mediacom blink #5 - the passion issue

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BLINK #5 PUBLISHED BY MEDIA TRENDS CONSUMERS #5 PELÉ THE MAN AND THE SUPERBRAND THE BRAND OLYMPICS London 2012 was the first social media Olympics, but how did the official sponsors fare? MOBILE PLATFORMS Why it's the best medium for passionate people PHILOSOPHY OF BRANDS Interview with Professor of Formal Philosophy, University of Copenhagen MASS MARKET EMOTIONS Mass market reach or niche market richness? Why not both? THE PASSION ISSUE

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MediaCom Blink #5 - The Passion Issue

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  • th

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    BLIN

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    5

    Published by

    Media Trends

    ConsuMers

    #5

    PelThe man and

    The suPerbrand

    be passionate!MediaCom has developed nine key rules to ensure your

    sponsorship activity delivers business results.

    (Above you have rule number seven.)

    To find out what the other eight are and to get a lot more

    detail on how to put the ideas into action read our new

    white paper, Can Sports Sponsorship Deliver?

    And sign up for our Insider programme, which will ensure

    you have exclusive access to all of MediaComs thoughts

    on the issues that matter.

    Visit News & Insight at mediacom.com to learn more or

    simply scan the QR code below.

    The brand olymPicsLondon 2012 was the first social media olympics,but how did the official sponsors fare?

    mobile PlaTformsWhy it's the best medium for passionate people

    PhilosoPhy of brandsinterview with Professor of Formal Philosophy,university of Copenhagen

    mass markeT emoTionsMass market reach or niche market richness?Why not both?

    The Passion

    issue

  • 2 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

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    #5 Winter 2012/2013

    MediaCom Global124 theobalds roadlondon WC1X 8rXuK

    tel.: +44 (0)20 7158 5500

    email: [email protected]: www.mediacom.com

    editor-in-Chief:signe Wandler, [email protected]

    Design & layout:Propellant, www.propellant.dkart Director, Martin Dahlbeck

    Cover:tinko Czetwertynski

    printed By:Vilhelm Jensen & Partnere

    issn: 1903-5373

    the opinions expressed in thearticles are those of the authors.Minor textual contents may berepublished as long as the original author and publication are cited.

    Find BlinK in the news & insight section at www.mediacom.com

    INTROWELCOME

    Why is the greatest footballer the world has ever known on the cover ofour magazine?

    let me explain.

    MediaCom recently announced that it would be helping the great manestablish new partnerships with brands around the world. For us,this relationship heralds an exciting evolution of both the agency and oursports division, MediaCom sport. i was delighted to welcome Pel to our MediaCom HQ in london a few months ago, and unsurprisingly, everyone was far more interested in Pel than what i had to say about our expanding capabilities. But thats alright. the continued interest in a 71-year-old man(who hasnt played in decades) is indicative of how passionate people areabout football and about sport.

    We saw that passion this past summer, as huge crowds in london cametogether to celebrate the olympics and Paralympics. the optimism andfan excitement were palpable, even to tV viewers. Why? Because sportexemplifies the power of passions to ignite and excite a city, a country andthe world. as consumers become increasingly critical of the hard sell, webelieve that authentically leveraging consumer passions such as sport is a powerful way to break through.

    and thats another reason why Pel is on our cover and profiled in this book(page 20): because this issue is all about passion.

    We learn what it takes to become a brand that consumers are passionateabout (page 6) and what happens when brands get it wrong (page8). We explore how tV viewing has been transformed into an active,passionate experience (page 46), while we debate using passion as a newway of segmenting consumer audiences (page 44). and just to be a bitcontroversial, weve asked a Professor of Philosophy for his take on brandsincreasing responsibilities in a challenging world (page 30).

    i hope this issue of BlinK helps you appreciate and think about usingthe power of passion, whether it be for sport, music or anotherconsumer favourite.

    as for me, i can only hope i look as good and have as much energy at 71 as Pel. Maybe passion keeps us young.

    regards,

    Stephen AllanMediaCom Worldwide Chairman and CEO

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    behind the scenes

    Matthew Mee andrew curryPeter walshe Vincent F. hendricks

    contributors

    European Strategy Director, MediaComEveryones passion is ultimately personal: respect that and add value to it.

    Director, The Futures CompanyPeople have been predicting since the invention of the World Wide Web that it will, sooner or later, get taken over by commercial interests. But fans and fandom still drive the business of the internet, not the other way around.

    Global BrandZ Director, Millward BrownBrands must understand that giving yourself away is a passion killer. Come and get me, Im cheap is not reason enough. Wow, Im worth a try because the barrier to entry is low [good price] and your experience will convince you what a great value I am is a much better strategy.

    Philosopher and logicianPhilosophy is in the business of premises, reasons for conclusions and the framing of arguments. Branding is in the business of framing, so philosophy may actually inform brand efforts and ambitions.

    to truly understand a global icon, you need to meet him for yourself. We talked to Pel at the scenic Hotel unique in so Paulo during Brazils long hot summer. as always, he was in a good mood and looking forward to the worlds attention turning to Brazil for the FiFa Confederations Cup in 2013 and the summer olympics in 2016.

    3BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • 28 40

    46

    44

    contents

    #5

    06 Characteristics of a Passionate Brand

    08 5 Engagements that Went Horribly Wrong

    12 Mobile: access, Participation, social

    14 Mass Market Emotions

    18 the Passionate shortcut

    20 life lessons from an Enduring icon

    28 infographic: sports sponsorship

    30 the Philosophy of Brands

    34 the Heart of the Matter

    38 Case study: nErF

    39 Case study: loewe

    40 M:Files: united by the Big Event

    42 Building a Future Proof Mobile strategy

    44 Passionate and Precise

    46 Getting active

    48 infographic: Brand olympics

    50 advertorial: Celebrating the World of Creativity: a Brief History of the Festival of Media

    4 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • 30the PhilosoPhy oF brandshow would a philosopher approach todays brand challenges? Copenhagen universitys Professor of Formal Philosophy talks about brand ambition and the need for a wider agenda.

    085 engageMents that went horribly wrongMatt Mee, Strategy Director, MediaCom EMEAit is inevitable that brands will seek to use our passions as a way to become relevant. sadly, too many get it wrong.

    06characteristics oF a Passionate brandBy Peter Walshe, Global BrandZ Director, Millward BrownWhy should brands care about passion? Research shows that the way consumers feel about a brand is a key indicator of sales performance.

    20liFe lessons FroM an enduring iconBy Erich BetingThe worlds greatest footballer talks about the influence of his father and the sporting passions that will erupt in brazil over the next four years.

    5BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • backgROuNdbrands & passiOn

    One of the indicators we use at BrandZ to determine how passionate people are about a brand are the words they use to describe the brands personality. Choosing to describe a brand as rebellious, fun or creative from a medley of adjectives that also includes softer options such as innocent, kind and friendly, for example, is a clear indicator of the greater or lesser passion elicited by the brand.

    Our key measure also assesses whether a brand polarises consumers. The greater the BrandZ clarity score, the more a brand divides opinions. It might seem counterintuitive, but polarisation is an important measure of passion; after all, products and services that are all things to all people are generally bland and less distinctive: an unhappy position, as far as brands are concerned.

    FouR AREAS oF PASSionSo what exactly do consumers think about when they rate some brands more passionately than others? Our studies suggest that there are four key areas:

    1. Adventurous/Rebellious2. Desirable/Sexy 3. Playful/Fun4. Creative

    All four areas are active, positive actions that embrace powerful and passionate descriptors of relationships with brands. We know from experience that there is a huge

    disparity between brands in the degree to which these words are mentioned. This shows us that passion is not something that is just casually given, but rather something that is earned by brands that are meaningfully different and deserving of such accolades.

    As a recent publication of Millward Brown Optimors Top 100 Global Brands shows, there are clear frontrunners in each of these four areas:

    Adventurous/Rebellious: Red Bull, Nike, Apple Desirable/Sexy: LOral, BMW, Apple Playful/Fun: Disney, Coca-Cola, Apple Creative: Google, Intel, Apple

    You might wonder why brands care about passion. Why not simply focus on sales?

    The truth is that the way consumers feel about brands is a proven driver of sales.

    By Peter Walshe, Global BrandZ Director, Millward Brown

    Passion does not only result in sales. The brands that are the most passionately rated are also the ones that earn the most online buzz (which, in turn, feeds sales and brand value).

    Is this connection surprising? I think not. The social space is where we interact freely on matters of interest, consequence

    or fun. Brands that participate in this space (without disrupting or interfering with the party) are engaging freely with willing audiences.

    Finally, a key learning from our studies is that low price does not buy passion. Instead, our data clearly shows that consumers with the greatest passion for a brand name price as their least powerful influence. Only those lacking a passionate relationship put price at the top.

    characteristics oF a Passionate brand

    Polarisation is an important measure of passion

    More passion equals more sales

    6 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • $112bN

    value

    eaRNedbuzz

    $511bN

    A pAssionAte AffAir 10 key Rules1. A distinctive brand is more likely to attract consumer passion.

    2. Passion adds value to a brand.

    3. building a single-minded brand promise entails understanding

    which passion to emphasise.

    4. Tone of voice is vital to underline passion in an interesting way.

    5. Media selection not only plays a part in targeting relevant

    consumers, but also implies the character and passionate

    nature of the brand.

    6. brand relationships are built on personal experience.

    7. being true to yourself as a brand is essential to a passionate

    experience. A brands entire value chain must deliver on this

    truth to ultimately affect customers.

    8. Passionate users are a brands best advocates and should

    be cultivated.

    9. do not worry about polarising your audience passion is not

    about being all things to all people.

    10. Think about the brands that inspire your own passion and

    consider what personal insights can be applied to your brand.

    BRAnDZ

    BrandZ is the worlds largest brand database of consumer opinion. it includes

    interviews with more than two million consumers and business-to-business

    customers in more than 43 countries about thousands of brands. to learn more

    please visit www.brandz.com

    Buzz meAns money

    2012

    2006

    7BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • pOINT Of vIew5 EngagEMEnts

    8 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • engagements that went horribly wrong

    It is inevitable that brands will try to leverage passion points as a way to create

    meaning and relevancy for brands. However, its not always as easy as it looks.

    By Matt Mee, Strategy Director, MediaCom EMEA Illustration by Jack Hudson

    At the most simplistic level, connecting with passion points is an attempt to garner attention in a time-starved world. There are, after all, a huge range of brands with similar functional and emotional benefits.

    It could also be a way that brands attempt to leverage key cultural moments in the hope that such an attachment will become fixed in the minds of consumers.

    And finally at its most sophisticated this drive for connection can also be a search for values that can be profitably transferred from a cultural entity to a brand.

    Sometimes all three factors propel brands in their push to become part of the cultural conversation.

    But if its clear what brands get out of it, a successful positioning must deliver a value exchange that works for all the parties involved: the brand, the property and the people.

    There is a dtente that has to be observed in order for everyone to come out ahead. It is a delicate balance that brands get wrong entirely too often.

    In fact like any unwelcome party guest such mistakes can be classified into one of five categories.

    9BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • We have all met them. You and your friends are having a great time when a loudmouth barges in on the conversation and wont stop talking about himself. Everyone makes a mental commitment to escape at the first opportunity, and the host is criticised for his poor handling of the guest list.

    In the UK, the Premier Leagues Newcastle United has played at its stadium, St James Park, since 1892. For the people of Newcastle, the club and the stadium were irrevocably connected. Its understandable, then, that the re-naming of the ground to the Sports Direct Arena did the brand no favours.

    It all seemed to be going so well. You met, found that you had quite a bit in common, spent a little quality time together and then nothing. S/he didnt call.

    Heres a little test for UK readers: who sponsored the FA Cup before Budweiser? Who has taken over the League Cup?

    In other markets, simply change the name of the competitions and ask yourself the same questions. Building connectivity with consumers requires long-term commitment.

    If someone is kind enough to invite you to a party, the unspoken rule is that you bring a gift (a bottle, a box of chocolates) that helps everyone have a good time and feel appreciated.

    The Olympics is an inclusive celebration of sport that should inspire and unite visitors from around the world, but Visas contribution to this party was to prevent fans from buying tickets or using ATMs unless they used a Visa card.

    The company suggested that the easiest way to obtain a Visa card is to contact your existing bank Alternately, anyone can purchase a Visa prepaid card from a Visa card issuer, which can be used immediately. Please visit the Visa website for details.

    I hope that this was effective at driving down their cost per acquisition, but what it didnt do is deliver the desired sweet spot: a positive value exchange with the fans.

    the oVerbearing bore

    the one night stand

    the tight-Fisted Party-goer

    pOINT Of vIew5 EngagEMEnts

    10 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • After alcohol has set to work on your initial party inhibitions, you decide to take to the dance floor and bust some moves. A close friend eventually points out that the other party-goers are regarding you with incredulity rather than admiration.

    Electrolux may have worked hard to activate its sponsorship of the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, but the response from most observers was ?. The fit between the worlds most glamorous film awards and the global white goods giant may have been a bridge too far.

    The opposite faux pas is being over-dressed for an event. Teaming Elizabeth Hurley and beef jerky even if its organic is another partnership that simply doesnt fit (yes, this really happened).

    You like fancy dress and your more glamorous friends said it was going to be a fun party. You arrive and discover that everyone else is dressed in rubber. You make your excuses and leave.

    The problem with popular culture is that it can be unpredictable, which causes huge problems for brand management. Whether its Tiger Woods or Kate Moss, brands need to be comfortable with not only the opportunity, but also the risks of working with figures and topics in popular culture.

    Although Cristal Champagne saw sales shoot through the roof because of its association with hip hop aristocracy, the CEOs comment that he regarded the phenomenon with curiosity led to a high-profile lambasting by Jay-Z. Know the rules before you decide to play.

    the disco-dancing dad

    the naiF

    11BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • 12 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

    ACCESSPeople who are passionate about a sport, band, game or film want access to the latest information or content 24/7. The smartphone offers this exact kind of constant connectivity: its the last thing switched off at night, the first thing checked in the morning and it is rarely more than two feet away from the owner.

    British broadcaster Sky has been a pioneer in this area with the launch of its Sky Go mobile app, enabling fans to watch sport live on their mobile devices. For the launch of the Sky Go app, MediaCom targeted sports fans using geo-targeted mobile messages to tap into fan interests when they are at their height: during the games themselves. The ability to access exclusive content at the exact moment of passion prompted five million streams among consumers in the first three weeks at launch.

    backgROuNdMObiLE

    mobile aCCess PartiCiPation soCialAccess, participation and social are core

    attributes that enable mobile to enhance

    or tap into consumer passions.

    By Stefan Bardega, Managing Partner, MediaCom

  • 13BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

    PARTiCiPATionThe mobile platform offers a way to motivate deeper, more immersive consumer participation by virtue of its ever increas-ing and often unique technological attributes.

    The features built into smartphones today includes location detection, image and video capture/distribution, social media integration, audio playback, voice recognition/control and near field communication (NFC), to name just a few. All of these services mean that participation can be not only more immediate, but also multi-sensory, resulting in a more rewarding fan experience.

    According to the Interactive Advertising Bureau, 56% of people watching the Super Bowl in the U.S. this year planned to use mobile during the game to access game stats, find information within Super Bowl apps, post game-related social media updates and photos and discuss the event live with other fans.

    SoCiAL Think about consumer passion as glue. Today, people who attend concerts, football matches or conferences connect for a short period of time, thanks to temporary geographic proximity and shared interests with other like-minded people.

    But in the future, mobile will generate connectivity long before and after events using social capabilities to connect people in the digital social space. Companies such as Zappacosta are developing smart mobile solutions that connect event wristband passes to your social profiles. Each time you enter an event or pass a kiosk, the wristband triggers an automatic message or photo push to your social profile, seamlessly connecting the real and digital worlds via mobile.

    Some believe that this kind of application underpins a consumer interest graph (as opposed to social graph), but we think its going to produce something more akin to a passion graph, with mobile at the core.PH

    ot

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    ra

    PH

    y t

    ho

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    s h

    aW

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    won't leave home without

    their smart phone.

    source: our mobile planet

    40%of consumers at concerts

    use Facebook to share their experiences.

    source: live nation

  • backgROuNdbusinEss MOdELs

    In the past, organisations that followed peoples passions were considered niche. Some werent organisations at all, really, but groups of fans and hobbyists doing some trading on the side. The Internet has changed this entire dynamic. Instead of having to choose between mass and niche, passion now has mass market potential.

    Thats what Philip Evans and Thomas Wurster argue, anyway.

    Passion is about experience, knowledge, and connoiseurship, and there are strong consumer trends which suggest these are all on the rise. One thinks of the professionalisation of the consumer world. It is no longer enough to be an expert cook; one needs to have the same knives a professional chef expects to find in the restaurant kitchen. Or consider the average cyclist, now following a professional training programme, recording training sessions via a heart monitor and uploading the data for analysis when he gets home.

    In many previously high-investment areas (think of music editing, video production), the cost of the technology needed for a professional-looking job has plummeted. The knowledge and tailoring that true expertise required used to limit reach. No more.

    The knowledgeable fan or enthusiast is the curator of

    Businesses no longer have to choose between mass market reach

    and niche market richness. They can have both, argues Andrew Curry.

    By Andrew Curry, Director, The Futures Company

    Mass Market eMotions

    a far larger museum today, with a far larger and more engaged audience. Similarly, the Internet enables businesses to reach passionate consumers far more easily: such brands are pulled into the conversation by consumers in communities of interest, rather than having to push themselves using conventional marketing.

    So hoW Do WE unDERSTAnD ThiS in TERMS oF PRoPoSiTion?One tool is a simple model that explores levels of engagement by provider and by customer.Originally created by The Futures Company for a report published by Coca-Cola, the model indicates low engagement on the part of both supplier and customer in the bottom left. This is a passion-free zone, occupied by retailers such as Poundland in the UK and other budget stores focused on piling high and selling cheap.

    The bottom right sees low engagement by the customer, but not by the provider. This is a zone of necessary but low-interest goods, provided by relatively high-engagement providers. One thinks of a supermarket such as Carrefour, for example, whose proposition is underpinned by hugely complex logistics upon which the shopper must rely.

    The passion in this quadrant usually lives behind the scenes, though it sometimes surfaces in positioning

    14 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • curators

    transactors

    friends

    paddlers

    customer engagement

    supplier engagement

    high

    low

    The internet builds opportunities for businesses able to speak the same language as fans and enthusiasts to reach them far more easily.

    statements (e.g., passionate about the freshest cauliflower) that seem like a good idea but largely pass consumers by.

    The top two zones are more interesting. The top right is the expected area for the passion-filled rich proposition, in which high-engagement providers and high-engagement customers meet in a passionate embrace. The Body Shop, LOccitane and Innocent fruit smoothies live in this category. Operating successfully in this space is expensive, but offers premium returns.

    In the top left hand zone we see a passion sleight of hand. Customers are engaged, but suppliers are not. This is the space in which online providers leverage enthusiastic communities to break the dilemma of reach and richness, offering depth and scale. An example in this category is Amazon, which first selected books not out of passion, but because they were the simplest products to source, store and ship. What Amazon has done brilliantly, however, is to build a space that has

    been colonised by enthusiasts, and it has encouraged this colonisation in the same way a gardener might design an area knowing that it will attract bees or butterflies.

    Likewise, eBay created a market where none existed before: the online equivalent of the yard sale and the flea market.

    In categories that have not been so easily leveraged, there is an opportunity for retailers beached by the Internet. Fans love access. And while every music shop

    cant have the enthusiasm of Londons iconic Rough Trade, the high street or main street retailer can break out of the mindset of logistics and stock management by moving online. Curators can thrive here, linking the knowledge and commitment that exist in both the physical and digital worlds.

    source: 1Philip evans and Thomas Wurster (1999), Blown to Bits. harvard business school Press.

    high

    low

    15BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • ARE YOU CONNECTED?

    TV is changing.

    Its no longer just about whats broadcast on TV increasingly, its about the content

    consumers select.

    Sometimes dubbed Connected TV or Smart TV, the new world of TV allows viewers to plug literally or wirelessly their new set into the Internet. It will radically change the

    way consumers use their TV and creates both opportunities and challenges for advertisers.

    MediaCom Beyond Advertising has created a short film explaining how Connected TV will allow brands to enhance the effectiveness of their branded content, create new distribution

    channels and develop true targeted advertising.

    Scan the QR Code below to view the film or go to www.mediacom.com/mediasimplified.

    Let our experts help your brands navigate the Connected TV future.

    Global: [email protected] APAC: [email protected] EMEA: [email protected]

    North America: [email protected]

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  • 18 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

    pOINT Of vIewspOnsOrship

    the Passionate shortcut

    The ambition of many sponsors is to create an emotional connection with their target audiences via a shared passion.

    Whether it be sport, music, art, fashion or causes, such shared interests is often an important part of consumers lives: something in which an individual invests time, money and emotional energy.

    Brands that can contribute to the way people enjoy their passions are in a strong position to secure positive sentiment amongst consumers. Research shows that audiences will be more receptive to brand messages from and more likely to think positively about a brand associated with their passions: especially those brands that can actively enhance the experience.

    SPonSoRShiP iS uniQuEThough elusive, brands continue to seek this magic point of engagement, given that an emotional connection is more likely to break through over more intrusive or, conversely, passive forms of advertising.

    Sponsorship marketing is unique, because it can be targeted to a specific community and deliver flexible assets that allow

    brands to create a dialogue with that target audience. Implemented correctly, sponsorship can deliver a credible and authentic message across all of the channels in which a passionate consumer engages. Those that do it well can endear themselves emotionally to that audience.

    Sponsorship assets can be used not only to deliver brand awareness, but also

    consumer-facing experiential events, product integration initiatives, point-of-sale promotions, hospitality experiences, CSR initiatives and digital content platforms.

    All these assets allow brands to deliver enhanced experiences and tangible value or benefits to the fan.

    But successful sponsorship requires sound business planning and clear objectives. A clear vision, thoughtful creative execution

    By contributing to big sporting events, brands can endear themselves to fans, says Rory Maxwell.

    By Rory Maxwell, MediaCom Sport

    and consistent brand values will help create the desired connection with consumers.

    SPonSoRShiP hAS PoWER ACRoSS SECToRSBy sponsoring teams or events, a brand can tap into the passion felt by their fans and, in turn, create passion for its own brand. As a fans relationship with, for example, a sports team develops and deepens, so

    will their feelings toward those companies associated with the team over the long term.

    Sponsorship hasnt always been given the credit it deserves, but its power is now clearly recognised.

    One of those who changed his point of view is David Wheldon, now Global Director of Brand at Vodafone Group. I certainly spent the 1980s thinking sponsorship was a waste of money a chairmans indulgence

    The strength of sponsorship is underlined by the fact that it is widely used by brands in low interest consumer categories.

  • 19BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

    incapable of driving brand engagement, brand equity or any of the other advantages I now know sponsorship can deliver. Im a total convert to sponsorship as a marketing platform, says Wheldon.

    Brands that have long known about the power of sponsorship include Red Bull. The brands strategy has been to support and create extreme sports and lifestyle activities that connect with its brand values of revitalising body and mind and increasing performance, concentration and energy levels. The brand has created an avid fan community around this lifestyle by sharing unique content with a huge, passionate audience.

    In much the same way, Coca-Colas World Cup sponsorship single-mindedly focused on footballs moment of greatest emotion: the goal. Whether reminiscing about the greatest celebrations in World Cup history, recording a World Cup celebration song or touring the FIFA World Cup around the globe, the company has fuelled fan emotion.

    Its easy to argue that Red Bull and Coke are sexy brands, but the power of sponsorship is also used by numerous brands in low-interest consumer categories.

    You cant manufacture emotion. Its already there. When you find it, just find a way to trigger it: tap into it, fuel it and watch it grow into something remarkable".

    Mark Harrison, Chair of the Canadian Sponsorship Forum

    Take npowers sponsorship of the English Football League the leagues below the Premiership and E.ON's role as a former sponsorship of the FA Cup. Both energy companies are not only using sponsorship to establish brand visibility, but to drive a greater emotional relationship with their Premiership by bringing the fans closer to the competitions that matter to them.

    The insurance sector has also been a strong player in the sponsorship industry for the same reason: to drive more brand loyalty and advocacy amongst customers by communicating with them via the emotive environment of sport.

    On an even more high-profile level, P&G's global Olympic Sponsorship as an IOC partner, which commenced with the 2012

    London games, illustrates the power that the company feels a movement like the Olympics can bring to its brands, many of which could be classified as low-interest FMCG products.

    In particular, P&G has used the Olympic spirit to tell a moving story aimed at engaging a powerful audience: mums of Olympic athletes.

    Perhaps the case for sponsorship is best made by those who seek to undermine it. Many brands try to ride on the coattails of official sponsors with ambush techniques: if sponsorship was ineffective, would these brands work so hard to replicate sponsorships effects?

    'Best JoB' P&G London 2012

    Olympic Games Film

  • LiFE LEssOns FrOM an

    Enduring iCOn

    sTORyLiFE LEssOns

    MEDIACOM - BLINK #520

  • 21BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • The closing ceremony of the London Olympic Games featured an unmistakably Brazilian twist. To mark the symbolic passing of the Games from London 2012 to Rio 2016, the stage was suddenly awash with vibrant colour, spectacular dancers and pounding samba drums.

    And while that was enough to get the sell-out crowd whooping with excitement, it was the emergence of a certain 71-year-old man that truly sent the 80,000 in the stands into a frenzy.

    Thats because the 71-year-old in question was Edson Arantes do Nascimento, better known as Pel, Brazils favourite son and the King of Soccer. Even the least ardent football fan can understand the scale of Pels accomplishments: the youngest-ever winner of a World Cup, the only player to win the trophy three times and the only footballer to score more than 1,200 professional goals. FIFA has named him Footballer of the Century, and he is the International Olympic Committees Athlete of the Century.

    Pel is a rare breed: one of the worlds last living icons whose timeless story still inspires people across the globe. Fifty-four years after helping Brazil win the World Cup, hes still able to draw crowds of screaming fans and pick up honorary degrees from universities hes never attended: mostly for what hes doing today, not his past achievements.

    Not bad for a commercial superstar whose family was so poor that as a child he had

    While most ageing icons eventually fade from view, Pel remains at the centre of it all:

    an influential, universally recognised and respected personality around the world.

    How has this enduring legend thrived in todays I want it now culture, and what

    can marketers learn from him?

    By Erich Beting

    Photography by Tinko Czetwertynski

    to play football with a ball of bundled socks and string.

    When the BLINK team met Pel at the Hotel Unique in So Paulo, it became clear that passion is the key to his enduring appeal. We asked him to share his advice on staying relevant at a time when attention is short-lived and fads are abundant.

    LESSon #1: BE kinD AnD RESPECT EvERyonE When you meet him in person, the one thing that stands out about Pel is his star power. But despite being a sporting legend for more than half a century, the man is also remarkably humble, emanating an easy-going charm and openness that puts everyone around him at ease.

    Indeed, before we start our interview, Pel is more than happy to chat with our crew about the teams they support and ask for their thoughts on the latest developments in international football.

    He is also keen to be part of the group. Upon seeing the huge throne that we had prepared, he quietly asks: Do you have a smaller chair? Because this one is too big

    Pel knows how far a throne is from his impoverished beginnings in the district of Trs Coraes, Brazil.

    As a child, Pel found joy and escape in football and became dedicated to the game. As he grew older, he was the one who practiced while others went to the beach. Since I was young, I knew that I needed to stay in good shape to be a good player, he says.

    Pel credits his father as being a big influence on his approach to the game, making sure the young player combined his competitiveness and excellence with compassion.

    "I used to play football with the kids on the street, and my father used to watch. Once, I played some tricks on some kids, and my father told me, 'Listen, this is not good. The gift you have to play football is a gift from

    God. Don't tease the kids. You must teach and help them. You won't become anything if you are not a nice person'".

    LESSon #2: DonT Think youRE ThE BESTPels attitude toward his gift, his teammates and even members of competing teams quickly won him lifetime fans around the world.

    Football, he argues, is a global game because it can be played by anyone. What makes football so special? he asks. It is

    Sporting Legend, Cultural Icon & Passionate Humanitarian

    sTORyLiFE LEssOns

    Life Lessons from an enduring icon

    22 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • why Pel? why now? Pel is the most famous and most successful

    footballer of all time. His skills have amazed the

    world, his story has inspired generations and his

    fame transcends cultures.

    But Pel is more than just an incredible

    footballer; he is also a humanitarian and an icon

    of cool. He is an exemplary spokesperson for

    Brazil, a role model for kids and a tireless social

    campaigner. He has the kind of wide-ranging

    appeal that few can touch.

    now, when all eyes are turning to Brazil the

    worlds sixth largest economy and host of

    the Confederations Cup in 2013, the World

    Cup in 2014 and the olympics in 2016 Pel

    is more relevant than ever. as brands look for

    ways to activate sponsorship deals in the lead

    up to this busy time, its difficult to think of a

    better spokesperson.

    MediaCom sport is proud to announce

    its partnership with legends 10, Pels

    exclusive global agent. this partnership offers

    MediaComs new and current clients exclusive

    access to a legendary, global superstar and

    most importantly a unique opportunity to

    enhance future marketing strategies.

    Marcus JohnGlobal Head of MediaCom Sport

    23BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • In 1967, both sides of Nigerias civil war declared a two-day truce so they could watch him play in Lagos

    a pastime for everyone. It doesnt matter if you are small, strong, fat everyone can play football. You have the pros, but its a game everyone can play.

    Pel was intensely aware of this, and worked on his fitness when many others thought he would ride on his glory. Thats another lesson that I learned from my father. God gave me the gift to play good football, but if Im not in good shape, I will fail, he says.

    Pel continues to apply this philosophy in his business dealings today. You can use this for sport or for business; I think its the same. First of all, respect people. Secondly,

    dont think you are the best, because if you do, then you start to lose. This is the same for any condition, any profession, he says.

    Lesson #3: Keep a cLear eye on what you reaLLy care about By the 1970s, Pel was officially retired and thought hed stay that way. Then he got an offer he couldnt refuse: come back to help get football noticed in the U.S. To Pel, this wasnt about playing again it was about his tremendous desire to bring more young people to football.

    Having never played football outside Brazil in his entire life, Pel signed with the New York Cosmos in 1975 and helped raise the games profile in a country where it had previously been all but ignored.

    Fundamentally, the secret of Pels long success on and off the pitch has been to make choices based on what he believes is truly important. Indeed, conscious of his position as a role model, Pel looks for commercial opportunities that allow him to engage younger generations.

    "I always think that, if I stay as an example to young people, that will be good. A lot of players think only about how they can make money right now. I think that this is my example, to encourage the next generation."

    Lesson #4: remember where you came from Even while playing professionally, Pel used his celebrity to draw attention to global issues, keeping his focus on those efforts that could affect real change. As an active player for Brazils professional team, Santos Futebol Club, his star appeal was so powerful that it triggered a two-day truce in Nigerias civil war. Fighters on

    both sides agreed that there was nothing more important than watching Pel play in Lagos.

    Today, Pel tirelessly directs his passion to charity work, inspiring others by demonstrating the power of individual potential and displaying an infectious optimism.

    Pel was appointed as UN ambassador for ecology and the environment in 1992 and has worked as a UNICEF Goodwill ambassador since 1995. He also helped pass legislation in Brazil, intended to reduce corruption in Brazilian football. The law became known as Pel Law. Earlier this year, British Prime Minister David Cameron asked him to help promote the international campaign, Race Against Hunger.

    Pel is equally passionate about promoting his home country at a time when it will soon host the biggest sporting events on earth: the Confederations Cup in 2013, the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016.

    "I worked for the World Cup Committee in 1994, 2002 and 2010 in other countries. Now, it is time to do something for my country I have to do something! These events are very important for the country. The next four years will be important in changing people's perception of Brazil."

    Pels work will focus on promoting what Brazil, the worlds sixth largest economy, can achieve. "Brazil was always the best on the field, but now we must show that we are also the best off the field ," he says.

    Lesson #5: Do gooD now. Dont be satisfieD with past achievements Certainly the next few years will create a vibrant legacy for Brazil, but for Pel the future is about what he can do now. He explains clearly that he would prefer to be remembered for his role in changing lives, not just for his sporting achievements.

    The future is now. What you do now for the future is the best thing, he says. Remember me not as a great player but as a human being and for what I have tried to do for future generations.

    After our interview, Pel thanked everyone for their time, making a point of shaking hands with everyone in the room. Its only a small gesture, but one that sums up the man perfectly.

    For all the cups and medals he has won on the football pitch, Pel is still the kid who grew up in Trs Coraes, playing with a ball made of bundled socks tied with string.

    storyLife Lessons

    24 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • on ThE WiDE APPEAL oF FooTBALL[it] is a pastime for everyone. it doesnt

    matter if you are small, strong, fat

    everyone can play football. you have the

    pros but its a game everyone can play.

    on CELEBRiTy AnD huBRiSthe future is now. What you do now for

    the future is the best thing. remember

    me not as a great player but as a human

    being and for what i have tried to do for

    future generations.

    on BRAZiL"i want to help my country off the field.

    i worked for the World Cup Committee

    in 1994, 2002 and 2010. now it will be

    in my country i have to do something.

    We take this very seriously and have to

    work very hard to deliver."

    on MoDESTy"i used to play football with the kids on

    the street, and my father used to watch.

    once, i played some tricks on some

    kids, and my father told me, 'listen, this

    is not good. the gift you have to play

    football is a gift from God. Don't tease

    the kids. you must teach and help them.

    you won't become anything if you are

    not a nice person.'"

    Pel in his own words

    25BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • 1940 1958 1975 19781962 1970

    1956 1961 1969 1972 1977

    Born in trs Coraes, Brazil

    Becomes the youngest ever World Cup winner at age 17

    Helps Brazil win their second World Cup

    Helps Brazil win their third World Cup

    Emerges from retirement to play for the new york Cosmos in the nasl (north american soccer league)

    Joins the football club santos, becomimg the youngest player to join Brazils First Division and the league's top scorer

    Declared a "non-exportable national treasure" by the Brazilian government

    scores his 1,000th goal

    Plays final game for santos

    Plays his final career match on 1 october at Giants stadium in nyC

    receives the international Peace award

    sTORyLiFE LEssOns

    26 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • 1995 20051981 20121995 1999

    1992 1995 1997 2000 2011

    named Extraordinary Minister for sports, Brazil

    awarded Brazils Gold Medal for outstanding services to sport

    named athlete of the Century by the international olympic Committee and reuters news agency

    receives lifetime achievement award from the BBC

    l'Equipe names him athlete of the Century

    awarded an honorary degree from university of Edinburgh

    appointed un ambassador for ecology and the environment

    appointedunEsCo Goodwill ambassador

    receives honorary Knight Commander of the order of the British Empire

    received honour of FiFa Player of the Century (shared with Maradona)

    named Brazil ambassador for 2014 World Cup

    represented Brazil in olympics closing ceremonies and welcomes the world to rio 2016

    27BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • MEDIACOM - BLINK #528

    INfOgRaphIcspOnsOrship 2010

    Deals by category (% oF rePorted deals)

    6%

    cult

    ure

    5%

    broa

    dcas

    t

    84%spo

    rts

    arts

    &

    3%

    righ

    ts

    nami

    ng

    2%ot

    her

    WO

    RLD

    W IDE S PEN

    D$46.3 bn

    the

    valu

    e of sponsor

    ship

    highest paiD athletes, 2011

    kobebryant

    53M

    lebronjames48M

    sponsoreD inDustries

    beer

    telecom

    98 deals wiTh a value of $1 bn

    clothing98 deals wiTh a value

    of $1.568 bn

    automotive194 deals wiTh a value

    of $958 million

    108 deals wiTh a value of

    $718 million

  • 29BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

    ForMula 131

    soccer2

    aMericanFootball

    Most iMortant factorsWhen choosing particular

    sports properties

    most SPONSORED

    sports

    connection with athletes

    global reach

    online reach

    csr/coMMunity reach

    27% 27%

    38% 9%

    north aMerica

    latin aMerica

    asiaPaciFic othereuroPe

    SouRCES: Forbes.com, sports business 2012 sponsors survey, TWsM 2010 Annual review / iFM sports Marketing surveys, TWsM 2012, ieG sponsorship Report, 4 Jan 2011

  • 30 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

    Q&abrand phiLOsOphy

  • MATT MEE: What does a brand mean to a philosopher?

    vincenT hendricks: To me, brands are signal exchanges between a company and a designated part of the public.

    Basically, branding is a signaling game; if you use a Mac, you are creative, successful and a free thinker; if you drive a luxury auto, you are successful in business and perhaps in your personal life, and so on.

    These signals can be very strong. What Apple is also selling is a lifestyle, or the impression of a particular kind of

    lifestyle. And that goes for many other well-established brands, as well.

    No brand wants to come across as being unattractive. So you tell a story, establish a narrative and frame a message in such a way that you hope has public appeal.

    MATT: So while social media lets us pretend that were all individuals, the role of brands as social currency undermines that?

    vincenT: People seem more narcissistic now than they ever were, and social media plays a crucial role here. Everybody wants to present themselves as being original,

    the PhilosoPhy oF brandsHow would a philosopher deal with the brand challenges that marketers

    face every day? Matt Mee, European Strategy Director at MediaCom asks

    Vincent F. Hendricks, Professor of Formal Philosophy at the University of

    Copenhagen, about brand ambition and the need for a broader agenda.

    By Matthew Mee, Strategy Director, MediaCom EMEAIllustration by Adam Hayes

    unique, fulfilling their own individually defined goals, being attractive and interesting, etc., and social media comes in handy for boosting these kind of signals.

    But at the same time, everybody is subscribing to or converging on the same values. We have never been so alike in our actions and decisions. Everybody wants a Burberry, Mac or a Gaggenau kitchen. But why?

    It all comes back to the signaling game. If success is presumed to be expressed by buying a new car, then in order for me to show everyone that I am successful, I have

    31BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • Vincent F. Hendricks is Professor of Formal Philosophy at the university of Copenhagen, Denmark, Elite

    researcher of the Danish state. He is the author of many books, among them Mainstream and Formal Epistemology (Cambridge university Press 2007), Thought2Talk (automatic Press/ViP 2007) and The Convergence of Scientific knowledge (springer 2001).

    He is also the author and editor of numerous other papers and books, and is Editor-in-Chief of synthese

    and synthese library.

    vinCent F. HEnDriCKs

    to acquire the signal itself. Its like with currency: I only accept the currency that everyone else has agreed upon and accepts. Its unequivocally demonstrating my success, so everybody feels uniquely successful, and yet everybody is the same because thats how the signaling game works. Brands are in the business of signaling success.

    MATT: So a successful brand is one that attempts to emulate or deliver those signals, to the point where it becomes a kind of societal norm?

    vincenT: Thats right, but many brands dont quite get that far. For the ones who do, the signal value is massive.

    MATT: At the crux of what youre saying is that brands need to create signaling effects. How do they do that?

    vincenT: The majority of firms are in the business of making money. Thats fine, but I would like companies to be more ambitious than that. They need to support things that are important to society, like properly formatted and presented information: information that could be used for decision-making.

    The financial crisis has shown us that when people get the wrong kind of information, they may make terrible decisions, get caught in bubbles, lemming effects, echo-chambers and so forth.

    Brands need more ambitious agendas that we value in this world. Wouldnt it be something to see a fragrance brand sponsor peacekeeping missions in the Middle East? A global societal ambition for an otherwise vanity-driven business: now thats novel and innovative!

    LonG-TERM CoMMiTMEnT nEEDEDMATT: How can this happen in a world in which corporations are becoming increasingly short-term in terms of their outlook?

    vincenT: Substantial ideologies are never implemented overnight. You have

    32 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • Matthew Mee is Head of Freshness and strategy for MediaCom EMEa. He is a sought after global

    speaker, and has written numerous articles including the age of Dialogue. Matt is based in london

    and holds a degree in English literature and drama.

    mattheW MEE

    to change peoples mindsets, you probably have to change some of their value set, outlook, perception, incentives and so on. There are many preconditions to making such a change work, but its not impossible. Most branding needs to be short-term: you want to get people right here and right now, but that need mustnt preclude longer-term ambitions.

    Theres a sort of prisoners dilemma with these things: if everybody is out to maximise utility for themselves, then everyone may experience a suboptimal outcome. No country in the world is going to be able to solve the climate crisis alone. No country in the world is going to be

    able to solve the financial crisis alone. No company can make a global social difference alone. These fundamental problems can only be solved if we all move and work together.

    Obviously, there has been a lot of conversation about the duties of commercial organisations to pursue an agenda of positive social consequence, and the need for their foundations to be moral or ethically correct. But corporate social responsibility should not merely be a point on the company agenda it has to be an ambitious societal agenda.

    MATT: Ultimately, what youre saying is that too many brands have been pushing the status quo in the short-term, without really looking at whats coming around the corner or acknowledging problems that require long-term collective action.

    vincenT: Each behaves as if its the maintenance guy, which is fine. But maintenance does not mean progression for the better: maintenance means maintenance. If your brand wants to be more influential, you need to have an ambition worth something. Thats innovative. Ambitious brands produce what consumers dont expect, not just more of what they do.

    Q&abrand phiLOsOphy

    33BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • pOINT Of vIewgrEat CasEs

    The hearT of The maTTerThere are lessons to be learned from brands that have looked to entertain.

    Kate Rowlinson highlights campaigns that have embraced consumer passions.

    By Kate Rowlinson, New Business and Marketing Director, MediaCom EMEA

    Hey man, my lawyer wants me to sell sneakers, and I looked at him straight and I said to him, F--- sneakers, lets sell speakers, and he said, Oh man, that sounds right.

    This was an exchange between Dr. Dre and his business partner and CEO of Interscope Records, Jimmy Iovine. The exchange led to the creation of Beats by Dr. Dre audio equipment for the hip hop connoisseur. Beats creates products which allow the music aficionado to listen to music as the artist intended: products that afford the discerning listener the real fan access to the nuances of recorded music: the studio licks and tricks that go unnoticed with lesser equipment.

    This verbal exchange between Dre and Iovine took seconds. The company now claims revenues in excess of $500m.

    As examples of tapping into passion points go, this is a pretty good one. A record company executive and an artist create a product line which extends and deepens the

    relationship consumers have with both of them. Beats by Dr. Dre on Facebook has 2.8 million likes and 118,306 people are talking about it right now.

    It may be easy to drive a deeper connection with music fans when youre already in the music business, but Dre has tapped into an audience far beyond his own fan base, and Universal, Interscopes parent, is reaping the rewards, the acclaim and the credibility.

    Beats by Dr. Dre is one small part of the bigger journey that has transformed Universal Music from a record company to a music company: a transition that is in full swing. In 2001, record sales accounted for almost 100% of Universals business. In 2011, a growing and meaningful percentage of income comes from ancillary, non-recorded music revenue streams, with most artist deals now including some additional rights. Not bad for a company and industry allegedly unable to adapt.

    And as a passion point of choice for brands, sport and music tend to top the bill sport actually accounts for 87% of global sponsorship deals, according to a recent TWSM report. Not surprising when you consider that sport and music offer up two of the most emotional experiences you can have as a human being, be it as a participant or spectator. At the recent Cannes Lions festival, there was an array of award entries from brands forging links with both sport and music. In fact, there was a whole sub-category devoted to the best use or integration of music.

    DoES iT SELL?ASOS has tapped into the current passion for street dance, its insight being that young guys take their style cues from this scene rather than fashion experts. It produced a film in which amazing dancers performed wearing ASOS clothes: the neat trick being that you could click and order the clothes directly from the video.

    Beats by Dr. Dre has extended Interscope Records and Dr. Dres

    relationship with the fans.

    34 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • Hyundai did something entirely different with music in scale and ambition. Project Re:generation is a bold undertaking from Hyundai in the US for its Veloster model. The Veloster is on a mission to target the creative class. Its not entirely clear why this car will appeal to the creative class (I always thought they liked vintage Mercedes), but it might be something to do with its hybrid ability to combine the style of a coupe with the functionality of a hatchback.

    Hyundai invited five famous DJs, one of whom was Mark Ronson, to recreate and reimagine five traditional styles of music, from classical to New Orleans Jazz. This resulted in a feature-length documentary that premiered at the SXSW Film Festival. Hyundai also secured a partnership with the Grammys, an endorsement in Rolling Stone and live performances on Letterman and a raft of other chat shows and, ultimately, at Coachella. So far, so credible. In terms of an entertainment property which spoke to and earned the admiration of hardcore music fans, Project Re:generation was an unmitigated success. According to its creators, the film will earn $130m dollars in advertising inventory alone from broadcast and digital streaming.

    Absent from the conversation, the promotional literature and the award entry, however, is any mention of Veloster sales. Did the huge effort drive business for Hyundai? The lesson from Project Re:generation must surely be the importance of ensuring that your passion-focused efforts sell stuff.

    Be Brave. aim high!The sport association that stuck out for me at Cannes was the South African Breweries Grand Prix winner, showcasing how Carling Black Label persuaded South African football to agree to let fans create and manage its professional teams via Facebook. Ridiculously brave in its scope, this partnership saw football fans deciding on the team roster and voting for live substitutions via their mobile phones during the game. More than 10.5 million votes were submitted. The message from Carling Black Label is: be brave, aim high!

    Deep Consumer insightMajestic Wine, the UK wine retailer, wanted to position itself to a broad audience as an accessible, unintimidating purveyor of wines. But how would it do this on a relatively low budget and in the most impactful and meaningful way?

    MediaCom unearthed a deep consumer insight that conversations about wine tend to start with food. This consumer truth led to the development of the Perfect Pairings strategy, which provided Majestic Wine suggestions alongside recipes, food articles

    and programmes at a time when consumers are thinking about their favourite food or planning a meal.

    This association has been successful for a client relatively new to above-the-line advertising, with consumer research showing uplifts in spontaneous brand awareness and well above-average responses on key brand metrics such as good at recommending the right wine for you.

    There is some extraordinarily good work going on across the globe right now, which roots brands firmly in the arena of peoples loves and passions. Its fair to say, though, that there is a major congregation around two big passion points and with 87% of global spend in sport this comes with a hefty price tag. So what of other passions and ways into them?

    Let one passion Drive anotherLauren Luke famously built a business and career by posting how to make-up videos on YouTube. Part of the genius behind Laurens posts was that she targeted her audiences passions and interests in order to maximise viewing levels. If she knew that teens would be searching for the latest Britney Spears video, she would do a Britney look and tag her films so they turned up in searches for Britney.

    Targeting people by their interests is nothing new, but data and the Internet will

    increasingly allow us to target big, expensive passion points through cheaper ones, a bit like Lauren did. Converse recently targeted teenage boys super cheaply by paying very little money for hugely voluminous search terms such as how to kiss a girl. The searches led to mini-Converse content initiatives, hence using one passion to drive to another.

    Whatever a BranD Does arounD a passion point, some simpLe truths remain: 1. Make sure it sells stuff 2. Be brave, aim high and 3. Make sure there is real consumer insight at the heart of it.

    35BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • HARDtalk is the flagship programme on BBC World News that asks the difficult questions. In this special series of interviews for Blink, Stephen Sackur, one of the BBCs most respected journalists, adapts the same uncompromising style with moguls and figureheads shaping the worlds of advertising, sales and media. This issue, Stephen goes head to head with Martin Lindstrom a brand marketing consultant and the author of Buyology and Brandwashed. He is the founding partner and chairman of the board of Buyology Inc, a strategic marketing company, and director of the London-based BRAND Sense Agency.

    Martin Lindstrom

    Advertising feature sponsored by BBC World News.BBC WORLD NEWS is a trademark of the British Broadcasting Corporation, BBC 1996.

    to relax a little bit more and we let our guard down. And I think thats the reality for any consumer is that they will read an article like this and say I have to be more careful now. And then we relax. We need a constant reminder and if thats not happening then we just go back to scratch again.

    SS: Youve described in detail how businesses now use neuroscience to get deep inside peoples brains to understand how best to access their most basic instincts. Youve described how companies reach out to the youngest of children to implant messages that become important later in their lives when they get cravings and desires for particular brands. How much further can all of this very manipulative work and science go?

    ML: Much, much further. But I think there are two questions how much further can it go and how much further will it go? I think the will part realistically will be dependent on the reactions of society and what individuals ethically are comfortable with. From the neuroscience point of view, we will see a steady evolution - that whole area will definitely start to explode over the next couple of years. On the other hand as consumers get more clever then the marketing community will become more clever and you will have a game of cat and mouse . But I do think we will get to stage where you can predict many of the steps that consumers will make before they are aware of them from a conscious point of view. Which in turn will mean that in principle consumers will become more vulnerable and at that stage there are some serious decisions to be made from an ethical point of view, from governments point of view and from the individual consumers point of view.

    SS: Is that a world that you want to live in - that you are happy to live in? Because to me it sounds thoroughly frightening.

    ML: No, not necessarily. I think thats the reason I decided it was a good time to write a book about this. I wanted to make a black and white statement in order to create a more direct debate between consumers and companies. Thats not because Im going against companies, because Im not Im still working for companies but it does give me some sort of good ammunition to start a debate internally within companies and make a change from the inside.

    SS: Let me mention this term youve coined this idea of Brandwashed. It seems to me that youve devoted a considerable portion of your life to helping the consumer become Brandwashed - steeped in brands from the earliest age even from in the womb you suggest are you in some senses now feeling guilty about the world youve helped to create?

    ML: Yes. I think it comes back to the fact that Im just as much of a consumer as a marketing guy. And I love to build brands I find it fascinating. And in many cases I think it can be incredibly rewarding, not just money wise but rewarding in the sense of giving people a sense of choice and credibility. But the reality is, that in the world now where companies are desperate to increase share prices and sell even more, they become too desperate. The reason why I wanted to write Brandwashed was mainly to say to them fine, we all love brands but you go too far right now and you forget that at the end of the day you are consumers too and that means that whatever you do to consumers, you are actually hurting yourself as an individual as well. So mainly what Im trying to say in this book is to get companies to wake up and start to realise that if they go too far now, the consequences could be so dramatic that it could tear down their brand. So they have a period of time now where they have to get their house in order, in terms of their ethical code and in terms of privacy. A lot of companies today have not realised that they are living on very dangerous ground.

    SS: You say in your book at times you are disturbed by the psychological tricks used by companies to sell their brands. I just wondered specifically what are you disturbed by right now?

    ML: Just to give you one example, Im sure youre aware of something called the super cookie? The cookie, as you know, stores information about us but the super cookie is a programming code that is stored and placed on our hard discs which is engineered in order that consumers are not able to find it. It recovers all the data of where we went to and what we did online and sells it to third parties. All the advertisers that are signed up have more information about the consumers so they can make things more targeted. What some of us are realising is that all of this data obtained by the super cookie has never really ticked the right legal boxes. And this is going so far that they will be able to tell what websites you went to before and what it means for the products they want to promote to you right now, and were starting to get into a very blurry field. And that makes me feel incredibly uncomfortable because what it means is that consumers have no way to get out of this. So what I tend to say to companies, because dont forget Im a marketing guy, is that its fine to take information about consumers but give the consumer the option to see what information you have gathered about them and give them the option to delete it, or at least to see the benefits if they decide to let the company use those details. But dont do what many companies are doing, which is to keep the data and not tell the consumer.

    What some of us are realising is that all of this data obtained by the super cookie has never really ticked the right legal boxes.

    I think that fear in the marketing community will start to be prominent because so many people will be against a brand that the most clever marketers will say I dont dare do this anymore.

    HARDtalk presenter, Stephen Sackur

    SS: Why should we trust business to be responsible with the data they are collecting about us that we are not even aware they are collecting?

    ML: I dont think we should trust them right now and thats the problem because we are in the transformation phase where its not self-regulating. I think we are stuck in a limbo between government regulation and marketing guidelines; and self-regulating laws that have been established by the industry. And then you have the third type of regulation the consumer regulated law. I think what will happen in the future most likely is that we will move away from government regulation and move towards more consumer-regulated activities; where consumers increasingly stand up and say hey this is not right Im going against a brand. Brands are incredibly sensitive so that the fact that consumers might stick together and go against a brand is probably the worst thing that can happen for them. I also think we will see a Wikileaks in the future a Wikileaks for brands. It will see independent organisations either established by competition or established by independent parties that have an interest in this where they would share the type of information that companies have about consumers. I think we will see that more and more. I think that fear in the marketing community will start to be prominent because so many people will be against a brand that the most clever marketers will say I dont dare do this anymore. And I also think that we will need to see ethics included in the training of those marketing guys, me included no one has learnt about it.

    SS: On a personal level, how careful are you now about the way you consume, the way you use the internet and the way you react to some of the multinational corporations that have given you a very good living over the years?

    ML: Im slightly schizophrenic whenever I buy stuff because on one hand, I really like brands. And then I have this internal fight with myself thinking that trick theyre using there is probably going too far. Sometimes when it goes too far I step out of it and think thats too ridiculous. I am more cautious online because I do know that most of the stuff we do online is more easy to track than a person can know. But weve become pretty lazy as consumers. Weve become so lazy that maybe well be aware of an alert for half a year, but then everyone else starts

    Martin Lindstrom conversation with HARDtalk presenter Stephen Sackur, 19th June 2012

    For further information on advertising and sponsorship on BBC World News and bbc.com please call +44 208 433 0000 or e-mail [email protected]

  • HARDtalk is the flagship programme on BBC World News that asks the difficult questions. In this special series of interviews for Blink, Stephen Sackur, one of the BBCs most respected journalists, adapts the same uncompromising style with moguls and figureheads shaping the worlds of advertising, sales and media. This issue, Stephen goes head to head with Martin Lindstrom a brand marketing consultant and the author of Buyology and Brandwashed. He is the founding partner and chairman of the board of Buyology Inc, a strategic marketing company, and director of the London-based BRAND Sense Agency.

    Martin Lindstrom

    Advertising feature sponsored by BBC World News.BBC WORLD NEWS is a trademark of the British Broadcasting Corporation, BBC 1996.

    to relax a little bit more and we let our guard down. And I think thats the reality for any consumer is that they will read an article like this and say I have to be more careful now. And then we relax. We need a constant reminder and if thats not happening then we just go back to scratch again.

    SS: Youve described in detail how businesses now use neuroscience to get deep inside peoples brains to understand how best to access their most basic instincts. Youve described how companies reach out to the youngest of children to implant messages that become important later in their lives when they get cravings and desires for particular brands. How much further can all of this very manipulative work and science go?

    ML: Much, much further. But I think there are two questions how much further can it go and how much further will it go? I think the will part realistically will be dependent on the reactions of society and what individuals ethically are comfortable with. From the neuroscience point of view, we will see a steady evolution - that whole area will definitely start to explode over the next couple of years. On the other hand as consumers get more clever then the marketing community will become more clever and you will have a game of cat and mouse . But I do think we will get to stage where you can predict many of the steps that consumers will make before they are aware of them from a conscious point of view. Which in turn will mean that in principle consumers will become more vulnerable and at that stage there are some serious decisions to be made from an ethical point of view, from governments point of view and from the individual consumers point of view.

    SS: Is that a world that you want to live in - that you are happy to live in? Because to me it sounds thoroughly frightening.

    ML: No, not necessarily. I think thats the reason I decided it was a good time to write a book about this. I wanted to make a black and white statement in order to create a more direct debate between consumers and companies. Thats not because Im going against companies, because Im not Im still working for companies but it does give me some sort of good ammunition to start a debate internally within companies and make a change from the inside.

    SS: Let me mention this term youve coined this idea of Brandwashed. It seems to me that youve devoted a considerable portion of your life to helping the consumer become Brandwashed - steeped in brands from the earliest age even from in the womb you suggest are you in some senses now feeling guilty about the world youve helped to create?

    ML: Yes. I think it comes back to the fact that Im just as much of a consumer as a marketing guy. And I love to build brands I find it fascinating. And in many cases I think it can be incredibly rewarding, not just money wise but rewarding in the sense of giving people a sense of choice and credibility. But the reality is, that in the world now where companies are desperate to increase share prices and sell even more, they become too desperate. The reason why I wanted to write Brandwashed was mainly to say to them fine, we all love brands but you go too far right now and you forget that at the end of the day you are consumers too and that means that whatever you do to consumers, you are actually hurting yourself as an individual as well. So mainly what Im trying to say in this book is to get companies to wake up and start to realise that if they go too far now, the consequences could be so dramatic that it could tear down their brand. So they have a period of time now where they have to get their house in order, in terms of their ethical code and in terms of privacy. A lot of companies today have not realised that they are living on very dangerous ground.

    SS: You say in your book at times you are disturbed by the psychological tricks used by companies to sell their brands. I just wondered specifically what are you disturbed by right now?

    ML: Just to give you one example, Im sure youre aware of something called the super cookie? The cookie, as you know, stores information about us but the super cookie is a programming code that is stored and placed on our hard discs which is engineered in order that consumers are not able to find it. It recovers all the data of where we went to and what we did online and sells it to third parties. All the advertisers that are signed up have more information about the consumers so they can make things more targeted. What some of us are realising is that all of this data obtained by the super cookie has never really ticked the right legal boxes. And this is going so far that they will be able to tell what websites you went to before and what it means for the products they want to promote to you right now, and were starting to get into a very blurry field. And that makes me feel incredibly uncomfortable because what it means is that consumers have no way to get out of this. So what I tend to say to companies, because dont forget Im a marketing guy, is that its fine to take information about consumers but give the consumer the option to see what information you have gathered about them and give them the option to delete it, or at least to see the benefits if they decide to let the company use those details. But dont do what many companies are doing, which is to keep the data and not tell the consumer.

    What some of us are realising is that all of this data obtained by the super cookie has never really ticked the right legal boxes.

    I think that fear in the marketing community will start to be prominent because so many people will be against a brand that the most clever marketers will say I dont dare do this anymore.

    HARDtalk presenter, Stephen Sackur

    SS: Why should we trust business to be responsible with the data they are collecting about us that we are not even aware they are collecting?

    ML: I dont think we should trust them right now and thats the problem because we are in the transformation phase where its not self-regulating. I think we are stuck in a limbo between government regulation and marketing guidelines; and self-regulating laws that have been established by the industry. And then you have the third type of regulation the consumer regulated law. I think what will happen in the future most likely is that we will move away from government regulation and move towards more consumer-regulated activities; where consumers increasingly stand up and say hey this is not right Im going against a brand. Brands are incredibly sensitive so that the fact that consumers might stick together and go against a brand is probably the worst thing that can happen for them. I also think we will see a Wikileaks in the future a Wikileaks for brands. It will see independent organisations either established by competition or established by independent parties that have an interest in this where they would share the type of information that companies have about consumers. I think we will see that more and more. I think that fear in the marketing community will start to be prominent because so many people will be against a brand that the most clever marketers will say I dont dare do this anymore. And I also think that we will need to see ethics included in the training of those marketing guys, me included no one has learnt about it.

    SS: On a personal level, how careful are you now about the way you consume, the way you use the internet and the way you react to some of the multinational corporations that have given you a very good living over the years?

    ML: Im slightly schizophrenic whenever I buy stuff because on one hand, I really like brands. And then I have this internal fight with myself thinking that trick theyre using there is probably going too far. Sometimes when it goes too far I step out of it and think thats too ridiculous. I am more cautious online because I do know that most of the stuff we do online is more easy to track than a person can know. But weve become pretty lazy as consumers. Weve become so lazy that maybe well be aware of an alert for half a year, but then everyone else starts

    Martin Lindstrom conversation with HARDtalk presenter Stephen Sackur, 19th June 2012

    For further information on advertising and sponsorship on BBC World News and bbc.com please call +44 208 433 0000 or e-mail [email protected]

  • In addition to the success for our client, the campaign has won internationally- recognised creative awards from The Global Festival of Media and Cannes Lions.

    We found two clear insights that helped us identify and connect with a new target audience for NERF. First, we realised that toy blasters were perfect for young men who hadnt really grown up.

    Second, we knew that young men just start-ing their working lives could find sitting at a computer screen frustrating. They needed to let off steam.

    This led to our solution: Office Wars five minutes of great fun before getting back to some serious hard work.

    hoW WE ConQuERED ThE nEW TARGET GRouP We identified Stromberg the German equivalent of The Office in the US as the must-watch primetime show for our target. The fifth season was in production after a two-year break, and the anticipation was massive.

    In close collaboration with the production house Brainpool, we embedded the NERF Blasters into the entire series. We kicked off a national craze for office warfare and started a

    new passion. The key to success was to ensure that the connection between the NERF Blaster and the show was seamless. Our savvy audi-ence would see through anything inauthentic.The next step was to use search, partnerships and social media to turn this engagement with the product on-screen into sales. We supported each episode with a smart search strategy, driving consumers to Amazon to buy the Blasters from Stromberg during and after each broadcast. We also sold NERF Blasters via the official Stromberg shop, reinforcing that they were a real part of the show.

    Finally, we connected via a Facebook page where 500,000 fans got a message from the main character himself, Bernd Stromberg, who said he didnt want his staff fighting anymore, so fans should try to win the Blasters from the show.

    inTERnATionALLy RECoGniSED SuCCESS CASE We not only earned massive social buzz and free media coverage, but also doubled the sales on Amazon in the the all-important pre-Christmas season.

    casesOFFiCE Wars

    NERF Blasters are colourful toys that fire foam darts or disks, but this type of play

    is not always seen as appropriate for German children. How do we sell them?

    By Markus Groweischede, Marketing Director, Hasbro Deutschland GmbH

    and Matthias Hoeppner, Group Head, MediaCom Beyond Advertising, Germany

    Working for our branded play

    division, we at Hasbro feel greatly

    honoured and encouraged by

    the Lions to continue to deliver

    immersive brand experiences to

    our consumers anytime and

    anywhere.

    Markus Grossweischede, Marketing Director, hasbro Germany

    office warsHelping germany Have fun at work

    38 MEDIACOM - BLINK #5

  • Loewe is a premium brand within the competitive and price-focused Hi-Fi TV category. Since 2003, Loewe has managed to strengthen its premium position by owning a list of very clear and unique brand values: minimalistic design, meaningful innovation and exclusive individuality. But for customers to fully understand these values, they must be expressed at every point of contact.

    2160 WAyS oF TELLinG: ThiS iS MEIn 2012, the company launched a new smart TV product line called Connect ID, with the objective of reaching a larger audience. It was crucial that Connect IDs lower prices not denigrate the companys core values, so Loewe promoted the new line as offering the consumer 2160 ways to design the Connect ID television so it expresses the buyers own style and personality.

    ThE PRoDuCT iS ThE STAR AnD So iS ThE CuSToMERIn addition, an exceptional customer experience in flagship stores and specialist retailers is a Loewe hallmark.

    How could the concept be extended to new channels selling Connect ID?

    The answer was to look at other occasions in the shoppers life when he is passionate

    about pursuing objects of beauty objects that reflect his own personality and associate Connect D with those moments.

    PiCTuRES AT An ExhiBiTionResearch revealed that art browsing and buying provided such opportunities, so Loewe began looking for an art partner that reflected its own values while also reinforcing Connect IDs lower pricing.

    LUMAS Galleries was that partner.

    LUMAS offers museum-quality art photography at price levels more accessible to a broader (particularly younger) audience. Likewise, LUMAS galleries and exhibitions are presented with the greatest of care, and the art buyer receives advice on how to personalise his purchase. It was the perfect combination for Connect ID.

    To create buzz, Loewe invited specialty retailers and a group of consumers to special LUMAS events in select German cities. A broader swath of consumers was also invited via regionally-targeted online campaigns created by MediaCom.

    The online activity drove overall interest in the events while enabling consumers to self-select and register for the exhibitions.

    inTEGRATED BRAnD CoMMuniCATion oF iTS oWnThe reaction from both consumers (particularly those found through the online campaigns) and nationwide and international press was overwhelmingly positive.

    Loewe was credited with creating a unique connection between Connect ID and a seemingly unrelated life experience art buying at a time consumers would be in a state of mind to appreciate beautiful things that helped express their own personalities (at an affordable price). The opportunity to get competent and credible advice was specifically pointed out as a new and most welcomed value.

    Consequently, Loewe has extended the idea of getting the best of both worlds into its next Connect ID communications campaign, establishing a collaboration with high-end German magazines and Internet portals.

    Together with its partners Philipp & Keuntje, MediaCom and Brandoffice Loewe once again proved its ability to not only promote innovation and individuality, but to also break new ground in the home media and entertainment system category.

    Premium positioning, indeed.

    casesLOEWE

    Loewe was challenged to find a new communications approach for its new product line

    the Connect ID. How could we articulate its premium brand values to a broader audience?

    By Henrik Rutenbeck, General Manager at Loewe Opta GmbH

    and Michael Knezevic, Unit Director at MediaCom Germany

    loewea matter of personality

    39BLINK #5 - MEDIACOM

  • M:fIlesthE big EvEnt

    uniTed by The big evenT

    What defines quality family time in a world where families are in transition? Divorce, delayed life events and globalisation have all put pressure on the family unit. The way that families talk to each other has also been transformed, thanks to digital devices.

    MediaCom set out to deliver an understanding of how Canadians interact with their digital devices by using our Real World Street tool. We talked to families with children up to 18 years of age, paying them several visits and engaging with different household members each time. Our Real World Street families were all digitally savvy despite some having moderate incomes. We sat in their family rooms and explored all their devices and how they were used, interviewing the older kids separately to discover what they did when their parents werent watching.

    The first big AHA! moment was our discovery that family digital behaviour was not impacted by income, number of children or the part of Canada where they lived. The key factor was the age of their children.

    Younger children were more excited and more comfortable with technology (as were their parents), but as children got older, parents developed a love/hate relationship with technology not dissimilar to the sentiments surrounding TV when it first became the centre of family life. However, despite this rancour and older childrens obsessive behaviour with their devices, parents continued to bring new technology into the home.

    We were also surprised by the number of devices in each of our Real World Street households. In a home headed by a single mom with two children over the age of 10, there were at least seven digital devices,

    despite the fact that the head of the family had a modest income.

    On average, we estimated that Canadian families now have 5.3 digital devices per home based on just 2.3 people per home. What we realised, however, was that family behaviour had not actually changed that much. Parents are still driven to protect and kids are driven to explore. The only way to protect younger children is to have them in close physical proximity; at this age, digital devices serve to educate and enable exploration in the home. As children get older and start to explore on their own, they physically and emotionally separate. Digital devices help parents keep an eye on them while not stifling their need to seek out and grow on their own.

    The explosion of mobile devices means that families are no longer bound by physical limitations. They can interact with content across many platforms while not even in the same room. Conversely, they can be in the same room while viewing different content (a behaviour most notable in households with one of Canadas three million tablets).

    In the 21st century, however, families unite around content. Not only do we live in a global village where we have friends and colleagues around the globe, we also have multiple schedules within one family. Years ago, we lamented the fact that the traditional family dinner was disappearing. Now we lament the lack of physical contact between family members. She comes in from school, drops her bag and runs to her room; she even sleeps with her mobile under her pillow! said Michelle, a mum to both a 4-year-old and a 12-year-old, who