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ARTS AND HUMANITIES CATEGORY 6 GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT GECCIG REPORT June 25, 2009 GECCIG COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Gerard Alosio, Thomas Hendrickson, David Laverny-Rafter, Elizabeth Miller, Steven Smith (Chair) A. PROCESS: Samples of student work was gathered during Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 from students whose Tech ID ends with 5. The work collected was of many different types due to the large variety of offerings within the College of Arts and Humanities. Although this group is identified as a committee, it was determined very early on that it was difficult to work in a committee in the traditional sense where the group would assemble together and collectively go over data. It proved difficult to find a suitable meeting time. The committee also recognized that they would be faced with comparing apples and oranges due to the large variety of class formats involved. Therefore, it was decided to each individually collect and analyze data and write separate reports, with the chair of the committee submitting a summary of the data. Each committee member collected data samples and applied the following three rubrics to individually formulate whether classes in the committee members’ department were meeting the objectives of General Education Category 6. 1. Student can create and/or critique a work in the arts or the humanities 1. Student has observed a work of art or a work in the humanities. 2. Student can create a work of art or a work in the humanities, and critique a work of art or a work in the humanities. 3. Student can create a work in the arts and/or humanities, and can critique a work of art and/or evaluate a work in the humanities. 4. Student can create a work in the arts and/or humanities, and can develop and use acceptable criteria to critique a work of art and/or evaluate a work in the humanities. 2. Student displays knowledge of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities. 1. Students can list works in the arts and humanities from different eras, or list works that deal with different issues from the same era. 2. Students can describe works in the arts or humanities from different eras, or discuss works that deal with different issues from the same era. 3. Students can compare and contrast works in the arts or humanities from different eras, and compare and contrast works that deal with different issues from the same era. Student comparison shows a depth of knowledge concerning the works compared. 4. Students can compare and contrast works in the arts and humanities from different eras, and compare and contrast works that deal with different issues

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Page 1: Humanities and the Arts

ARTS AND HUMANITIES CATEGORY 6

GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT GECCIG REPORT

June 25, 2009 GECCIG COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Gerard Alosio, Thomas Hendrickson, David

Laverny-Rafter, Elizabeth Miller, Steven Smith (Chair)

A. PROCESS:

Samples of student work was gathered during Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 from students whose Tech ID ends with 5. The work collected was of many different types due to the large variety of offerings within the College of Arts and Humanities. Although this group is identified as a committee, it was determined very early on that it was difficult to work in a committee in the traditional sense where the group would assemble together and collectively go over data. It proved difficult to find a suitable meeting time. The committee also recognized that they would be faced with comparing apples and oranges due to the large variety of class formats involved. Therefore, it was decided to each individually collect and analyze data and write separate reports, with the chair of the committee submitting a summary of the data. Each committee member collected data samples and applied the following three rubrics to individually formulate whether classes in the committee members’ department were meeting the objectives of General Education Category 6. 1. Student can create and/or critique a work in the arts or the humanities

1. Student has observed a work of art or a work in the humanities. 2. Student can create a work of art or a work in the humanities, and critique a

work of art or a work in the humanities. 3. Student can create a work in the arts and/or humanities, and can critique a

work of art and/or evaluate a work in the humanities. 4. Student can create a work in the arts and/or humanities, and can develop

and use acceptable criteria to critique a work of art and/or evaluate a work in the humanities.

2. Student displays knowledge of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.

1. Students can list works in the arts and humanities from different eras, or list works that deal with different issues from the same era.

2. Students can describe works in the arts or humanities from different eras, or discuss works that deal with different issues from the same era.

3. Students can compare and contrast works in the arts or humanities from different eras, and compare and contrast works that deal with different issues from the same era. Student comparison shows a depth of knowledge concerning the works compared.

4. Students can compare and contrast works in the arts and humanities from different eras, and compare and contrast works that deal with different issues

Page 2: Humanities and the Arts

from the same era. Student comparison shows a depth of knowledge concerning the works compared.

3. Student displays understanding of the relationship between the arts and the humanities and culture.

1. Student can identify a relationship or a connection between a work in the arts and/or the humanities and society.

2. Student can explain a relationship or a connection between a work in the arts and/or the humanities and society.

3. Student can explain how works in the arts and humanities help to define, create, recreate, change or sustain a society, or how that society creates conditions or constraints for the creation of works in the arts and humanities.

4. Student can explain how works in the arts and humanities help to define, create, recreate, change or sustain a society, and how that society creates conditions or constraints for the creation of works in the arts and humanities.

Each individual committee members’ report has been added to this document after this summary page. It was left to the discretion of each member to determine what forms of data were to be collected and how the three rubrics were to be applied. B. RESULTS Each individual committee member reached their own carefully crafted conclusions from individual analysis of all data collected and anyone reviewing this document is encouraged to review all of the individual reports. In summary, each report found that the classes examined were meeting the GECCIC 6 requirements. C. RECOMMENDATIONS

When the committee first met, its members were faced with the task of deciding to use

the existing GECCIC 6 rubrics or revise and create an improved standard to apply to all

of the data collected. The task of making such a revision was dismissed as too

daunting a task and thus the existing three rubrics were again utilized. This assessment

tool needs to be reviewed and revised by a committee whose sole purpose is to revamp

the assessment procedure.

Several of the committee members felt that a larger sampling of students would be

more suitable for accurately assessing the outcome of an entire class, rather than

depending on a much smaller sampling such as students whose Tech ID ends in 5.

Some individual committee members used a larger sampling size since they had the

data available and the resources to go over a larger set of data. In many of the smaller

classes examined, there may only be a few students representing the entire class.

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This committee made great strides in overcoming the question of large format lecture

style classes where the only data available was in the form of multiple choice exams. In

this style of class, individual questions from each exam administered were selected that

specifically addressed each of the three rubrics. In this way, statistics were generated

that could demonstrate numerically whether the class being examined met the

requirements of the General Education Category. Previous GECCIC reports did not

include or examine large format classes at all. One suggestion in regards to the large

format classes is that instructors review the three rubrics and keep them in mind when

crafting exam questions to facilitate data analysis for future GECCIC reports.

Page 4: Humanities and the Arts

FALL 2008/SPRING 2009: CATEGORY 6 ASSESSMENT OF ART 160:

ART 160: Introduction to Visual Culture

Individual assessments were completed for the following general education

course:

� Art 160: Introduction to Visual Culture

We addressed the criteria for evaluation in relation to each course included

in this assessment. However, Art 160 is unique in its class size and other

aspects of course delivery. The only art course offered outside of Nelson Hall,

Art 160 seeks to provide an introduction to visual culture to over 800

students, in four sections, each academic year. Assessment included review of

student writing assignments, qualitative information from student

interactions, and the usual quantitative measures of standard course

evaluation forms.

ART 160: INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURE

“Following the completion of Category 6 of the General Education Program,

students can”:

1) Create and/or critique artistic performances:

Art 160: Introduction to Visual Culture provides an overview of

visual culture – historically and in contemporary society. Objectives

include understanding:

• the role of the artist

• the role of the observer

• the role of art in society

• the role of Art 160 in the context of other general education courses

Page 5: Humanities and the Arts

Within this context, students critique works of art based on objectives

specific to the course.

Typical assignments asks students to critique a work of art

addressing:

� Form and content in visual culture

� A personal critique of art work(s) utilizing the

vocabulary of the course text

� Reactions to specific art works or videos about visual

culture as in-class writing assignments.

The following writing samples from Art 160 students demonstrate

their use of vocabulary and reactions to the formal elements of art:

“There is a lot of negative space in each of the three drawings

although the pictures do not look empty.”

“The whole piece is balanced asymmetrically.”

“Lines descend from the rooftop and intersect with the contoured

line bordering the roof. Implied lines direct my sights starting at

the entrance, working upward to the right, then down.”

“The bold lines in this piece, although stylized as propaganda, are

also reminiscent of pop art.”

Page 6: Humanities and the Arts

The defined objectives encourage students to not only engage with

artwork, but they must do so in ways consistent with the process of

art criticism – using its unique vocabulary and methods. Similar to

the assessed studio courses, Art 160 helps students to grapple with

specific content and subject matter while also incorporating their

own ideas and point-of-view. This, in turn, links their

understanding of how form and content interact. These written

assignments challenge students to think about visual culture in new

ways.

As stated in the Art 160 syllabus, the objective of the course is to

help students learn to be a fully informed observer, better

understand the role of the artist, and the role of art in society.

Critiquing examples of visual culture ties these objectives to the

overall goal of providing a solid general education exposure to the

world of art.

In summary, students: 1) build a critical vocabulary of formal issues

in visual culture, 2) better understand the historical context of

visual culture, and

3) gain exposure to diverse examples of contemporary visual culture.

Again, this mirrors the intent of Art Department studio courses by

developing strong critical thinking and analysis skills.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts

and humanities:

Page 7: Humanities and the Arts

Art 160 explores visual culture in a way that emphasizes scope and

variety while also connecting visual culture to the humanities as a

whole. This is achieved by first building a vocabulary of terms and

providing some historical grounding. Then, visual culture is

explored one medium at a time – drawing, painting, prints, camera

and computer arts, graphic design, sculpture and installation, crafts

and architecture. I each area, students are presented with

traditional, modern and postmodern examples of media.

To further highlight this connection, another student quote

explaining the impact of Art 160: “Every time I see a work of art in

the library or on campus I think to myself, what is the artist trying

to get across?” Before students can begin to understand the scope and

variety of visual culture, they have to learn to look. Art 160 is an

intense introduction to paying more attention to the world around

us. Students routinely indicate increased interest in the architecture,

photos, videos, and other areas of visual culture that they had taken

for granted prior to the course.

Demonstrating awareness of the scope and variety of works in the

arts and humanities is inextricably linked to helping students better

understand the relationship between the arts and other areas within

the humanities. As a result, some of the quotes from the next section

(3) relate to and resonate in the current section (2).

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and the humanities and

society:

Art 160 makes reference to a variety of other areas within the

humanities – particularly theatre, literature, philosophy and

Page 8: Humanities and the Arts

music. Beyond this, the course also connects students with history,

economics, sociology and many other disciplines. Art 160 stresses the

importance of an overall awareness of the issues in the humanities

and how they are best understood with reference to other fields of

knowledge and experience.

Quoting from a student: “Before this class I had no idea that art was

such an important part of cultural history. I took for granted having

such beautiful things around me and I think this class has taught

me to have greater appreciation for different types of art.” Art 160

helps students to pay attention to the diversity of visual culture

while building a sense of context and understanding. Again, like the

studio classes, Art 160 connects with daily life – a visit to the

gallery, greater attention to our architectural environment, or the

printed page as graphic design.

Beyond this, the relationship of the arts and fast-paced change in

contemporary society helps students to see the issues of the

humanities as a part of their lives. As they are exposed to

challenging course content, their definition of art, visual culture

and the humanities in general is stretched. From another student:

“Reading the description I learned the artist suspended himself

above a canvas and swung over it dangling his feet to smear the

paint around. Normally I’m not one to appreciate this sort of work,

but the knowledge I have gained in this class allows me to

appreciate how this can be considered art.” Another student wrote: “I

feel like his sculptures were an exploration of the bizarre

blended with the scary reality of a modern world. The bright colors

and crazy arrangement of ideas was very new and exciting to me.”

Art 160 works in conjunction with other general education courses

in the humanities to help students better understand our individual

and collective lives and how they overlap.

Page 9: Humanities and the Arts

FALL 2008/SPRING 2009: CATEGORY 6 ASSESSMENT OF STUDIO ART

COURSES:

ART 100: ELEMENTS AND PRINCIPLES OF ART

ART 231: MIXED MEDIA ART

275: PHOTOGRAPHY

Individual assessments were completed for the following studio courses:

� Art 100: Elements and Principals of Art

� Art 231: Mixed Media

� Art 275: Photography

We have addressed the criteria for evaluation in relation to each course in

the documentation that follows. However, there are some generalizations and

explanations that pertain to all courses, and we will summarize those here:

“Following the completion of Category 6 of the General Education Program,

students can”:

1) Create and/or critique artistic performances:

All of the assessed studio courses are centered on the creation of art

as related to specific course objectives. Students create a number of

works throughout the semester, and these works are discussed and

evaluated in class critiques. Class discussions and critiques are

supplemented by the presentation of work from history as well as

contemporary visual examples. New artists and processes are

introduced through Power Point presentations, videos, and class

field trips.

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Each of these strategies (the creation of work, the critique of work,

and the introduction of new work) reinforces the objectives set forth.

The nature of studio art courses necessitates that students make and

critique works of art. However, in this assessment, it is our goal to

illustrate that students make art in relation to specific objectives,

that achieving those objectives correlates to their understanding of

art-making, and that a broad knowledge of art history and

contemporary art helps to better their own work while also allowing

them to more articulately contextualize their work.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts

and humanities:

As mentioned above, an integral part of the three assessed studio

courses is the introduction of new artists. Power Point presentations,

videos, class field trips to galleries and museums, and guest artist

presentations broaden students’ knowledge of art. They become

familiar with a variety of working methods and stylistic tendencies,

as drawn from numerous and diverse historical, cultural, and

geographic perspectives.

This goal reinforces the goal set forth in item 1 (Create and/or

critique artistic performance). A broad and diverse art vocabulary

helps students to more effectively create art and to more eloquently

and concisely discuss their work and that of others. Specific

examples will be cited for each course.

Page 11: Humanities and the Arts

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and the humanities and

society:

The assessed studio courses aim to forge connections between real-

world issues and ideas and artistic modes of expression. Students

learn how they can communicate ideas visually to an audience, and

how art can be influential in expressing a viewpoint, idea, or

emotion. They learn about the persuasive power of art—art can

indeed by purely visual, but it can also dictate actions and shift

opinions.

In summary, the generalizations above set the stage for our

assessment of three studio courses: Art 100: Elements and Principals

of Visual Art, Art 231: Mixed Media, and Art 275: Photography. In

the descriptions that follow, detailed examples are cited for each

course. In keeping with the directives set forth in the spring 2008

instructional meeting, we have not included the examples, but

rather described them and attempted to explain their significance

and relative success in relation to the assessment criteria.

A note about the methods of assessment

The itemized assessment that follows will examine each course and

give concrete examples of how each objective is achieved. Because of

the nature of studio art courses, it was impossible to evaluate the

objectives based on the gathering of work samples alone. For

example, we would not be able to assess students’ ability to critique

work based on only visual examples, nor would we be able to

Page 12: Humanities and the Arts

adequately talk about the scope and variety of work that students

are presented with.

Thus, to adequately address the breadth of information required to

satisfy all three objectives, we utilized the following methods of

assessment:

1) Anonymous work samples: Work samples were collected for

each course and analyzed in relation to objectives.

2) Supplemental course materials: Supplemental course

materials such as course syllabi, assignment sheets, and other

handouts were collected and analyzed. These materials

reinforced the connection between course objectives and the

work being produced in each course.

3) In-class observations: To appropriately evaluate critiques, it

was necessary to observe critiques for each course.

Critique are, in essence, a performance-based process. Because

most critiques are conducted in-class with no written

documentation, it was impossible to evaluate their role and

effectiveness without this type of direct observation.

4) Anonymous student survey: We felt that it was important to

address attitudinal outcomes in relation to the criteria set

forth. For example, do students feel that they are being

exposed to a diversity of artists, processes, and approaches? If

so, how? Survey data was utilized to ensure that our

observations were in line with students’ actual experience of

the class.

Page 13: Humanities and the Arts

ART 100: ELEMENTS AND PRINCIPALS OF ART

“Following the completion of Category 6 of the General Education Program,

students can”:

1) Create and/or critique artistic performances:

Art 100 deals primarily with the elements and principles of art.

The elements of art include line, shape, color, texture, space, and

value. The principles of art include emphasis and subordination,

unity and variety, harmony, movement, rhythm and repetition, and

scale and proportion.

The class involves an applied approach to these topics as well as

critical discussion and critiques that focus on these aspects of art.

Students thereby not only create works of art that show a mastery of

the aforementioned skills, but they also look at and discuss the ways

in which other artists have addressed the elements and principles in

their works. The course objectives, as stated in a syllabus, are as

follows:

Visual Art is a powerful form of communication with a unique

vocabulary: a written and visual language of its own. In this

course, students will learn to be conversant in this language in

theory, discourse and practice. This is primarily a studio class:

students will use the basic language of visual organization—what

are called the Elements and Principles of Art—to solve visual

problems and create artworks through a variety of media and

Page 14: Humanities and the Arts

methods. Although art making is our main focus, students will

also learn to use the vocabulary of visual organization to describe

and evaluate forms of visual expression.

Studio assignments challenge students to apply their knowledge of

skills such as line, balance, color, and rhythm and repetition For

example, one assignment asks students to create a dynamic

positive/negative shape relationship utilizing only black and white

paper and collage techniques. The resulting works exemplify a clear

understanding of the formal concept of positive and negative space

and how that can be applied in a work of art. Critiques of this type

of assignment further understanding of the strengths and weaknesses

of each student’s efforts, and how they can improve their work to

more successfully address objectives.

Similarly, the course asks students to speak about their own work

and that of others in a class critique setting. They are asked to

evaluate the success of their efforts and those of others in relation to

set goals based on formal objectives. An innovative method of peer

evaluation is applied in the form of a questionnaire. Students are

asked to answer a list of questions about the work of one of their

classmates. By filling out this worksheet, students show that they

understand the elements and principals and that they can identify

the relative success of their usage in a work of art. They also build

their vocabularies and better their written communication skills in

relation to art-making.

After observing and evaluating this criterion, we feel that success in

this area is very high.

Page 15: Humanities and the Arts

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the

arts

and humanities:

The focus of Art 100 is on addressing the elements and principles of

art through hands-on studio work as well as through the

presentation of a variety of examples. Elements and principles are

introduced through Power Point presentations that feature both

contemporary and historical images. The collected data shows that

these examples range from contemporary American work to examples

of work from diverse cultures and geographies.

Examples are specific to the elements and/or principles that are

being addressed in each unit. Artists featured in these presentations

include important American and European artists as well as non-

western artists from varying periods in art history. A diversity of

examples ensures that students see not only works from a single genre

or movement, but instead comprehend the plurality of art

throughout history.

While showing these visual examples is arguably enough to ensure

an awareness and comprehension of the variety and scope of visual

art, students create assignments that take this idea one step further.

For example, they do a color assignment where they use a famous

work of art as an armature, and then alter the color palette of that

work to comply with several different color exercises. This forces a

certain intimacy with the work and ensures a more in-depth

understanding of the process of the artist.

Page 16: Humanities and the Arts

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and the humanities

and society:

A primary aim of Art 100 is to help students understand the basic

ways of communicating visually. They will leave the course able to

analyze the effectiveness not only of fine art, but of other modes of

visual communication (advertising, graphic design, etc). By learning

about the ingredients that go into visual work, students will know

how to assess visual strategies and to make intelligent visual

comments in all facets of their daily lives.

ART 231: MIXED MEDIA

“Following the completion of Category 6 of the General Education Program,

students can”:

4) Create and/or critique artistic performances:

Art 231: Mixed Media focuses on the incorporation of a variety of

materials, processes, and techniques. Rather than incorporating one

specific media into their projects, students instead are required to

work with multiple materials for each assignment. Materials may

range from traditional to experimental. Students are exposed to new

media, and methods of making work. They learn to speak about

their work and that of others in class critiques as well as through

the development of an ongoing written journal about their work.

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Students create work based on objectives specific to the course. One

assignment asks students to make a bas-relief environment based on

the following criteria:

� Make or find a box measuring at least 15” x 20” and at least

4” high

� Using items found from your attic, thrift stores, recycling

centers, alleyways, etc, depict a mood or idea that you want to

convey to the viewer.

� Using a camera, shoot different photographs of subject matter

that might help convey the mood or idea to the viewer. You

can only use black and white images (people, places, things,

etc)

� Using the item and images, arrange them in a fashion that

helps emphasize your ideas to the viewer.

� Decide whether the box is to be displayed on a wall or flat

surface.

The defined objectives illustrate that students not only create work, but they

create work that forces them to grapple with specific content and subject

matter while also incorporating their own ideas and point-of-view. Set

criteria help guide the students in the process of making while also providing

a structure for evaluation and critique. Assignments challenge students to

think about their work in new ways and to push themselves conceptually

and formally.

As stated in a course syllabus, an objective of the course is “To incorporate a

written statement/conceptual idea with each work and to verbally

communicate these ideas to an audience.” Thus, students are held

accountable for their work through an ongoing process of critique and self-

Page 18: Humanities and the Arts

evaluation. This helps them to build their vocabulary as related to visual

art while also developing strong critical thinking and analysis skills.

5) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts

and humanities:

Through Art 231, students will become aware of the diversity of

processes, materials, and techniques that are applied in

contemporary artwork. Visual examples, presented in Power Point

and through videos, add to students’ knowledge of specific artists and

works as well as to their understanding of art history. One of the

course objectives, as set forth in a course syllabus is “To learn a basic

understanding of various sculptural materials and equipment

through the study and practice of selected contemporary and

historical processes as well as the study of contemporary and

historical artists.

Student comments about the course attest to their increased

awareness of the diversity of art-making practices. For example, one

student remarked on a video about Andy Goldsworthy’s

environmental installations: “I really enjoyed his work with nature.

It was very intriguing how he played off of his surroundings.” Most

students are not familiar with work that integrates natural

materials and exists outside of a typical gallery setting. Screening

this video helps to familiarize students with a different type of

artistic practice.

The course syllabus includes a list of artists for students to look at.

Many of the artists on the list are featured in the collection at the

MSU library, and oftentimes the artists are shown in slide

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presentations. Having such information accessible allows students to

expand their awareness beyond the confines of what is presented in

class by seeking out books, videos, and other supplemental materials

in relation to artists they are particularly interested in.

6) Describe the relationship between the arts and the humanities and

society:

This course helps students understand how to effectively convey their

ideas to an audience through a range of materials and processes.

They will learn how they can express a broad range of topics and

views through their work, and how to most effectively achieve a

connection between form and concept.

The course also emphasizes using banal, everyday materials to create

art. One student noted, “…the majority of the projects involved found

objects as material. We were urged to pay attention to the mundane

objects of everyday life and create projects with them an/or inspired

by them.” Hence, the integration of non-art objects into works of art

forges important connections between everyday life and art-making.

It shows that are need not be disconnected from daily routines, but

rather that it can benefit from a careful scrutiny of one’s

surroundings.

ART 275: PHOTOGRAPHY

“Following the completion of Category 6 of the General Education Program,

students can”:

1) Create and/or critique artistic performances:

Page 20: Humanities and the Arts

Students in Art 275: Photography are continually asked to work

toward specific formal and conceptual goals, successfully applying

their knowledge in photographic works as well as through

participation in class critiques.

Assignments in the course are centered around specific goals. For

example, one assignment deals with lighting and is described as

follows:

Make photographs of people at interesting locations in strong

directional lighting (lamp, window, morning or evening light,

etc). Experiment with single light sources and possibly a reflector

to control shadow density. Notice how dramatic lighting makes

interesting visual effects appear. Incorporate strong visual textures

and prominent shadows in your compositions that are created by

the lighting. The more unusual and striking lighting, the better.

Photographs for this project exemplify unique and dramatic lighting

situations, showing that the assignment objective is being understood and

achieved by students. In one instance, children climb on a playground

structure. The photograph is taken looking up, so that the children are

silhouetted by bright sunlight. In another example, the strong afternoon

shadow of a drain pipe is echoed on a brick wall below.

When critiquing photographic works, students refer back to the assignment’s

objectives as a point-of-reference. Some examples of critique questions to

prompt discussions include: Is dramatic lighting used effectively? Does it

help to convey a message to the viewer? If so, describe that message.

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By setting strong guidelines and objectives for each assignment, students learn

to confront new challenges in their work and to discuss their own work and

that of others in an articulate manner.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts

and humanities:

Art 275 introduces students to a variety of work in the medium of

photography. Students look at examples of artists throughout history

who utilize photography in ways that compliments the goals of class

assignments. The course syllabus states, “Presentations of student

and well known photographic work will provide a context for

discussions and assignments.” These visual examples heighten their

awareness of the scope and variety of works while also helping to

explain the objectives of specific assignments.

Several students remarked on the ways that the course furthered

their understanding of the diversity and scope of photographic work.

One enthused about Jacob Reese and Dorothea Lange, saying “I

found the artworks compelling because they captured images and

feelings of people during dramatic and change periods of history,

often through they eyes of the misfortunate.” Thus, the goals of

Ruberic 2 were reinforces while also creating the relationships that

are the goals of Ruberic 3 (see below).

Page 22: Humanities and the Arts

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and the humanities and

society:

Students learn how they can translate real-world subjects and issues

through their photographic work. Purposeful and well-thought

formal decisions translate to work that successfully conveys a

message, mood, or idea to the viewing public. They learn that

photography can successfully express a range of opinions and ideas,

and that the photographer becomes the “author, “ dictating the way

in which the work is read by their audience.

One student noted after taking the course, “Art influences

culture/society through color, emotions, propaganda, imagery,

advertisement, and more.” Another remarked, “In this class, I have

the ability to photograph people and things that other people may

not see.” This highlights students’ awareness that the visual arts can

help provide a window to seemingly mundane or unnoticed events

in everyday life, thereby shifting people’s perceptions and helping

them to better understand the world around them.

IN CONCLUSION

The assessment for the courses discussed was very positive. Each course

showed clear and measurable success in relation to the set objectives. Because

of the high level of success in each area, it was actually difficult to think of

possibilities for improvement. The Curriculum Committee within the

Department of Art was very favorably impressed with both the quality of the

materials being presented by instructors and the quantitative and qualitative

outcomes as realized in work samples and student attitudinal statements.

We encourage a continuation of the learning methods that are currently being

utilized, and hope to have similarly strong results in future assessments.

Page 23: Humanities and the Arts

To the Members of the General Education Assessment Committee,

Here are the results of my research into large class compliance with General Education Requirements.

Two Pop Music classes (Music 125 and 126) and Introduction to Music were addressed and the

numbers came out as follows:

In the fall, Pop Music 125 Jazz to Country, Blues to Broadway is offered in two sections. One hundred

percent of student responses are included here from one those sections. There is no significant

statistical difference between the two sections, so I saw no need to include them both when so large a

pool was available with the one class. The following statistics come from the fall of 2007. I was on

sabbatical in the fall of 2008. Using results from a semester when a graduate assistant was covering my

classes wouldn’t be a fair or accurate representation of the usual and customary presentation of the

class.

Three hundred and forty students, 100% of those enrolled, are included in this data.

Six representative questions were chosen for each of the three rubric categories from each of four

exams given. Rubric terminology has been adjusted slightly to address Music more appropriately and

specifically.

Rubric 1: Students have observed, listened to, and can appropriately critique a work of art in music.

Students have gained the necessary language and terminology required to discuss music intelligently.

Students in all large General education music courses (Pop Music and Intro to Music) are

required to attend no less than three live musical performances chosen specifically for them each

semester. The concert schedule is created, organized, and developed with the Gen. ed. student in mind

so that each and every artist performs a type or style of music that supports classroom material in some

significant way. Students of these classes attend on average, 3.5 live performances per student each

semester.

Sample questions that fit in this rubric are listed by exam with percentage of students answering

correctly following each.

Page 24: Humanities and the Arts

Exam #1: 1-66%, 6-84%, 12 – 88%, 16- 70%, 20- 74%, 46- 74% average: 75%

Exam #2: 5-70%, 7-82%, 12-68%, 16-72%, 21-74%, 25-66% average: 72%

Exam #3: 1-80%, 3-70%, 7-86%, 46-68%, 48-70%, 29-78% average: 75%

Exam #4: 4-66%, 7-86%, 11-90%, 16-74%, 39-76%, 49-90% average: 78%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 1 questions correctly” 75.5%

Rubric 2: Student displays knowledge of the variety and scope of works in music. Student can compare

and contrast works, styles, periods, composers and performers appropriately

Exam #1: 1-66%, 5-56%, 9-76%, 15-88%, 21-90%, 24-68%, average: 87%

Exam #2: 1-66%, 16-72%, 18-78%, 32-78%, 34-70%, 47-68% average: 72%

Exam #3: 2- 70%, 4-70%, 6-66%, 8-76%, 12-90%, 14-88%, average: 77%

Exam #4: 4-66%, 9-88%, 11-90%, 16-74%, 21-78%, 27-84% average: 78%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 2 questions correctly” 79%

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Rubric 3: Student has knowledge of the relationship between music and culture

Exam #1: 13-74%, 18-70%, 30-88%, 35-72%, 36-74%, 40-84% average: 77%

Exam #2: 3-90%, 9-70%, 19-68%, 22-76%, 42-86%, 48-82% average: 79%

Exam #3: 8-76%, 7-74%, 27-70%, 10-66%, 41-90%, 47-84% average: 77%

Exam #4: 13-72%, 17-86%, 16-74%, 39-76%, 43-70%, 27-80% average: 76%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 3 questions correctly: 77%

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In the spring, Pop Music U.S.A. 126 : R&B to M.T.V. is offered in two sections. One hundred percent of

student responses are included here from one of those sections. There is no significant statistical

difference between the two sections, so I again saw no need to include them both in this study. The

following statistics come from the Spring 2009.

Spring 2009 Pop Music U.S.A.: R&B to M.T.V.

Rubric 1: Students have observed, listened to, and can appropriately critique a work of art in music.

Students have gained the necessary language and terminology required to discuss music intelligently.

Students in Pop Music U.S.A. and Intro to Music are required to attend no less than three live

musical performances chosen specifically for them each semester. The concert schedule is created,

organized, and developed with the Gen. ed. student in mind so that each and every artist performs a

type or style of music that supports classroom material in some significant way. Students of these

classes attend on average, 3.5 live performances per student each semester.

Exam #1: 3- 71%, 5-96%, 10- 87%, 14- 93%, 20-72%, 33- 68% average: 81%

Exam #2: 1-62%, 2-97%, 7-54%, 18-86%, 23-72%, 31-81% average: 74%

Exam #3: 1-83%, 5-81%, 7-61%, 14-93%, 28-94%, 30-52% average: 77%

Exam #4: 3-80%, 18-81%, 23-67%, 30-63%, 32-89%, 35-83% average: 77%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 1 questions correctly: 76%

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Rubric 2: Student displays knowledge of the variety and scope of works in music. Student can compare

and contrast works, styles, periods, composers and performers appropriately

Exam #1: 12-75%, 17-81%, 20-72%, 23-98%, 38-70%, 42-64% average: 77%

Exam #2:: 1-62%, 12-66%, 18-86%, 33-85%, 40-52%, 48-92% average: 74%

Exam #3: 1-83%, 7-61%, 10-89%, 22-81%, 29-58%, 32-81% average: 76%

Exam #4: 2-57%, 3-80%, 8-70%, 11-75%, 12-55%, 40-88% average: 71%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 1 questions correctly: 75%

Rubric 3: Student has knowledge of the relationship between music and culture

Exam #1: 2-78%, 8-80%, 16-70%, 32-86%, 45-92%, 49-47% average: 76%

Exam #2: 4-82%, 8-71%, 13-81%, 20-60%, 24-63%, 36-84% average: 73%

Exam #3: 2-71%. 8-90%, 10-89%, 11-96%, 16-80%, 22-81% average: 85%

Exam #4: 2-57%, 8-70%, 14-86%, 19-76%, 22-98%, 24-83% average: 82%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 3 questions correctly: 79%

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**Overall average of students in Music 125 and 126 answering Rubric 1, 2, and 3 sample questions

correctly: 77%

Music 120: Introduction to Music had an enrollment of 165 students in the Spring of 2009. 100% of the

students included in the numbers below. Exam #1 was not included as the question-by-question

statistical averages were not available.

Students in Introduction to Music) are required to attend no less than three live musical

performances chosen specifically for them each semester. The concert schedule is created, organized,

and developed with the Gen. ed. student in mind so that each and every artist performs a type or style

of music that supports classroom material in some significant way. Students in Intro to Music attend on

average, 3.5 live performances per student each semester.

Sample questions that fit in this rubric are listed by exam with percentage of students answering

correctly following each.

Rubric 1: Students have observed, listened to, and can appropriately critique a work of art in music.

Students have gained the necessary language and terminology required to discuss music intelligently.

Exam #2: 1-65%, 3-70%, 8-68%, 10-70% average: 68%

Exam #3: 2-61%, 16-63%, 25-90%, 28-69% average: 71%

Exam #4: 2-64%, 4-64%, 12-96%, 23-70% average: 74%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 1 questions correctly” 71%

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Rubric 2: Student displays knowledge of the variety and scope of works in music. Student can compare

and contrast works, styles, periods, composers and performers appropriately

Exam #2: 6-64%, 11-78%, 20-61%, 37-81% average: 74%

Exam #3: 6-71%. 7-70%, 16-73%, 17-68% average: 70%

Exam #4: 11-77%, 14-64%, 15-73%, 16-74% average: 72%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 2 questions correctly” 72%

Rubric 3: Student has knowledge of the relationship between music and culture

Exam #2: 15-67%, 19-66%, 36-79%, 40-96% average: 72%

Exam #3: 2-61%, 8-74%, 27-84%, 30-97% average:79 %

Exam #4: 35-96%, 36-80%, 37-51%, 43-87% average:79 %

Overall average of students answering Rubric 3 questions correctly: 77%

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**Overall average of students in Introduction to Music answering Rubric 1, 2, and 3 sample questions

correctly: 73%. This average is 4% pts. lower then that of Pop Music U.S.A. I attribute the difference to

the much larger large number of International students enrolled in the course, most of whom have little

or no experience with the subject matter (European Art Music) or the large lecture format.

International students make far greater use of extra credit opportunities to raise their grades that isn’t

represented in the “lower than Pop Music” test averages.

Summary:

Three quarters of the nearly nine hundred students included in this study answered the sample

questions correctly. I have not included the one other General Education music offering: Women in

Music ,which was taught on-line for a limited time and will not be offered in the foreseeable future. - G

Page 31: Humanities and the Arts

Assessment of THEA 100 Sections 1 & 2 for Category 6 (Fall, 2009)

THEA 100 Introduction to Theatre Section 1

Approach

This class is a large lecture hall format class with the primary grading tool consisting of three multiple

choice exams and one cumulative final exam covering information from the lectures, class reading, and

attendance at a minimum two theatrical events over the semester. Materials from students with a tech

ID ending in 5 were collected during the Fall semester of 2008. Total enrollment in the class was 129.

Six representative questions were chosen for each of the three rubric categories from each of four

exams given. Rubric terminology has been adjusted slightly to address Theatre more appropriately and

specifically.

Rubric 1: Students have observed and can appropriately critique a work of art in theatre. Students

have gained an understanding of the process of creating a theatrical event and the necessary language

and terminology required to discuss that theatrical event intelligently.

Sample questions that fit in this rubric are listed by exam with percentage of students answering

correctly following each.

Exam #1: 3-73%, 16-100%, 21 – 93%, 54- 780%, 61- 60%, 64- 80% avg: 81%

Exam #2: 1-66%, 3-93%, 21-66%, 33-100%, 35-53%, 42-73% avg: 75%

Exam #3: 11-100%, 16-93%, 19-93%, 20-86%, 25-93%, 65-73% avg: 86%

Final Exam: 11-86%, 28-93%, 29-93%, 38-86%, 50-100%, 57-93% avg: 91%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 1 questions correctly: 83.25%

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Rubric 2: Student displays knowledge of the variety and scope of works in theatre. Student can

compare and contrast works, styles, genres, periods, playwrights and performers appropriately.

Exam #1: 1-86%, 6-100%, 7-100%, 38-73%, 62-100%, 65-93%, avg: 92%

Exam #2: 5-86%, 26-73%, 50-93%, 52-80%, 63-73%, 64-73% avg: 79%

Exam #3: 1- 100%, 4-80%, 15-66%, 27-86%, 37-66%, 38-100%, avg: 83%

Final Exam: 4-93%, 7-853%, 16-93%, 19-80%, 37-60%, 61-40% avg: 69%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 2 questions correctly: 80.75%

Rubric 3: Student has knowledge of the relationship between theatre and culture.

Exam #1: 2-26%, 14-100%, 11-73%, 25-93%, 48-100%, 53-100% avg: 82%

Exam #2: 5-86%, 9-93%, 20-93%, 31-86%, 50-93%, 64-73% avg: 87%

Exam #3: 9-33%, 12-86%, 43-100%, 47-93%, 51-86%, 64-86% avg: 80%

Final Exam: 21-93%, 31-100%, 34-100%, 43-93%, 60-100%, 63-100% avg: 97%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 3 questions correctly: 86.5%

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Conclusions:

The data from exams show that students are achieving the category 6 objectives. It should be noted

that for future GECCIC reports, it would be helpful for instructors crafting the exam questions to have

the pedagogical goals of the three rubrics in mind so that a larger quantity of questions available from

the data pool more directly coincide with the rubrics. This would make future reports easier to prepare

and more statistically relevant. It is also worth mentioning that many students participate in extra credit

opportunities where they assist in the technical aspects of mounting productions. This invaluable active

learning opportunity is in no way reflected in this study. Perhaps there may be a way of examining this

in future reports since it directly speaks to rubric #1.

THEA 100 Introduction to Theatre Section 2

Approach

This class is a large lecture hall format class with the primary grading tool consisting of weekly multiple

choice quizzes as well as a short cumulative final exam covering the lectures, class reading, and

attendance at a minimum two theatrical events over the semester . Students in this section also

prepared and presented a theatrical style small group final project drawing from knowledge gleaned

from the semester long study of the subject matter. No statistically relevant way of assessing this final

group project for the purposes of this GECCIC report could be determined; but its invaluable active

learning experience was no doubt a contributor to the high test scores on the final exam whose data is

included in this study. It should also be noted that section 2 uses the same text and equal number of

points available as section 1. The only major difference between the two sections is the number of

exams and the length of those exams. The instructors for the two sections even share some exam

questions and guest lecture in each others sections to ensure a comparable experience for students in

both sections. Materials from students with a tech ID ending in 5 were collected during the Fall

semester of 2008. Total enrollment in the class was 56.

To make the data somewhat comparable with section 1, short quizzes administered in section 2 are

grouped together in groups of three . Six representative questions were chosen for each of the three

rubric categories from each three quiz grouping. Rubric terminology has been adjusted slightly to

address Theatre more appropriately and specifically.

Page 34: Humanities and the Arts

Rubric 1: Students have observed and can appropriately critique a work of art in theatre. Students

have gained an understanding of the process of creating a theatrical event and the necessary language

and terminology required to discuss that theatrical event intelligently.

Quizzes 1,2,3:

1/12- 80%, 1/21-80%, 2/7- 80%, 2/24- 100%, 3/6-80%, 3/19- 80% avg: 81%

Quizzes 4,5,6:

4/6-60%, 4/12-80%, 5/11-100%, 5/25-100%, 6/4-100%, 6/25-80% avg: 86%

Quizzes 7,8,Final:

7/2-80%, 7/12-80%, 8/8-80%, 8/11-100%, F/4-100%, F/40-60% avg: 83%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 1 questions correctly: 84%

Rubric 2: Student displays knowledge of the variety and scope of works in theatre. Student can

compare and contrast works, styles, genres, periods, playwrights and performers appropriately.

Quizzes 1,2,3:

1/11- 100%, 1/25-100%, 2/18- 40%, 2/19-60%, 3/2-80%, 3/11- 100% avg: 80%

Quizzes 4,5,6:

4/9-80%, 4/13-60%, 5/14-100%, 5/16-80%, 6/18-100%, 6/22-100% avg: 86%

Quizzes 7,8,Final:

7/1-80%, 7/15-80%, 8/2-40%, 8/3-80%, F/5-100%, F28-80% avg: 76%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 2 questions correctly: 80.6%

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Rubric 3: Student has knowledge of the relationship between theatre and culture.

Quizzes 1,2,3:

1/10- 0%, 1/19-80%, 2/8- 100%, 2/16- 100%, 3/4-100%, 3/9- 60% avg: 73%

Quizzes 4,5,6:

4/1-100%, 4/16-60%, 4/18-60%, 5/3-80%, 5/12-100%, 5/24-100% avg: 83%

Quizzes 7,8,Final:

8/3-80%, 8/5-40%, F/2-40%, F/16-60%, F/21-100%, F/26-100% avg: 70%

Overall average of students answering Rubric 3 questions correctly: 75.3%

Conclusions:

The data from exams show that students are achieving the category 6 objectives. It should be noted

that for future GECCIC reports, it would be helpful for instructors crafting the exam questions to have

the pedagogical goals of the three rubrics in mind so that a larger quantity of questions available from

the data pool more directly coincide with the rubrics. This would make future reports easier to prepare

and more statistically relevant. It is also worth mentioning that many students participate in extra credit

opportunities where they assist in the technical aspects of mounting productions. This invaluable active

learning opportunity is in no way reflected in this study. Perhaps there may be a way of examining this

in future reports since it directly speaks to rubric #1.

Page 36: Humanities and the Arts

THEA 101/01: Acting for Everyone

“Following the completion of category 6 of the General Education Program, students can:”

1) Students can create and/or critique artistic performances.

Students in this class prepared and presented three acting performance projects over the course of the

semester. The instructor assigned a point score for each of these performance projects and provided

those scores to this reporter. Review of these scores showed that the students in this class were able to

prepare and present artistic performances that demonstrated an understanding of basic acting

techniques. Students in this class were also required to see three theatrical productions of different

genres and write a critique paper for each of the performances they attended. Although the writing

samples provided were at a level one might expect of a 100 level class, the samples did show the

students had both a comprehension of the process that was required in creating the event as well as an

understanding of how to effectively and appropriately discuss the artistic choices made by the artists

involved in the performance. It should be noted that this section only had one student with tech id

ending in 5.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities:

Students were not only required to write critique papers of theatrical performances of two different

genres, they were also asked to critique one another’s performance projects. These monologues, oral

interpretation exercises, and two person scenes were from many different plays of different styles,

genres, and time periods. During these critiques, students became aware of how their peers chose to

address the unique challenges of the many varying types of performances they were exposed to. While

this exposure is hard to quantify, it certainly was an integral part of the class participation portion of the

class.

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and humanities and society:

Although the instructor did tangentially discuss how performer choices affect audiences and how topical

issues brought up by playwrights relate to society as a whole, the focus of the class was on teaching how

actors create a character through fundamental acting techniques. The goals of the class do not

individually single out and address how theatre relates to society. Therefore it is difficult to assess how

well the class specifically addressed this goal.

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THEA 101/02: Acting for Everyone

“Following the completion of category 6 of the General Education Program, students can:”

1) Students can create and/or critique artistic performances.

Students in this class prepared and presented three acting performance projects over the course of the

semester. The instructor prepared assessment sheets critiquing the projects and provided those

assessments to this reporter. Review of these assessment sheets showed that the students in this class

were able to prepare and present artistic performances that demonstrated an understanding of basic

acting techniques. Students in this class were also required to see a minimum of two theatrical

productions of different genres and write a critique paper for each of the performances they attended.

Although the writing samples provided were at a level one might expect of a 100 level class, the samples

did show the students had both a comprehension of the process that was required in creating the event

as well as an understanding of how to effectively and appropriately discuss the artistic choices made by

the artists involved in the performance. The instructor of this section provided the most complete

record of data for this class.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities:

Students were not only required to write critique papers of theatrical performances of two different

genres, they were also asked to critique one another’s performance projects. These monologues, oral

interpretation exercises, and two person scenes were from many different plays of different styles,

genres, and time periods. During these critiques, students became aware of how their peers chose to

address the unique challenges of the many varying types of performances they were exposed to. While

this exposure is hard to quantify, it certainly was an integral part of the class participation portion of the

class.

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and humanities and society:

Although the instructor did tangentially discuss how performer choices affect audiences and how topical

issues brought up by playwrights relate to society as a whole, the focus of the class was on teaching how

actors create a character through fundamental acting techniques. The goals of the class do not

individually single out and address how theatre relates to society. Therefore it is difficult to assess how

well the class specifically addressed this goal.

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THEA 101/03: Acting for Everyone

“Following the completion of category 6 of the General Education Program, students can:”

1) Students can create and/or critique artistic performances.

Students in this class prepared and presented three acting performance projects over the course of the

semester. The instructor prepared very thorough written critiques of the projects and provided those

assessments to this reporter. It should be noted that the instructor provided some samples of these

assessments but did not provide all three assessments for all students with tech id ending in 5. Review

of these assessment sheets provided showed that the students in this class were able to prepare and

present artistic performances that demonstrated an understanding of acting at a very basic level.

Students in this class were also required to provide a written character analysis for one of the

performance projects. Although the writing samples provided were in more of a “list form” rather than

in a formal “academic paper” format, the samples did show the students had both a comprehension of

the process that was required in creating a character as well as an understanding of how to effectively

and appropriately discuss the artistic choices to bring those characters to life. Students in this class

were also required to see a minimum of two theatrical productions of different genres and write a

critique paper for each of the performances they attended. Samples of these papers were not provided.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities:

Students were not only required to write critique papers of theatrical performances of two different

genres, they were also asked to critique one another’s performance projects. These monologues, oral

interpretation exercises, and two person scenes were from many different plays of different styles,

genres, and time periods. During these critiques, students became aware of how their peers chose to

address the unique challenges of the many varying types of performances they were exposed to. While

this exposure is hard to quantify, it certainly was an integral part of the class participation portion of the

class.

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and humanities and society:

Although the instructor did tangentially discuss how performer choices affect audiences and how topical

issues brought up by playwrights relate to society as a whole, the focus of the class was on teaching how

actors create a character through fundamental acting techniques. The goals of the class do not

individually single out and address how theatre relates to society. Therefore it is difficult to assess how

well the class specifically addressed this goal.

Page 39: Humanities and the Arts

THEA 101/04: Acting for Everyone

“Following the completion of category 6 of the General Education Program, students can:”

1) Students can create and/or critique artistic performances.

Students in this class prepared and presented two acting performance projects over the course of the

semester. The instructor prepared a detailed numerical rubric with additional written comments

critiquing the projects and provided those assessments to this reporter. Review of these assessment

sheets showed that the students in this class were able to prepare and present artistic performances

that demonstrated an understanding of basic acting techniques. Students in this class were also

required to see a minimum of two theatrical productions of different genres and write a critique paper

for each of the performances they attended. Although the writing samples provided were at a level one

might expect of a 100 level class, the samples did show the students had both a comprehension of the

process that was required in creating the event as well as an understanding of how to effectively and

appropriately discuss the artistic choices made by the artists involved in the performance. It should be

noted that one of the students with tech id ending in 5 did not complete all of the assignments so the

samples reviewed were not a complete sampling.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities:

Students were not only required to write critique papers of theatrical performances of two different

genres, they were also asked to critique one another’s performance projects. These monologues, oral

interpretation exercises, and two person scenes were from many different plays of different styles,

genres, and time periods. During these critiques, students became aware of how their peers chose to

address the unique challenges of the many varying types of performances they were exposed to. While

this exposure is hard to quantify, it certainly was an integral part of the class participation portion of the

class.

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and humanities and society:

Although the instructor did tangentially discuss how performer choices affect audiences and how topical

issues brought up by playwrights relate to society as a whole, the focus of the class was on teaching how

actors create a character through fundamental acting techniques. The goals of the class do not

individually single out and address how theatre relates to society. Therefore it is difficult to assess how

well the class specifically addressed this goal.

Page 40: Humanities and the Arts

THEA 101/05: Acting for Everyone

“Following the completion of category 6 of the General Education Program, students can:”

1) Students can create and/or critique artistic performances.

Students in this class prepared and presented three acting performance projects over the course of the

semester, with opportunity to reprise these three assignments for an additional opportunity for

learning/improvement . The instructor prepared assessment sheets critiquing the projects and provided

some of those assessments to this reporter. Review of the assessment sheets provided show that the

students in this class were able to prepare and present artistic performances that demonstrated an

understanding of basic acting techniques. Students in this class were also required to see a minimum of

three theatrical productions of different genres and write a critique paper for each of the performances

they attended. Although the writing samples provided were at a level one might expect of a 100 level

class, the samples did show the students had both a comprehension of the process that was required in

creating the event as well as an understanding of how to effectively and appropriately discuss the

artistic choices made by the artists involved in the performance.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities:

Students were not only required to write critique papers of theatrical performances of two different

genres, they were also asked to critique one another’s performance projects. These monologues, oral

interpretation exercises, and two person scenes were from many different plays of different styles,

genres, and time periods. During these critiques, students became aware of how their peers chose to

address the unique challenges of the many varying types of performances they were exposed to. While

this exposure is hard to quantify, it certainly was an integral part of the class participation portion of the

class.

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and humanities and society:

Although the instructor did tangentially discuss how performer choices affect audiences and how topical

issues brought up by playwrights relate to society as a whole, the focus of the class was on teaching how

actors create a character through fundamental acting techniques. The goals of the class do not

individually single out and address how theatre relates to society. Therefore it is difficult to assess how

well the class specifically addressed this goal.

Page 41: Humanities and the Arts

THEA 101/06: Acting for Everyone

“Following the completion of category 6 of the General Education Program, students can:”

1) Students can create and/or critique artistic performances.

Students in this class prepared and presented three acting performance projects over the course of the

semester. The instructor only provided copies of student’s short answer quizzes. No assessment of the

three acting projects were provided. No sample of students’ written reviews of MSU productions was

provided. It is difficult for the reviewer to determine if the Gen Ed category 6 requirements are being

fulfilled in this section.

2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities:

Students were not only required to write critique papers of theatrical performances of two different

genres, they were also asked to critique one another’s performance projects. These monologues, oral

interpretation exercises, and two person scenes were from many different plays of different styles,

genres, and time periods. During these critiques, students became aware of how their peers chose to

address the unique challenges of the many varying types of performances they were exposed to. While

this exposure is hard to quantify, it certainly was an integral part of the class participation portion of the

class.

3) Describe the relationship between the arts and humanities and society:

Although the instructor did tangentially discuss how performer choices affect audiences and how topical

issues brought up by playwrights relate to society as a whole, the focus of the class was on teaching how

actors create a character through fundamental acting techniques. The goals of the class do not

individually single out and address how theatre relates to society. Therefore it is difficult to assess how

well the class specifically addressed this goal.

Conclusions:

The instructor from section 2 provided the most complete record of data for this class. Although data

was collected and studied from all sections, most conclusions regarding this class were based primarily

on the complete data from this section. All sections of the class have identical goals, assignments, and

grading points systems so this was deemed appropriate. For future GECCIC reports, it is strongly

recommended that instructors from all sections keep a complete sampling of all student work so that a

complete and thorough study can be completed. It would also be beneficial to future GECCIC reports if

all sections of this class used the same assessment tool/rubric for grading performance projects. In this

way more specific conclusions could be made.

Page 42: Humanities and the Arts

Date: May 6, 2009

TO: Urban and Regional Studies Institute (URSI)

FROM: Departmental Assessment Committee – Professor David

Laverny-Rafter (Chair) and Professor Beth Wielde-Heidelberg

RE: Category 6 General Education Assessment for 2008-2009 Academic Year

I. Assessment Process

In order to contribute to the University-wide General Education (GECCIG) assessment process and the

annual URSI assessment process, URSI has focused its 2008-2009 assessment on Category 6-Arts and

Humanities and Category 5-Social and Behavioral Sciences. Specifically, samples of student’s work were

collected from students enrolled in URBS 110: The City (a Category 6 course), URBS 230-Community

Leadership and URBS 150: Sustainable Communities (both Category 5 courses) during Fall, 2008

semester and evaluated in terms of the extent to which they addressed the university-wide rubrics for

General Education courses. The findings for the Category 6 course assessment are included in a separate

report.

The process for selecting a sample of URSI General Education course assignments to be evaluated

consisted of the following steps which were developed by the University –wide General Education

assessment group for Categories 5 and 6 courses:

1. Identify courses within the department that address the variety of General Education learning

outcomes and skill-building exercises. In this regard, URBS 110, 150 and 230 were chosen

because they reflect the range of knowledge and skill building that are expected of students in

URSI General Education courses.

2. Randomly select a sample of students to participate in the assessment by choosing students

from each course with Tech ID numbers that end in “5.”

3. Request students identified in Step 2 above to volunteer to participate.

4. Collect written work from students who were identified in Step #2. This was a confidential

sample – all reference to student’s or faculty name associated with the written work was

eliminated.

5. Analyze the extent to which the written work collected relates to the Category 5 and 6 rubrics.

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As a result of the above process, assessment of URBS 110: The City (Category 6 course) was based on

review of 3 written student papers on urban architectural characteristics.

II. Assessment Rubrics

Rubrics used in the Category 6 assessment project have been created by the university-wide General

Education group and include:

Category 6: General Education/Arts and Humanities Rubrics

Rubric #1: Create and critique artistic performances

Rubric #2: Display knowledge of scope and variety of works in arts and humanities

Rubric #3: Display understanding of the relationship between arts and humanities and society

III. Findings of General Education Assessment in URSI

Before describing the findings related to the review of student’s work, we wish to clarify that the

following important issues in General Education were not analyzed in this assessment:

• Large lecture classes-many of the URSI’s General Education courses are taught in large

lecture rooms which employ multiple-choice exams to test student’s knowledge. This

assessment project did not include review of objective exam results but instead focused

on written work produced by students.

• Use of Teaching Assistants-often URSI General Education courses use graduate students

as Teaching Assistants where they conduct small group exercises, facilitate discussion

groups, etc. The courses used in this assessment project did not have TAs assisting the

faculty.

• Group problem solving exercises-key skill areas required of urban professionals involved

communication with community residents, facilitating discussion, resolving conflict, etc.

Therefore one component of URSI’s General Education courses involves students in

team projects where they must share information, achieve consensus and produce

action plans. The written work collected in this assessment project only included

individual written reports and did not address group problem solving. Also, the rubrics

involved in Category 6 did not address group problem solving skills.

Based on our review of the written work submitted by our student sample, the following conclusions

can be made about the extent to which the work met Category 6 outcomes:

• Rubric #1- Create and critique artistic performance

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Not applicable to URSI General Education courses.

• Rubric #2-Display knowledge of scope and variety of works in arts and humanities

The written papers on urban architectural characteristics displayed knowledge of wide variety of urban

architectural styles from a diversity of cultures.

• Rubric #3-Demonstrate relationship between the arts and humanities and society

The written papers on urban architectural characteristics demonstrated appreciation of how alternative

architectural styles are reflected in contemporary society.

IV. Recommendations

Based on this assessment of samples of work by students in URSI’s Category 6 General Education course

during Fall semester, 2008, the following conclusions and recommendations have been identified:

1. Consider alternative forms of assessment research. Reconsider the current methods for

selecting a random sample because the use of the one tech ID number usually results in a small

sample size. In addition to reviewing samples of student’s written work, direct surveys of a

sample of students enrolled in large lecture classes should be considered. Large lecture classes

often lack written assignments so they have not been included in this assessment project.

2. Integrate questions related to desired Category 6 rubrics into multiple choice examinations.

This could be done by faculty assigned to the course or by asking faculty from related

departments to design test questions that directly reflect the outcomes desired in Category 6

rubric.

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EET 125 – Perspectives On Technology

Assessment of EET 125 for Category 6 (Fall, 2009)

Approach

Student materials from both fall sections of EET 125 were examined. At first a sample of students with

tech IDs ending in 5 was examined. Since this sample yielded data similar to the overall class it was

decided to use the total class data (127 students) as the sample. In addition to quizzes, class materials

included a final paper and online discussions (this is an online class). Finally, account was taken of the

feedback obtained from the class survey taken at the end of the semester.

Rubric 1 (Create and/or critique artistic performances):

Students observed and offered criticism of the aesthetic qualities of various objects. In addition, they

answered questions concerning the styles and impact of a variety of different groups and individuals.

Overall performance on exam questions in this area was (approximately) 69% (using a multiple choice

exam format).

Rubric 2 (Knowledge of scope and variety):

Students were exposed to and let to comment on a wide variety of objects from various time frames that

addressed similar issues. Exam questions were given to ascertain their appreciation of the variety of

possible approaches and the scope of choices these approaches entailed. Performance on the exams in

this area were (approximately) 63%.

Rubric 3 (Relationship)

Discussions were held concerning the relationship between design and the responses and impacts on

society. Specific examples were cited in TV, computers, instruments, and visual media. Specific

questions were asked on quizzes and the results tallied. Overall the students scored an average of 72%.

Overall Assessment

In addition to the exams, students prepared and submitted papers covering various esthetic aspects of

designs, their impacts on society, and the comparisons between various solutions. Overall, out of a

possible 12 points, the students scored 10.5. As a final indicator, when surveyed about the course 74%

felt that the course either “absolutely” or “largely” satisfied the objectives; 86% felt that the material was

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appropriate for the objectives, 82% felt the course objectives were appropriate and the material was in

line with the objectives; while 79% felt the course was either “great” or “well above average.”

Planned Improvements

Based on the survey feedback from the fall sections a (267 page) manual is being produced and the course

is planned to be converted to a streaming video format this summer. Both the text and streaming video is

planned for introduction next fall.

Conclusions

It is believed that the class results on quizzes and written assignments demonstrate that the course

objectives are being achieved and the category 6 objectives are being met. In addition, student feedback

indicates that the students themselves believe that the course is meeting the objectives and is functioning

appropriately. Overall the course seems to be well received, however improvements are possible. In the

short term two changes are planned for introduction into this course next year.