has r1b-m412 its origins in a r1b component arrived in ... · singolo uomo presso cui era comparsa...

of 15 /15
Ignazio Abeltino Has R1b-M412 its origins in a R1b component arrived in Western Europe in the Neolithic with the Impresso people and containing also R1b-L23 ? The prevalent Y-chromosome haplogroup in Western Europe is R1b-M412 (also known as R1b- L51), and this means that the majority of present-day Western Europeans have a common ancestor in the first single man with the mutation that characterizes this sub-clade of R1b. The available ancientDNA data show that all the oldest M412 individuals (third and second millennium cal BC, Central-Western Europe) have a significant presence of steppe ancestry, which is practically absent among the Neolithic individuals of the West studied so far. Moreover R1b-L23 (from wich M412 derives) is attested in the eastern part of Europe in the third millennium cal BC. These elements are interpreted by many researchers as decisive clues in favour of the hypothesis that M412 derives from a L23 component present along with the steppe ancestry in some group migrated from the East to Central-Western Europe in the first half of the third millennium cal BC or little before. However, this approach involves some problems. The first attestations of M412 (more precisely some sub- clades of this haplogroup) are among the Bell Beaker people who lived in Central Europe in the second half of the third millennium cal BC. We still do not know whether in the oldest Bell Beaker communities of the West (i.e. those at the basis of this culture) M412 was present or not, but both scenarios have problematic implications for the thesis that M412 has its origins in a L23 component arrived from the East just a few centuries before. Furthermore the available data to date attest the presence of L23 only in the easternmost part of Europe, and among the Corded Ware people (migrated from the East to Central Europe) dominated R1a while L23 is missing. Until now there is no sign of a L23 component migrated from the Eastern European Plains to Central-Western Europe in the fourth/third millennium cal BC. The haplogroup R1b is attested among the Impresso-Cardial people of Western Europe. Since the question of the origins of M412 remains problematic and the paleogenetic data available so far have failed to resolve this issue, it is conjecturable that the R1b component present among the Impresso- Cardial people had Eastern European origin (as perhaps the tradition of the ceramics decorated with impressions) and contained also L23. This hypothesis is not in line with prevailing estimates about the chronology of the appearance of this sub-clade of R1b, who is attributed to less ancient stages. Pending that future ancientDNA studies solve this and the other issues around L23 and M412, in favour of a high chronology it can be noted that the descendants of the first man L23 in the third millennium cal BC constituted the large part of the male component of Yamnaya people and Bell Beaker people, two important populations without common origins or cultural ties and who lived in very distant parts of Europe. This text is the translation of the Abstract of "I sottogruppi di R1b oggi dominanti in Europa occidentale hanno le loro origini in una componente R1b (contenente anche L23) arrivata nell’Ovest nel Neolitico con la corrente Impresso ?", see below

Author: others

Post on 11-Mar-2020

6 views

Category:

Documents


0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Ignazio Abeltino

    Has R1b-M412 its origins in a R1b component arrived

    in Western Europe in the Neolithic with the Impresso

    people and containing also R1b-L23 ?

    The prevalent Y-chromosome haplogroup in Western Europe is R1b-M412 (also known as R1b-

    L51), and this means that the majority of present-day Western Europeans have a common ancestor

    in the first single man with the mutation that characterizes this sub-clade of R1b. The available

    ancientDNA data show that all the oldest M412 individuals (third and second millennium cal BC,

    Central-Western Europe) have a significant presence of steppe ancestry, which is practically absent

    among the Neolithic individuals of the West studied so far. Moreover R1b-L23 (from wich M412

    derives) is attested in the eastern part of Europe in the third millennium cal BC. These elements are

    interpreted by many researchers as decisive clues in favour of the hypothesis that M412 derives

    from a L23 component present along with the steppe ancestry in some group migrated from the East

    to Central-Western Europe in the first half of the third millennium cal BC or little before. However,

    this approach involves some problems. The first attestations of M412 (more precisely some sub-

    clades of this haplogroup) are among the Bell Beaker people who lived in Central Europe in the

    second half of the third millennium cal BC. We still do not know whether in the oldest Bell Beaker

    communities of the West (i.e. those at the basis of this culture) M412 was present or not, but both

    scenarios have problematic implications for the thesis that M412 has its origins in a L23 component

    arrived from the East just a few centuries before. Furthermore the available data to date attest the

    presence of L23 only in the easternmost part of Europe, and among the Corded Ware people

    (migrated from the East to Central Europe) dominated R1a while L23 is missing. Until now there is

    no sign of a L23 component migrated from the Eastern European Plains to Central-Western Europe

    in the fourth/third millennium cal BC.

    The haplogroup R1b is attested among the Impresso-Cardial people of Western Europe. Since the

    question of the origins of M412 remains problematic and the paleogenetic data available so far have

    failed to resolve this issue, it is conjecturable that the R1b component present among the Impresso-

    Cardial people had Eastern European origin (as perhaps the tradition of the ceramics decorated with

    impressions) and contained also L23. This hypothesis is not in line with prevailing estimates about

    the chronology of the appearance of this sub-clade of R1b, who is attributed to less ancient stages.

    Pending that future ancientDNA studies solve this and the other issues around L23 and M412, in

    favour of a high chronology it can be noted that the descendants of the first man L23 in the third

    millennium cal BC constituted the large part of the male component of Yamnaya people and Bell

    Beaker people, two important populations without common origins or cultural ties and who lived in

    very distant parts of Europe.

    This text is the translation of the Abstract of "I sottogruppi di R1b oggi dominanti in Europa

    occidentale hanno le loro origini in una componente R1b (contenente anche L23) arrivata

    nell’Ovest nel Neolitico con la corrente Impresso ?", see below

  • ORIGINAL VERSION IN ITALIAN LANGUAGE

    I sottogruppi di R1b oggi dominanti in Europa

    occidentale hanno le loro origini in una componente

    R1b (contenente anche L23) arrivata nell’Ovest nel

    Neolitico con la corrente Impresso ?

    Excerpt from: Ignazio Abeltino,(2016), Le popolazioni dell’Europa neolitica con ceramiche

    decorate con impressioni (culture delle pianure orientali e culture Impresso-Cardiali dell’Europa

    mediterranea e occidentale) erano indoeuropee? La prospettiva archeologica, linguistica e

    genetica

    TRANSLATION IN ENGLISH: "Were the Neolithic peoples of Europe with ceramics decorated

    with impressions (cultures of the Eastern Plains and Impresso-Cardial cultures of Mediterranean

    and Western Europe ) Indo-European ? The archaeological, linguistic and genetic perspective"

    Abstract

    L’aplogruppo del cromosoma Y prevalente in Europa occidentale è R1b-M412, e questo

    comporta che la maggioranza degli Europei occidentali moderni ha un antenato comune nel

    singolo uomo presso cui era comparsa la mutazione che caratterizza questo sottogruppo di

    R1b.

    I dati ancientDNA disponibili hanno evidenziato che tutti i più antichi individui M412 e

    derivati (terzo e secondo millennio cal. a.C., Europa centro-occidentale) presentano sul piano

    genome-wide una presenza significativa di steppe ancestry, che risulta praticamente assente

    tra i neolitici dell’Ovest finora studiati. Inoltre R1b-L23 (da cui deriva M412) è attestato nella

    parte più orientale d’Europa nel terzo millennio cal. a.C. e questi dati vengono da molti

    interpretati come elementi risolutivi a favore della ipotesi che M412 derivi da una componente

    L23 presente insieme alla steppe ancestry in qualche gruppo dell’Est migrato verso l’Europa

    centro-occidentale nella prima metà del terzo millennio cal. a.C. o poco prima. Questo

    approccio tuttavia presenta alcuni problemi. Le prime attestazioni di M412 e derivati oggi

    disponibili sono relative alle genti Bell Beaker che vivevano in Europa centrale nella seconda

    metà del terzo millennio cal. a.C.. Ancora non sappiamo se tra le più antiche comunità Bell

    Beaker dell’Ovest (cioè quelle alla base di questa corrente culturale) M412 era presente

    oppure no, ma entrambe gli scenari presentano delle implicazioni problematiche per la tesi di

    una origine di M412 in una componente L23 arrivata da est appena pochi secoli prima.

    Inoltre i dati ad oggi disponibili hanno attestato la presenza di L23 soltanto nelle lontane

    estremità orientali d’Europa mentre tra le genti Corded Ware migrate da est in Europa

    centrale dominava R1a mentre L23 manca, e finora non c’è traccia di una componente L23

  • che dalle pianure orientali abbia raggiunto l’Europa centro-occidentale nelle Età dei Metalli

    per dare origine in questa parte del continente a M412.

    L’aplogruppo R1b risulta presente tra le genti di tradizione Impresso-Cardiale dell’Ovest.

    Poiché la questione delle origini di M412 resta problematica e i dati paleogenetici finora

    disponibili non sono riusciti a risolverla, si può considerare la possibilità che la componente

    R1b presente tra i neolitici dell’Ovest avesse origine nell’Europa orientale e contenesse anche

    L23. Questa ipotesi non è in linea con le stime prevalenti riguardo la cronologia di questo

    sottogruppo di R1b, la cui comparsa viene attribuita a fasi meno antiche. In attesa che i futuri

    studi ancientDNA facciano chiarezza su questo punto e sulle altre questioni che ruotano

    attorno a L23 e M412, a favore di una cronologia alta si può notare che i discendenti del

    primo uomo L23 nel terzo millennio cal. a.C. risultano costituire larghissima parte della

    componente maschile di due popolazioni importanti come quella degli Yamnaya e quella dei

    Bell Beaker, che vivevano in parti del continente tra loro lontane e che non avevano né legami

    né una origine culturale comune.

    Come è noto i sottogruppi di R1b dominanti nell’Europa centro-occidentale sono concentrati in

    quest’area e hanno una comune origine nel sottogruppo R1b-M412, anche chiamato R1b-L51 [Jarve

    2008; Myres et al. 2011]. La mutazione che caratterizza M412 si è presentata in un singolo uomo

    che costituisce un antenato comune non solo per la maggioranza degli Europei occidentali di oggi

    ma anche, come conseguenza delle migrazioni dall’Europa, per una parte importante degli attuali

    abitanti di Nord America, Sud America e Oceania.

    Il primo uomo M412 risulta nato da un padre appartenente al sottogruppo R1b-L23, che oggi è

    diffuso, seppure con frequenze non elevate, in Europa e nelle regioni dell’Asia confinanti con il

    continente europeo. Le frequenze più significative di L23 e dei suoi sottogruppi orientali oggi sono

    in Armenia, nella parte settentrionale del Medio Oriente, nell’area uralica e nei Balcani [Battaglia et

    al. 2008; Jarve 2008; Myres et al. 2011; Grugni et al. 2012; Herrera et al. 2012; Karachanak et al.

    2013]. Naturalmente per affrontare il tema delle origini di L23 e di M412 si deve fare riferimento ai

    dati ancientDNA, che a partire dal 2012 hanno cominciato a svelare la diffusione dell’aplogruppo

    R1b nella preistoria [Lee et al. 2012; Allentoft et al. 2015; Haak et al. 2015; Mathieson et al. 2015;

    Szecsenyi-Nagy 2015; Cassidy et al. 2016; Fu et al. 2016], e oggi (maggio 2016) disponiamo di un

    quadro cronologico e geografico che possiamo sintetizzare nel seguente modo. La più antica

    attestazione di R1b è relativa ad un individuo del Nord Est italiano (Villabruna-Belluno) di circa

    14.000 anni fa. La seconda più antica attestazione (si tratta di un sottogruppo di R1b1a) è relativa ad

    un individuo della regione di Samara in Russia, vissuto nella parte centrale del sesto millennio a.C.

    e appartenente ad una cultura locale con ceramiche decorate con impressioni. Nella parte finale del

    sesto millennio R1b (in questo caso il sottogruppo R1b1c) compare in un individuo dell’Aragona

    (Iberia) appartenente alla corrente Impresso-Cardiale. La più antica attestazione di L23 risulta

    presso le genti Yamnaya-Kurgan che vivevano nelle pianure europee orientali nel terzo millennio

    a.C., tra le quali troviamo quasi esclusivamente R1b, con prevalenza dei sottogruppi orientali di

    L23. Invece le più antiche attestazioni di M412 e derivati risultano presso le genti Bell Beaker

    dell’Europa centrale del terzo millennio.

    Cerchiamo ora di individuare quali possono essere le implicazioni dei dati ancientDNA ad oggi

    disponibili riguardo al tema delle origini di M412. L’area da cui è partita la diffusione di L23

    sembra potersi individuare nelle pianure europee orientali. Questo appare verosimile in primo luogo

    perché i sottogruppi orientali di questo aplogruppo sono prevalenti tra le genti Yamnaya della

    Russia del terzo millennio a.C.. Gli Yamnaya risultano parzialmente affini sul piano genome-wide

    (la differenza è costituita da una presenza molto più forte della componente dei cacciatori-

    raccoglitori del Caucaso presso gli Yamnaya) all’unico rappresentante che finora conosciamo delle

  • genti con ceramiche decorate con impressioni che abitavano quelle stesse regioni nel sesto

    millennio, e significativamente questo individuo apparteneva ad un sottogruppo di R1b1a. Come è

    noto da R1b1a deriva anche R1b-M269 (cioè R1b1a2), dal quale a sua volta deriva L23 (cioè

    R1b1a2a). Quindi appare probabile che gli Yamnaya derivassero in parte dalle genti che abitavano

    quelle regioni nei millenni precedenti, ed è realistico che anche l’aplogruppo prevalente tra gli

    Yamnaya (cioè R1b-L23) avesse una origine di questo tipo. La possibilità alternativa che R1b-L23

    non si sia diffuso dall’Europa orientale ma dal Medio Oriente/Caucaso appare scarsamente

    supportata. Come abbiamo visto R1b1a è presente tra i cacciatori-raccoglitori della Russia europea,

    che certamente non avevano una recente origine mediorientale o caucasica (come indicato sia dal

    loro profilo culturale che dal loro profilo genome-wide). Ovviamente non è impossibile che in fasi

    precedenti al terzo millennio (quando L23 risulta dominante tra gli Yamanya della Russia) una

    componente R1b1a sia migrata dalle pianure europee orientali verso il Medio Oriente o il Caucaso e

    che in queste regioni siano comparsi M269 e L23 per poi diffondersi sia verso l’Europa orientale

    che verso l’Europa occidentale. Ma appare più verosimile che la presenza di M269 e di L23 nella

    parte settentrionale del Medio Oriente sia legata ad antiche migrazioni dalla non lontana Europa

    orientale, forse soprattutto quelle legate alla antica indoeuropeizzazione di Armenia, Anatolia e

    Iran.

    Come abbiamo detto L23 (a cui fa capo la larghissima maggioranza della componente R1b

    dell’Europa moderna) ha la sua più antica attestazione tra le genti Yamnaya, ma tra esse troviamo

    soltanto i sottogruppi orientali di L23, mentre i sottogruppi occidentali di questo aplogruppo (che

    fanno capo a M412) risultano assenti. E anche oggi la componente prevalente dell’aplogruppo R1b

    in Europa orientale, Caucaso e Medio Oriente è costituita dai sottogruppi orientali di L23, mentre

    M412 nell’insieme di queste regioni è poco frequente e la sua presenza è riconducibile a più o meno

    antiche migrazioni dall’Europa occidentale. Gli elementi fin qui evidenziati sembrano implicare che

    M412 (cioè R1b1a2a1) derivi da una componente L23 che probabilmente viveva nell’Est Europa

    prima che si realizzasse una separazione geografica tra il gruppo rimasto nell’Europa orientale e

    quello migrato verso l’Ovest europeo, all’origine di M412 e dei suoi importanti sottogruppi.

    Tenendo conto dei dati paleogenetici disponibili può quindi essere utile provare ad individuare in

    quale fase della preistoria e sullo sfondo di quale contesto culturale può essere avvenuta questa

    separazione geografica. Riguardo le origini di M412 lo schema attualmente prevalente comporta

    che questo aplogruppo abbia origine in una componente L23 migrata da est verso l’Europa centro-

    occidentale durante la prima metà del terzo millennio o poco prima. Tutti i più antichi M412

    dell’Europa centro-occidentale (terzo e secondo millennio a.C.) presentano sul piano genome-wide

    una presenza significativa di steppe ancestry (cioè, come abbiamo visto nei paragrafi precedenti,

    EHG + CHG), che risulta praticamente assente tra i neolitici dell’Ovest finora studiati. Il fatto che

    L23 (da cui deriva M412) sia attestato nella parte più orientale d’Europa nel terzo millennio e la

    circostanza che i primi M412 dell’Europa centro-occidentale presentano steppe ancestry vengono

    da molti interpretati come elementi risolutivi a favore della ipotesi che M412 derivi da una

    componente L23 presente insieme alla steppe ancestry in qualche gruppo dell’Est migrato verso

    l’Europa centro-occidentale nel quarto/terzo millennio. Certamente questo schema è compatibile

    con i dati disponibili e legittimamente viene considerato da molti come il più realistico, tuttavia

    come cercheremo di evidenziare in queste pagine si scontra con alcuni problemi.

    Un sottogruppo di M412, R1b-U106, è attestato in Svezia nella parte finale del terzo millennio in

    un individuo della cultura Battle Axe [Allentoft et al. 2015], legata alla cultura della Ceramica

    Cordata originaria dell’Est. L’aplogruppo predominante tra le genti della Ceramica Cordata è R1a, e

    soltanto un singolo individuo sembra (la qualità del campione è scarsa) essere R1b, ma non ci sono

    indizi che si tratti proprio di L23 [Allentoft et al. 2015]. Tenendo conto della relativa parentela tra

    genti Yamnaya e genti della Ceramica Cordata una presenza minoritaria tra questi ultimi di L23 non

    appare improbabile. Ma è difficile immaginare che proprio in una piccola componente di questo

    tipo abbiano le loro origini R1b-M412 e i suoi principali sottogruppi, che risultano prevalenti tra le

    genti Bell Beaker dell’Europa centrale. Questo implicherebbe che le genti Bell Beaker in origine

  • sarebbero state senza M412 e derivati, e che in Europa centrale una componente R1b-L23 presente

    in misura modesta tra le confinanti genti della Ceramica Cordata sarebbe riuscita a infiltrarsi tra i

    Bell Beaker diventando in breve tempo predominante con i suoi nuovi sottogruppi (cioè M412 e

    derivati). La verosimilità di uno schema di questo tipo non appare elevata, inoltre se la componente

    maschile dei Bell Beaker avesse gran parte delle sue origini in quella delle genti della Ceramica

    Cordata allora ci aspetteremmo di trovare ben rappresentato tra i Bell Beaker anche R1a, che invece

    ad oggi risulta mancante.

    Come detto in precedenza tutti gli individui appartenenti a M412 e ai suoi sottogruppi

    discendono dal primo uomo M412 (il cui padre era un L23), quindi sul piano teorico non è

    necessario immaginare una importante migrazione da est contenente L23 verso l’Europa

    occidentale, e si potrebbe pensare ad un piccolo gruppo (non rilevato o non rilevabile sulla base dei

    dati archeologici) o addirittura a un singolo gruppo familiare o un singolo individuo migrato verso

    l’Europa centro-occidentale, ma sarebbe sorprendente se i futuri studi ancientDNA confermeranno

    un quadro di questo tipo. I dati attualmente disponibili dicono che le più antiche attestazioni di

    M412 e derivati sono relative alle genti Bell Beaker della seconda metà del terzo millennio a.C..

    Fino ad oggi gli unici Bell Beaker di cui è stato studiato il profilo genetico vivevano in Europa

    Centrale e tra loro prevalgono appunto M412 e derivati, ma ancora non sappiamo se i Bell Beaker

    dell’Ovest erano anch’essi caratterizzati oppure no da una prevalenza di M412. Peraltro è

    interessante notare che entrambe gli scenari presentano delle implicazioni problematiche per la tesi

    di una origine di M412 in una componente L23 arrivata nella prima parte del terzo millennio o poco

    prima da est. Se si scoprirà che le comunità Bell Beaker delle varie parti d’Europa erano

    accomunate da una prevalenza di M412 questo implicherebbe che la maggioranza dei maschi Bell

    Beaker (quindi un numero considerevole di uomini) discendeva da un individuo appartenente ad

    una comunità che era arrivata nell’Ovest (da dove è partita la corrente Bell Beaker) soltanto alcuni

    secoli prima. Un fenomeno di questo tipo sarebbe sorprendente anche perché implica una crescita

    rapidissima del numero dei discendenti maschi del primo uomo M412. Inoltre presenta dei problemi

    anche sul piano archeologico perchè ci aspetteremmo di trovare qualche riscontro dell’arrivo di

    questa comunità originaria dell’Europa orientale, e la traccia di elementi culturali che rimandano

    all’Est nel contesto culturale da cui è emersa la cultura Bell Beaker.

    Se invece i maschi Bell Beaker dell’Ovest non erano M412 e derivati ma avevano altri

    aplogruppi questo implicherebbe che la componente maschile originaria di questa popolazione in

    Europa centrale è stata completamente sostituita. In altri termini in questa parte del continente

    l’impianto della cornice culturale Bell Beaker arrivata da ovest insieme ad una componente mtDNA

    con delle affinità con quella dell’Ovest [Lee et al. 2012; Brandt et al. 2013; Brotherton et al. 2013;

    Allentoft et al. 2015; Haak et al. 2015; Mathieson et al. 2015] si sarebbe realizzato con una

    eliminazione della componente maschile originaria, cioè quella che non avrebbe avuto M412.

    Inoltre questa componente maschile eliminata sarebbe stata sostituita da una componente M412 di

    cui nell’Europa centrale non si riesce ad individuare la possibile origine, in quanto L23 risulta

    attestato soltanto nelle lontane estremità orientali d’Europa e tra le genti Corded Ware arrivate in

    Europa centrale da est dominava R1a e finora L23 manca. Sulla base dei dati attualmente

    disponibili lo scenario appena delineato non appare probabile ma ovviamente è possibile che nuovi

    dati ancientDNA in futuro ne dimostrino la fondatezza.

    Per cercare di venire a capo dei problemi sopra accennati qualcuno potrebbe mettere in dubbio

    che l’origine della corrente culturale Bell Beaker sia in Iberia e ipotizzare qualche regione

    geograficamente più esposta alle influenze dall’Europa orientale, ma un approccio di questo tipo

    striderebbe non solo con il quadro archeologico e cronologico [Rojo-Guerra et al. 2005; Van Der

    Linden 2007] ma anche con la circostanza che il profilo mtDNA dei Bell Beaker dell’Europa

    centrale mostra delle affinità con quello attestato in Iberia nei millenni precedenti.

    Considerando i problemi sopra evidenziati riguardo l’ipotesi della comparsa di M412 in qualche

    misterioso gruppo con L23 arrivato nell’Europa centro-occidentale da est nella prima parte del terzo

    millennio o poco prima, in linea con lo schema generale qui proposto possiamo prendere in

  • considerazione una ipotesi alternativa. Come esposto nel paragrafo precedente la teoria qui

    presentata comporta che R1b fosse presente tra i portatori della tradizione delle ceramiche impresse

    arrivati nei Balcani dalle pianure europee orientali (che avrebbero dato un contributo fondamentale

    alla formazione della cultura Impresso balcanica, alla base della corrente Impresso-Cardiale arrivata

    nell’Ovest), e la componente R1b presente tra le genti di tradizione Impresso dell’Iberia avrebbe

    appunto questa origine. Poiché la questione delle origini di M412 resta problematica e i dati

    ancientDNA finora disponibili non sono riusciti a risolverla, può essere utile considerare l’ipotesi

    che nella componente R1b che sarebbe migrata dalle pianure dell’Est ai Balcani ci fosse anche L23

    (più avanti parleremo dei problemi cronologici relativi a questa ipotesi). E che questo aplogruppo

    con la corrente Impresso partita dalla Penisola Balcanica abbia poi raggiunto nel sesto millennio

    l’Europa occidentale, dando origine in questa parte del continente a M412 e ai suoi derivati.

    Come abbiamo visto il cacciatore-raccoglitore di Samara appartenente ad una cultura con

    ceramiche decorate con impressioni (finora l’unico individuo appartenente a queste culture dell’Est

    di cui è stato studiato il profilo genetico) appartiene ad un sottogruppo di R1b1a. Come sappiamo

    anche il nodo (cioè R1b-M269) da cui derivano L23 (R1b1a2a) e M412 (R1b1a2a1) è un

    sottogruppo di R1b1a. L’individuo dell’Iberia appartenente alla tradizione Impresso ha invece

    aplogruppo R1b1c, quindi si tratta di una forma più distante da quella del cacciatore-raccoglitore di

    Samara, anche se i due sottogruppi hanno un’antica origine comune nel nodo R1b1. Riepilogando,

    sulla base dei dati che abbiamo fin qui evidenziato possiamo immaginare il seguente schema. Tra le

    genti con ceramiche decorate con impressioni delle pianure europee orientali oltre a R1b1a (a cui

    apparteneva l’individuo della regione di Samara) potevano essere presenti altri sottogruppi di R1b, e

    tra questi anche L23. Questa ed altre forme appartenenti all’aplogruppo R1b (e ovviamente anche

    quella dell’individuo Impresso dell’Iberia) sarebbero state presenti anche nel gruppo migrato nei

    Balcani, permettendo in questo modo all’aplogruppo L23 nei secoli successivi di raggiungere con la

    corrente Impresso il Sud Ovest europeo. Una dinamica culturale di questo tipo potrebbe aver fatto

    da sfondo alla separazione geografica tra la componente L23 rimasta in Europa orientale (che alcuni

    millenni più tardi si presenterà molto forte tra gli Yamnaya) e la componente L23 migrata verso

    l’Ovest europeo (alla base di M412 e dei suoi importanti sottogruppi).

    Va riconosciuto che l’ipotesi che la comparsa di L23 risalga alla parte centrale del settimo

    millennio cal. a.C. (cioè in fasi anteriori alla comparsa della cultura Impresso nei Balcani) non è in

    linea con il fatto che ad oggi prima del terzo millennio non ci sono attestazioni di questo

    aplogruppo, e le poche attestazioni di R1b relative ai millenni precedenti appartengono a forme più

    basali di questo macro-aplogruppo. Ma il problema principale riguarda questo tipo di

    inquadramento cronologico, perché secondo le stime prevalenti questo aplogruppo non risalirebbe

    al settimo millennio ma a fasi meno antiche della preistoria. In attesa che futuri studi ancientDNA

    facciano luce sulla effettiva cronologia di L23, a favore di una datazione alta possiamo notare che i

    discendenti del primo uomo L23 nel terzo millennio risultano costituire larga parte della

    componente maschile sia degli Yamnaya che dei Bell Beaker, cioè di due popolazioni che vivevano

    in regioni tra loro lontane e che non avevano nè legami né una origine culturale comune. E tra la

    fine del terzo e l’inizio del secondo millennio i discendenti del primo uomo L23 appaiono essere

    fortemente impiantati anche in Irlanda (tre su tre [Cassidy et al. 2016]). A mio parere non è molto

    convincente l’idea che l’antenato comune di queste che gia nel terzo millennio dovevano costituire

    delle moltitudini fosse vissuto soltanto un paio di millenni prima, e dobbiamo considerare che in

    quelle fasi della preistoria il tasso di mortalità (compreso quello infantile e giovanile) doveva essere

    alto e quindi la progressiva moltiplicazione del numero dei discendenti maschi del primo uomo L23

    (cioè quello a cui risalgono sia i sottogruppi orientali che quelli occidentali di questo aplogruppo)

    deve essersi realizzata a ritmi relativamente contenuti. Con una cronologia di L23 più alta, come

    quella qui ipotizzata, risulterebbe meglio comprensibile la notevolissima diffusione dei discendenti

    del primo uomo L23 in Europa nel terzo millennio a.C.. L23 avrebbe avuto una presenza

    significativa in alcune regioni dell’Est nella seconda metà del settimo millennio cal. a.C. e la forte

    presenza di L23 e derivati tra le genti Yamnaya avrebbe appunto questa antica origine, comune

  • anche alla componente L23 migrata (insieme alla tradizione delle ceramiche impresse) verso i

    Balcani e poi verso l’Europa occidentale e alla base di M412 e derivati, che nel terzo e secondo

    millennio nell’Europa centro-occidentale risultano predominanti in alcune popolazioni e presenti in

    altre. Sarebbe sorprendente se i futuri studi ancientDNA dimostrassero che la predominanza dei

    sottogruppi di L23 nel terzo millennio sia tra i Bell Beaker che tra gli Yamanya costituisce una

    semplice casualità, e si può ipotizzare che entrambe le popolazioni derivino da gruppi delle fasi

    precedenti della preistoria all’interno dei quali L23 era ben rappresentato.

    Il quadro della distribuzione geografica dei sottogruppi di M412 che appare nel terzo e secondo

    millennio si presenta con una struttura che è in parte simile a quella moderna (U106 nell’area

    nordica [Allentoft et al. 2015], M529 nelle Isole Britanniche [Cassidy et al. 2016]), e anche questo

    elemento stride con le ipotesi che implicano tempi brevi nell’Ovest tra l’arrivo di L23 e la

    diffusione dei maggiori sottogruppi di M412 in diverse regioni della parte centro-occidentale

    d’Europa.

    A proposito della componente R1b-U106 presente in Svezia nella parte finale del terzo millennio

    si può considerare l’ipotesi che avesse origini occidentali, e che appartenesse al contesto che si era

    formato localmente prima dell’arrivo delle genti della Ceramica Cordata da est. R1b-L11 (da cui

    discende U106) deriva direttamente da M412 e potrebbe aver raggiunto l’area nordica in diversi

    modi, ad esempio con la corrente Michelsberg (che era partita dalla Francia settentrionale, cioè da

    un’area influenzata dall’orizzonte culturale Impresso [Lichardus-Itten 1986; Manen & Mazuriè de

    Keroualin 2003; Rivollat et al. 2015]) confluita nella cultura Funnel Beaker, oppure con la

    diffusione dei modelli del megalitismo, comparsi nella parte occidentale d’Europa molto prima che

    nell’area nordica, oppure con qualche altra migrazione da ovest che non ha lasciato chiare tracce

    archeologiche. Né si può escludere una origine di questa componente M412 nelle comunità Bell

    Beaker più settentrionali. È interessante notare che in fasi contemporanee alla presenza di U106 in

    Svezia troviamo nella vicina Danimarca l’aplogruppo mtDNA H3 [Allentoft et al. 2015], che

    appare ricollegabile alle comunità di tradizione Impresso dell’Europa sud occidentale.

    Riepilogando, come abbiamo visto le più antiche attestazioni di M412 e derivati sono tra le

    popolazioni Bell Beaker dell’Europa Centrale, che sul piano genome-wide hanno una presenza

    significativa di steppe ancestry (EHG + CHG), la quale sostanzialmente manca tra gli individui

    dell’Ovest finora studiati del Neolitico e del Calcolitico. Allo stesso tempo le genti Bell Beaker

    hanno legami sul piano mtDNA e anche sul piano culturale (ad esempio tra loro è presente la

    tradizione del megalitismo) con l’Europa sud occidentale, da dove appunto sembra essere partita la

    corrente Bell Beaker. Se accettiamo l’ipotesi che la componente R1b presente tra le genti Impresso

    dell’Ovest ha le sue origini nella migrazione dalle pianure europee orientali ai Balcani di un gruppo

    portatore della tradizione delle ceramiche impresse allora dobbiamo pensare che in origine questa

    componente R1b si accompagnasse a qualche forma di steppe ancestry. Tuttavia l’individuo R1b1c

    di tradizione Impresso dell’Iberia (come gli altri individui Impresso finora studiati) non aveva

    steppe ancestry [Haak et al. 2015] quindi possiamo immaginare uno scenario dove questo tipo di

    ancestry si è sostanzialmente diluita nei Balcani nel processo di formazione delle genti Impresso per

    la fusione con comunità numericamente più ampie e dove predominava la componente basal

    eurasian. Se (come ipotizzato in questo paragrafo) all’interno della componente R1b arrivata

    nell’Ovest era presente anche L23 questo implicherebbe che M412 è comparso in una componente

    R1b ormai non più affiancata sul piano genome-wide alla steppe ancestry. L’accostamento tra

    M412 e questo tipo di ancestry si sarebbe prodotto soltanto nel terzo millennio grazie a fusioni tra

    popolazioni dell’Est e dell’Ovest in Europa centrale. In alternativa a questo schema si può

    considerare la possibilità che questo accostamento abbia invece origini più antiche. L’individuo

    R1b di tradizione Impresso dell’Iberia non aveva steppe ancestry forse perché appunto apparteneva

    a delle comunità locali dove la steppe ancestry originariamente accoppiata a R1b si era già

    completamente diluita, ma è possibile che esistessero anche situazioni di tipo diverso e che

    nell’Europa mediterranea/occidentale ci fossero delle comunità Impresso-Cardiali (ancora non

  • individuate dagli studi ancientDNA) con una parte significativa delle proprie ascendenze nei

    portatori della tradizione delle ceramiche impresse dalle pianure orientali ai Balcani. A questi

    sottogruppi Impresso-Cardiali potrebbe risalire una quota non irrilevante della steppe ancestry

    presente tra le popolazioni dell’Europa occidentale delle Età dei Metalli e forse, come proposto in

    precedenza, anche la componente L23 all’interno della quale è emerso M412. Se questa ipotesi

    fosse fondata implicherebbe che non solo le genti Bell Beaker ma gli stessi Europei occidentali

    moderni hanno una parte importante delle loro origini in queste popolazioni del Neolitico. In futuro

    sapremo se M412 ha effettivamente origine in migrazioni contenenti L23 dall’Europa orientale

    verso l’Ovest nei primi secoli del terzo millennio o poco prima, in linea con l’ipotesi oggi

    dominante, o se invece nel sesto millennio in qualche regione dell’Europa meridionale/occidentale

    esistevano delle minoritarie comunità di tradizione Impresso con presenza di R1b-L23/R1b-M412 e

    di steppe ancestry.

    Per concludere è utile evidenziare che anche se i futuri studi ancientDNA stabiliranno che M412

    non è originario di una componente L23 arrivata in Europa occidentale nel Neolitico, in ogni caso la

    presenza di R1b1a tra le genti con ceramiche decorate con impressioni della Russia europea [Haak

    et al. 2015] rende verosimile che M269 (cioè R1b1a2), L23 (cioè R1b1a2a) e M412 (cioè

    R1b1a2a1) appartengano ad una linea di discendenza che ha le sue origini in queste popolazioni

    dell’Est. Sia M269 che L23 risultano presenti nelle pianure europee orientali nelle Età dei Metalli e

    anche se il sottogruppo di R1b1a dell’individuo di Samara del sesto millennio è diverso da quello

    da cui deriva la linea M269/L23 l’ipotesi più realistica è che questi sottogruppi abbiano origine

    proprio nella componente R1b1a attestata tra i cacciatori-raccoglitori di quelle stesse regioni. Gli

    scenari alternativi non sono supportati dall’attuale quadro ancientDNA ed appare verosimile la

    derivazione della componente R1b degli Yamanya, dei Bell Beaker e degli Europei moderni dalla

    componente R1b delle genti con ceramiche decorate con impressioni delle pianure europee

    orientali. Con i futuri studi ancientDNA sarà interessante scoprire che natura ha la parentela tra la

    componente maschile delle genti Yamnaya e quella delle genti Bell Beaker, cioè se si tratta di una

    parentela risalente alle Età dei Metalli (con una migrazione da est di L23 verso l’Europa centro-

    occidentale nel quarto/terzo millennio) oppure se, in linea con l’ipotesi proposta in questo

    paragrafo, si tratta di una parentela con origini più antiche e risalente al Neolitico Antico, con la

    migrazione di una componente L23 prima verso i Balcani e poi, con la corrente Impresso, fino

    all’Europa occidentale.

    References

    ACHILLI A., RENGO C., MAGRI C. et al.,(2004), The molecular dissection of mtDNA

    haplogroup H confirms that the Franco-Cantabrian glacial refuge was a major source for the

    European gene pool, in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 75: 910-918

    ALLENTOFT M.E., SIKORA M., SIOGREN K.G. et al.,(2015), Population genomics of Bronze

    Age Eurasia, in Nature 522:167–172

  • AL-ZAHERY N., SEMINO O., BENUZZI G. et al.,(2003), Y-chromosome and mtDNA

    polymorphisms in Iraq, a crossroad of the early human dispersal and of post-Neolithic migrations,

    in Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 28: 458-472

    BADRO D.A., DOUAIHY B., HABER M. et al.,(2013), Y-chromosome and mtDNA genetics

    reveal significant contrasts in affinities of modern middle eastern populations with european and

    african populations, in PLoS ONE 8(1): e54616

    BALANOVSKY O., ROOTSI S., PSHENICHNOV A. et al.,(2008), Two sources of the Russian

    patrilineal heritage in their eurasian contest, in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 82: 236-250

    BALANOVSKY O., DIBIROVA K., DYBO A. et al.,(2011), Parallel evolution of genes and

    languages in the Caucasus region, in Mol. Biol. Evol. 28: 2905-2920

    BALARESQUE P., BOWDEN G.R., ADAMS S.M. et al.,(2010), A predominantly Neolithic origin

    for European paternal lineages, PloS Biol 8: e1000285

    BATTAGLIA V., FORNARINO S., AL-ZAHERY N. et al.,(2008), Y-chromosomal evidence of the

    cultural diffusion of agriculture in Southeast Europe, in Eur. J. Hum. Genet. 17: 820-830

    BOATTINI A., MARTINEZ-CRUZ B., SARNO S. et al.,(2013), Uniparental markers in Italy

    reveal a sex-biased genetic structure and different historical strata, in PLoS ONE 8(5): e65441

    BRAMANTI B., THOMAS M., HAAK W. et al.,(2009), Genetic discontinuity between local

    hunter-gatherers and Central Europe’s first farmers, in Science 326: 137-140

    BRANDT G., HAAK W., ADLER C.J. et al.,(2013), Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the

    formation of central european mitochondrial genetic diversity, in Science 342: 257–261

    BROTERTHON P., HAAK W., TEMPLETON J. et al.,(2013), Neolithic mitochondrial haplogroup

    H genomes and the genetic origins of Europeans, in Nat. Commun. 4: 1764

    BROWN M.D., HOSSEINI S.H., TORRONI A. et al.,(1998), mtDNA haplogroup X: an ancient

    link between Europe/Western Asia and North America? in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 63: 1852–1861

    BUSBY G., BRISIGHELLI F., SANCHEZ-DIZ P. et al.,(2012), The peopling of Europe and the

    cautionary tale of Y chromosome lineage R-M269, in Proceedings of the Royal Society B:

    Biological Sciences 279: 884-892

    CARAMELLI D., LALUEZA-FOX C., VERNESI C. et al.,(2003), Evidence for a genetic

    discontinuity between Neanderthals and 24,000-year-old anatomically modern Europeans, in PNAS

    100: 6593-6597

    CARVALHO-SILVA D.R., SANTOS F.R., ROCHA J., PENA S.D.G.,(2001), The phylogeography

    of brazilian Y-chromosome lineages, in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 68: 281-286

    CASSIDY L.M., MARTINIANO R., MURPHY E.M. et al.,(2016), Neolithic and Bronze Age

    migration to Ireland and establishment of the insular atlantic genome, in PNAS 113 (2):368-373

  • CHANDLER H., SYKES B. & ZILHAO J.,(2005), Using ancient DNA to examine genetic

    continuity at the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in Portugal, in Actas del III congreso del Neolitico

    en la Peninsula Iberica: 781-786

    CINNIOGLU C., KING R., KIVISILD T. et al.,(2004), Excavating Y-chomosome haplotype strata

    in Anatolia, in Hum Genet 114: 127-148

    D’AMORE G., DI MARCO S., FLORIS G. et al.,(2010), Craniofacial morphometric variation and

    the biological history of the peopling of Sardinia, in HOMO-Journal of Comparative Human

    Biology 61: 385–412

    DEGUILLOUX M.-F., SOLER L., PEMONGE M.-H. et al.,(2011), News from the West: ancient

    DNA from a french megalithic burial chamber, in Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 144: 108-118

    DEGUILLOUX M.-F., LEAHY R., PEMONGE M.-H., ROTTIER S.,(2012), European

    Neolithization and ancient DNA: an assessment, in Evolutionary Anthropology 21: 24-37

    DER SARKISSIAN C., BALANOVSKY O., BRANDT G. et al.,(2013), Ancient DNA reveals

    prehistoric gene-flow from Siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe,

    in PLoS Genetics 9: e1003296

    DER SARKISSIAN C., ALLENTOFT M.E., AVILA-ARCOS M.C. et al.,(2015), Ancient

    genomics, in Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370: 20130387

    FERNANDEZ E., PEREZ-PEREZ A., GAMBA C. et al.,(2014), Ancient DNA analysis of 8000

    B.C. near eastern farmers supports an Early Neolithic pioneer maritime colonization of mainland

    Europe through Cyprus and the Aegean Islands, in PLoS Genet 10: e1004401

    FLORES C., MACA-MEYER N., LARRUGA J.M. et al.,(2005), Isolates in a corridor of

    migrations: a high-resolution analysis of Y-chromosome variation in Jordan, in J. Hum. Genet. 50:

    435-441

    FRANCALACCI P. & SANNA D.,(2008), History and geography of human Y-chromosome in

    Europe: a SNP perspective, in Journal of Anthropological Sciences 86: 59-89

    FRANCALACCI P., MORELLI L., ANGIUS A.,(2013), Low-pass DNA sequencing of 1200

    Sardinians reconstructs European Y-chromosome phylogeny, in Science 341:565–569

    FU Q., POSTH C., HAJDINJAK M. et al.,(2016), The genetic history of Ice Age Europe, in Nature

    534: 200-205

    GAMBA C., FERNANDEZ E., TIRADO M. et al.,(2012), Ancient DNA from an Early Neolithic

    Iberian population supports a pioneer colonization by first farmers, in Mol. Ecol. 21: 45-56

    GAMBA C., JONES E.R., TEASDALE M.D. et al.,(2014), Genome flux and stasis in a five

    millennium transect of European prehistory, in Nature Communications 5: 5257

    GARCIA O., FREGEL R., LARRUGA J.M. et al.,(2011), Using mitochondrial DNA to test the

    hypothesis of a european post-glacial human recolonization from the Franco-Cantabrian refuge, in

    Heredity 106: 37-45

  • GOMEZ-SANCHEZ D., OLALDE I., PIERINI F. et al.,(2014), Mitochondrial DNA from El

    Mirador cave (Atapuerca, Spain) reveals the heterogeneity of chalcolithic populations, in PLoS

    ONE 9(8): e105105

    GRUGNI V., BATTAGLIA V., HOOSHIAR KASHANI B. et al.,(2012), Ancient migratory events

    in the Middle East: new clues from the Y-chromosome variation of modern Iranians, in PLoS ONE

    7(7): e41252

    GUNTHER T., VALDIOSERA C., MALMSTROM H. et al.,(2015), Ancient genomes link early

    farmers from Atapuerca in Spain to modern-day Basques, in PNAS 112 (38):11917-11922

    HAAK W., BRANDT G., DE JONG H. et al.,(2008), Ancient DNA, strontium isotopes, and

    osteological analyses shed light on social and kinship organization of the Later Stone Age, in PNAS

    105(47): 18226-18231

    HAAK W., BALANOVSKY O., SANCHEZ J. et al.,(2010), Ancient DNA from european Early

    Neolithic farmers reveals their Near Eastern affinities, in PLoS Biol 8 (11): e1000536

    HAAK W., LAZARIDIS I., PATTERSON N. et al.,(2015), Massive migration from the steppe was

    a source for Indo-European languages in Europe, in Nature 522: 207–211

    HAMMER M., CHAMBERLAIN V., KEARNEY V. et al.,(2006), Population structure of Y

    chromosome SNP haplogroups in the United States and forensic implications for constructing Y

    chromosome STR databases, in Forensic Science International 164: 45-55

    HERRERA K., LOWERY R., HADDEN L. et al.,(2012), Neolithic patrilineal signals indicate that

    the Armenian plateau was repopulated by agriculturalists, Eur. J. Hum. Genet. 20: 313-320

    HERVELLA M., IZAGIRRE N., ALONSO S. et al.,(2012), Ancient DNA from hunter-gatherer and

    farmer groups from northern Spain supports a random dispersion model for the Neolithic

    expansion into Europe, in PLoS ONE 7: e34417

    HERVELLA M., ROTEA M., IZAGIRRE N. et al.,(2015), Ancient DNA from South-East Europe

    reveals different events during Early and Middle Neolithic influencing the european genetic

    heritage, in PLoS ONE 10(6): e0128810

    HOFMANOVA Z., KREUTZER S., HELLENTHAL G. et al.,(2015), Early farmers from across

    Europe directly descended from Neolithic Aegeans, in BioRxiv preprint

    IZAGIRRE N. & DE LA RUA C.,(1999), An mtDNA analysis in ancient Basque populations:

    implications for haplogroup V as a marker for a major Paleolithic expansion from Southwestern

    Europe, in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 65: 199-207

    JARVE M., (2008), Refining the phylogeny and phylogeography of the human Y chromosome

    haplogroup R1b1b

    JONES E.R., GONZALEZ-FORTES G., CONNELL S. et al.,(2015), Upper Palaeolithic genomes

    reveal deep roots of modern Eurasians, in Nature Communications 6:8912

    KARACHANAK S., GRUGNI V., FORNARINO S. et al.,(2013), Y-chromosome diversity in

    modern Bulgarians: new clues about their ancestry, in PLoS ONE 8(3): e56779

  • KELLER A., GRAEFEN A., BALL M. et al.,(2012), New insights into the Tyrolean Iceman’origin

    and phenotype as inferred by whole-genome sequencing, in Nat. Commun. 3: 698

    KEYSER C., BOUAKAZE C., CRUBEZY E. et al.,(2009), Ancient DNA provides new insights into

    the history of south Siberian Kurgan people, in Hum. Genet. 126: 395-410

    LACAN M., KEYSER C., RICAUT F.-X. et al.,(2011a), Ancient DNA reveals male diffusion

    through the Neolithic Mediterranean route, in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108: 9788-9791

    LACAN M., KEYSER C., RICAUT F.-X. et al.,(2011b), Ancient DNA suggests the leading role

    played by men in the Neolithic dissemination, in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108: 1788-1791

    LAZARIDIS I., PATTERSON N., MITTNIK A. et al., (2014), Ancient human genomes suggest

    three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans, in Nature 513: 409–413

    LEE E.J., MAKAREWICZ C., RENNEBERG R. et al., (2012), Emerging genetic patterns of the

    European Neolithic: perspectives from a Late Neolithic Bell Beaker burial site in Germany, in Am.

    J. Phys. Anthrop. 148: 571-579

    LEVY-COFFMAN E., (2006), We are not our ancestors: evidence for discontinuity between

    prehistoric and modern Europeans, in J. Genet. Geneal. 1: 40-50

    LICHARDUS-ITTEN M.,(1986), Premieres influences mediterraneennes dans le Neolithique du

    Bassin Parisien: contribution au debat, in Le Neolithique de la France: 147-160

    MALMSTROM H., LINDERHOLM A., SKOGLUND P. et al., (2015), Ancient mitochondrial

    DNA from the northern fringe of the Neolithic farming expansion in Europe sheds light on the

    dispersion process, in Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370: 20130373

    MALYARCHUK B., DERENKO M., GRZYBOWSKI T. et al., (2010), The peopling of Europe

    from the mitochondrial haplogroup U5 perspective, in PLoS ONE 5(4): e10285

    MANEN C. & MAZURIÈ DE KEROUALIN K.,(2003), Les concepts La Hoguette et Limbourg: un

    bilan des données, in Cahiers d’archeologie romande 95: 115-145

    MATHIESON I., LAZARIDIS I., ROHLAND N. et al.,(2015), Genome-wide patterns of selection

    in 230 ancient Eurasians, in Nature 528: 499-503

    MELCHIOR L., LYNNERUP N., SIEGISMUND H.R. et al.,(2010), Genetic diversity among

    ancient nordic populations, in PLoS ONE 5(7): e11898

    MYRES N.M., ROOTSI S., LIN A.A. et al.,(2011), A major Y-chromosome haplogroup R1b

    Holocene era founder effect in Central and Western Europe, in Eur. J. Hum. Genet.19: 95-101

    NASIDZE I., LING E., QUINQUE D. et al.,(2004), Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome

    variation in the Caucasus, in Annals of Human Genetics 68: 205-221

    NIKITIN A., NEWTON J., POTEKHINA I. et al.,(2012), Mitochondrial haplogroup C in ancient

    mitochondrial DNA from Ukraine extends the presence of East Eurasian genetic lineages in

    Neolithic Central and Eastern Europe, in J. Hum. Genet. 57: 610-612

  • OLALDE I., ALLENTOFT M.E., SANCHEZ-QUINTO F. et al.,(2014), Derived immune and

    ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European, in Nature 507: 225–228

    OLALDE I., SCHROEDER H., SANDOVAL-VELASCO M. et al.,(2015), A Common Genetic

    Origin for Early Farmers from Mediterranean Cardial and Central European LBK Cultures, in

    Mol Biol Evol

    OMRAK A., GUNTHER T., VALDIOSERA C. et al.,(2016), Genomic evidence establishes

    Anatolia as the source of the european neolithic gene pool, in Current Biology 26:1-6

    ÖZDOGAN M.,(2014), A new look at the introduction of the Neolithic way of life in Southeastern

    Europe. Changing paradigms of the expansion of the Neolithic way of life, in Documenta

    Praehistorica XLI: 33-49

    PALA M., OLIVIERI A., ACHILLI A. et al.,(2012), Mitochondrial DNA signals of Late Glacial

    recolonization of Europe from Near Eastern refugia, in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 90: 915-924

    PALANICHAMY M.G., ZHANG C.-L., MITRA B. et al.,(2010), Mitochondrial haplogroup N1a

    phylogeography, with implication to the origin of European farmers, in BMC Evol. Biol. 10: 304-

    313

    PASCHOU P., DRINEAS P., YANNAKI E. et al.,(2014), Maritime route of colonization of

    Europe, in PNAS 111(25): 9211–9216

    PINHASI R., THOMAS M., HOFREITER M. et al.,(2012), The genetic history of Europeans, in

    Trends in Genetics 28 (10): 496-505

    RAGHAVAN M., SKOGLUND P., GRAF K.E. et al.,(2013), Upper Palaeolithic siberian genome

    reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans, in Nature 505: 87–91

    REGUEIRO M., CADENAS A.M., GAYDEN T. et al.,(2006), Iran: tricontinental nexus for Y-

    chromosome driven migration, in Hum. Hered. 61: 132-143

    RICAUT F.-X., COX M.P., LACAN M. et al.,(2012), A time series of prehistoric mitochondrial

    DNA reveals western european genetic diversity was largely established by the Bronze Age, in

    Advances in Anthropology 2(1): 14-23

    RIVOLLAT M., MENDISCO F., PEMONGE M.H. et al.,(2015), When the waves of european

    neolithization met: first paleogenetic evidence from early farmers in the southern Paris Basin, in

    PLoS ONE 10(4): e0125521

    ROJO-GUERRA M.A., GARRIDO-PENA R. & GARCIA-MARTINEZ DE LAGRAN I.,(2005),

    Bell Beakers in the Iberian Peninsula and their european context

    ROOSTALU U., KUTUEV I., LOOGVALI E.-L. et al.,(2007), Origin and expansion of

    haplogroup H, the dominant human mitochondrial DNA lineage in West Eurasia: the near eastern

    and caucasian perspective, in Mol. Biol. Evol. 24 (2): 436-448

    ROOTSI S., MAGRI C., KIVISILD T. et al.,(2004), Phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup

    I reveals distinct domains of prehistoric gene flow in Europe, in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 75: 128-137

  • ROOTSI S., MYRES N., LIN A. et al.,(2012), Distinguishing the co-ancestries of haplogroup G Y-

    chromosome in the populations of Europe and the Caucasus, in Eur. J. Hum. Genet. 20: 1275-1282

    ROWLEY-CONWY P.,(2009), Human prehistory: Hunting for the earliest farmers, in Current

    Biology 19: 948-949

    SANCHEZ-QUINTO F., SCHROEDER H., RAMIREZ O. et al.,(2012), Genomic affinities of two

    7,000-year-old iberian hunter-gatherers, in Current Biology 22:1494-1499

    SAMPIETRO M.L., LAO O., CARAMELLI D. et al.,(2007), Paleogenetic evidence supports a

    dual model of Neolithic spreading into Europe, in Proc. R. Soc. B. 274: 2161-2167

    SCOZZARI R., CRUCIANI F., PANGRAZIO A. et al.,(2001), Human Y-chromosome variation in

    the Western Mediterranean area: implications for the peopling of the region, in Human

    Immunology 62: 871-884

    SEGUIN-ORLANDO A., KORNELIUSSEN T.S., SIKORA M.,(2014), Genomic structure in

    Europeans dating back at least 36,200 years, in Science 346(6213):1113–1118

    SEMINO O., PASSARINO G., OEFNER P.G. et al.,(2000), The genetic legacy of Paleolithic

    Homo sapiens sapiens in extant Europeans: a Y chromosome perspective, in Science 290: 1155-

    1159

    SENGUPTA S., ZHIVOTOVSKY L., KING R. et al., (2006), Polarity and temporality of high-

    resolution Y-chromosome distributions in India identify both indigenous and exogenous expansions

    and reveal minor genetic influence of Central Asian pastoralists, in Am. J. Hum. Genet. 78: 202-

    221

    SIKORA M., CARPENTER M.L., MORENO-ESTRADA A. et al.,(2014), Population genomic

    analysis of ancient and modern genomes yields new insights into the genetic ancestry of the

    Tyrolean Iceman and the genetic structure of Europe, in PLOS Genet. 10: e1004353

    SJODIN P. & FRANCOIS O.,(2011), Wave-of-advance models of the diffusion of the Y

    chromosome haplogroup R1b1b2 in Europe, in PLoS ONE 6(6): e21592

    SKOGLUND P., MALMSTROM H., RAGHAVAN M. et al.,(2012), Origins and genetic legacy of

    Neolithic farmers and hunter-gatherers in Europe, in Science 336: 466-469

    SKOGLUND P., MALMSTROM H., OMRAK A. et al.,(2014), Genomic diversity and admixture

    differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian foragers and farmers, in Science 344: 747–750

    SOARES P., ACHILLI A., SEMINO O. et al.,(2010), The archaeogenetics of Europe, in Current

    Biology 20: 174-183

    SZÉCSÉNYI-NAGY A., BRANDT G., KEERL V. et al.,(2015), Tracing the genetic origin of

    Europe's first farmers reveals insights into their social organization, in Proceedings of the Royal

    Society of London: Biological Sciences 282

    SZÉCSÉNYI-NAGY A.,(2015), Molecular genetic investigation of the Neolithic population history

    in the western Carpathian Basin

  • TOMORY G., CSANYI B., BOQACSI-SZABO E. et al.,(2007), Comparison of maternal lineage

    and biogeographic analyses of ancient and modern Hungarian populations, in Am. J. Phys.

    Anthrop. 134: 354-368

    TOPF A.L., GILBERT M.T., FLEISCHER R.C. et al.,(2007), Ancient human mtDNA genotypes

    from England reveal lost variation over the last millennium, in Biol. Lett. 35: 550-553

    TORRONI A., BANDELT H.-J., D’URBANO L. et al.,(1998), mtDNA analysis reveals a major

    late Paleolithic population expansion from southwestern to northeastern Europe, in Am. J. Hum.

    Genet. 62: 1137-1152

    UNDERHILL P.A., POZNIK G.D., ROOTSI S. et al.,(2014), The phylogenetic and geographic

    structure of Y-chromosome haplogroup R1a, in European Journal of Human Genetics 23:124-131

    VAN DER LINDEN M.,(2007), What linked the Bell Beakers in third millennium BC Europe ?, in

    Antiquity 81:343–352

    VANEK D., SASKOVA L. & KOCH H.,(2009), Kinship and Y-chromosome analysis of 7th

    century human remains: novel DNA extraction and typing procedure for ancient material, in Croat.

    Med. J. 50: 286-295

    VILLAR F., PROSPER B.M., JORDAN C. & FERNANDEZ ALVAREZ M.P.,(2011), Lenguas,

    genes y culturas en la prehistoria de Europa y Asia suroccidental

    WILDE S., TIMPSON A., KIRSANOW K. et al.,(2014), Direct evidence for positive selection of

    skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 y, in PNAS 111: 4832-4837

    YUNUSBAYEV B., METSPALU M., JARVE M. et al.,(2012), The Caucasus as an asymmetric

    semipermeable barrier to ancient human migrations, in Mol. Biol. Evol. 29 (1): 359-365