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Leadership dialoguesImproving outcomes for all110/07/2015Leadership dialoguesExecutive summaryLeadership DialoguesJanuary 2014 - July 2015Silcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonActive engagement and collaboration will improve teaching quality over time.A 360 view of teaching quality over time provides an accurate measure of how a teacher is performing.For professional learning to be effective, teachers need to be at a given level of competency.Teacher mindset determines if a teacher can transition from RI to good teaching quality over time.Leadership directly impacts on outcomes for all.Mode 2 professional learning: a professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, formal and informal dialogue and collaboration.Dialogic school: a school which promotes improved outcomes for all by employing precise, context-driven and collaborative leadership to create a professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, formal and informal dialogue and collaboration.

10/07/20153contextOffice for Standards in Education (2013) School Inspection Report: Primary School A. URN: 131183. London: Ofsted publicationsSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonThis Ofsted recommendation for Primary School A initially comprised the research project aims and intended impact. It led to a hypothesis which asserted the relationship between a model of continuing professional development which personalised professional learning and an increase in outstanding teaching.The initial phase of the research project focused on an iterative cycle of data collection and analysis leading to interim findings which broadened the scope of the research project. Improving teaching quality over time became the aim, with an emphasis on the teacher being a designer of learning not just a deliverer of a curriculum. The prerequisite for this being a professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, dialogue and collaboration. Given this, the intended impact became the creation of a dialogic school which would promote improved outcomes for both children and teachers.A change in context during the second phase afforded the Leadership Dialogues research project the opportunity to employ the case study method. A further iteration of the cycle of data collection and analysis led to a revision of the interim findings, a transitioning from internal to external validity and a move towards generalisability.However, the consideration of cultural and micro-political issues during this phase of the research project introduced further areas for research and broadened its scope: what are the barriers to change in teachers requiring improvement and how is the role of leadership integral to improving outcomes for both children and teachers? These questions will define the final phase of the research project.10/07/20154hypothesis

For schools to ensure quality of teaching over time, they need to build capacity in designing learning around all learners needs. This shift from the school as deliverer of the curriculum for children to the school as designer of learning for all requires the engagement of all in action focused on learning.Silcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonPrimary pupils artwork unveiled at Kidbrooke by the Mayor of Greenwich ahead of construction beginning on expanded school site for Primary School B, December 2014.The methodological frameworkCohen, L., Manion, L. and Morrison, K. (2011) Research Methods in Education. RoutledgeHorst, H., Hjorth, L. and Tacchi, J. (2012) Rethinking ethnography: An introduction. Media International Australia, Incorporating Culture and Policy 145 (2012): 86Silcock, R. (2014) The Case for Change: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West London10/07/20156The methodological frameworkPiecing together the evidence of teaching quality over timeLearning journey evident in booksQuality of childrens learning matched by quality and frequency of feedback markingPupil attainment and progress data over a term and over a yearNo gaps in progress or attainment for groupsQuality of the learning environment and how it supports learningBreadth and balance of curriculumQuality of behaviour for learningWhat this tells us about attitudes to learning, engagement and established routinesPupil perceptions of learningWhat they say about the quality of teaching over timeQuality of observed teachingThe manner in which the teacher reads the context and adapts teaching to engage learnersEnrichmentTo what extent is learning enriched across the curriculumSilcock, R. (2014) Inquiry for Impact: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West London10/07/20157The methodological frameworkEvidenceMethodWeaknessLearning journey evident in booksObservationWill the expectation of a book scrutiny impact on the learning journey evident in books?Pupil attainment and progress data over a term and over a yearSchool performance dataSchool performance data is based on teacher assessments and is not indicative of attitudes to learning.Quality of the learning environment and how it supports learningPhotographsPhotographic evidence will only record the potential for the learning environment to support learning.Quality of behaviour for learningObservation/School performance dataAn observer in a classroom will impact on the environment.Pupil perceptions of learningQuestionnaireWill pupils feel encouraged to be honest?Quality of observed teachingObservationAn observer in a classroom will impact on the environment.EnrichmentQuestionnaireWill stakeholders feel encouraged to be honest?Silcock, R. (2014) Inquiry for Impact: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonAn assessment model using a mix of qualitative and quantitative research methods built around the tool of observation (weaknesses countered).10/07/20158Ethical issuesHammersley, M. and Traianou, A. (2012) Ethics and Educational Research. British Educational Research Association on-line resource. Available at http://www.bera.ac.uk/ [accessed January 2014]Silcock, R. (2014) Inquiry for Impact: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonThe leadership for learning modelThe theoretical framework

Leadership cultureTell less, ask more: the exposure of all stakeholders to inquiry, dialogue and collaboration will promote the desired culture of telling less and asking more and the corollary of relationship buildingLeadership relationshipsFor all stakeholders: the building of relationships underpins the success of every complex social organisation susceptible to an array of both external and internal influences, including schoolsLeadership structureA transparent leadership structure: defines accountabilities that will fuel school improvement both internally and externallyLeadership systemsPrecise leadership systems: leadership systems present the tangible realisation of cognitive politicsLeadership learningAction focused on learning: all stakeholders need to be provided with the opportunity to learn which will promote critical thinking and a focus on change; a prerequisite for responding to the increased complexity of social lifeSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonContextualising the leadership for learning model should serve to emphasise the key components of it. At both Primary School A and Primary School B leaders have successfully managed meaning and created a shared reality by embedding a leadership culture which is focused on telling less and asking more. This leads to the building of leadership relationships for all stakeholders. A transparent leadership structure and precise leadership systems support the management of meaning and maintain the shared reality. Focusing action on leadership learning secures a shared moral purpose.1010/07/2015The leadership for learning modelThe evidence

Leadership cultureInformed by data from the final phase of the research project which is indicative of the impact of leaders on teacher mindset and on outcomes for all stakeholdersLeadership relationshipsSupported by the data and the subsequent finding from the initial and second phase of the research project which states that active engagement for teachers within a context of personalised professional learning will lead to an improvement in teaching quality over time; teachers being able to take a lead in their professional learningLeadership structure/Leadership systemsDesigned following the data and the subsequent finding from all phases of the research project which advocates a 360 view of teaching quality over time; supports the management of meaning and maintains the shared realityLeadership learningSupported by the data and the subsequent finding from the initial and second phase of the research project which states that active engagement for teachers within a context of personalised professional learning will lead to an improvement in teaching quality over time; promotes a shared moral purposeSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonIn effect, teachers being afforded the opportunity to take a lead in their professional learning, the corollary of which is children being afforded the opportunity to take a lead in their learning leads to improved outcomes for all.This is because the assessment model which facilitates a 360 view of teaching quality over time, Piecing together the evidence of teaching quality over time, the transparent leadership structure which defines accountabilities that fuel school improvement and the systems which support these (school development plan, monitoring schedule, etc.) support the management of meaning and maintain the shared reality.1110/07/2015Data collection and analysisSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonData collection and analysisResearch Project Development PlanPhaseTimescaleKey tasksInterventionsData collectionEvaluationReporting3January 2015 to July 2015Adapt research methodologyConduct researchAnalyse data and determine impactAt the level of leaderAt the level of RI teacherAssessment model Piecing together the evidence of teaching quality over timeQuestionnaireYesYesSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonData collection and analysisResearch Project Development PlanPhaseTimescaleKey tasksInterventionsData collectionEvaluationReporting3January 2015 to July 2015Adapt research methodologyConduct researchAnalyse data and determine impactAt the level of leaderAt the level of RI teacherAssessment model Piecing together the evidence of teaching quality over timeQuestionnaireYesYesSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonData collection and analysiswhat are the barriers to change in teachers requiring improvement?Silcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonThe expansive use of an open code within the assessment model during this phase of the research project facilitated a more precise 360 view of teaching quality over time by positioning teachers requiring improvement between the fiftieth and seventieth percentiles and positioning good teachers above the seventieth percentile. This enabled the identification of teachers transitioning from requiring improvement to good teaching quality over time following the completion of the intensive fixed term support plan; with a teacher making this transition.10/07/201515Data collection and analysiswhat are the barriers to change in teachers requiring improvement?Silcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonData collection and analysishow is the role of leadership integral to improving outcomes for both children and teachers? Following the completion of the senior leadership development programme, Leading with Precision, for leaders at both Primary School A and Primary School B leader and teacher attitudes towards leadership were ascertained using a questionnaire with the purpose being to understand the perceived impact of leadership on teacher mindset.10/07/201517Research project impactclaimsLeadership Dialogues research project claimsActive engagement and collaboration will improve teaching quality over time:For professional learning to be effective, teachers need to be at a given level of competencyTeacher mindset determines if a teacher can transition from RI to good teaching quality over time.A 360 view of teaching quality over time provides an accurate measure of how a teacher is performing.Leadership directly impacts on outcomes for all.Silcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonResearch project impactleading change

To get involved or for a project update click on icon:Albeit tacitly, newly appointed leaders introduced the leadership for learning model to Primary School A and continued adherence to it fuels the schools ongoing success. This is evidenced in the schools transition from satisfactory to good overall effectiveness with outstanding leadership and management. Scalability and sustainability is further supported by the early expansion of the personalised professional learning framework, an intervention designed during the initial phase of the research project which led to the defining of a causal relationship between personalised professional learning and teaching quality over time, across the X Partnership of schools. This early validation of an interim finding from the research project, despite being tokenistic in practice, determined that a component of the research project could be scaled and sustained. Finally, the transference of the leadership for learning model from Primary School A to Primary School B, leading to rapid and sustained improvement at Primary School B, testifies to the capacity of the leadership for learning model to secure leadership for change, not least because of the disparate contexts of these schools.Inevitably there is scope for continued research to add further robustness to the leadership for learning model. In particular, to strengthen the findings from the final phase of the research project focused on teacher mindset and the impact of leadership: how can leaders secure teacher buy-in? A more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the disposition of teachers requiring improvement and how their responses to and interpretations of situations can be impacted on and subsequently defined by leaders could further substantiate the leadership for learning model by forcing leaders to explicitly acknowledge the existence and centrality of cognitive politics in schools.10/07/201519glossary

TermDefinitionAction ResearchPractitioner based research focused on change at the local level.Case StudyA process or record of research into the development of a particular person, group or event which utilises the complexity of multiple variables and adopts a mixed methods approach in order to understand what is being investigated. Data collection and analysis is guided by the development of a theoretical position at the outset.Complexity TheoryThe design of minimal interventions with the purpose of effecting major change.Design ThinkingReframing problems (how the problem is defined) to find overlooked solutions.Dialogic SchoolA school which promotes improved outcomes for all by employing precise, context-driven and collaborative leadership to create a professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, formal and informal dialogue and collaboration.EpistemologyHow knowledge is acquired.EthnographyThe observation of society from the viewpoint of the research subject.HeutagogySelf-determined or learner-centric learning.InterpretivismAn emphasis on the ability of the individual to construct meaning.Joint Practice ResearchCollaborative practitioner based research focused on change at the local level.

glossaryLead PractitionerA teacher who delivers outstanding teaching quality over time and subsequently leads colleagues to improve their practice.MethodologyThe explanation for the methods used to conduct research.MethodsThe methods used to conduct research.MindsetThe fixed mental attitude or disposition which predetermines a persons responses to and interpretations of situations.Mixed Methods ResearchThe collecting, analysing and mixing of both quantitative and qualitative research methods to understand a research problem.Mode 1 ResearchAcademic, investigator-initiated and discipline-based knowledge production.Mode 2 Professional LearningA professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, formal and informal dialogue and collaboration.Mode 2 ResearchContext-driven, problem-focused and interdisciplinary knowledge production.OntologyView of reality and being.ParadigmAn overall theoretical research framework.PositivismTo prove or disprove a hypothesis.glossaryQualitative ResearchUsed to gain an understanding of underlying reasons, opinions and motivations providing insights into a problem.Quantitative ResearchThe quantification of a problem by generating numerical data or data that can be transformed into useable statistics.360 viewA measure of teaching quality over time which incorporates all of the key indicators of how a teacher is performing.referencesAlexander, R. 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