ignatius park college 368 ross river road, cranbrook ......number 21 | 28 june 2018 368 ross river...

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A Catholic Secondary College in the Edmund Rice Tradition The Edmund Rice Community acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land on which the College stands, the Bindal and Wulgurukaba People, and pay our respects to the Elders past, present and future. Ignatius Park College Newsletter Number 21 | 28 June 2018 368 Ross River Road, Cranbrook Townsville Australia 4814 E: [email protected] W: www.ipc.qld.edu.au T: 07 4796 0222 F: 07 4796 0200 From the Principal Dear Parents, Friends and Caregivers Ignatius Park College acknowledges that the land we meet on today is the traditional lands for the Bindal and Wulgurukaba People and that we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country. We also acknowledge the Bindal and Wulgurukaba People as the traditional custodians of the Townsville region and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Bindal and Wulgurukaba People today. Sir Winston Churchill was one of the most widely revered and iconic leaders in world history. He was a wartime Prime Minister and his passion and courage quite literally altered the course of history. He once stated, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal, it is the courage to continue that counts.” This quote is important for all our students to reflect upon as they receive their Semester 1 academic reports this week. In receiving their reports, they need to compare their Term 1 and Term 2 results and identify if their grades have been maintained or improved in the first half of the year. For some students the year commences with great enthusiasm and a focus on their studies. However, as the semester progresses and the novelty of being back to school diminishes, this can sometimes reflect a deterioration in their commitment to their studies. The key to becoming an effective student is learning how to study smarter, not harder. This becomes more and more true as they advance through their education. An hour or two of studying a day is usually sufficient to make it through middle school with satisfactory grades, but as they move through their senior years they will require more than one hour and will need to develop smarter studying skills which assist them in completing the complexities of, and to meet the rigor of the senior years. We are aware that there are some students who are able to breeze through school with minimal effort, this is the exception. The vast majority of successful students achieve their success by developing and applying effective study habits. It is important that study habits become routine in their daily lives, so they are not leaving work to the last minute, or superficially covering a topic without any real depth or analysis. Through establishing set habits, it allows the student to develop routines that keep them focused and goal driven. By developing strong study skills, a student can become successful, and not be overwhelmed by workloads, due dates, major assignments and exams. As parents, please take the opportunity during the holidays to sit down with your son and reflect upon their grades for this term, their application to their studies and general homeroom teacher comments. Subject teacher comments are also available on the College LMS online system. Be aware if your son’s grades have continued to improve throughout the year and, if not, what changes to their study skills will be needed for them to create a positive difference. The following are the top ten study habits employed by highly successful students which could be used in your discussion: Don't attempt to cram all your studying into one session. Plan when you're going to study. Study at the same time every day.

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  • A Catholic Secondary College in the Edmund Rice TraditionThe Edmund Rice Community acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land on which the College stands, the Bindal and Wulgurukaba People, and pay our respects to the Elders past, present and future.

    Ignatius Park CollegeNewsletterNumber 21 | 28 June 2018

    368 Ross River Road, CranbrookTownsville Australia 4814

    E: [email protected]: www.ipc.qld.edu.au

    T: 07 4796 0222F: 07 4796 0200

    From the Principal Dear Parents, Friends and Caregivers

    Ignatius Park College acknowledges that the land we meet on today is the traditional lands for the Bindal and Wulgurukaba People and that we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country. We also acknowledge the Bindal and Wulgurukaba People as the traditional custodians of the Townsville region and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Bindal and Wulgurukaba People today.

    Sir Winston Churchill was one of the most widely revered and iconic leaders in world history. He was a wartime Prime Minister and his passion and courage quite literally altered the course of history. He once stated, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal, it is the courage to continue that counts.” This quote is important for all our students to reflect upon as they receive their Semester 1 academic reports this week. In receiving their reports, they need to compare their Term 1 and Term 2 results and identify if their grades have been maintained or improved in the first half of the year.

    For some students the year commences with great enthusiasm and a focus on their studies. However, as the semester progresses and the novelty of being back to school diminishes, this can sometimes reflect a deterioration in their commitment to their studies. The key to becoming an effective student is learning how to study smarter, not harder. This becomes more and more true as they advance through their education. An hour or two of studying a day is usually sufficient to make it through middle school with satisfactory grades, but as they move through their senior years they will require more than one hour and will need to develop smarter studying skills which assist them in completing the complexities of, and to meet the rigor of the senior years.

    We are aware that there are some students who are able to breeze through school with minimal effort, this is the exception. The vast majority of successful students achieve their success by developing and applying effective study habits. It is important that study habits become routine in their daily lives, so they are not leaving work to the last minute, or superficially covering a topic without any real depth or analysis. Through establishing set habits, it allows the student to develop routines that keep them focused and goal driven. By developing strong study skills, a student can become successful, and not be overwhelmed by workloads, due dates, major assignments and exams. As parents, please take the opportunity during the holidays to sit down with your son and reflect upon their grades for this term, their application to their studies and general homeroom teacher comments. Subject teacher comments are also available on the College LMS online system. Be aware if your son’s grades have continued to improve throughout the year and, if not, what changes to their study skills will be needed for them to create a positive difference. The following are the top ten study habits employed by highly successful students which could be used in your discussion:

    • Don't attempt to cram all your studying into one session.

    • Plan when you're going to study.

    • Study at the same time every day.

  • P 2 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Pastoral

    • Each study time should have a specific goal.

    • Never procrastinate your planned study session.

    • Start with the most difficult subject first.

    • Always review your notes before starting an assignment.

    • Make sure you're not distracted while you are studying.

    • Use study groups with others effectively.

    • Review your notes, schoolwork and other class materials over the weekend.

    Last week Bishop Timothy Harris visited Ignatius Park College for morning tea to meet and speak to our staff. Bishop Harris also used the opportunity to walk around the College to view our new chapel, that will be dedicated in August, and interact with students in their classroom. The Bishop took time to visit our Hospitality, Technology and Art areas to discuss with students, individually, their learning in the classroom. Bishop Tim Harris will be celebrating our Anniversary Mass, 15 August on the Feast of the Assumption. All are welcome.

    This week we farewell Miss Melanie Baxter who will be leaving our College community after two and a half years and returning to her family in Canada. Ms Baxter has been an outstanding educator and Ignatius Park College will miss her passion and dedication to teaching. We wish her all the best on her journey beyond Iggy Park. Also, Ben Dervish-Ali, our Drama Teacher, will be leaving the College this week and we thank him for the expertise he brought to the Drama Department this term. Mr Jordan Jilg (Information Technology Systems Administrator) will be taking leave for the remainder of this year and we look forward to his return at the commencement of 2019.

    Mrs Andrea Tarttelin (Faculty Leader - English) will be attending the EREA immersion experience in South America during the holidays with teachers from EREA schools nationally. Her immersion will encompass Peru, Argentina and Uruguay and will provide her the opportunity to immerse in the work of the Church and the Christian Brothers, and show solidarity with our Edmund Rice schools in these countries. We wish Mrs Tarttelin a safe and rewarding journey and look forward to her return in Week 2 next term. Also during the holidays, 27 students from Ignatius Park College will be attending the New Zealand Ski Trip in Queenstown from 5 – 14 July. I would like to thank Mr Craig Brown, Mr Ben Williams and Mr Simon Di Giacomo who will be attending the ski trip and supervising the students.

    Next week our First XIII Rugby League students will participate in the Confraternity Carnival in Charters Towers. The Carnival had its origins with the Christian Brothers when their schools from Ipswich and Bundaberg would meet and contest games of Rugby League every year. This grew over time with the first carnival occurring in Bundaberg in 1980 and attracted six schools. There are now over 40 schools competing in the Confraternity Shield and I am looking forward to watching our students next week play in Charters Towers and hopefully bring the shield back to Iggy Park. Thank you to Steven Lansley and Christian Quabba who Manage and Coach our First XIII team. Also, congratulations to the Brothers Rugby Union Club who celebrate their 50th Anniversary this weekend.

    Reminder to all parents that subjects being offered in 2019 will be confirmed at the beginning of Term 3. Students will commence Term 3 on Tuesday, 17 July.

    NAIDOC Week will be celebrated next week from Sunday, 8 July until Sunday, 15 July. The theme this year is entitled “Because of Her, We Can!” and celebrates the essential role that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have played, and continue to play, as leaders, trailblazers, politicians, activists and social change advocates. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women fought and continue to fight, for justice, equal rights, our rights to country, for law and justice, access to education, employment and to maintain and celebrate our culture, language, music and art.

    The following prayer was written by Rev Tim Matton-Johnson, a former Deputy National Chairperson for UAICC, and an Aboriginal person from Tasmania. It is a version of the Lord’s Prayer.

    Great Spirit, Creator of all,From the stars to all the earth,

    Loved and respected be your name,May it happen that all should live your way,

    Following your purpose for all creation.Enable us to find what we need for today’s journey.

    Forgive us when we go wrong As we forgive those who wrong us.

    Have compassion on us when we are being tested, Do not abandon us to fear and evil.Our hope is in your new community.

    You are the one who can transform all creation, making everything new, now and for all eternity.

    AMENHave a wonderful and restful holiday break.

    Shaun Clarke I Principal

  • P 3 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Praying with EdmundJesus, you drew disciples to yourself and called them to do the same. May we never lose sight of your presence in the relationships we share. Like Edmund, may we learn to live as brothers and sisters in you. AMEN

    Liberating EducationWe open hearts and minds, through quality teaching and learning experiences, so that through critical reflection and engagement each person is hope-filled and free to build a better world for all.

    What knowledge and skills do we equip our young people with so that they are able to discern the liberation needs of others?

    Our next touchstone to explore is: Justice and Solidarity.

    Sustainability

    At what point did we allow, ‘hey, this is good value’ to simply mean, ‘hey, this is super cheap’?Value is about so much more than a price tag. In fact, value can be thought of in three parts:

    • the value of the product or service in isolation (how much money leaves our pocket);

    • the environmental impact or value (how many trees were cut down or rivers polluted); and

    • finally the social impact or value (the jobs created to make the product).

    Together these three components comprise “deep value”.

    Unfortunately, much of our consumer experience and choice rests solely on the price tag. We are confronted by this on a daily basis: can we justify the organic, free range eggs, when the other eggs are less than half the price? Most of us choose according to price, but the deep value of a product doesn’t disappear just because we only pay for part of it. The cost is transferred as a negative impact to the social context, the environment, or both. By definition, this is completely unsustainable.

    It is unsurprising in this context, where it is the lowest price that matters, that many people have lost faith in business as a driver of positive change in the world. So how can we shift this conversation? How can we redefine value to include all three components of deep value?

    Arguably, it starts with how we define success in business. Traditionally, business success has been defined solely as the capacity to maximise profits for shareholders. In this context, we inevitably ignore the social and environmental impact of our decisions in pursuit of money. But what if we defined success in business differently?

    There are many inspiring and insightful people and organisations responding to that question— movements like conscious capitalism, social enterprise, collaborative

    Identity & Mission

  • P 4 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Identity & Mission

    consumption, responsible business and social investment are demonstrating ways to create deep value in business. Whether this means encouraging employee ownership, having meaningful community engagement or introducing responsible environmental policies, it goes right to the heart of deep value and provides a way for business to reflect the values they hold in the value they create.

    These approaches to business all reflect a philosophy of deep value.

    Adapted from an article written by Kaj Löfgren and Mele-Ane Havea for Dumbo Feather Magazine.

    Faith in Action

    SONY Camp – Companion Training

    DON’T FORGET – Companion Training Session 2 is on Monday 16 July from 9am to 1pm. All companions must attend. Morning tea and lunch are provided. Wear closed in shoes and bring a hat.

    RetreatsThe Year 10 Retreat has been POSTPONED. It will now be held on Thursday, 30 August 2018. We are looking for some male role models to join small groups of students to enrich the experience. If you are a dad, step - dad, male carer, grandfather, etc – WE WANT YOU! Please contact [email protected] if you are interested and available. More details to come, so watch this space.

    Johanna Smith I Deputy Principal - Identity and Mission

  • P 5 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Pastoral

    Bishop Tim Harris Visit

  • P 6 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Photography Competition

    Townsville STEM Hub - Photography CompetitionFour categories –

    - Primary school (5-12 years)

    - Secondary school (13-17 years)

    - Open (18 years and above)

    - People’s Choice - awarded by popular vote online

    Theme: Sharing the story of Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) in Townsville at work, home and play.

    Your photo might capture your parent at work, something mathematical you found at home, research you or your colleague is undertaking, or a natural phenomenon that captures your eye. Share the story of your image with a caption of 50 words or less about how your image links to STEM in Townsville at Work, Home, or Play to win some great prizes. Terms, conditions and entry criteria applies.This project has recieved financial assistance from Inspiring Australia through the Townsville STEM Hub.

    Enter now! Entries close midnight 22 July, 2018.

    Alyssa Deer I Faculty Leader - Science

    Pastoral

    Lost PropertyLost property is currently overflowing with items belonging to the students. If your son is missing any items, can you please ensure he checks Lost Property prior to the holidays.

    All items remaining will either be donated to St Vincent De Paul or disposed of on the Student Free Day, Thursday, 29 June 2018.

    John Doolan I Deputy Principal - Pastoral

    Uniform Shop NewsPlease note the uniform shop will be closed the pupil free day, Friday 29 June 2018. It will reopen on the first day of term, Tuesday, 17 June 2018 at 8am to 10.45am

    Larissa Moule I Uniform Shop

    Changes To Afternoon Homeroom – Semester 2Next semester the College will be trialling a move away from afternoon homeroom to allow for increased time during morning homeroom. The Pastoral Team has been looking at ways to improve homeroom time and to also add to an increased settling of the College.

    The trial will mean the five minutes from afternoon homeroom will be allocated to the morning time. There will be no loss of teaching time, however, lesson times will be adjusted to allow for the change.

    In addition, the school day will finish at 3.00pm, instead of 3.03pm. The exisiting 3.03pm finish is a historical decision relating to when Holy Spirit School also finished at 3.00pm. The extra three minutes on our timetable was designed to allow for additional time for the primary parents and students to clear Ross River Road and Albert Street areas. Holy Spirit now finishes at 2.50pm so this device is no longer relevant.

    It is hoped that this move will allow for increased quality time at the beginning of the day. This will also provide the opportunity to catch late students, particularly late bus boys. In the afternoon, it should improve the calm around the school, as there will be less movement at the end of the day. We will also be including an early bus bell to signal when these students can leave class.

    John Doolan I Deputy Principal - Pastoral

    https://whatson.townsville.qld.gov.au/events/townsville-stem-hub-national-science-week-2018-photography-competition

  • P 7 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Pastoral

    Reconciliation Week 2018 – Palm Island VisitAs part of Reconciliation Week 2018, our students enjoyed a sunset cruise through the Palm Islands in the Coral Sea. As well as a surprise visit from a humpback whale, which spent twenty minutes posing around the Sealink boat, our young men heard opera, poetry and some inspirational messages from a number of Indigenous icons.

    Together with a group from Cowboys House, a boarding facility for emerging Aboriginal and Islander leaders, our students departed from Townsville and were welcomed on the island with a smoking ceremony.

    Our students, together with fifty pupils from Bwgcolman State School, were cleansed by walking through smoke before reboarding on the cruise.

    Guest speakers included Poet and Comedian, Maggie Walsh, former Young Australian of the Year Nicholas Marchesi, Opera Singer, Shauntai Batzke, Doctor, Raymond Blackman, former Cowboys player, Obe Geia, Clinical Nurse, Lauwana Blackley, Long-serving Palm Teacher, Veronica Coutts and Townsville Hospital Board Member, Dr Gracelyn Smallwood.

    The event was part of the ‘100 Years Strong’ Centennial Anniversary to mark when Indigenous people began to be forcibly placed on Palm Island, which is the traditional home of the Manbarra people.

    Mrs Walsh, or Aunty Maggie as she is known, told students, ‘Bwgcolman means many tribes, representing the many tribes who were put here. My great grandmother was put here. We didn’t ask to move. We were forced to come here. I wish I spoke my language, but my grandmother wasn’t allowed to speak it. We are here to celebrate 100 years of strength, of survival, and you young people are the future’.

    As part of her stand-up act, Aunty Maggie, who had just performed at a Comedy Festival in Sydney, said, ‘Townsville. People are always moaning, saying everywhere else is better. The grass is greener on the other side. I say, of course the grass is greener on the other side. They got no water restrictions over there.’

    Dr Gracelyn Smallwood, who grew up on Palm, said, ‘Like most people we lived in little tin shack. I couldn’t read or write but at the age of 60 I became a doctor. Growing up we were all as fast as Cathy Freeman and as good as JT. But, that’s not enough. You’ve gotta get a Western education. That’s how, when it’s time, you’ll be able to look after your own families.’

    ‘You’ve got a lot of opportunities we didn’t have. You gotta take them. It’s wonderful to see so many non-Indigenous boys here today. This is what reconciliation is about.’

    The event was sponsored by the Palm Island Council and Sealink Ferries. This year’s Reconciliation theme is ‘Don’t Make History a Mystery.’

    Maggie Walsh’s work, ‘Sunset’, a collection of poetry, is available in local book shops.

    Special thanks to CLT Assistant, Kathy Jarrett, for organising and her support on the day.

    Jonathon Pearce I Teacher

  • P 8 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Defence News - Year 11 and Year 12 StudentsAre you considering a career in the Australian Defence Force?

    On Thursday, 19 July (first week back after holidays) past student, Damien Kipping, will be visiting our College to talk to any Year 11 and 12 students who may be interested, and to answer any of your questions.

    Damien is currently enrolled in the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), and is coming along to share his insider-knowledge about life at ADFA.

    Date: Thursday, 19 July

    Time: 12.30pm (second lunch)

    Venue: Big Ben

    Leanne Mahoney | Defence Transition Mentor

    End of Term Liturgy

    Pastoral

  • P 9 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Parent Teacher InterviewsSchool will finish at 12.30pm on Wednesday, 25 July 2018. If students are unable to travel home, supervised study will be provided in the Library until 3:00pm. If students are not travelling directly home, they must change out of their school uniform. There will be no Homework Program operating this day.

    Access to Parent Teacher bookings will open at 4.00pm, Friday, 29 June 2018 and will close, Sunday, 22 July 2018 at 5.00pm. After this time, we will be unable to accept any further bookings.

    Some teachers may be unavailable. In this case, please email [email protected] to request for a teacher to contact you.

    For assistance with Logins, please contact the Administration Team on 4796 0222 or [email protected]

    Parent Lounge - Logging inPlease click here to access Parent Lounge

    Username - Your username is your parent code. Please find this on your latest Statement of Account or by looking at your son’s ID Card (first 5 digits of the student number)

    Student CardParent code is the first 5 digits of the student code (01234 in this example)

    SET Plan InterviewsAt Ignatius Park College we ensure that students in Year 10 develop a Senior Education and Training Plan (SET plan) in partnership with their parents. The SET plan maps out a student’s education and training plan of action to achieve their intended learning option (ILO) through the compulsory participation phase (SET Plan Interview). Students are supported to acquire the skills and knowledge to develop their SET plan and to revise it during their studies.

    During the SET Plan Interview the College ensures that learning opportunities are provided in accordance with the SET plan. The SET plan is reviewed and updated as necessary and transferred to another institution, if required.

    The SET Planning Interviews for 2018 will be booked using Parent Lounge. Please see below for important dates and guides for making bookings.

    This information may also be accessed online from the College Website, under Learning > Interviews

    Important InformationSET Planning Interviews will be held on Tuesday, 24 July 2018, in the Edmund Rice Hall, 8.30am to 5.30pm. Normal classes will be operating throughout the day, with students leaving their class for the interview and then returning.

    Online Bookings will open on Monday, 9 July 2018 and will close on Thursday, 19 July 2018. The SET Plan forms need to be completed digitally and emailed to [email protected] or printed and handed into the Edmund Rice Office by 3pm, 19 July 2018.

    Please note that changes to subjects can be made at the SET Plan Interview and after Tuesday, 24 July 2018. Subject changes prior to this date will not be accepted.

    For assistance with Parent Lounge Logins, please contact Parent Reception on 4796 0222 or [email protected]

    Curriculum

    https://tassweb.ipc.qld.edu.au/parentlounge/login.cfm?reason=timeout

  • P 10 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Statement of AccountParent code is the account number (01234 in this example)

    Passwords - If you have forgotten your password please use the Forgot Password link at the top of the login page.

    Using Parent Teacher online

    Once Logged in - select Parent Teacher Interviews from the top menu.

    In the Parent Teacher Interviews menu - select Book an Appointment next to the teacher / subject you wish to make a booking for.

    Please note if a teacher is fully booked they will no longer appear, you may email [email protected] to request an interview at a later stage.

    In the next window, select an appointment time and then confirm.

    Repeat these steps for each teacher you wish to book and interview for.

    Curriculum

  • P 11 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Curriculum

    VET and Industry Placement

    Industry PlacementIf you are out and about in the city this week, you may see our students in the workforce as part of the College’s Industry Placement Program. Around 110 Year 11 and Year 12 boys are having a ‘real life’ experience this week.

    We would like to thank all our employers who support this program, as without them our students would not be able to gain this valuable experience, and be so work-ready when they graduate.

    We hope the boys have enjoyed their week and gained some new on-the-job skills.

    School Based ApprentishipWe would like to congratulate our latest school based apprentice, Matthew Kent (Yr 12B), who was signed up for a Certificate III in Commercial Cookery with Jam Corner. Matthew will attend work every Friday for the rest of the school year and after graduation he will become a fulltime apprentice. This is a wonderful opportunity and we would like to thank Matt Merrin and the team at Jam Corner.

    Shane Dove | Program Leader VET

  • P 12 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Curriculum

    Action Automatics

    Adits IT Solutions

    Advantage Signs

    AE Smith & Son NQ (Electrical)

    Aitkenvale State School

    AJ McLean Constructions

    A-lec Electrics

    A-Lect Auto Electrical

    Allytech Body Fabrication Pty Ltd

    Alpha Omega Health Gym

    Baker & Co

    Bill & Ben The Cabinet Men

    Bonlec Electrical

    Boundary St Automotive

    Brite-Lec

    Brother's Leagues Club

    Brown & Hurley Group

    Bushland Beach Tavern

    Casa Engineering (Tsv)

    CD Projects

    Chambers Wildlife Rainforest Lodges

    Coastal Gasfitting and Plumbing

    Colliers International

    Computer Workshop Townsville

    Craig Stocks Electrical

    Cranbrook State School

    CrossFit Townsville

    Cummins Townsville

    CW & GS Blaik Electrical

    Darryl Hurst Auto Electrical

    DN Electrical

    DNA Carpentry

    Ergon Energy

    Exclusive Refinishing

    Food Relief NQ

    Four Seasons Airconditioning

    Franzmann Plumbing

    Gabrielli Constructions

    Genesis Fitness Annandale

    Glasgow Building & Development

    GPB Constructions

    Grady Homes

    Greg Thomas Electrical

    Hammerhead Marine & Fabrication

    Hannabull Group

    Hastings Deering (Australia) Ltd

    Honeycombes Sales & Service

    Horace Constructions

    Horan & Bird Electrical & Airconditioning

    Hurst Constructions Qld

    Ignatius Park College - Hospitality Dept

    JB & Sons Builders

    John Gray Constructions

    Jorgensen Plumbing

    Keypower Systems

    Kickstart Fitness Townsville

    KJ's Mining and Engineering

    Kolby's Electrical

    Laila Gordon Personal Training

    Lamberts Produce

    Lancini Homes

    Lancini Homes

    Leslie's Auto Electrical

    Marteene Painting Services

    Mauricio Moto - Personal Trainer

    Mazlin Electrical Services

    McCanns Airconditioning

    Meridian Helicopters

    Mineforce

    Moncrieff Cabinetmakers

    MVO Airconditioning Pty Ltd

    Norfab

    NQ Carpentry

    NQ Coolectrix

    NQ Fuel & Maintenance

    Otto's Fresh Food Market

    P & C Smith Electrical

    Pinnacle Power

    Ray White Kirwan

    Reldas Constructions

    RSL Club Townsville

    Sandblasting Services

    Solex

    Tacoma Plumbing

    TCC - Fleet Services

    TCC - Sport Facilities

    The Ville

    TMP Civil Services

    Tony Ireland Holden (Car Workshop)

    Top to Bottom Plumbing

    Townsville Mobile Vet

    Townsville Windows and Screens

    Tyrepower Townsville

    Waltlec Electrical & Refrigeration

    Weigh 'n' Pay Scrap Metal

    WF Electrical

    William Ross State High School

    Woodfields Engineering

    Wulguru Steel Fabrication

    VET - Placement Providers List

  • P 13 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Co-curricular

    Rugby League

    First XIII The First XIII squad now switch their focus to the annual Confraternity Shield which will be held in Charters Towers next week from Sunday through until Friday. Ignatius Park College has a long and proud association with the Confraternity Carnival and have won the prestigious state-wide competition in 2008, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2016. The First XIII look forward to representing the College community with pride, and are honoured to wear our school colours at such a prestigious carnival, with over 50 teams from across the State.

    With the carnival being held so close to home this year, it is a wonderful opportunity to get as many supporters as possible to attend and fill the grounds with Blue and White.

    For those unable to attend the carnival, updates will be provided as well as a live stream of certain games on the Queensland Independent Secondary School Rugby League (QISSRL) website and Facebook page.

    The 20 players representing Ignatius Park College at the 2018 Confraternity Carnival are shown below:

    Cameron Bateup (Capt.)

    Dane Thompson

    Lleyton Anderson

    Sam Nimmo (Vice Capt.)

    Dean Barnes

    Michael O’Brien

    Pemulwuy Yanner

    Joey Jensen

    Darcy Stevenson

    Mark Gardiner

    Ethan Roberts

    Jack Thompson

    Dylan Bayliss-Brow

    Zac McMinn

    Ethan Targett

    Ethan Hagarty

    Isaac Hawes

    Heyden Rowbotham

    Tom Chester

    Rayshawn Mills-Prior

  • P 14 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Co-curricular

    Queensland RepresentativesTrey Valentine, Kmani Levi and Thomas McIntosh have left for training camp as part of the Queensland White Secondary Schools Rugby League Team to contest the National Titles in Mackay in week 1 of the holidays. All three boys are to be congratulated on this outstanding achievement and we wish them well when they pull on their State Colours. Well done to all.

    Rugby League SponsorsThe Ignatius Park College Rugby League Development Program would like to thank the following Sponsors for their generous support in 2018. Without the help of our sponsors, the continued success of the program would not be possible.

    Christian Quabba | Teacher

    Kmani Levi Thomas McIntosh Trey Valentine

  • P 15 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

    Co-curricular

    Bill Turner Cup - IPC Progress to State Quarter FinalsA compact defence and slick ball movement were keys to victory in IPC’s 5-0 win in the Bill Turner Cup interdistrict play-off against Holy Spirit, Mackay this week. The team now progresses through to the final eight schools in the State.

    In a match played in the neutral venue of Ayr, Ignatius Park dominated proceedings from the first whistle. A midfield trio of Aiden Freeman, Ashton Waddington and Isaac Mayo quickly took control of the game and combined well with the forward line to create numerous opportunities in the first 10 minutes. Mayo opened the scoring at 12 minutes, with a clinical headed goal from Freeman’s corner. IPC continued to threaten for the remainder of the half and fine strikes from Kyle Robinson and Yani Collocott saw Iggy head to the half-time break 3-0 ahead.

    Ignatius Park’s dominance continued throughout the second half. A well organised defence easily handled all attacking efforts from Holy Spirit and the back four were also efficient in quickly transitioning from defence to attack. A long-range effort from Freeman added another goal to the scoresheet within the first 2 minutes of the half. Regular goalkeeper, Joseph Gregory, was given a late run as striker and proved his versatility by scoring the last goal to round out the 5-0 victory.

    Ignatius Park will now play the Cairns District Champions early in Term 2. Victory in this game would see the College qualify for the state finals series in Brisbane in mid-August. Well done to all boys involved and a big thanks to Mr Bruce for driving the College bus.

    Shane Dove I Program Leader – Vocational Education and Training

    U16s NQ FootballCongratulations Kyle Robinson, Daniel Kratzmann, Yanni Collocott, Bailey Waddington and Jared Mitchell who represented North Queensland at the State Queensland Championships in Brisbane in June.

    John Alloway I Program Leader - Sport

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    North Queensland - bountiful natural resources and a wealth of human talent. But the model on which our society is currently based results in degradation of natural resources, uncertainty of business and employment, and ongoing concerns about social justice.

    Time and time again, our faith is placed in the latest ‘silver bullet’ project: a new local attraction, a new mine, a new dam for more irrigated agriculture, a new satellite suburb. So often such proposals come at an economic, social and environmental cost.

    The 2018 A New Economy for North Queensland Symposium will bring together people exploring new, more sustainable ways of doing things in areas such as food and energy, work, production and consumption, social enterprise, the built environment, income distribution, and population. It will be an opportunity to look outside the box, to creatively question traditional ways of doing things, and to explore new options for a fair, flourishing and sustainable region.

    Our goal is clear: Communities and economies that fit within the productive capacity of a healthy environment.

    Two Day Symposium Saturday 14 & Sunday 15 July 2018Amaroo On Mandalay • Magnetic Island • NQ

    You’re invited toA New Economy for North Queensland

    The Symposium will be held for two days on glorious Magnetic Island, 25 minutes north of Townsville by passenger ferry.

    KEYNOTE SPEAKERS INCLUDE•

    For more information on how to participate, please see the reverse side of this flyer.

    NORTH QUEENSLAND SYMPOSIUM – DAY 1 8.00 - 09.00 Registration, tea and coffee 9.00 - 09.15 Welcome to Country from the Wulgurukaba People 9.15 - 9.30 Overview of Symposium - Michelle Maloney and Wendy Tubman 9.30 - 10.00 Doughnut Economics - Kate Raworth, Author & Senior Associate, Oxford University (via internet) 10.00 - 10.30 The Transition to Diverse Economies - Amanda Cahill, Next Economy

    10.30 - 11.00 Morning Tea 11.00 - 12.30 Building ecologically sustainable futures – presentations and panel discussion A new agriculture, a new earth - Charles Massey, Author and fifth generation farmer Renewable energy and the future of coal - Tim Buckley, Director, Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis Rethinking environmental protection - Wendy Tubman, former President NQCC and activist Panel discussion led by Michelle Maloney, AELA Panelists: Amanda Cahill, Charles Massey, Tim Buckley, Wendy Tubman

    12.30 - 1.30 LUNCH

    1.30 - 3.00 Parallel Session 1 1.1 Indigenous Economics 1.2 Rethinking Food Systems 1.3 Democracy & Political Economy Duane Fraser ‘Indigenous economics, a perspective’

    Joel Orchard ‘Community supported Agriculture’

    Robin Rodd ‘Economic development and democratisation: The case for a North Queensland state’

    Valentine Nona and Sue Kenney ‘Palm Island Sustainability Hub’

    Terrie Hamilton-Smith and Anna Cousins ‘Newport Organic Collective’

    Bill Laing ‘Capitalism v renewable energy’ (30 minute workshop)

    Ben Gertz ‘Where to from here?’ Helen Hill ‘Journey from conventional to regenerative agriculture’

    3.00 - 3.30 Afternoon Tea

    3.30 - 4.30 Parallel Session 2 2.1 Cooperatives and social enterprises

    2.2 Money and currencies 2.3 Sharing and Exchange

    Jane Mnjaramba ‘Migrant African Women Entrepreneurs in small business in NQ’

    Marie Shieh & Barry Disch ‘Would public banks work in Australia?’

    Patricia Morgan ‘Creating Sharing Maps for your community’ (30 minute workshop)

    Paul Jukes ‘Transforming the economy with cooperatives’ (30 minute workshop)

    Nick McGuigan & Thomas Kern ‘Creative Accounting: Disrupting Business Norms through Art’ (30 minute workshop)

    Belinda Moore ‘FNQ Community Exchange’ (30 minute workshop)

    4.30 - 5.30 Priorities for building a new economy in North Queensland – Facilitated group discussions

    6pm - 8pm Conference Dinner (at Conference Venue: Amaroo on Mandalay)

    NORTH QUEENSLAND SYMPOSIUM – DAY 2 8.30 - 9.15 Registration, tea and coffee 9.15 - 9.30 Welcome to Day 2 - Wendy Tubman 9.30 - 10.00 Curing affluenza and other ills - Richard Denniss 10.00 - 10.30 Bioregional economics - a framework for building the new economy within ecological limits - Michelle

    Maloney 10.30 - 11.00 Future visions for the Australian economy - Panel Discussion facilitated by Wendy Tubman

    Panelists: Richard Denniss, Charles Massey, Jane Gleeson-White, Valentine Nona, Michelle Maloney

    11.00 - 11.30 Morning tea

    11.30 - 12.30 Parallel Session 3 3.1 Sustainable lifestyles 3.2 Sustainable communities 3.3 Creating systemic change

    Frank Dallmeyer ‘Adapting lifestyles’

    Tracey Cooper 'The Valley Centre - rebuilding sustainable local communities' (30 minute workshop)

    Michelle Maloney and James Lee, AELA ‘GreenPrints: bioregional economic governance’ (30 minute workshop)

    David Kault ‘One child families for sustainability’

    Sara Cole and Chris Otto ‘Designing for sustainable communities in the tropics’

    Amanda Cahill 'Transitioning to diverse economies’ (30 minute workshop)

    Simon Foale ‘Reducing our footprint: learning from other cultures’

    12.30 - 1.30 LUNCH

    1.30 - 2.00 Where to with Adani? A conversation between Tim Buckley and Richard Denniss

    2.00 - 3.00 Parallel Session 4 4.1 Law and Regulation 4.2 Energy and waste futures 4.3 Work/life balance

    Jane Gleeson-White ‘Grass-roots law and kangaroo economics’

    Michael Lunn ‘Electric Vehicle Construction in NQ’

    Patricia Morgan ‘The inner dimension of working for change’ (30 minute workshop)

    Elizabeth Spencer ’Rules for a New Economy’ (30 minute workshop)

    Adam Connell ‘Finding value from waste: innovating for a circular economy’

    Christine Doan ‘Using intuition to find purpose in your business’ (30 minute workshop)

    3.00 - 3.30 Afternoon tea

    3.30 - 4.30 Priorities for North Queensland. Facilitated group discussions

    4.30pm Close

    How you can be part of A New Economy for North Queensland

    $160 Standard rate$90 Concession/unwaged

    Tickets are available at: www.trybooking.com/UQ

    The symposium is being hosted at: Amaroo On Mandalay 61-79 Mandalay Avenue,Nelly Bay Magnetic Island.

    Saturday 14 Sunday 15 July, 2018.

    www.neweconomy.org.au/nq-symposium-2018

    www.trybooking.com/UQTR

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    Entertainment Book

    https://www.entertainmentbook.com.au/orderbooks/270m778

  • P 18 | Redefining the Education of Young Men

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