps to greatly improve l'uukapele. Withimprovement in the roads more people caneasily get up the mountains. Let's make itpossible for them to stay and enjoy them-selves after they get there.

    117 1 ARE SUCCESSFUL MERCHANTSSuccessful merchants are constant adver-

    tisers. They buy goods to sell, not to keepconstantly on hand as some of the old styleadvertisements were worded; but to turnover as quickly as possible that they may buyfresh goods, up to date and snappy, and oncethey have placed them on their counters amishelves they inform the public through thelocal papers, that such merchandise has ar-rived for public inspection.

    Keep posted if you want to be in lineto purchase tin; right goods at the rightprice, is a maxim that all should heed, andthe local paper is the bulletin that keepsyou in touch with your community interests,if the merchant fails to make an announce-ment of the kind, quality and price of hiswares that is his fault; but read your localpaper, news, advertisements ami all, and youwill have a working knowledge valuable toyou.

    Do not send your money out of townwhen you can get what you need n't home,encourage your local merchants to keep youposted, for it is as much to their interestas yours that they do so. Your interest iscommunity interest.

    The only time when no news is goodnews to the average citizen is when he failsto hear from the tax assessor.

    We understand that the Russian sovietgovernment has changed its motto from "Letme also speak," to "Let me also eat."

    This world is so full of all kinds of peo-ple but not one who hasn't his own favoritecure for rheumatism.

    The most consoling feature most peopleget out of the new income tax blank is thatthe last one appeared to get by alright.

    Edison has just celebrated his T.'ih birth-day. He can't invent anything to keep theyears from piling up.

    We found a man yesterday who was tto buy a cold cure that wasn't

    us ''the old reliable."

    THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, MAY 2, 1922

    I SLANDManaging Editor

    MAY 2, 122

    HOG CHOLERA tIn spite of the fact that the board of

    agriculture and forestry maintains there isno hog cholera in Hawaii, there are manyhogs dying of some disease that looks andacts like cholera. And it is becoming a veryevident fact that these hogs are just as deadas those that die with bona fide cholera.

    On this island at present some plan-tations are innoculatiug their hogs for chol-era. The cost is high, so high it is said as tobe almost prohibitive to many of the smallerhog owners. And yet without the innocula-tio- n

    death is certain. Some hog men predictthat the disease will not run its course un-til all the hogs on the island are killed offby it. -

    We don't pretend to say whether thisdisease is cholera or hemorrhagic septicemia.But we do say that whatever it is, it is kill-ing far too many hogs and that the properauthorities should recognize the fact andtake certain steps to stop it. These diseasesare being successfully combatted all over themainland of the United 'states and there isno reason why they cannot be here.

    WHAT IS THRIFT?In the average man's inind, thrift means

    saving money. In theory that is thrift, butin practice it may be the reverse. For thriftmeans getting the most for your money byinvesting it in things for which there is apresent use or future profit. Putting a pad-lock on the pocket is not thrift. That's stingi-ness.

    If one can buy a lot worth $300 for ?200,it is thrift to buy it. If a suit of clotheswhich will be needed next fall can be boughtnow for $20 when it will cost $30 when nextfall arrives, then it will be thrift to buy it.Thrift is taking advantage of opportunitiesin which there is a profit. It means keepingyour dollars everlastingly on the job. Thriftalso means refraining from useless expendi-tures that keep the pocket book so thin thatinvestments cannot be taken advantage ofwhen they are offered. Things should be pur-chased from the standpoint of use and profit,ami if there is no present use aud no futureprofit in sight, don't buy.

    No matter what your definition of thriftmay be, when it is carefully studied andanalyzed and boiled down, it simply meansgetting ready for a big opportunity, and hop-ing it will come. And getting ready for thebig opportunity is just another definitionof laying away for the rainy day. Don't hideor dissipate your savings. Invest them. Thereare so many fine opportunities open rightnow, and right around here, that no man,who cares about the future, can afford to ne-glect them or close his eyes to them.

    The man who spends his time sitting ona nail keg at the grocery ranks as a pro-ducer along with the hen that sits on o doorknob, except that the hen is honest in herintentions.

    The man who takes no interest in townimprovements is stealing a ride on the chariotof progress.

    Love at first sight may be alright, butthe wise man always takes a second look.

    It takes two to make a quarrel,the minister, to make it permanent.

    Where QuickAction Pays

    rvELAYS cannot be otherwise than- dangerous when dealing In stocks.

    With this in mind, we offer our cli-ents on Kauai the benefit of ourconstant close touch with marketconditions, and action which startswithin a few moments after instruc-tions are put on the wireless. KeepIn direct communication with ourinvestment department.

    1 TRCHifliL

    So to serve that we may continueto Berve

    MOKIHANA CLUB GIVESTHREE ONE-AC- PLAYS AT

    TIP TOP FRIDAY EVE'N

    Three one-ac- t plays will be the of-fering of the Dramatic Study branchof the Mokihana Club at the TipTop theater next Friday evening.

    The first play to be presentedwill be a fantasy called "The Mak-er of Dreams." The characters arePelrrot, played by Miss Helen King,Pelrette, played by Miss LyndallJacobs and the manufacturer playedby Mrs. Robert Mlddleton. The char-acter played by Mrs. Mlddleton isLove, who disguises herself as anold man in order to deliver her mes-sage to Peirot and I'eirctte.

    This play Is under the directionof MIhs Opal Colbert.

    The second play will bo from theFrench Revolution called "Beautyand the Jacobin," and deals withthe efforts of a party of aristocratsto escape from France, during thereign of terror. The characters andplayers are as follows:

    Marquis de Valny Cherault, T. E.Longstreath; Anne de Laseyne, hissister Mary B. Knight; Elolse D'Ann-vllle- ,

    his former bethrothed, Mrs. T.L. Morgan; Valsin, a revolutionist,C. J. Fern; Dossonville, his assist-ant, W. II. Balthls.

    ' Miss Edith Rice has charge ofthe direction of Beauty and the Ja-cobin."

    The third play takes place in thepresent day, the scene being laid inNew York. It Is a satire on psycho-analysis called, "Suppressed Desires 'Mrs. C. L. Lane plays, the part otHenrietta Brewster, a' young womandabbling in psycho-analysi- Dr. T.L. Morgan plays the part of herhusband, while Mrs. J. H. Midkiffplays the part of her sister.

    "Suppressed Desires" is being di-rected by Mrs. H. D. Sloggett. Theplay is very amusing, the lines be-ing very clever and the situationsfarcical. '

    Tickets may be secured from Mrs.Frank Crawford and Mrs. C. M. V.Forster which can be exchanged forreserved seats at the Lihue Store.

    .1

    The Bank of Hawaii Ltd.LIHUE BRANCH

    BANKING HOURS

    9 A. M. TO S P. M.

    1 ' Vl at-- m m m m mnamauon jStore

    Wholesale and Retail Groceriesbry Goods of all Descriptions

    General Plantation ,Supplies

    i

    f JEWELERS fEverything in the

    Siloet and Gold LineTftcAXu Glassand Jltt Goods

    tXCtichaniii theSeat Quality Only

    H. F. Wndhimsiiiii& Co. Ltd.

    Leading Jevtltri

    P. O. BOX 342 HONOLULU

    Dr. T. L. MorganOSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN

    Office on Win. Hyd Ulce Promises

    Phone 154 L

    The Financial OutlookThe demand throughout the mainland for high grade

    in-

    vestment securities, which has developed as a result of thegradual lowering of interest rates, exhibits no signs of slack-ening. As a result, bond prices are steadily advancing and itappears, that the time is drawing near when the opportunity

    investment securities at prices whichto purchase high degreehave passednot to return, in all, yield liberal returns will

    probability, for many years.

    It will soon be true that the investor who had foresight toaccumulate conservative investment securities at present pric-es will be in a position to point with pride to the wisdomof his judgment.

    WATERHOUSE. TRUST CO., LTD.

    HONOLULU

    Don't be DiscouragedBecause you have not been

    able to save in the past, butmake up your mind today to save

    Momo definite part of allincome earned.

    The saving habit ha broughtindependence to others, and

    it will do as much for you.

    Acquire the saving habit audstick to it.

    Our savings department willhelp you.

    THE BANK OF BISHOP & CO., LTD.

    Waimea, Kauai.

    LEWERS & COOKE, Ltd.1 00-17- Ho. King St., Honolulu.

    Special Attention Given toParcel Post Orders

    Lumber and Building Materials. 'Mixed Taints and Auto Enamels.Furniture Enamels.Linoleums, Hugs. .. . '

    Congoleum and Pabcolin Rugs.Wallpapers and Glass.

    Write for Samples

    Dealers in General MerchandiseAmerfcan Factors PaintsAmFac Red Label CbffeeYale Locks & Hardware

    MinraraiWHOIEJALI g DISTRIBUTORS

    --tub

    If you are not now receiving the REXALL MONTHLYMAGAZINE please send your name for mailing list. TheMagazine has recently been enlarged, and improved by theaddition of stories by prominent writers and pictures ofcurrent events.

    THIS SKKYICH IS ABSOLUTELY FREE.

    Benson, Smith & Co., Ltd.SERVICE EVERY SECOND

    The Kexall Store Box 420 Honolulu, T. H.

  • -- SPORTS-BASEBALL

    Next Sunday will see the KauaiAthletic Association off to Us an-nual race for the pennant. Thisyear's race looks as though It willbe the best In history as all theteams that finished below Makee,last year's champs, are strengthenedand should give the champs a battlefor it this year.

    McBryde, the runner-u- p last year,added Tank Ohama, the best catch-er In the league, to their line-u- p andWith Tilly as a battery mate, theyhave easily the best battery in theleague. The rest of the McBrydeline-u- will be practically the sameas last year. Ako will play first,Spalding second, Watase short, andKamaka third. The outfield will con-sist of Perrlera in left, Sally Wat-ase in center, and Noboto or Proutein right.

    The main strength of the Mc-Bryde team will lie in its batteryand hitting strength. With Tilly and

    ' Tank working right they are goingto give the opposition an awful bat-tle. If Tilly cannot Btop them fromgetting on the bases they are goingto have quite a job moving along,for woe betide the baserunner thattries to steal on Tank. He certainlycarries a gun and it is sure deathto try and steal off him. Tilly hascorralled a bunch of hitters and

    ' they should be able to tew runs, per game.

    Makaweli la an unknown quantlty, but Tilly reports after the Ma-kaweli McBryde game, that theyhave a bunch of hitters that aregoing to worry every pitcher in theleague before the season is over.

    . There are six left handed batters. on the team and as there are no left

    handed pitchers in the league theyshould have everything their ownway. One bad feature of the teamis that they will have a left handedcatcher and left handed, short-stop- .

    With all these left handers thereis one disadvantage, they are lia-ble to start thinking left handed,

    ' which would be a calamity on any' baseball club.

    Koloa expects . to Improve theirteam over last year, but owing tothe loss of Robelo they will be weakin the box, but hopes that the Cos-ta boys, who will do the twirling,will deliver.

    Gabriel, who caught for McBrydelast year, will do the bulk of thereceiving; Ray Alameda will play

    . first; Schimmelphennig second;Bush, short, and Ikeda third. Wala-leale- ,

    Lovell and Kondo will playoutfield.

    Joe Ornellaa will manage theteam and may step in with an oc-casional pinch hit as Joe Is a veter-an at the ' game and used to weilda wicked bludgeon when he didperform.

    HANAMAULU WINSTHE CHAMPIONSHIP

    Hanamaulu cinched the title in theifaiue junior league by defeating theSunrise, Sunday, at the Llhue dia-mond by the score of 9 to 3.

    The Sunrise were out to win asthey had imported the Hironakabrothers from Kealia as a batteryto help them win, but even with animported battery the Sunrise were

    liiiiig

    IIUss s

    ;v SS S &

    53 lllilll1 11311

    I lllilllt m m m &

    IIIPPIIP

    VOLLEYBALL

    Saturday, the finals in the Kaua'.Public Schools Athletic league vol-leyball tournament was held at Ll-hue and the Hanalei school won thegirls'- championship, defeating theEleele girls' team, the championsof the west Bide. The girls' cup Isnow the permanent possession ofthe Hanalei school as they havewon it three times.

    The boys' championship was cap-tured by Kekaha by defeating Ha-nalei. The Kekaha boys outplayedtheir largeropponents at all stagesof the game, winning handily.

    NOTICEThere will be an Important meet-

    ing of the Kauai Athletic Associa-tion at the Llhue Court House nextThursday evening, May 4th, for thepurpose of settling the status of o

    and for the purpose of choos-ing i uniform ball for all leaguegames. All directors are urged to bepresent, as both these issues are ofutmost Importance to the league.

    not equal to the occasion.Hironaka cannot be blamed for

    losing the battle as he pitched fair-ly good ball, but his support wasvery ragged in the pinches.

    Hanamaulu certainly surprisedwhen they won the second

    series, as they were the tailendersIn the first round, never winninga game. In the second round theymanaged to defeat every team butthe Sunrise and then they took abrace and defeated them in theplay-of- f Sunday.

    EE

    to Each Show

    THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, MAY 2, 1922

    TENNISLast week saw the start of the

    west side men's doubles handicaptournament. Two tennis raquets havebeen offered as a prize by H. P.Faye. There are three classes In thetournament. The "A" class which isminus fifteen, the "B" class whichIs scratch and the "C" class whichIs plus fiteen.

    The second round will be com-plete by May 8th and the semi-final- s

    will be played on May 14, andthe finals on May 21. The commit-tee reserves the right to name theplace of play for the semi-final- sand finals but the first and secondround niuy bet arranged by mutualagreement. The secretary. Dr. Glals-yer- ,

    should be notified a day beforethe match Is to bo played.

    Each player must furnish onenew ball for every match. The firstand second rounds will bo two outof three, while the semi-final- s andfinals will be three out of five.

    The following is the result orthe first round:

    Session and Tuttle "C" were de-feated by Creevey and Bedell "C",6-- Broland and Fernandes "li"defeated Gregg and I). Sinclair "C".6-- Richter and Nunes defeatedDamkroger and Dunn "A",6-- Baldwin and Marcallino "A"defeated Miller and Carlson "C",6-- 6-- Lindsay and Davidson "C"were defeated by Brenham andGlalsyer "A", A. Kruse andBomke "C" defeated Danforth andW. Kruse "B", 6-- 6-- Cannon andFaye "A" defeated Kaye and .Sin-clair "B", 0-- 10-8- , 6-- Knudsen andBurns "A" defeated Hofgaard andJesse "C", 6 3,

    The second round will be Creeveyand Bedell vs. Broland and Fernan-des; Richter and Nunes vs. Bald-win and Marcallino; Brenham andGlalsyer vs. Kruse and Bomke, and

    (Continued on Page Six)

    HERE AGAINEddie Fernandez Shows

    Lihue Grounds Near Armory

    Midgets. Fire Eaters, SwordSwallower, Trained Rats and

    Trained Dogs

    EVERY NIGHT THIS WEEK

    Admission Adults 25c

    sVJiM 7arf.iTlHIri!J 121V I Un: 1

    lil WILLSA pcrHon making a will should remember the uncertainties of life; tbat

    tlie will may go into effect shortly and be bis last opportunity to express biswishes in regard to his properly. This makes a will a very important in-strument and should be prepared by competent legal authority.

    Don't let a 'home-made- " will be sufficient. There may be too manyniceties of language and law, which cause such wills to be dangerous andworthless.

    Let us be your legal authority.

    Bishop Trust Company, Lid.924 Bethel St. Honolulu ' Telephone 6177

    Grammar Schools To

    Hold Track And Field

    Meet May 27th

    The Kauai Public Schools Athlet-ic League will hold their annualtrack and field meet at the I.ihuepark on May 27th at 1:00 p. m.the original plans called for themeet to be held June 3rd, but ow-ing to the fact that the annual sing-ing contest for the public schoolsand the county fair were scheduledon May 27 it was thought that thechildren would get a great deal morebenefit out of being able to attendboth of the above events along with

    the track, It was therefore decidedto change the date of the meet tothe 27th.

    The singing contest will be heldIn the morning at the Tip Top at10 o'clock and the rest of the morn-ing will be given to the childrento see the exhibits of the countyfair.

    Weighing In of contestants willtake place in the morning after thesinging contests, each school beinggiven an alloted time.

    Each boy and girl will be allow-ed to weigh In, In their track suit.Contestants' numbers will be givenout at this time and all entries willbe checked at the weighlng-in- .

    The regular A. A. U. rules in re-gard to the events will govern themeet. It was decided that any sub-stitutes for the entries must bemade at the time of weighing in,no substitutes to be allowed afterthat time.

    The meet will be under the direc-tion of Neil Locke, and he has pre-pared a set of rules and regula-tions regarding the meet wMch willbe sent to each principal some timethis week.

    Children 15c

    FIFTEEN YEARS EXPERIENCE IN SETTLING AND MANAGING ESTATES

    J 3 K1

    it '

    33

    I

    lj Between friends, the r rj J

    gift that convey, the; Jft 'Mil AU j

    o 1 1 of personal ;' J'-Y- jj ! I

    i

    !m W 1I appointment I IIW&IV-j Ma), phone 614 ' ' JI W. J. Senda Studio fII Lihue, Kauai

    jjjKauai Views, Kodak Film, Finishing, Framing. J

    Theo. H. Davies & Co., Ltd.HONOLULU AND HILO

    Sugar Factors and Commission MerchantsIMPORTERS OF GENERAL MERCHANDISE

    GENERAL HARDWAREBuilders' Hardware, crockery, Glassware, Silverware, Sporting Goods,

    Fishing Tackle, Firearms, Ammunition, Safes, Refrigerators,Spurk Plugs, Flashlights, Paints, Varnishes, Brushes

    Oils, Greases, Harness, Saddlery, Roofing, Trunks,Suit Cases, Etc., Etc.

    GROCERIESFancy and Stape Lines, Feed, Etc.

    DRY GOODSShoes, Toilet Supplies, Stationery, Etc., Etc.

    INSURANCE AGENTSWriters of Fire, Marine, Compensation, Automobile and Miscellaneous

    Insurance Policies

    AGENTS FORCanadian-Australia- n Royal Mail Steamship Line

    Upon application information will be cheerfully furnished in regardto any other lines in which you may interested.

    Waimea Stables, Ltd.At Waimea and Nawiliwili

    The Most Famous Garages on Kauai.

    The place to get transportation to

    The Barking Sands, Olokele Canyon,Waimea Canyon, Kokee Camps,

    Kukuiolono Park, Wailua Falls,Hanalei, Haena Caves

    Our automobiles are comfortable, our drivers are re-liable and have been with us for many years, and

    know every Inch of the country.

    We rent Ford Cars Without Drivers.We do draylng and hauling by trucks all over the Island.

    We run the stage line between Lihue and Kekahathree round trips per week

    WAIMEA BRANCHTel. 43--

    A. GOMEZ, Mgr.

    NAWILIWILI BRANCHTel. 492--

    CLEM GOMES, Mgr.

    We Have It

    Whatever you may need in theline of Dry Goods, Groceries,and General Merchandise, wehave it.

    ELEELE STOREJ. I. S1LVA

  • School Notes

    KAPAA SCHOOLJudge Vaughn of Hosolulu was n

    visitor recently. Me had lunch withus and took much Interest til our

    activities.The Kamehameha school boys un

    der Col.. Clarke and Principal Dart- -

    lett were entertained and entertained. We heard that they enjoyedtheir brief visit here and we are niways glad to have them. One ot

    the bovs is a recent graduate of

    this school.An important event took place

    last week In our school kitchen. Th.-fiv-

    cent lunches have been reducedto half its former price, with no induction in quantity or guality ami

    this new late will prevail duringthe remainder of thu school yeaiThe number of lunches served nan

    greatly Increased and over 700 wen

    served ill a single day last week.The school was surprised witli

    a fire drill last Thursday and th.result was very satisfactory. Over350 pupils left the main building liless than f0 seconds.

    Messrs. Horner, Sloggett and Swaiinspected our shop and garden onMonday. Visitors to the school any

    time during school hours will seemany excellent vegetables for sale.

    We have discovered some atroci-ous thieves after our vegetables andare making preparations to capturethem. They are known as mynahbirds.

    LIHUE SCHOOLThe new administration building

    is almost completed and soon workwill begin on the clasB rooms.

    Miss Toninl, who has been in Ho-nolulu, sick, for several weeks, ismuch better, and hopes to be backto school next week.

    Last Friday, Dr. Erdman visitedour school. He gave us an interest-ing talk on being kind to animals.The fifth grade sang a song afterhis talk.

    We have been busy trying outfor the track meet and have 'aboutchosen our best athletes from theother pupils.

    Monday, May 1, we had a prettyMay-pol- e at our morning exercises.It was greatly enjoyed by all thechildren, also the teachers and vi3itors. The children who danced ar-ound It looked pretty and graceful.

    We had two of the final gamesof volleyball on our court SaturdayThe Kekaha boys defeated the Hanalei boys and the Hanalel girlsdefeated the Kleele girls.

    The eighth grade have chosenwhite and red for their class colors,and Shasta daisies for their flower.They are planning to have theirgraduation exercises on Wednesdaynight, June 21. There are 23 boysand girls in the class and they areworking hard just now, for eachand everyone of them wants to gettheir diplomas.

    Last Saturday the gradewent on a picnic to Kipukal.

    Mr. Pugh and Mr? Yamamoto aregoing to take all the boys who havegardens around to visit all the homegardens in Lihue district.

    WAIMEA SCHOOLThe one hundredth annlvesary of

    Ueneral Oram's birth was appropri-ately celebrated in the classes andat the morning exercises on Thurs-day.

    Mr. Pugh made a visit to the shoplast Monday. Work starts on the in-cinerator this week.

    Mrs. Cannon presented the ninthgrade girls in a very creditable May-pole dance on the school campus,Monday, May 1. The pole was strung

    526

    Sports

    (Continued from page five)Cannon und l'aye vs. Knudsen andHums. The lust match will be played at Koloa Saturday afternoon at4 o'clock should be the best matchof the second round.

    The west side ladies' handicap doubles will start play this week underthe same rules as the men's doubles.Two raquets have been offered asprizes by B. D. Baldwin.

    The first round Is as follows:Mrs. Uankin and Mrs. Cannon "A'

    vs. Mrs. Donald nnd Mrs. llatrlek"U": Mrs. Jesse and Mrs. Hedell"II" vs. Mrs. Dutchart and Miss Coert "C"; Mrs. Creevey and Mrs.Baldwin "C" vs. Mrs. Miller andMrs. Jensen "C"; Miss Douglas andMiss Troy "C" vs. Mra. Hall and.Mrs. Clutterbuck "A".

    The singles for the Honolulu Sporting Goods Co. cup now heldby Foster Horner, will start lmmediately. An additional trophy inthe way of a cup Is offered by Caleb Burns, the winner to retain possession ot the same.

    All matches must be finished bythe 22nd ot May in the first roundBest two out of three in the firstand second round. Each player mustfurnish two balls for each matchDate, place and hour to be arrang---

    ed by mutual agreement, the com'mittee reserving the right to namesame in case of dispute. Semi-final- sand finals to be arranged by committee. The following Is the drawing for the first round:

    Bulthis vs. Knudsen.Bedell vs. Corstorphine.Rankin vs. W. Kruse.Brenham vs. Hofgaard.C. Burns vs. M, Nunes.Cannon vs. Bomke.Faye vs. Dunn.Creevey vs. Davidson.Baldwin vs. Ichlnose.F. Burns vs. Gregg.Kaye vs. Glaisyer.W. Miller vs. Fernandes.F. Horner vs. Allen.Damkroger vs. Richter.D. Sinclair vs. W. Sinclair.Broland vs. A. Horner Jr.

    with sixteen ribbons which werewoven and unwoven twice. The sightwas very interesting, particularly tothe younger pupils who had not seenit before.

    Mr. Crowell put the classes tothinking on Wednesday when hegave them the following problem:A and B can do a piece of workin four days. A. and C can do it infive days. B and C can do It in 6days. How long would it take themto do it together? Mr. Crowell of-fered $5 cash to the pupil who firstsolved it, without help. After twodays Miss Barlow showed the fresh-men the correct solution. No prizewas collected.

    The free movie, music and singinggiven at Mntsumaura hall on Satur-day, 2!Uh, was well attended. Mr.Waimuu and his friends gave several numbers which were much ap-preciated. Mr. Moulit gave the hallfree, setting aside his own show forthe school production. The schoolchorus appeared twice and did creditably. The show was given becauseof the breakdown of the movie ma-chine II, cut the movies from thevaudeville program that night.

    A freshman party is contemplatedand the eighth graders from Keka- -1m, Kleele and Makaweli will bethe guests of the Waimea freshmenWe hope to have many of them withus next year.

    GOOD MEALS IfJ HONOLULU

    Await you at Child'sNew, modern, hijdi class restaurant, con- - J$$t rally located. Cool and comfortable.Intelligent, courteous service. European

    plan. Operated in connection with tbe

    Blaisdell HotelJ.F. CIII LI), Proprietor.

    YUEN KEE CAFE kapaa. kauai

    GENUINE CHOP SU1 on Order by Phone

    Pies Cakes & Confectionery - Catering

    PHONE

    'Cry Our Ice Cream

    THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, MAY 2, 1922

    Auto Club Holds

    Successful Run(Continued from page one)

    Mr. Lydgate, and due time reachedthose Interesting spots, arriving thereIn detachments, according to theirstrength, and some badly blown, butglad that they finally made it.A Mermaid Story

    "While resting there, Mr. Lydgatetold a very pretty story ot the mermaid whose home was In the trans-lucent depths of the smaller grot-tos, who eloped with the Prince ofWainiha, lived unhappily with himfor a time and finally i killed himand returned' to their grotto home.And there, to escape from the attacks ot the enraged people of theneighborhood, she plunged into thetranslucent depths of her grottohome, which her abundant, longsperading, brown hair filled, as ascreen to hide her from her pursuers and she has never been seensince. Hence the peculiar brown infusion that used to fill the water,but which has now turned gray. Thmermaid Is growing old!Along the Kalalau Trail

    The last lap ot the program wasalong the Kalalau trail to the loftyvantage point from which the magntficent panorama of the Na Palicoast can be seen. For this therewas quite a falling off in numbers.but Borne fiteen made It and foundit all that was claimed for it.

    There were various gueses asto the elevation of this point ot van-tage, running all the way from BOOto 1500 feet. The latter guess wasbased on the ardors of the climbersrather than on any common senseestimate of the elevation. "If Itwasn't 1500 feet, it ought to be!As a matter of fact It is about 450feet.Cameraman Was There

    The cameraman, Senda, was ofthe party, and took a number ofpictures, in which these hardy hikers will appear in the foreground ofmuch magnificent scenery, so disposed, we hope, as not to spoil it

    Back to the CartOne hour's sharp hiking brought

    them back to the cars at the DryCave whence by this time all therest had fled and another hour anda half brought them home.

    It was a wonderful day and wehope the Automobile Club will do

    I it again.

    TIP TOP-IC- S

    NORMA TALMADGE ININTERESTING DRAMA

    Itudyard Kipling, years ago, madea remark about the similarity ot thepassions of the colonel's lady andJudy O'Grady, but it was acceptedby most people as being more orless of a poetical fancy. NormTalmadge, the young star of "ADaughter of two Worlds," in whichshe enacts a role more widely dlverse than even the poet's contrasis authority for the statement thatMr. Kipling should be haled asdiscoverer of a profound truth.

    In "A Daughter of Two Worlds'which will be shown at the Tip Toptheater Saturday, Miss Talmadge por-trays the daughter of a notoriousdive keeper. At first she is unmoralnnd uncultured, then she has the

    of the training of an ex-clusive girls' school and becomes afavorite in the upper strata of thesociety world, then thru the dis-covery she is again the daughterof the dive keeper. All thru theproduction her every action is inkeeping with her station In life.

    MARY MILES MINTERIN CHARMING PLAY

    The Tip Top theater has the goodfortune of being able to producea film next Sunday in which thecharming little actress, Mary MilesMinter, who was recently a visitorto Honolulu, Is starred.

    This will be one of the best pat-ronized films of the week, no doubthaving this personal flavor in addi-tion to the intrinsic value of theproduction Itself.

    Probably this winsome actress ap-plies personally the paraphrase ofan old saying which Judiih gives in"Moonlight and Honeysuckle":"Count that day lost whose low de

    scending sun,Finds no heart broken or other

    mischief done."For in life she seems to "manage"

    every Doay even as sne does asJudith, who manages everybody onthe ranch except Tod, her father'sranch manager. First thing herfather knew she managed him intopolitics and he found himself wearing city clothes, in Washington andbeing called senator. Judy nun- -gered for society and got along famously until she found herself engaged to two men at once. Then inher predicament, she was glad to

    P. O. BOX 42 see the old beau from the ranch ap' pear on the scene.

    SAVE MAY 27th for

    ThComity

    at

    e

    in

    FairLihue County Lot

    and Armory

    10 A. M. to 12 Midnight

    Information regarding Concessions and Exhibitsmay be secured from Sheriff Rice

    ! Tip Top TheatrESATURDAY

    Norma Talmadge

    A DAUGHTER OF TWOS WORLDS" JAdapted from llie famous novel liy Leroy Scott.

    As Jennie, daughter of n dive keeper and associate of crooks who flees her sordidand finds a new and finer world mid the love id' a fine, clean lnjui, Miss Tal-

    madge presents the most splendid work of her remarkable career.

    SUNDAY

    Mary Miles Minter

    in

    "MOONLIGHT and HONEYSUCKLES"

    TUESDAY

    Anita Stewart

    in

    "VIRTUOUS WIVES"

    Thursday, May 1 1

    Prince Kuhio Kalanianaole's FuneralAlso Scenes of Kauai

    1

  • MECHANIC LOOKING'

    FOR PLACE TO WORKON GARDEN ISLAND

    The following letter was receivedlast week by the secretary of the

    iKauai Chamber of Commerce. Anyemployer interested in thia man mayget hla name and Honolulu addreBSby dropping a note to the Secretary,Kauai Chamber of Commerce,

    The letter follows:"I am writing for Information in

    regards to work on plantations orother places in your district.

    I have had ten years' experiencein assembling, operating and repair-ing autos, trucks and tarctors. Havealso operated' and repaired Dieseland airplane motors, also air com-pressors and have had experiencewith steam engines, but the lastfive years I have specialized In in-ternal combustion motors. I canread blue prints and can erect machinery from the same.

    "I do not want a position butwant a job where there Is a chunctfor advancement with enough payfor decent 'living conditions. Thaiis all I expect at first. After thatmy work should speak for itself.

    "I, prefer plantations of smalltowns to city work as I was raisedon a cattle ranch in Montana and 1BtlU like the country. I ,can furnishboth civilian and army references.I get discharged July 3rd of thisyear.."

    TEACHERSATTENTION

    Teacher desiring to spend thesummer vacation In Honolulu,by communicating with theRoielawn, 1366 King St., Hono-lulu, celebrated for its excel-lent cuisine, reservations withboard can be secured, and atthe Beach Annex, 2517 'Kala-kau- a

    , Ave., Walklkl, at reduc-ed summer rates.

    Honolulu Paper Co.Limited

    Wholesale Paper Dealersand Stationers.

    821-82- 3 Alakea 8tree't

    HONOLULU, HAWAII.

    - -- - 9- -

    HOTEL LIHUE(The Fairview)

    T Twenty two Elegant Roomsin Main Uuiluing

    Three Airy CottagesCuisine Unexcelled in Coun-

    try Districts v

    W. H. Rice, Jr.,Proprietor

    -

    MISS MARGARET LUMIS VISITING SISTER

    Miss Margaret Lum, who return-ed recently from the mainland af-ter completing a three year's coursein professional nursing at the Par;,dlse Valley sanitarium and hospitalin San Diego. Cal., and then serveda year at the White Memorial hos-pital in Los Angeles, arrived on Ka-uai last week to Visit her sister,Mrs. O. M. Shak of Kapaa,

    This Is Miss hum's first visit tothe Garden Island and she .intendsto stay here several months beforereturning tf. Honolulu to take upher chosen profession

    DELEGATE FROM ISLAND,LARGEST MEMBERSHIP

    Word has Just been received byPresident Raymond of the KauaiTeachers' Association that the Ha-waii Education Association's dele-gate to represent all the islands atthe National Education Association'sconvention to be held in Boston inJuly, will be selected from the is-land having the highest percentageof paid up membership in the Na-tional Education Association on May10th, i922. This percentage will bebased upon the number Of publicjchool teachers on the payroll AprilJO, substitutes not Included.

    President Raymond also under-stands that the Island of Hawaiiat present has the highest percent- -ige of teachers enrolled.

    TO NAME LOCAL TEACHERSUMMER CAMP COMMITTEE

    A request has been received byGeo. S. Raymond, of the KauaiTeachers' Association to name a lo-cal teacher to serve as a member ofthe Volcano Recreation Camp com-mittee at Kilauea and this name willshortly be announced.

    This1 camp was formerly a military camp, which the Hawaii Education Association has taken overand a teacher is selected to manageit each year for island teachers whowish to take advantage of the won-derful climate and attractions ofKilauea and vicinity. ' The camp iswell located with reference to surrounding sights in that sectjon ofHawaii, and a great number of teachers took advantage of the opportunity and spent their vacationsthere last year.

    Hotel Leonard(Formerly Majestic)

    HONOLULU

    Thoroughly Tenooated

    Rates ReasonableHot and Cold Showers

    and TulsFort and Beretania Streets

    H. L. SHAW, Mgr.

    CALIFORNIA FEED CO.

    Jt LIMITEDDealers In

    t Hay, Grain and Chicken SuppliesI SOLE AGENT8 FORT International Stock, Poultry Foodt and other specialties. Arabic for

    cooling Iron Roofs. Petaluma Incubators and Brooders.

    f King's Special Chick Foodf P. O. Box 46S Honolulu

    You can have LOVE'S

    American Maid Bread

    Cream Bread(Made With Fleischmann's Yeast) Mailed Direct to You by

    PARCELS POSTPlace your standing order with

    LOVE'S BISCUIT & BREAD COMPANYHONOLULU, T. H.

    Here's a Pump for YouMr. Gasoline DealerFIFTEEN gallons a minute can be umiel intoautomobile with a Milwaukee pump.

    Thin quick Hcrvice means satisfied motoristwho will come back again ami again. This is justone of the many features of Milwaukee pumps.They are made by specialists in (lie pump indus-try. Ask for full details "on how to get the gasoline business in Jour district.

    Honolulu Iron WorksCompany

    Wholesale Distributors

    T

    THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, MAY 2, 1022

    PENSION FUNDTRUSTEES MEET

    The Board of Trustees of the

    Pension Fund of theCounty of Kauai, Territory of Ha-wa