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  • Food and Beverage Consumption and Health Series

    FRUIT JUICES: PROPERTIES, CONSUMPTION AND NUTRITION

    No part of this digital document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form orby any means. The publisher has taken reasonable care in the preparation of this digital document, but makes noexpressed or implied warranty of any kind and assumes no responsibility for any errors or omissions. Noliability is assumed for incidental or consequential damages in connection with or arising out of informationcontained herein. This digital document is sold with the clear understanding that the publisher is not engaged inrendering legal, medical or any other professional services.

  • Food and Beverage Consumption and Health Series

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    2009. ISBN: 978-1-60741-045-4

    Marketing Food to Children and Adolescents Nicoletta A. Wilks

    2009 ISBN: 978-1-60692-913-1

    Food Labelling: The FDA's Role in the Selection of Healthy Foods Ethan C. Lefevre (Editor)

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    Fish Consumption and Health George P. Gagne and Richard H. Medrano (Editors)

    2009 ISBN: 978-1-60741-151-2

    Milk Consumption and Health Ebbe Lange and Felix Vogel (Editors)

    2009 ISBN: 978-1-60741-459-9

    Red Wine and Health Paul O'Byrne (Editor)

    2009 ISBN: 978-1-60692-718-2

    Fruit Juices: Properties, consumption and Nutrition Pauline G. Scardina (Editor)

    2009 ISBN: 978-1-60741-505-3

  • Food and Beverage Consumption and Health Series

    FRUIT JUICES: PROPERTIES, CONSUMPTION AND NUTRITION

    PAULINE G. SCARDINA EDITOR

    Nova Biomedical Books New York

  • Copyright 2009 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means: electronic, electrostatic, magnetic, tape, mechanical photocopying, recording or otherwise without the written permission of the Publisher. For permission to use material from this book please contact us: Telephone 631-231-7269; Fax 631-231-8175 Web Site: http://www.novapublishers.com

    NOTICE TO THE READER The Publisher has taken reasonable care in the preparation of this book, but makes no expressed or implied warranty of any kind and assumes no responsibility for any errors or omissions. No liability is assumed for incidental or consequential damages in connection with or arising out of information contained in this book. The Publisher shall not be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary damages resulting, in whole or in part, from the readers use of, or reliance upon, this material. Any parts of this book based on government reports are so indicated and copyright is claimed for those parts to the extent applicable to compilations of such works. Independent verification should be sought for any data, advice or recommendations contained in this book. In addition, no responsibility is assumed by the publisher for any injury and/or damage to persons or property arising from any methods, products, instructions, ideas or otherwise contained in this publication. This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information with regard to the subject matter covered herein. It is sold with the clear understanding that the Publisher is not engaged in rendering legal or any other professional services. If legal or any other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent person should be sought. FROM A DECLARATION OF PARTICIPANTS JOINTLY ADOPTED BY A COMMITTEE OF THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION AND A COMMITTEE OF PUBLISHERS. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Fruit juices : properties, consumption, and nutrition / [edited by] Pauline G. Scardina. p. ; cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Fruit juices. I. Scardina, Pauline G. [DNLM: 1. Beverages. 2. Fruit. 3. Food Preservation. 4. Nutritive Value. 5. Phytotherapy--methods. WB 430 F944 2009] QP144.F78F78 2009 613.2--dc22

    2009021732

    Published by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. New York

    mephistoText BoxISBN 9781607415053

  • Contents

    Preface i

    Chapter 1 Effect of Temperature, Pressure and Concentration on the Thermal Conductivity of Liquid Food Products (Fruit and Vegetable Juices, Oils, Milks) and Biological Fluids: Experimental and Modeling 1 A.I. Abdulagatov, I.M. Abdulagatov, M.A. Magerramov, and N.D. Azizov

    Chapter 2 Cactus Pear Juice: A Source of Multiple Nutraceutical and Functional Components 79 Hasna El Gharras

    Chapter 3 Preservation of Fruit Juices by Pulsed Electric Fields 107 Pedro Elez-Martnez, Robert Soliva-Fortuny and Olga Martn-Belloso

    Chapter 4 Impact of Harvesting and Storage on Bioactive Components in Varieties of Orange (Citrus Sinensis L.) 127 M.J. Esteve and A. Frigola

    Chapter 5 Reduction in Reovirus Infectivity by Pure and Store-Purchased Cranberry and Grape Juice Drinks 151 Steven M. Lipson, Angelika Sobilo, Maria Adragna, Martin Roy, Allen Burdowski, Ben Collins and Guenther Stotzky

    Chapter 6 Characteristics of Chemical Components and Functional Properties Of Chinese Quince (Pseudocydonia Sinensis) Fruit And Juice Extract 167 Yasunori Hamauzu

    Chapter 7 Effect of Temperature, Pressure and Concentration on the Viscosity of Fruit Juices: Experimental and Modeling 183 A. I. Abdulagatov, M. A. Magerramov, I. M. Abdulagatov and N. D. Azizov

  • Contents vi

    Chapter 8 Effects of Permeation on Mass Transfer Coefficient for Laminar Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in Membrane Modules During Clarification/Concentration of Fruit Juice 255 Sirshendu De, Sunando DasGupta and S. Ranjith Kumar

    Chapter 9 Membrane Based Clarification/Concentration of Fruit Juice 311 Sirshendu De, Sunando DasGupta and S. Ranjith Kumar

    Index 371

  • Preface Juice is a liquid naturally contained in fruit or vegetable tissue. Juice is prepared by

    mechanically squeezing or macerating fresh fruits or vegetables without the application of heat or solvents. For example, orange juice is the liquid extract of the fruit of the orange tree. Common methods for preservation and processing of fruit juices include canning, pasteurization, freezing, evaporation and spray drying. Juices are often consumed for their health benefits. For example, orange juice is rich in vitamin C, while prune juice is associated with a digestive health benefit. Cranberry juice has long been known to help prevent or even treat bladder infections, and it is now known that a substance in cranberries prevents bacteria from binding to the bladder. Fruit juice consumption overall in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and the USA has increased in recent years, probably due to public perception of juices as a healthy natural source of nutrients and increased public interest in health issues. This new important book gathers the latest research from around the globe in this field.

    Chapter 1 - The best and complete comprehensive compilation all of the available thermal conductivity data for liquid food products (fruit and vegetable juices, oils, milks) and biological fluids (blood, urine, plasma) at the present time are provided. The overview of the most important methods (parallel-plate, coaxial-cylinder, and transient hot-wire) for determining the thermal conductivity of liquid foods is provided. The theoretical bases of the methods (working equations used to calculate the thermal conductivity), experimental apparatus details, constructions of the thermal conductivity cells for each method, procedures of the measurements, and uncertainty of the each technique were described. The effect of temperature and concentration on the thermal conductivity of liquid foods were studied. Various empirical, semiemprical, and theoretical models (polynomials, power, exponential, logarithmic, and their various combinations, composition, and structural models) for the thermal conductivity of liquid foods were stringently tested with new accurate measurements on plum, pear, cherry-plum, raspberry, cherry, peach, apricot, and sweet-cherry juices at temperatures from 20 to 120 C and at pressures from 0.1 to 0.3 MPa for the concentrations from 9.8 to 60 Brix. The accuracy, applicability, and predictive capability of the various theoretical models were studied. A new model was developed to accurately represent the combined effect of temperature and concentration on the thermal conductivity of fruit juices. Models which represent the thermal conductivity of juice relative to pure water were considered.

  • Pauline G. Scardina ii

    Chapter 2 - Recently, functional foods present in natural resources, such as fruits, vegetables, oilseeds, and herbs, have received a great attention both by health professionals and the common population for improving overall well-being, as well as in the prevention of diseases. In fact, regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risks of chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, stroke, Alzheimers disease, cataract and age-related functional decline.

    The recent scientific investigations on cactus reported high content of some chemical constituents, which can give added value to cactus products in terms of functionality. The cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) appears to be an excellent candidate for the inclusion in food. According to several studies, the great number of potentially active nutrients and their multifunctional properties make cactus pear perfect candidates for the production of health-promoting food and food supplements. Traditionally, its appreciated for its pharmacological properties by the Native American