mediacom fact book 2016

of 156/156
TV Mobile Radio Events Print Content Affiliates Out Of Home Sport Regional Press AV Partnerships Paid Social Cinema CultureCom Direct Response Search & SEO Kids Direct Mail VOD/Online Display Real World Insight Programmatic 8 - 13 106 - 111 38 - 41 122 - 127 14 - 25 112 - 117 96 - 99 42 - 49 128 - 133 26 - 37 118 - 121 100 - 105 50 - 59 134 - 141 60 - 67 82 - 89 142 - 153 68 - 71 90 - 95 72 - 77 78 - 81

Post on 05-Aug-2016

221 views

Category:

Documents

7 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Hello and welcome to the 2016 edition of the MediaCom Fact Book. As always, the aim of this book is to combine a useful reference for key media facts and figures, with key insights into current trends from our experts in each sector, giving you the information you need for the coming year.

TRANSCRIPT

  • TV Mobile

    Radio Events

    Print Content

    Affiliates

    Out Of Home Sport

    Regional Press AV Partnerships

    Paid Social

    Cinema CultureCom

    Direct Response

    Search & SEO

    Kids

    Direct Mail

    VOD/Online Display

    Real World Insight

    Programmatic

    8 - 13 106 - 111

    38 - 41 122 - 127

    14 - 25 112 - 117

    96 - 99

    42 - 49 128 - 133

    26 - 37 118 - 121

    100 - 105

    50 - 59 134 - 141

    60 - 67

    82 - 89

    142 - 153

    68 - 71

    90 - 95

    72 - 77

    78 - 81

  • 2015/2016

    MediaCom 124 Theobalds Road London WC1X 8RX UK

    Tel: +44 (0)20 7158 5500 Web: mediacom.com

    Josh Krichefski, MediaCom UK CEO EA: Dixie Maloney Tel: +44 (0)20 7158 4539 Email: [email protected]

  • 7Fact Book2016 Edition Key Media Facts & Figures

    Hello and welcome to the 2016 edition of the MediaCom Fact Book,

    As always, the aim of this book is to combine a useful reference for key media facts and figures, with key insights into current trends from our experts in each sector, giving you the information you need for the coming year.

    Im enormously proud to be taking up my new role as UK CEO at what Im sure youll agree is an exciting time for the industry. Fittingly, in each of the sections of this years Fact Book, youll see evidence of the media buying landscape shifting and moving at a remarkable pace. But youll also see how we, as the UKs leading media agency, are adapting to these changes across our wide array of disciplines.

    This year you may notice some subtle changes in the structure and layout of the book, which we believe will make it easier for you to get to the facts and figures that matter most.

    As ever, if you have any questions on the content of this book, or if youd like further details about the facts, figures and issues mentioned here dont hesitate to get in touch with us. I hope you enjoy reading it and I look forward to hearing your feedback.

    Best,

    Josh Krichefski MediaCom CEO, UK

  • 8Affiliates

    8

    TVJonathan MastersonHead of TV [email protected]

    A look back at 2015

    No sign of slowing

    In last years Fact Book we predicted the four main points wed be discussing in this years edition would be Station Ownership, Premier League rights, the Rugby World Cup and viewing trends. Its safe to say that those four issues dominated another strong year in TV, along with record TV revenues.

    Advertiser demand for television showed no sign of slowing down in 2015; with the market experiencing a record high for the year. Demand has grown 9% compared to 2014 (source: GroupM), and we believe this is down to a number of factors. Weve seen large growth categories in finance, motors and pharmaceutical (according to figures from Nielsen). The Governments decision to push spend forward into Q1 due to purdah restrictions (which prohibit spending in the six weeks prior to an election) also proved beneficial.

    Some feared the lack of a big summer sporting event could have adversely affected June and July, but those fears proved unfounded, in fact, compared with the World Cup in 2014, this period saw an increase in revenue. Momentum continued into Q4, and despite Englands poor performance in the Rugby World Cup, the tournament injected further money into TV. This, combined with advertisers embracing a late TV market, fuelled inflation, which in turn improved weekly TVRs.

  • 9Fact Book 2016

    Adult audiences drop, but TV still delivers

    In previous years weve seen impact growth counterbalance revenue-driven inflation, but for the second year running we are seeing further declines in adult TV audiences (especially 16-34s) which has led to an overall increase of 10% (16-34s broadcast growth is over 18%).

    But TV still delivers. From all the econometric models and results weve seen, TV still comes out top, and in 2015 it was no different. MediaCom clients alone bought 5.9m TV spots and demand continues to grow. Why? Because TV is still good value for money. Despite growing demand, ITVs adult CPT in 2015 has only increased 12% since 2000. In contrast, house prices have increased over 48% and travel fares 66% in the same period (source: ONS).

    Three major sales points

    We have seen TV sales points consolidate further as Viacom, after their 450m purchase in 2014, moved the Channel 5 sales operations over to Sky Media. As you can see from the chart below, we now have three major sales points responsible for over 99% of TV spend.

    ITV

    Port

    folio

    C4 P

    ortfo

    lio

    Sky

    Port

    folio

    Oth

    er

    0%

    5%

    10%

    15%

    20%

    25%

    30%

    35%

    40%

    45%

    50%

    TV is still good value for money. ITVs Adult CPT in 2015 has only inflated 12% since 2000. In contrast, house prices have increased over 48% and travel fares 66% in the same period.

  • 10

    TV

    Sporting dominance

    The battle for sporting rights dominance continued in 2015, with Sky and BT retaining the Premier League TV rights for a record 5.14bn, and Eurosport securing the Olympic TV rights for a cool 922m.

    The Rugby World Cup came and went, and while Englands performance doesnt warrant more than a passing mention, the tournament performed strongly for ITV. Impacts increased year-on-year throughout the competition period across all main audiences and over 11m viewers tuned in to watch England vs Wales. As of writing, the only other programme to exceed this on commercial TV was the Britains Got Talent final, which pulled in an audience of over 12.3m.

    BTs first season as the home of the Champions League has been solid in terms of viewing, with over 800,000 people tuning in to watch Manchester United vs Wolfsburg, yet this has been outperformed by Premier League coverage.

    Evolving engagement

    For the second year in a row, we have seen audience decline on linear TV and we foresee this trend continuing as the years go by. TV is going through another golden age in regards to the content we are seeing on our screens C4s Humans, Skys You, Me & The Apocalypse and a rebooted version of The Muppets all stand out. Alongside this, we are seeing viewing habits change, with media owners evolving their business to suit new consumer behaviours. Multi-screen behaviour in particular has become of great interest to media owners: ITV announced the launch of ITV AdVentures, AdSync+, and the ITV Hub; Channel 4 launched PVX; and Sky followed their own AdSmart with the unveiling of AdVance.

    At MediaCom, our market leading approach is based on an AV neutral planning ethos, from Cinema to in-mobile video. We believe this approach ensures that our clients maximise coverage with their target audience at the right entry cost, even as traditional engagement methods evolve.

  • 11

    Fact Book 2016

    A look forward to 2016

    Programmatic TV

    With TV technology evolving and programmatic such a buzz word, the big question for 2016 is whether programmatic TV will be scalable. While opinion is divided on the matter, our view is that we will not see programmatic linear TV at scale for a good while yet. We are starting to see the basics, such as AdSmart, being adopted and Channel 4 arent shy about showing their enthusiasm for programmatic, but there are a lot of issues to work out first before this becomes a reality.

    Key areas will need to be addressed in terms of compliance with Ofcom restrictions such as the post 9pm watershed, HFSS (products high in fat, salt or sugar) and ex-kids (meaning an ad will not be broadcast before, during or after childrens programmes), as well as regulations on ownership and sharing of first party data. But as we discussed in our 2015 summary, TV is clearly evolving in terms of trading models and audience viewing. There are now strong programmatic routes to buy TV content outside of linear programming, and across multiple devices as audience fragmentation continues.

    Strong AV planning across all devices is more vital than ever before. This needs to take into account campaign KPIs, using the correct programmatic solution to deliver the cover lost by audience decline on traditional TV. This isnt about preparing for the future, this is the reality of good TV buying in todays market.

    TV still on top

    This is, however, a market in a state of change and many of the old fashioned principles remain valid. TV has always, and continues to drive the highest ROI in econometric studies due to its incredibly broad appeal

    and impact as well as pricing, which has been depressed by the peculiarities of TV trading.

    The market mechanics mean that while a client might target a 16-34 audience with a spot during the X Factor, on TV they will only pay for the 2.2m

    16-34s that watch the spot. The other 5.9m people watching TV at the moment the ad is aired are effectively free. In the rush to optimise every part of the communications system, its often tempting to call these extra viewers wastage, however, lets not forget the power of these audiences. Fundamentally brands have built their media plans around this benefit, which programmatic would work to reduce, so not all advertisers would be keen to see it disappear.

    TV continues to drive the highest ROI due to its broad appeal, impact and pricing

  • 12

    TV

    The content battle

    Content continues to be key, particularly as we move into the digital and data arena where there is a lot of serious and cash-rich competition for the traditional content creators. Commercial impacts are in decline but media consumption is up 48% since 2010. 24 year-olds are watching 36%

    less traditional TV than their parents were at the same age (source: BARB). The consumer wants top quality content and now has even more choice of where to get it. This demand from both traditional and increasingly non-traditional broadcasters (the likes of Amazon and Netflix) only leads to driving up the price of buying rights.

    Media owners face new pressures and are on the lookout for new solutions to deal with the issue. One answer to this problem is sharing the cost with each other. In 2016, ITV will join

    forces with the BBC to secure a free-to-air rights deal that will see both broadcasters screen Six Nations Rugby until 2021. The new deal brings the Six Nations to ITV for the first time in its history, and looks to be a prudent business decision. ITV and the BBC can no longer take on Sky and BT for sporting rights on their own. We expect to see an increase in joint ventures in 2016, with more broadcasters coming together to create programming like Channel 4 and AMCs Humans.

    While the battle for content will continue to be hard fought, there are two government-related issues to think about for next year.

    Responsible advertising

    Commons debates continue to be waged around responsible advertising, particularly in regards to food. Just ahead of finance, food is the biggest sector in terms of advertising expenditure on TV in the UK, so this could have huge implications for the industry this year. The Government have frequently been questioned on food advertising restrictions of late, and in 2016 we may well see these restrictions tightened. There are rumblings from the Government that there will be a review of the Ofcom guidelines on advertising for HFSS products, with a possible post 9pm watershed a distinct possibility.

    Commercial impacts are in decline but media consumption is up 48% since 2010. 24 year-olds are watching 36% less traditional TV than their parents were at the same age (source: BARB).

  • 13

    Fact Book 2016

    Channel 4s privatisation

    The other area where there has been much talk is that of Channel 4s potential privatisation.

    The impact of such a move could take away C4s uniqueness in a highly consolidated market. It would certainly change their remit to one focused on driving profit for stakeholders. Currently, C4 invest all their profit back into content. They use a lot of independent production companies to create their content, and if privatisation means profit goes to the shareholders, then creativity could be compromised. Similarly, commercial pressures could mean a change in their ethos of sticking with a show they believe in. Gogglebox was a slow burner with regard to ratings, but is now not only a jewel in the crown, it is also an outlet for award winning media ideas. If C4 was privately owned, Gogglebox would have been axed after its first series, or shifted to a digital channel. Similarly, C4 will be showing the 2016 Paralympics from Rio, the cost of production would have made this impossible if it were a privately owned company.

    A great year for sport

    Speaking of sport, 2016 looks set to be a great year for commercial TV and sporting events. This summer we have the Euro 2016 Final tournament in France, as well as, the Olympics and Paralympics in Rio, with all events looking to bring in large audiences to broadcast television.

    Events which feature British teams/sportspersons will always attract the largest TV viewing and, thanks to the expanded Euros, there have never been more home nations in a major football tournament with England, Wales and both Northern and the Republic of Ireland featuring. Media owners like ITV and C4, along with many of our clients, will be hoping we see strong Home Nations and Team GB performances to deliver high audience figures over summer not to mention bragging rights.

  • 14

    Affiliates

    14

    PrintChris Reed / Richard CrossAssociate Directors MarketPlace [email protected] / [email protected]

    A look back at 2015

    Publishers adapt and diversify

    It was a fascinating year for the National Press sector as it continued to evolve, with the market finally exhibiting signs of how best to utilise their digital platforms from both a commercial and content POV.

    In late November the market was taken by surprise by the news that The Sun was set to drop its paywall and once again become free for all to access. This move clearly demonstrates that one model doesnt fit all and that publishers must be willing to adapt if they are going to thrive in this increasingly digital focused sector.

    Audiences have not deserted their trusted source for news and opinion, they have simply diversified and changed their consumption habits. The Times is a fine example of this; at the end of 2014 the title announced that they had made operating profits for the first time in 13 years, and to the tune of 1.7m. Many senior figures within the industry see this as vindication for News UKs decision to charge for their online content, in spite of the fact that such content is consumed by an affluent and scarce audience.

  • 15

    Fact Book 2016

    First impression targeting

    The Telegraph continued to make huge strides in 2015 with their First Impression targeting. Volkswagen Group was one of the first advertisers to buy into the opportunity and it continues to be a focal point of their business model. The package offers advertisers the chance to reach their audience with maximum impact through the delivery of

    an HPTO or first online execution plus the first format in the print edition.

    Last call for the Lads Mags

    This year finally saw the long awaited demise of the Lads Mag; FHM, Loaded, Nuts

    and Zoo are no more. They paid the price for not adapting and moving with the times. A stellar success in the 1990s, FHM boasted a paid for circulation of over 700,000 copies per month, however, their lowest common denominator approach to life focusing on birds, booze and banter ceased to be relevant to modern consumers. While undoubtedly a blow to the market, the death of the Lads Mag gives market forces an opportunity to step back and separate the wheat from the chaff.

    Rise of freesheets

    On a more positive note, the free market continued to evolve and grow. Dennis Publishing launched Coach magazine as a weekly freemium title with a health and lifestyle angle to the content. This came about weeks after Time Inc relaunched NME as a freesheet in an attempt to rescue a classic British media brand. No doubt Time Inc are hoping for a revitalisation of Evening Standard/Time Out proportions but the question is, will turning a formerly credible musical journal into a mass market publication work?

    Source: Newsworks

    Arrivals and departures dominated the magazine sector in 2015 and gave a tantalising insight into the potential future of the magazine marketplace

    39 millionpeople across PCs, smartphones

    and tablets

    Newsbrands reach

    24 millionpeople read newsbrands on their

    phone more than the entire population of Australia

  • 16

    Print

    A look forward to 2016

    Measurability

    The biggest challenge newsbrands face over the coming months centres around measurability and how print and digital should be considered as a single entity for targeting audiences. Publishers Audience Measurement Company (PAMCo) will certainly address these issues, however, many industry figures have commented on the prolonged time this has taken to get out to the market. The report will be the first brand measurement approach and a single source of data. The testing period ended in December 2015, and the survey is due to start in April 2016, with the full report set to be released in H1 2017.

    Quality content will always be at the very heart of the magazine brand ecosystem. The ability to get content in front of as many readers as possible, irrespective of the devices or platforms, is becoming ever more crucial. The likes of Facebook, Google, Twitter, Buzzfeed and Flipboard have played a pivotal role in helping magazine brands extend their content and conversations, but the advertising revenue for the content originators has been somewhat elusive until now.

    Apple News

    The release of iOS9 in early September 2015 saw the death of Newsstand (once heralded as the saviour of traditional publishing), and the birth of Apple News. So what is Apple News? From a users perspective it will be a news feed aggregation app very similar to the Flipboard offering. The user can choose areas of interest to follow from dynamic lists and then let the app do the work to suggest additions, which will also track user interests over time.

    At first inspection it seems like standard stuff, but interestingly it will give advertisers and publishers more control than ever before with the ability to place ads alongside key content with various formats via Apples own iAds platform. Apple have also taken the unprecedented step to reward the originators with up to 100% of the ad revenue generated from advertising on their hosted content.

    Transparency

    In the past Apple have been very protective over data sharing and tracking, but all this looks set to change. Tracking and collaborative smart targeting is rumoured be part of the offering, giving advertisers the insight theyve been craving from Apple, as well as a richer creative environment for publishers. We welcome this transparency with open arms, but only time will tell if this will be the silver bullet for publishers.

  • 17

    Fact Book 2016

    A bright outlook

    The medium to long-term outlook is relatively bright. There is a renewed confidence returning to this vibrant sector, with publishers putting the recession far behind them via a plethora of launches in the ad-funded freemium market, and newsbrands leading the way as providers of quality web and mobile-ready content. The market will continue to evolve and innovate much as it always has done.

    35000

    30000

    25000

    20000

    15000

    10000

    5000

    0

    Adults 15+ (000s)

    Source: NRS PADD (July 14 - June 15)

    Newsbrands - Total monthly reach (vs print 2011)

    The

    Tele

    grap

    h

    The

    Gua

    rdia

    n

    Inde

    pend

    ent

    The

    Tim

    es

    Dai

    ly E

    xpre

    ss

    Dai

    ly M

    ail

    Dai

    ly M

    irror

    The

    Sun

    Dai

    ly S

    tar

    Lond

    on E

    veni

    ng S

    tand

    ard

    Met

    ro

    Total combined print, PC & mobile

    2011 print monthly reach

    Source: Newsworks

    82%

    70 mins

    94%

    95%

    of the total smartphone audience

    reading newspapers

    ABC1s each month

    of 18-34 year-olds each month

    Newspaper sites reach

    On the days they read them, people spend on average

    Newsbrands reach

    Newsbrands reach

  • 18

    Print

    Sunday papers October 2015

    Sun on SundayThe Mail on SundaySunday MirrorThe Sunday TimesThe PeopleSunday ExpressThe Sunday TelegraphThe ObserverDaily Star SundaySunday MailThe Sunday PostThe Independent on SundayScotland on SundaySunday Herald

    Sunday papers October 2015

    Sun on SundayThe Mail on SundaySunday MirrorThe Sunday TimesSunday ExpressThe Sunday TelegraphThe ObserverDaily Star SundaySunday MailThe Independent on Sunday

    Circulation (ABC actively purchased) Oct 2015

    1,463,2731,262,542720,118701,620280,220352,770351,738266,591197,939188,987170,62444,68024,14229,009

    PageMono

    n/a39,30060,69030,30028,42034,00023,76513,89013,93310,472

    All Adults 51,598 %

    9.38.24.44.81.32.02.51.51.61.51.20.80.20.2

    PageClr

    55,50255,80090,09038,60040,67042,000n/a18,05722,00016,660

    Men 25,188 %

    10.48.24.75.01.32.12.71.91.61.71.10.90.20.2

    MonoScc

    n/a129144117116809759.6n/a44

    Women 26,410 %

    8.28.24.14.71.32.02.41.21.61.31.30.60.20.1

    ColScc

    n/a18122015016615311677.38n/a64

    15-44s 24,744 %

    9.64.53.53.60.50.91.31.71.11.20.40.80.10.1

    Twitter Followers(UK)

    N/AN/A388,0009,8982,7391,390,0002,4376,135N/A7,841

    ABC1 27,630 %

    6.09.56.83.40.92.34.00.71.12.40.81.00.30.2

    FacebookLikes(UK)

    N/AN/A433,688N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A

    Av Time Spent Reading

    35.965.193.841.848.262.284.835.744.679.562.954.567.363.3

    TabletReadership

    10,00026,4749,46392,000133,03573,00050,00062,406N/AN/A

  • 19

    Fact Book 2016

    Dailies October 2015

    The SunDaily MailMetroEvening Standard Daily MirrorThe Daily TelegraphDaily StarDaily ExpressThe TimesiDaily RecordThe GuardianFinancial TimesThe Independent

    Dailies October 2015

    The SunDaily MailDaily MirrorThe Daily TelegraphDaily StarThe TimesDaily ExpressThe GuardianiThe Independent Financial TimesMetroEvening Standard

    Circulation (ABC actively purchased) Oct 2015

    1,755,3901,448,5101,349,476900,498747,285460,184426,798401,142352,365205,565177,441166,96543,45040,552

    PageMono

    n/a37,80029,00046,00023,76516,645n/a11,40010,47210,47242,400n/an/a

    All Adults 51,598 %

    10.57.16.13.04.22.32.12.12.11.21.31.3 -0.5

    PageClr

    55,50253,97936,80059,000n/a27,19531,36018,00016,66016,66058,60020,04070,210

    Men 25,188 %

    12.86.87.43.84.72.52.92.32.51.41.41.5 -0.7

    MonoScc

    n/an/a112106n/a75n/an/a4444n/an/an/a

    Women 26,410 %

    8.37.44.92.23.72.11.21.91.71.01.21.2 -0.3

    ColScc

    233n/a14221497123128n/a6464n/an/a295

    15-44s 24,744 %

    10.33.38.94.12.90.92.00.91.50.81.01.2 -0.5

    Twitter Followers(UK)

    933,0001,131,000562,0001,390,000134,000652,000385,0004,660,000107,0001,060,0004,480,000217,000274,000

    ABC1 27,630 %

    6.28.46.53.82.93.71.02.13.41.60.72.2 -0.7

    FacebookLikes(UK)

    1,951,7763,156,406308,2972,723,266878,662433,688571,0755,032,224N/A3,468,1252,653,5651,116,579496,151

    Av Time Spent Reading

    30.143.7520.4621.533.956.227.343.6745.436.732.5344.935.834.1

    AverageUnique VisitorsAdults

    2,036,00011,246,0002,450,0001,864,0004,768,0008,556,000874,0002,477,000445,000547,000708,0009,394,000711,0004,665,000

    TabletReadership

    10,0002591775,08773,00049,75871,000100,46450,000N/A4,18311,43728,0006,519

  • 20

    Print

    Newspaper supplements October 2015

    ES MagazineSun TV BuzzSun on Sunday FabulousDaily Mail WeekendGuardian WeekendGuardian GuideFT MoneyIndependent MagazineTelegraph MagazineTimes MagazineDEX SaturdayDMR We Love TellyDSTAR Hot TVMOS YouMOS EventSunday Times MagSTI CultureSTI StylePPL Love SundaySTL StellaSTL SevenIOS New ReviewObserver MagObs. Food MonthlySEX S MagazineDSTS OK! Extra

    Circulation (ABC actively purchased) Oct 2015

    344,3631,755,3901,755,3901,448,510166,965166,965n/a40,552460,184352,365401,142747,285426,7981,262,5421,262,542720,118720,118720,118280,220351,738351,73844,680188,987188,987352,770426,798

    All Adults 51,598 %

    1.28.85.78.11.81.7 -0.42.51.91.93.6 -6.05.33.53.22.9 -1.51.60.41.21.31.50.9

    Men 25,188 %

    1.38.74.67.31.81.7 -0.52.31.91.93.3 -4.94.73.63.22.4 -1.21.50.51.21.21.40.9

    Women 26,410 %

    1.18.76.68.91.81.7 -0.42.71.91.93.8 -75.73.53.23.3 -1.91.70.41.31.51.70.9

    15-44s 24,744 %

    1.47.25.22.7131.2 -0.30.71.20.61.7 -2.62.12.52.22.1 -0.60.60.40.91.10.40.9

  • 21

    Fact Book 2016

    ABC1 27,630 %

    1.74.83.59.63.02.8 -0.74.03.12.02.2 -7.26.35.65.24.7 -2.52.70.62.02.21.70.4

    Ratecard

    20,00031,00055,50241,0009,0009,00020,19010,00023,25216,54030,00031,25015,00034,20034,20019,950n/an/a45,75018,30018,30010,00010,00011,00027,50015000

    Twitter Followers(UK)

    206,000NA87,6001,88319,20249,50044,8003,30818,80015,300N/AN/AN/A37,40015,90036,400N/A147,608N/A82,700N/A16,00024,700N/AN/AN/A

    FacebookLikes(UK)

    4,68720,137235,108N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A45,53862,444N/AN/A183,60921536,780N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A

  • 22

    Print

    Womens weeklies January-June 2015

    BellaBestChatCloserGraziaHeatHello!Inside SoapLookNew!NowOK!Pick Me UpReal PeopleRevealStarTake a BreakThats Life!WomanWomans OwnWomans WeeklyYours

    Circulation(ABC actively purchased)Jan-Jun 15

    185,850164,539265,760276,333126,762170,790207,344133,228118,017245,829135,444179,387138,984152,612130,781146,149602,674239,691243,927204,446275,339 251978

    All Adults 51,598 %

    0.90.61.62.00.71.92.10.90.70.91.23.11.20.60.80.54.21.20.91.51.40.8

    Men 25,188 %

    0.10.10.40.30.10.50.50.30.10.10.20.70.30.10.10.21.20.30.10.20.20.1

    Women 26,410 %

    1.61.22.83.61.33.33.71.51.31.62.15.42.01.11.50.87.12.11.72.72.61.4

    15-44s 24,744 %

    0.50.41.53.21.23.42.41.31.21.62.14.51.70.81.40.83.91.40.40.90.70.1

  • 23

    Fact Book 2016

    Ratecard

    18,15018,84510,77418,61812,42020,54017,2784,50014,00013,47518,00016,1708,9008,90014,27512,10022,92010,90019,05023,65012,4009,661

    UniqueVisitorsAdults

    -30,00020,000205,00087,000256,000324,000 -146,00012,000126,000250,76816,000 -138,0006,000117,00036,00035,00021,00012,00052,000

    AverageMinutesper Visit

    -2.06.12.42.32.34.32.32.21.21.73.16.4 -2.12.37.73.72.42.14.32.7

    Twitter Followers(UK)

    9,90418,1004,92385,101341,218380,711156,26936,566161,649120,822107,941518,8123,6366,418100,66140,7253,2063,44210,60013,5003,1116,177

    FacebookLikes(UK)

    6,41562,565100,726357,528138,411442,4421,322,244244,5551,195,852-32,9721,199,48786,91535,86591,5147,32855,24653,00016,299299,36316,12012,574

    TabletJan-Jun 15

    -2801,0281,9363,7321,7022,3409041,673 -1,9194,567448309824786 - -7756732,822 -

  • 24

    Print

    Mens lifestyleJanuary-June 2015

    EsquireFHMGQMens FitnessMens HealthQZoo

    Home interestJanuary-June 2015

    25 Beautiful HomesCountry Homes & Int.Country LivingElle DecorationGood HomesHomes & GardensHouse & GardenHouse BeautifulIdeal HomeLiving etc

    TV weekliesJanuary-June 2015

    Radio TimesTotal TV GuideTV & Satellite WeekTV ChoiceTV EasyTV TimesWhats on TV

    Circulation(ABC actively purchased)Jan-Jun 14

    27,06440,21775,11333,801142,48641,10324,001

    Circulation(ABC actively purchased)Jan-Jun 14

    71,53870,121139,21442,915 -68,49863,542105,262161,76266,455

    Circulation(ABC actively purchased)Jan-Jun 14

    706,655108,829136,8881,276,045122,091211,9841,010,798

    All Adults 51,598 %

    0.21.10.81.22.10.60.6

    All Adults 51,598 %

    0.70.71.30.40.91.41.20.92.00.4

    All Adults 51,598 %

    3.81.01.03.80.62.25.4

    Men 25,188 %

    0.42.11.42.23.71.01.0

    Men 25,188 %

    0.20.40.80.20.30.80.70.31.10.1

    Men 25,188 %

    3.70.51.02.60.41.83.7

    Women 26,410 %

    0.10.20.30.10.50.30.2

    Women 26,410 %

    1.21.11.80.71.42.01.81.52.80.6

    Women 26,410 %

    4.01.2150.72.67

    15-44s 24,744 %

    0.42.01.323.61.01.0

    15-44s 24,744 %

    0.50.60.80.61.01.10.80.81.90.5

    15-44s 24,744 %

    2.01.012.90.51.74.9

    ABC1 27,630 %

    0.31.01.11.32.50.90.4

    ABC1 27,630 %

    1.01.01.80.71.11.71.51.32.40.5

    ABC1 27,630 %

    5.30.70.82.70.41.83.6

  • 25

    Fact Book 2016

    Ratecard

    12,60718,00014,9943,50010,8899,1568,800

    Ratecard

    6,2256,4008,8519,1004,50012,17018,37213,35512,4407,050

    Ratecard

    20,3507,0005,71517,00011,90016,45020,160

    AverageMinutesper Visit

    1.92.71.41.726.21.21.6

    AverageMinutesper Visit

    2.62.81.72.1 -2.62.52.22.72.3

    AverageMinutesper Visit

    1.8 - -12.9 - -3.7

    Twitter Followers(UK)

    339,400155,900772,300539,7003,100,000118,000321,500

    Twitter Followers(UK)

    13,60031,386118,00068,200189,426140,00068,100265,00080,40096,200

    Twitter Followers(UK)

    59,5372,07410,38973,734N/A15,977147,665

    FacebookLikes(UK)

    682,7733,214,7421,806,1262,761,9944,434,366106,7882,785,527

    FacebookLikes(UK)

    N/A1,800,0002,300,0001,300,0003,22781,4844,400,0004,800,0002,200,000491,342

    FacebookLikes(UK)

    53,860N/A6,043459N/A22,0377,631

    TabletJan-Jun 15

    2,9412,9946,494 - 6,287 - 1,641

    TabletJan-Jun 15

    7037017661,108 -9594894901,3911,653

    TabletJan-Jun 15

    31,649 - -257 - -3,093

  • 26

    Affiliates

    26

    Regional PressAnnette Stephens / Les MiddletonAssociate Director Connect / Associate Director, MediaCom Accent, MarketPlace [email protected] / [email protected]

    A look back at 2015

    Managing decline

    With around 22m copies distributed every week, local newspapers continue to form an important part of the local media landscape. However, as predicted, 2015 witnessed another decline (around 8%) in the print circulations of regional press products albeit at a reduced rate. This comes on the back of a continued reduction over the last 5 years, of around 40% from 2010 to date.

    Titles covering smaller geographic areas (generally frees) have outperformed the market and theres been a reduction in the number of free titles closing, but the overall decline has been attributed to titles with larger circulations covering regions and cities.

    Digital bright spots

    In contrast, digital growth has been exceptional. We have witnessed another surge in digital traffic across the last year and its now relatively commonplace for digital platforms to dwarf their print counterparts.

    Publishers are working to diversify their online products further and the online propositions are, in many cases, no longer just a replication of the printed product. Online audiences for these publications tend to be younger and more upmarket, and unsurprisingly there are many touchpoints for communicating with this audience.

    Mobile usage has also increased exponentially, now significantly exceeding desktop reach. This is not a huge surprise given the meteoric rise in smartphone usage and general consumption habits across devices.

  • 27

    Fact Book 2016

    An evolving MarketPlace

    We have consistently talked in our year-end summary about the increased impetus on the selling of packages and this has proved especially important in 2015, creating a cost efficient way for advertisers to reach the larger cities where regional print brands are strong and ultimately bringing incremental revenue via agency spend.

    As expected, Newsquest moved their sales operation into the Mediaforce fold in February of 2015, radically changing our day-to-day buying relationship, with just two sales points covering the vast majority of the regional marketplace. We havent witnessed any significant changes to either publishers proposition. This may come with time.

    Finally, one of the biggest developments of 2015 was the Trinity Mirror purchase of Local World. This has been a long awaited move and is, in our view, a significant milestone. This acquisition has made inroads to rejuvenating the marketplace, and has heaped a little more pressure on the likes of Johnston Press, who are no longer the biggest players in the field.

    A look forward to 2016

    Content and partnerships

    We expect that 2016 will bring an increased focus on content, along with the creation of strong, cross-platform partnerships. The consolidation of the market has brought shared knowledge, ideas and expertise that we believe will benefit some of the smaller players.

    Undoubtedly the main players will still be pushing their packages and we fully support this as a way of delivering quality reach in the main conurbations.

    We also believe that there will be further diversification of products and solutions to ensure that regional publishers continue dialogue and connect with their consumers to get a slice of the local/regional pie across all vehicles and devices.

  • 28

    Regional Press

    Publication

    Basildon Evening EchoBirmingham MailBolton NewsBournemouth The Daily EchoBradford TelegraphBurton MailCambridge NewsColchester Evening GazetteCoventry TelegraphDerby TelegraphDorset EchoEast Anglian Daily TimesGloucestershire EchoGrimsby TelegraphHartlepool MailHuddersfield Daily ExaminerHull Daily MailIpswich & Felixstowe Star (Mon-Wed, Fri)Ipswich & Felixstowe Star (Thur)Lancashire & Wigan Evening PostLancashire TelegraphLeeds Yorkshire Evening PostLeicester MercuryLiverpool EchoManchester Evening News (Mon-Wed, Sat)Manchester Evening News (Thur-Fri)Newcastle JournalNewcastle upon Tyne Sunday SunNews & Star CarlisleNorfolk Eastern Daily PressNorth West Evening MailNorwich Evening NewsNottingham PostNuneaton News (Paid)Oldham Evening ChronicleOxford MailPortsmouth NewsSheffield StarShropshire Star (Mon-Fri)Southampton Southern Daily EchoStoke The SentinelSunday Mercury BirminghamSunderland EchoSwindon AdvertiserTeesside Evening GazetteThe Argus Brighton

    Website

    www.echo-news.co.ukwww.birminghammail.co.ukwww.theboltonnews.co.ukwww.bournemouthecho.co.ukwww.thetelegraphandargus.co.ukwww.burtonmail.co.ukwww.cambridge-news.co.ukwww.gazette-news.co.ukwww.coventrytelegraph.netwww.derbytelegraph.co.ukwww.dorsetecho.co.ukwww.eadt.co.ukwww.gloucestershireecho.co.ukwww.grimsbytelegraph.co.ukwww.hartlepoolmail.co.ukwww.examiner.co.ukwww.hulldailymail.co.ukwww.eveningstar.co.ukwww.eveningstar.co.ukwww.lep.co.uk/www.wigantoday.netwww.lancashiretelegraph.co.ukwww.yorkshireeveningpost.co.ukwww.leicestermercury.co.ukwww.liverpoolecho.co.ukwww.manchestereveningnews.co.ukwww.manchestereveningnews.co.ukwww.chroniclelive.co.ukwww.chroniclelive.co.ukwww.newsandstar.co.ukwww.EDP24.co.ukwww.nwemail.co.ukwww.eveningnews24.co.ukwww.nottinghampost.comwww.nuneaton-news.co.ukwww.oldham-chronicle.co.ukwww.oxfordmail.co.ukwww.portsmouth.co.ukwww.thestar.co.ukwww.shropshirestar.comwww.dailyecho.co.ukwww.stokesentinel.co.ukwww.birminghammail.co.ukwww.sunderlandecho.comwww.swindonadvertiser.co.ukwww.gazettelive.co.ukwww.theargus.co.uk

    England

    BasildonBirminghamBoltonBournemouthBradfordBurtonCambridgeColchesterCoventryDerbyDorchesterIpswichCheltenhamGrimsbyHartlepoolHuddersfieldHullIpswichIpswichPrestonBlackburnLeedsLeicesterLiverpoolManchesterManchesterNewcastleNewcastleCarlisleNorwichBarrow-in-FurnessNorwichNottinghamNuneatonOldhamOxfordPortsmouthSheffieldTelfordSouthamptonStokeBirminghamSunderlandSwindonStockton-on-TeesBrighton

  • 29

    Fact Book 2016

    Monthly Unique Users (000)

    416515701873831681852722032253372867312181151294190190726223401997471,1391,13947147132455915319925010122495245292124926165515149353221700

    Twitter Followers

    18,300115,62922,70047,20026,8006,46742,57511,00038,85341,58128,90025,70012,79111,7437,91035,32839,37613,60013,60013,80041,500101,00049,538242,868276,191276,19134,391n/a21,00052,0009,15530,20070,2704,45510,50035,20040,00071,80043,09744,90033,992n/a29,60019,40040,04549,900

    Facebook Likes

    17193153,36520,99568,70819,25512,17515,11232,00024,20230,39510,7564,43319,45522,57212,43854,67087,3178,4498,44916,86410,35443,21231,2121,019,572799,152799,15230,986n/a16,43240,33114,5907,94354,84313,8615,66910,30530,88021,20122,77156,67353,487n/a71,48810,96080,89613,794

    Sales House

    MediaforceTMSMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceTMSTMSMediaforceTMSTMSMediaforceMediaforceTMSTMSMediaforceTMSTMSMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceTMSTMSTMSTMSTMSTMSMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceTMSTMSMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceTMSNewsquestTMSTMSMediaforceMediaforceTMSMediaforce

    ABC Circ

    22,31327,66211,77716,91817,4239,86915,08811,34921,30621,88912,35919,72511,19019,8248,27914,05131,6018,51628,25418,31112,81421,94630,44859,75436,831105,53915,80729,19011,72640,71310,30010,60320,5772,1478,99412,10325,89422,28632,34021,18533,42622,75018,87611,18825,49313,309

    Source: ABC Jan-June 15 (daily circ figures Mon-Sat where possible) ICREG data as of 01 Nov 15

  • 30

    Regional Press

    Publication

    Basildon Evening EchoBirmingham MailBolton NewsBournemouth The Daily EchoBradford TelegraphBurton MailCambridge NewsColchester Evening GazetteCoventry TelegraphDerby TelegraphDorset EchoEast Anglian Daily TimesGloucestershire EchoGrimsby TelegraphHartlepool MailHuddersfield Daily ExaminerHull Daily MailIpswich & Felixstowe Star (Mon-Wed, Fri)Ipswich & Felixstowe Star (Thur)Lancashire & Wigan Evening PostLancashire TelegraphLeeds Yorkshire Evening PostLeicester MercuryLiverpool EchoManchester Evening News (Mon-Wed, Sat)Manchester Evening News (Thur-Fri)Newcastle JournalNewcastle upon Tyne Sunday SunNews & Star CarlisleNorfolk Eastern Daily PressNorth West Evening MailNorwich Evening NewsNottingham PostNuneaton News (Paid)Oldham Evening ChronicleOxford MailPortsmouth NewsSheffield StarShropshire Star (Mon-Fri)Southampton Southern Daily EchoStoke The SentinelSunday Mercury BirminghamSunderland EchoSwindon AdvertiserTeesside Evening GazetteThe Argus Brighton

    England

    BasildonBirminghamBoltonBournemouthBradfordBurtonCambridgeColchesterCoventryDerbyDorchesterIpswichCheltenhamGrimsbyHartlepoolHuddersfieldHullIpswichIpswichPrestonBlackburnLeedsLeicesterLiverpoolManchesterManchesterNewcastleNewcastleCarlisleNorwichBarrow-in-FurnessNorwichNottinghamNuneatonOldhamOxfordPortsmouthSheffieldTelfordSouthamptonStokeBirminghamSunderlandSwindonStockton-on-TeesBrighton

    AIR Adults

    58,91781,75246,45144,01446,82425,62044,02029,92857,75158,03431,49251,38628,87050,11420,43437,78581,00621,74151,05469,78449,20282,95385,221154,055106,754256,09167,37481,05933,985120,56633,65027,26654,3055,58123,71936,69371,94085,30385,63755,68585,98067,91948,55729,09766,29933,898

    AIR Men

    29,92442,19722,79522,48724,19413,25523,15515,25630,56430,12116,25026,74914,81125,62810,40319,43242,05511,22924,51635,79027,03934,02143,84778,78157,585123,24440,42741,46715,63556,66717,83814,02827,9722,92212,17419,45538,12841,80544,31828,67344,54834,71624,70315,30333,97517,537

    Continued

  • 31

    Fact Book 2016

    AIR Women

    28,99439,55623,65521,52722,63012,36520,86514,67227,18627,91315,24224,63614,05924,48710,03118,35338,95110,51226,53833,99422,16348,93241,37475,27349,168132,84726,94739,59318,35063,89915,81313,23726,3332,65911,54517,23833,81243,49841,31927,01241,43233,20323,85513,79432,32416,361

    AIR ABC1

    30,97532,98216,80223,97420,14110,78824,27216,56229,63525,51016,59431,94014,98022,0496,76715,97434,87410,40227,75034,13118,18732,55238,36174,39843,353115,21838,76530,35315,30579,44312,30812,67025,0982,9809,85726,44534,81031,40840,86931,14334,06726,35317,87613,66328,69124,166

    RatecardMono SCC

    7.8015.005.108.5011.046.499.554.4018.1511.956.8510.307.709.077.267.9817.158.868.8616.294.9023.7018.4029.0028.8534.1016.3018.857.5813.5210.6710.4117.205.356.6211.1516.1629.019.658.9011.8012.8514.446.9016.9510.30

    Pg Mono

    2,2463,5701,4692,4483,1791,7652,6251,2674,3203,2501,9732,7192,0942,4672,2221,8994,6652,3392,3394,9851,4117,2525,0056,9026,8668,1163,8794,4861,8043,5692,5392,7484,6781,4551,3503,2114,9458,8772,9342,5633,2103,0584,4191,9874,0342,966

    Pg Col

    2,2463,5701,4692,4483,8168833,4121,2675,8324,0631,9733,8072,6183,0842,8882,5645,8313,2753,2756,4801,4119,4286,2569,3189,61311,3625,2376,0572,5264,6403,5553,5735,8487281,8233,2116,42811,5403,9602,5634,0121,5295,7441,9875,4462,966

    Source: ABC Jan-June 15 (daily circ figures Mon-Sat where possible) ICREG data as of 01 Nov 15

  • 32

    Regional Press

    Publication

    The Chronicle NewcastleThe Citizen GloucesterThe Gazette BlackpoolThe Herald PlymouthThe Northern EchoThe Post BristolThe Press YorkWest Midlands Express & Star (Mon-Wed, Fri)West Midlands Express & Star (Thur)Western Daily PressWestern Morning NewsWestern Morning News SundayWorcester NewsYorkshire Post

    Publication

    Daily Record ScotlandLiverpool Sunday EchoPaisley Daily ExpressSunday Mail (Scotland)**/***Aberdeen Evening ExpressPress & Journal AberdeenCourier & Advertiser DundeeDundee Evening TelegraphEdinburgh Evening NewsThe ScotsmanSunday Herald ScotlandGlasgow Evening TimesThe Herald ScotlandGreenock TelegraphScotland On SundaySunday Post**/***

    Publication

    Belfast Telegraph*Sunday Life (Belfast)*Ulster News Letter (Belfast)*Irish News*

    Website

    www.chroniclelive.co.ukwww.gloucestercitizen.co.ukwww.blackpoolgazette.co.ukwww.plymouthherald.co.ukwww.thenorthernecho.co.ukwww.bristolpost.co.ukwww.yorkpress.co.ukwww.expressandstar.comwww.expressandstar.comwww.westerndailypress.co.ukwww.westernmorningnews.co.ukwww.westernmorningnews.co.ukwww.worcesternews.co.ukwww.yorkshirepost.co.uk

    Website

    www.dailyrecord.co.ukwww.liverpoolecho.co.ukwww.dailyrecord.co.ukwww.dailyrecord.co.ukwww.eveningexpress.co.ukwww.pressandjournal.co.ukwww.thecourier.co.ukwww.eveningtelegraph.co.ukwww.edinburghnews.scotsman.comwww.scotsman.comwww.heraldscotland.comwww.eveningtimes.co.ukwww.heraldscotland.comwww.greenocktelegraph.co.ukwww.scotsman.comwww.sundaypost.com

    Website

    www.belfasttelegraph.co.ukwww.belfasttelegraph.co.ukwww.newsletter.co.ukwww.irishnews.com

    England

    NewcastleGloucesterBlackpoolPlymouthDarlingtonBristolYorkWolverhamptonWolverhamptonSomersetDevon and CornwallDevon and CornwallWorcesterLeeds

    Scotland

    ScotlandLiverpoolPaisleyScotlandAberdeenAberdeenDundeeDundeeEdinburghEdinburghGlasgowGlasgow Glasgow GreenockScotlandScotland

    Northern Ireland

    Northern IrelandNorthern IrelandNorthern IrelandNorthern Ireland

  • 33

    Fact Book 2016

    Monthly Unique Users (000)

    471104166167991312578301301158142142313253

    Monthly Unique Users (000)

    7367477367365071797593729551,4041,5706631,5706631,404131

    Monthly Unique Users (000)

    2,8002,80089503

    Twitter Followers

    81,10712,59931,9008,54331,70061,94836,80071,99071,9908,71035,607n/a13,90091,200

    Twitter Followers

    80,333n/a3,765n/a18,00020,20016,9008,31271,40084,20043,50030,80043,5007,73284,20063,900

    Twitter Followers

    84,30084,30024,80043,837

    Facebook Likes

    139,05021,04047,56863,95013,80385,24517,36677,10877,10814,27218,636n/a19,9987,927

    Facebook Likes

    193,322n/a8,501n/a63,48019,94517,59620,376107,98981,7805,49412,3125,49418,69281,7823,467

    Facebook Likes

    154,898154,8985,33732,802

    Sales House

    TMSTMSMediaforceTMSMediaforceTMSMediaforceTMSTMSTMSTMSTMSMediaforceMediaforce

    Sales House

    TMSTMSTMSTMSMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforce

    Sales House

    MediaforceMediaforceMediaforceMediaforce

    ABC Circ

    32,84812,74413,56720,13928,81022,66718,14860,990107,68119,97024,97711,0008,48727,981

    ABC Circ

    197,58020,8975,387215,81332,82760,29246,99118,71423,76223,82132,02131,37836,98111,26427,450195,426

    ABC Circ

    45,90542,23917,85338,581

    Source: ABC Jan-June 15 (daily circ figures Mon-Sat where possible) ICREG data as of 01 Nov 15

    *Readership: NITGI15 **Oct 15 ABC

    Regional press website delivery: publisher statement *** Readership: NRS Jan-Jun 15

  • 34

    Regional Press

    Publication

    The Chronicle NewcastleThe Citizen GloucesterThe Gazette BlackpoolThe Herald PlymouthThe Northern EchoThe Post BristolThe Press YorkWest Midlands Express & Star (Mon-Wed, Fri)West Midlands Express & Star (Thur)Western Daily PressWestern Morning NewsWestern Morning News SundayWorcester NewsYorkshire Post

    Publication

    Daily Record ScotlandLiverpool Sunday EchoPaisley Daily ExpressSunday Mail (Scotland)**/***Aberdeen Evening ExpressPress & Journal AberdeenCourier & Advertiser DundeeDundee Evening TelegraphEdinburgh Evening NewsThe ScotsmanSunday Herald ScotlandGlasgow Evening TimesThe Herald ScotlandGreenock TelegraphScotland On SundaySunday Post**/***

    Publication

    Belfast Telegraph*Sunday Life (Belfast)*Ulster News Letter (Belfast)*Irish News*

    AIR Adults

    113,57834,11041,70552,97970,22560,37348,204163,885271,66952,43264,94032,12022,09796,486

    AIR Adults

    572,82058,18212,180576,40965,497129,94190,93526,04084,12585,397105,88975,981107,79427,36879,717529,055

    AIR Adults

    155,000174,00065,000154,000

    England

    NewcastleGloucesterBlackpoolPlymouthDarlingtonBristolYorkWolverhamptonWolverhamptonSomersetDevon and CornwallDevon and CornwallWorcesterLeeds

    Scotland

    ScotlandLiverpoolPaisleyScotlandAberdeenAberdeenDundeeDundeeEdinburghEdinburghGlasgowGlasgow Glasgow GreenockScotlandScotland

    Northern Ireland

    Northern IrelandNorthern IrelandNorthern IrelandNorthern Ireland

    AIR Men

    56,80017,74320,09327,09436,72331,41225,09884,292138,58827,19833,307n/a11,34564,006

    AIR Men

    293,85429,8506,216290,47132,07461,00743,4669,11441,25347,16660,18638,12555,81713,61042,710267,499

    AIR Men

    77,40083,90035,20079,500

    Continued

    Continued

    Continued

  • 35

    Fact Book 2016

    AIR Women

    56,77816,36621,61125,88533,50328,96123,10679,593133,08125,23431,633n/a10,75232,480

    AIR Women

    278,96628,3325,964285,93833,42268,93547,47016,92642,87238,23145,70337,85651,97713,75837,007261,566

    AIR Women

    78,00089,90029,80074,400

    AIR ABC1

    34,22716,51223,43125,01335,49929,70329,50763,726119,04632,33340,079n/a11,24268,431

    AIR ABC1

    175,28825,9536,625237,13323,59669,34646,6277,24441,88672,27792,40533,56592,98410,48969,096224,174

    AIR ABC1

    101,00076,20026,30079,700

    RatecardMono SCC

    24.207.7013.489.909.0015.856.5025.7528.3510.659.009.007.7518.63

    RatecardMono SCC

    42.807.1411.3259.6019.5026.7518.107.2017.8530.7410.0015.0019.008.1530.7448.50

    RatecardMono SCC

    22.4815.759.9013.25

    Pg Mono

    5,7602,0944,1252,6932,5924,4111,8727,8288,6182,8972,4482,4482,23211,476

    Pg Mono

    10,1861,9422,69414,1854,5056,1794,1811,6635,4626,2712,8804,32011,2862,1526,27111,543

    Pg Mono

    6,1154,2843,0293,604

    Pg Col

    7,7752,6185,3623,3662,5925,3891,87210,56811,6353,6213,0603,0602,23214,919

    Pg Col

    13,7522,4283,63719,1496,0818,3425,4352,0797,3387,6132,8804,32011,2863,2277,76015,006

    Pg Col

    8,8666,2124,2414,434

    Source: ABC Jan-June 15 (daily circ figures Mon-Sat where possible) ICREG data as of 01 Nov 15

    *Readership: NITGI15 **Oct 15 ABC

    Regional press website delivery: publisher statement *** Readership: NRS Jan-Jun 15

  • 36

    Regional Press

    Publication

    Daily Post WalesSouth Wales EchoSouth Wales Evening PostWales on SundayWestern Mail WalesSouth Wales Argus Newport

    Publication

    Daily Post WalesSouth Wales EchoSouth Wales Evening PostWales on SundayWestern Mail WalesSouth Wales Argus - Newport

    Name

    Big CitySunday BestThe NationalOne Local

    Name

    Big CitySunday BestThe NationalOne Local

    Website

    www.dailypost.co.ukwww.walesonline.co.ukwww.southwales-eveningpost.co.ukwww.walesonline.co.ukwww.walesonline.co.ukwww.southwalesargus.co.uk

    Website

    n/a - see individual datan/a - see individual datan/a - see individual datan/a - see individual data

    Wales

    WalesCardiffSwanseaWalesWalesNewport

    Wales

    WalesCardiffSwanseaWalesWalesNewport

    Packages

    UKUKUKUK

    Packages

    UKUKUKUK

    AIR Adults

    3,396,0003,361,0003,291,0004,218,000

    AIR Adults

    63,99051,01967,91342,11549,35332,973

    AIR Men

    1,796,0001,714,0002,102,0002,218,000

    AIR Men

    33,27026,13635,15821,63925,64516,908

  • 37

    Fact Book 2016

    Monthly Unique Users (000)

    222775146775775428

    Monthly Unique Users (000)

    n/an/an/an/a

    Twitter Followers

    50,12589,59439,2258,83289,59441,600

    Twitter Followers

    n/an/an/an/a

    Facebook Likes

    72,559175,69353,059175,699175,69929,672

    Facebook Likes

    n/an/an/an/a

    Sales House

    TMSTMSTMSTMSTMSMediaforce

    Sales House

    TMSTMSTMSMediaforce

    ABC Circ

    24,71319,15826,14414,78918,64112,671

    ABC Circ

    1,437,6521,480,3471,500,9061,787,400

    AIR Women

    1,600,0001,647,0001,542,0002,000,000

    AIR Women

    30,72124,88332,75420,47623,70816,066

    AIR ABC1

    1,248,0001,281,0001,938,0001,974,000

    AIR ABC1

    37,81724,94230,44317,29628,55213,640

    RatecardMono SCC

    200.00

    RatecardMono SCC

    11.0715.0010.7013.7327.025.63

    Pg Mono

    unpublishedunpublishedunpublished40,000

    Pg Mono

    2,6356.035.682,9103,2686,4311,621

    Pg Col

    40,000

    Pg Col

    3,5578,1483,6384,4118,6821,621

    Source: ABC Jan-June 15 (daily circ figures Mon-Sat where possible) ICREG data as of 01 Nov 15

  • 38

    Affiliates

    38

    RadioLauren Croly / Kirsty Poole / Ella MitchellMarketPlace Manager / Connect Manager / Connect Planner [email protected] / [email protected] / [email protected]

    Highlights

    Radio streaming has increased 16% vs 2013

    The Audio Digital Market has become much more simple

    XFM is rebranded as Radio X, with an exciting line-up of big talent

    Bauer media streamline their radio offering

    A look back at 2015

    The growth of digital audio

    As RAJAR published its third quarter results for the radio market, they reported a 15% growth for adult listening via the internet over the last two years, equating to 4.7m listeners (14%) per week. Seven hours of radio are now consumed via the internet every week compared to six in Q3 2013, an increase of 16%.

    With all the streaming and audio digital platforms on the market, Global Radio identified a gap to simplify this arena with the introduction of the Digital Audio Exchange (DAX) in 2014. DAX allows a single entry point, offering a one-stop shop for the management and delivery of audio adverts across 141 Digital Audio Brands.

  • 39

    Fact Book 2016

    Improved insight, better targeting

    In 2015, Xaxis Audio extended its audience targeting capabilities from general broad reach and regional targeting, to the ability to target one of any top 20 interest segments through Turbine, their Data Management Platform (DMP).

    We also saw platforms such as Acast offering detailed audience data and improved insight into the podcast market as advertisers look to capitalise on the explosion of the digital audio industry.

    Bauers implement network changes

    Bauer Radio had a number of changes across their local and national brands in 2015 this strengthened their proposition and increased their footprint across the country.

    Magic joined D2, becoming a fully national brand to closer compete with Heart

    Kisstory had an increased DAB presence in London and a selection of local multiplexes

    Kiss Fresh was also made available in London via DAB

    Bauers Place Portfolio took over Magics regional stations and The Hits, meaning for each regional FM station you now also have a second and third. These are aimed at different demographics; 15-24s, 25-44s and 45-64s

    Global Radio launch Radio X

    September 2015 saw the re-brand of XFM to Radio X, with the station focussing on drawing in a 25-44 male audience. The new line-up contains big name talent like former Radio 1 DJs Chris Moyles and Vernon Kay, as well as Johnny Vaughan, and Kaiser Chief, and Ricky Wilson. Since launch, Global Radio have seen great success; within the first month Radio X has exceeded XFMs performance in 2014, they have seen 4.8m pageviews to radioX.co.uk (XFM 2014: 2.5m), 7m app streams and over 7m video views on the Chris Moyles Radio X Facebook page.

  • 40

    Radio

    A look forward to 2016

    2016 projected revenue

    In 2016, we expect revenue to be around +4% for radio. This is due to more categories/advertisers using the channel as well as the continued support from the motor, government and retail sector.

    Key moves on the horizon

    For a while theres been speculation that talkSPORT would be the next station to be bought by another media owner. This rumour looks increasingly likely now that UTV Media has sold its television services to ITV for 100m. Many believe that they will continue to operate as a radio business under a new name. We suspect Bauer Media will be first in line to try to attain this business in 2016.

    New stations

    The second national commercial radio DAB multiplex has been awarded to Sound Digital, a combination of Arqiva, Bauer Media and UTV Media. UTV will launch two original speech stations, talkRADIO and talkSPORT 2, which will increase choice and variety for speech stations and challenge the BBCs dominance in this sector. UTVs proposed business radio station talkBUSINESS has given up its slot on Digital 2 in favour of a deal with Share Radio. Virgin Radio will return under a partnership between the Virgin Group and UTV.

    Spotify explore programmatic

    Spotify have announced that they are moving into the programmatic space, with more sophisticated targeting available within a private, invite only, marketplace for the leaderboard format. Playlist targeting is also a programmatic first, utilising Spotifys targeting capabilities. Audio will be available programmatically in the coming months as negotiations with Xasis are currently taking place. This is expected to become a big part of the Spotify business.

  • 41

    Fact Book 2016

  • 42

    Affiliates

    42

    Out Of HomeGill ReidHead of OOH [email protected]

    Highlights

    Out of Home sector continues to grow - forecast +4% for 2015

    Digital continues to be the key driver for growth, increasingly becoming more of a national offering as the footprint expands

    Technology evolution is playing an increasingly important role with dynamic delivery becoming more commonplace

    A look back at 2015

    Digital developments

    2015 has been a buoyant year across the majority of formats both classic and digital. Longer lead-in times across the market are now common place.

    JCDecaux won the tender for TfL London 6-sheets. This award consolidates Londons bus shelter contracts into a single proposition of 15,000 back lit 2sqM panels, paving the way for a significant digital transformation, as well as big changes to media owner share in this format.

    Digital development and technology continued throughout the year across all formats and in all major cities. This was in line with infrastructure development, such as in Birmingham, with the opening of the New Street Station expansion.

  • 43

    Fact Book 2016

    Digital OOH

    Throughout the year there have been further developments in more audience-led solutions via Route, plus the use of other data sets such as Touchpoints, CACI and mobile data, leading to a more targeted approach.

    Weve also seen a more connected approach with other media channels, specifically with the way OOH and mobile, and OOH and radio, have interacted to create integrated campaigns.

    We estimate that digital OOH revenue will hit 351m in 2015, representing approximately a third of all Out of Home media. Digital growth reflects the continued investment by media owners into new locations, increasing the digital footprint nationally. Its also forecast that 33% of revenue will be driven by digital by the end of 2015.

    Innovation: Jurassic World

    Jurassic Worlds takeover of Waterloo station was the biggest station takeover ever, with complete domination of every available screen, as well as live tweets and the trailer on Motion at Waterloo.

    i-beacon technology allowed commuters to listen to the audio via their smartphone which accompanied featurettes on Transvision. Visitors also had the chance to learn about dinosaurs through audio guides of the museum gallery on digital 6-sheets, where sound content was connected through smartphones via a dedicated URL.

  • 44

    Out Of Home

    Innovation: Tap To Beat Cancer

    The Cancer Research contactless payment window is a world first. It leverages existing and emerging technology to reflect changing consumer behaviour and deliver an innovative new way for Cancer Research to raise funding.

    The solution comprises a purpose-built digital screen totem with an embedded contactless payment device which is pushed flush against the store window. The screen is visible outside and the payment device works through the glass. The window is wrapped with vinyl to hide all but the screen.

    On the window is a large call-to-action, stopping passing shoppers and asking them to tap their contactless card on the window to donate to CRUK. On screen, a scientist sits idle in her lab until someone donates, then she gets up and conducts a lab task and the screen plays a thank you message.

    The campaign ran in Cancer Research stores in Marylebone, High Street Kensington, Guildford and Brighton and was planned to be installed into 6s but was trialled on store fronts.

  • 45

    Fact Book 2016

    Innovation: Coca-Cola Snow Globes

    Coca-Cola brought a snowy Christmas to the high streets with their snow globe 6-sheets. The snow globes were in fully branded bus shelter 6-sheets and activated through a touch button on the panel that played the Coca-Cola Christmas jingle and released snow in the unit.

    Ten snow globes were installed on the high streets of London, Manchester and Birmingham, alongside the Bluewater, intu Metrocentre and Bullring shopping centres.

  • 46

    Out Of Home

    Innovation: Googles AI Poster

    Google launched the first artificially intelligent poster campaign which displayed different ads depending on how people reacted to them.

    The technology used a genetic algorithm to test executions based on features such as copy, layout, font and image.

    Each poster was installed with a camera that allowed M&C Saatchi to measure peoples engagement with the ads based on whether they looked happy, sad or neutral.

    Ads that failed to trigger an engagement were eliminated, and those that prompted a reaction will be reproduced in future executions.

    During the initial launch period, the project automatically generated and displayed 1,540 adverts and tracked more than 42,000 interactions.

  • 47

    Fact Book 2016

    Innovation: Womens Aid Look At Me

    Womens Aid partnered with Ocean to create interactive billboards to recognise when people were actively paying attention to an image of a bruised woman on screen.

    This was the first digital OOH campaign ever to use peoples attention to trigger an immediate change in the creative. Those who looked at the billboard received feedback via a live video feed that ran along the bottom of the ad as a visual ticker-tape, registering an increasing number of viewers.

    As more people took notice of the image of the woman, her bruises slowly healed, demonstrating to passers-by that by not turning a blind eye, they can help confront the signs of domestic violence.

  • 48

    Out Of Home

    A look forward to 2016

    Digitisation

    Increased digitisation across the country will continue from all media owners expectation that a 35% of OOH revenue will be driven by digital come the end of the year. This digital development programme will fast-track dynamic trading models based on impacts and automated delivery.

    Well also see a move towards live availability which will allow greater audience optimisation.

    Underground, overground

    The full effect of the JCDecaux win of the TfL contract in London will be felt. A transformation programme will be put in place across the year with a move to develop 1,000 digital 6-sheet units.

    The London Underground contract will also be announced in 2016; this is the biggest of all the OOH contracts so any move of media owner will have a significant effect on share.

    If JCDecaux also win the London Underground tender this could have huge implications, significantly shifting the overall share within the UK market.

    The continued expansion of digital is leading to discussions on greater trading efficiencies. This will start with automated delivery possibly leading to the potential programmatic trading within some sectors/environments.

  • 49

    Fact Book 2016

    Med

    ia

    Com

    pute

    rs

    Gov

    t, so

    cial

    and

    pol

    itica

    l

    Food

    Drin

    k

    Reta

    il

    Mot

    ors

    Trav

    el &

    Tra

    nspo

    rt

    Fina

    nce

    Tele

    com

    s

    Ente

    rtai

    nmen

    t & L

    eisu

    re

    0102030405060

    Source: Category Expenditure NMR. H1 2015 Expenditure Outdoor Media Centre

    Top spending OOH categories H1 2015

    2008

    2009

    782

    2010

    880

    2011

    886

    2012

    970

    2013

    99020

    141010

    2015

    (f/c

    ast)

    1052

    2016

    (f/c

    ast)

    1084

    m

    OOH revenue 2008-2016

    Forecast +3.5% for 2015

    938

    2008

    2009

    2010

    2011

    2012

    2013

    2014

    2015

    (f/c

    ast)

    2016

    (f/c

    ast)

    OOH industry inflation

    -4

    -8.7

    4.4 4

    6

    2.5 33

    +3% for 2016

  • 50

    Affiliates

    50

    CinemaAmy Anderson / Gary Cook / Mesha Williams Associate Director Connect / MarketPlace Manager / Senior Buyer- Investment [email protected] / [email protected] / [email protected]

    Highlights

    2015 was all about agile planning and brands building closer strategic relationships with film through partnerships and naming rights opportunities

    The availability of the adult gold spot offers an unprecedented opportunity for brands

    2016 is all about using tech to enhance impact through a multisensory experience of cinema

    Well also see advertisers connect foyer messaging with on-screen messaging to drive relevance and recall

  • 51

    Fact Book 2016

    A look back at 2015

    A record year for film

    As anticipated, 2015 was one of the biggest years for film ever with estimated revenue predicted to be up 20% year-on-year, admissions up 9% and brand count up 30%.

    This success has been driven by the top 30 films of the year, many of which far exceeded expectations. Fifty Shades of Grey now holds the record for the biggest box office haul for an 18 certificate film, Fast and Furious 7 was the fastest film to reach $1bn globally, and in April we saw Avengers: Age of Ultron deliver the biggest ever UK box office opening. Add to this the release of Jurassic World (as of writing, the third biggest film released worldwide), Spectre, The Hunger Games and Star Wars, and it seems 2015 was destined to be a stellar year for cinema.

    Family films have also performed incredibly well in 2015. Pixar released two films in the same calendar year; Inside Out and The Good Dinosaur. On top of this, family features Inside Out, Minions and Home all reached the top 10 for the year, over-delivering +30% compared to expectations.

    The gold spot

    The most significant change in 2015 for Cinema has been the availability of the adult gold spot in the absence of an annual deal taken up by a single brand. With 100% of audience attendance at this point in the reel, this offers an opportunity for brands to create increased standout, maximum impact, and a further premium offering to the silver spot.

  • 52

    Cinema

    Improved agility

    In 2015, we continued to see brands capitalise on cinemas increased planning agility. This has included bespoke day-of-week and time-of-day planning, in line with in-store promotions or TV launches. Weve also seen an increase in proximity planning using postcode mapping tools, which have allowed advertisers to run bespoke creative based on the audiences proximity to the nearest retailer, driving both relevance and recall.

    As content creation continues to be the centre of brands connected media planning strategies, we have seen increased interest in the content spot positioned after the main ad reel and before the silver spot. An opportunity for brands to showcase their longer, most engaging creatives on the big screen in a premium position in reel.

    We have seen the quality of the cinema experience continue to improve with 4K capable projectors being installed across the network to ensure the strongest, sharpest picture available, as well as Dolby Atmos sound technology ensuring theconsumerexperience is as premium and impactful as ever.

    Non reel/in foyer activity has extended to owning naming rights of specific chains/sites, including the IMAX. Naming rights opportunities exist across screens, signage on building exteriors as well as the seat head rests and bars an incredibly effective way for a brand to align with both the film itself and the leading film technology at the heart of British cinema.

    It is unsurprising that in a year where we have seen the release of films most anticipated blockbusters, we have seen a rise in pre-booked ticket sales. On average, a third of sales are pre-booked, with 26% online via laptop, tablet or PC and 4% on mobile.

  • 53

    Fact Book 2016

    UK top films 2015 Box office performance

    Star Wars: The Force Awakens007 SpectreJurassic WorldThe Avengers: Age of UltronMinionsInside OutFast & Furious 7Fifty Shades of GreyThe Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2The Martian

    113.96m94.74m64.48m 48.34m47.71m39.24m38.64m35.05m29.96m23.51m

  • A look forward to 2016

    Enhancing the user experience

    Investment into improving the user experience is set to continue into 2016, with the roll-out of more 4DX cinemas. 4DX gives a glimpse into what the future of cinema might be. The state of the art technology delivers a fully immersive cinematic experience, meaning movies are no longer bound by their visual and acoustic limits. The experience is meant to stimulate all your senses, not just sight and hearing. Vibrating motion seats move in synchronisation with the action on the screen, while jets of air recreate the temperatures and conditions depicted on screen. These extra sensations heighten the excitement and keep the audience involved.

    Cinema gets personal

    As a result of the continued modernisation of the industry through developments in digital technology, brands now have the ability to personalise their adverts on and off screen. Innovations in the cinema space will continue into 2016, with brands having the opportunity to influence the big screen and the foyer in a more personalised way. Content generated in the cinema foyer via interactive digital 6-sheets can be connected with on-screen adverts, repeating messages, making ads personal and unique. Cinemagoers are fully engaged and very receptive, meaning that a brands message is more likely to be at the forefront of their mind. According to research conducted by Millward Brown, cinema has the strongest combined brand impact of any medium, and with the introduction of 37 Degrees, it is now possible for brands to capture audiences undivided attention in a new and refreshing way. 37 Degrees technology allows two different images to be projected onto a cinema screen simultaneously with the viewer only seeing one due to the specially adapted 3D glasses. This means that a cinemagoer may not have the same experience as the person sat next to them. We believe that the technology is an exciting way to spark powerful awareness in a creative way.

    2016s most anticipated releases

    Cinema in 2016 is expected to be stronger than ever, with an estimated 168m industry admissions due to a spectacular slate of films. In 2016, there will be a selection of main releases and blockbusters such as Captain America: Civil War, Star Trek Beyond, X-Men: Apocalypse, The Hateful Eight, and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Next year will also see the release of the new Star Wars: Rogue One, which has a conservative box office prediction of 60m. Further to this superb line-up, family films are expected to continue to perform well at the box office, solidifying the strength of this genre. Four of the top ten predicted box office films are family focused, with Finding Dory, and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, having box office expectations of 45m each. To put this into context, blockbuster Avengers: Age of Ultron took 48m at the box office last year.

    Cinema

    54

  • UK top films 2016 Predicted box office performance

    Star Wars: Rogue OneFantastic Beasts and Where to Find ThemFinding DoryBatman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Captain America: Civil WarThe BFGX-Men: ApocalypseStar Trek BeyondThe Secret Life of PetsBourne 5

    60m45m45m35m35m35m28m25m25m20m

    Fact Book 2016

    55

  • 56

    Cinema

    Cinema is alive and well

    Cinema buying routes

    Admissions (m)

    Calendar Year

    2012

    2013

    2014

    2015

    2016

    172m

    166m

    158m

    172m

    168m

    150

    155

    160

    165

    170

    175

    Source: CEA Admissions 2012-2015

    Geo Targeting

    Film Package

    Premium/Youth/ Male/Female/Family AGP

    Audience Guarantee Pack (AGP)

  • 57

    Fact Book 2016

    Cinema pushes buttons the other media cant

    Source: CAA FAME 2014. Base 11+ Q.

    Source: DCM

    Focused

    Relaxed

    Stimulated

    Distracted

    Engaged

    Excited

    Attentive

    Uninterested

    Bored

    Involved

    Passive

    Happy

    Tired

    Cinema

    TV

    Internet

    Magazines/newspapers

    Radio

    95%of copy used on cinema Is TV copy

    (people just think its better)

  • 58

    Cinema

    5 key takeaways

    The cinema ad reel

    Standard Pricing

    +15%

    +30%

    +60%

    Ident

    Ident

    Main Ad Reel

    Cinime

    Trailers

    Film

    Content Spot

    Silver Spot

    Gold Spot

    OneTwoThreeFourFive

    Cinema makes brands memorable

    Cinema creates a brand love story

    Cinema makes brands feel different

    Cinema turns audiences into customers

    Cinema wins influential fans for brands

  • 59

    Fact Book 2016

    Our core audience are light TV viewers

    Source: CAA/IMS Coverage & Frequency 2014

    Source: Hall and Partners

    67%

    8x 3x 2x

    65%

    49%

    25%

    ABC1

    More Stand Out More Brand Attribution More Memorable

    15-44s

    Men

    London & South East TV Region

    172 millionAdmissions per year

  • 60

    Affiliates

    60

    Direct ResponseJames Hyams / Jody AirdBusiness Directors [email protected] / [email protected]

    Highlights

    2015 was a year in which we saw the mass market consumer responding through multi-channel journeys, with brands addressing this behaviour through their communication infrastructure

    Advertisers are now having to make larger optimisation decisions to drive performance, and these optimisations are being made in real time to drive efficiency through the entire communications system

    In 2016 well see previously untapped conversion opportunities opening up thanks to new technologies that facilitate purchase, with brands determining the incremental gains

    The decision-making across the complete communication plan, and the understanding of the interdependencies within the communication system, will be a major focus to ensure all potential demand is extracted from the market

    The advances in mobile, coupled with an increase in showrooming among consumers, will need to be turned into opportunities to drive incremental response

  • 61

    Fact Book 2016

    A look back at 2015

    Leaving linear behind

    Response continued to evolve in 2015. As dynamics moved away from linear response via the phone or last/first click, we saw a move towards multi-channel response with consumers choosing the most convenient route depending on the task at hand. For example, people will respond to a press advert or TV advert via the device or method they feel most comfortable with. Instead of using a phone or test response, consumers are much more likely to pick up a mobile or tablet and search for something related to the advert rather than call the number included.

    This has led to both the method and the time of consumer responses changing dramatically. Mobile is now the go-to platform for consumers responding to marketing stimuli, though for some, desktop remains important for actual transactions. A focus on activity across the entire communications system is now vital.

    The evolution of mobile has meant that daytime TV response is now upwards of 70% on the web, with TV driving on average 13% of total online response. This was illustrated by our recent work with Thinkbox on the new rules and new roles of TV response.

    13%

    13%

    13%

    14%

    15% 17%

    18%

    E-Commerce

    40%

    26%

    34%

    Bricks &Mortar

    Source: TV response: new rules, new roles 2015. Based on 8 brands

  • 62

    Direct Response

    Shifts in optimisation

    Text response continues to perform well, offering incremental responses to TV in particular for charity and telecommunications advertisers who have seen text response become a mainstay of their DRTV planning.

    Micro-optimisation has since become less important and the testing of new routes to market outside of traditional DRTV buys, such as sponsorships and early peak, are showing positive results as we take into account total response impact.

    Within TV these routes have included areas such as buying specific audiences akin to brand buys and post peak proving cost-effective alongside increased use of TV sync and DRTV Extend (VOD). Audience-specific buys in particular are showing significant traction despite the increased cost.

    This is not limited to TV however, as traditionally high-performing channels (such as DR Print) have fast become difficult to optimise on short-term response metrics, so audience planning combined with econometric learning is now key for justification.

    We are starting to see other channels, which have been historically less effective on a linear basis (like radio), begin to play an important role in response driving plans. This is particularly the case since the advent of digital radio buys combined with programmatic through Xaxis.

    0

    50

    100

    150

    200

    250

    PPC

    55

    DRT

    V

    60

    DR

    Dis

    play

    67

    DR

    Radi

    o

    95

    Inse

    rts

    160

    DRT

    V Pe

    ak

    207

    Nat

    Pre

    ss

    212

    CPA

    Performance Index

    Radio CPA

    Source: Business Science Economiser

  • 63

    Fact Book 2016

    Optimising the system

    This has meant there is now an increasing need for broader performance frameworks that take into account all forms of response to ensure justification for broadcast channels within a media plan.

    This in turn has lead to the need for greater understanding of the consumer purchase journey and the context behind consumers decision-making to ensure that response comms are relevant and persuasive. Its not enough to focus on the areas that traditionally performed well, we need to understand and measure the whole system of communications.

    Investment in response channels has moved proportionally towards digital to better match the way consumers are spending their time and being influenced by media. 58% of all spend across response driven media is now devoted to digital. Testing has also been consistent on newer routes to market such as Xaxis TV sync, Sky advance and Group M LIVE Audience.

    Mobile investment is starting to grow for MediaCom Response clients as smartphone use becomes an integral part of the retail experience. Shopping with a mobile device, checking prices and searching for deals is now commonplace and will only become more prevalent in years to come. Because of this, there will naturally be value in testing new routes-to-purchase early in a bid to outsmart competitors and discover untapped methods of reaching consumers on their purchase journey.

  • 64

    Direct Response

    A look forward to 2016

    Systems, not silos

    In 2016, brands with a complete understanding of their communication system will see the biggest gains. This understanding will enable brands across all sectors to respond to their performance needs in a timely fashion, maximising business return. The alignment of communication teams will ensure the response strategy is driving optimum returns by developing and understanding the full impact of the system. Brands which are at the forefront of system-based planning already have four core components in place for the coming year:

    1. Total ROI impact in the short- and long-term of channel investment decisions

    2. Time to response increases in investment and an understanding of when the return should be delivered

    3. Scalability content distribution plans that can be deployed at scale delivering tailored/personalised consumer journeys through AV, programmatic and CRM

    4. Test and learn plan with the purpose of activating strategy and approach in the most impactful and effective method

    The short-term response drivers PPC, daytime TV (DRTV) and affiliates are all expected to inflate in the coming year. These factors already account for 40-45% of a brands marketing investment. Brands are looking for response solutions that offset inflation primarily through onsite optimisation, investment limits, and content. Onsite optimisation and sales attribution will include greater path-to-purchase understanding on all variables incorporating onsite attribution to the relevant media, dynamic web chat-based on orientation, increased localised understanding, dynamic landing pages and effective use of digital retargeting across VOD, display and Facebook. Well also see investment into further understanding the dark side of media optimisation, the aspects which make a difference but are challenging when determining the ROI i.e. operations and external factors.

  • 65

    Fact Book 2016

    Competitor Online

    Seas

    onali

    ty

    Econ

    omy

    Offl ineSocial

    Website/

    DistributionPromo

    Price

    Operations

    MediaEx

    tern

    al

    Sales

    The components of a direct response framework

  • 66

    Direct Response

    In-market moments

    In-market content plans that trigger on identifiable purchase signals to drive relevancy and reasons to buy, will create a natural uplift on SEM traffic. The in-market content will have to cut through with the right consumers as

    the volume of content grows exponentially. Every minute 4.2m Facebook posts and 300 hours of new YouTube content are uploaded. In 2015, a home improvement company made major media saving of 3.7m by investing in an in-market content plan with scalable distribution.

    The adoption of key media developments within programmatic, AV, SEM and mobile conversion will provide brands with incremental response gains. Programmatic will offer greater data segmentation, utilising Live Audience to identity the responsive audiences through the use of data management platforms.

    In TV, there have been three key developments:

    DRTV Extend supplying scalable and cost efficient video on demand that is optimised in real time

    TV and digital sync through Xaxis Sync and Sky AdVance maximising presence to potential impact consumers

    Spotlift maximising optimisation through responsive allocation across mobile, web, tablets, text and telephony

    Well see the Identification of Micro In-Market Buying Moments that trigger personalised messaging and propositions across display, VOD, search and email. Through mobile, contactless and OOH response, every offline touchpoint could become a conversion/ecommerce opportunity. Take Cancer Researchs Tap to Beat Cancer campaign in which window displays in select Cancer Research stores were turned into a contactless donation channel. This sought to combat the potential fall in donations as we move towards a cashless society. On making their contribution, donors would see a short video of a scientist at work in a lab, providing immediate feedback to their actions.

    In-market mobile response continues to grow, with consumer showrooming (viewing merchandise in a traditional retail environments, and then buying online) becoming mass and habitual. Brands that are able to capitalise on this will see incremental conversion gains particularly if linked through Apple Pay, which will allow brands to take advantage of moments of impulse.

    Every minute 4.2m Facebook posts and 300 hours of new YouTube content are uploaded.

  • 67

    Fact Book 2016

    Summary

    2015 represented a transition period for the discipline of response based marketing activity. 2016 promises to be the year in which both clients and agencies will fully embrace system-based planning. The means by which consumers consume and respond to media has changed to such a degree that this shift is inevitable.

    While this evolution will involve an initial leap of faith the rewards are already proving to be vast. Brands who have moved from linear based planning into a system approach are seeing improvements in marketing return on investment from anywhere between 10-20%. Simply by understanding the consumers motivations at particular stages of the purchase cycle and ensuring we feed them a relevant message we can both improve performance levels and sow the seeds for a longer-term conversation.

    Technology will be at the forefront of this development. New and bespoke tracking and reporting systems now provide advertisers with clear insight into their optimum mix of media channels alongside the ability to optimise their campaigns on a real-time basis, aided by the growth of mobile.

    For those brands willing to embrace the new environment, 2016 promises to be a year of opportunity.

  • 6868

    Direct MailMatthew OramAssociate Director, Response One [email protected]

    Highlights

    Direct mail is the UKs third largest media channel with an ad spend of 965m in H1 2015, the highest since 2010, and on a par with Online

    Changes to EU Data Regulation and developments within the charity sector have brought consumer privacy into sharper focus

    Integration, personalisation and programmatic buying are key areas for direct mail in 2016

    A look back at 2015

    The private life of mail

    In many ways, 2015 felt like the year that direct mail stepped out of the shadows and back into the minds of both media professionals and the wider UK public. A huge catalyst for this was MarketReachs comprehensive and compelling study The Private Life of Mail, supported by MediaComs own Chairwoman, Karen Blackett OBE, as part of Royal Mails Mailmen campaign.

  • 69

    Fact Book 2016

    The impact of mail

    Focusing on the impact of mail on the home, heart, head and wallet, the research delivered actionable insight and revealed the following:

    39% of mail recipients say they have a dedicated display area in their home where they put mail

    Mail is kept in a household on average for 17 days for advertising mail, 38 days for door drops, and 45 days for bills and statements

    57% of consumers claim that receiving mail makes them feel more valued

    The total communications ROI for campaigns which included mail was 12% higher than those that didnt

    Taken as a whole, the key message to marketeers was that mail as a medium has a unique power to cement the presence of brands in the minds of consumers, but only if used correctly and properly integrated with other channels.

    Tighter regulations

    In the public arena, mail was cast in a less favourable light in what were perceived aggressive marketing campaigns by the charity sector, a topic which attracted significant coverage in the latter half of 2015. Though much of the ire was directed at telemarketing techniques, the resulting changes to the Institute of Fundraising Code of Practice have impacted mail too, limiting charities fundraising abilities through tighter enforcement of donor data broking and sharing. On a broader scale, new EU Data Regulations are reaching the final stages of drafting and will be ratified this year. As such, the onus for 2016 onward is to deliver mail solutions which still maximise the strengths of the channel (tangibility, emotional impact, personalisation) without compromising the protection of consumers and their privacy.

  • 70

    Direct Mail

    A look forward to 2016

    This time its personal

    One of mails greatest strengths is its ability to put a relevant message in the hands of every person it reaches. Advertisers have known this for years, but to date, the uptake and implementation of advanced personalisation has been slow. Developments in digital printing, web-to-print software and CRM segmentation mean that the barrier to entry is now lower than ever (both in terms of resource and cost). Advertisers must realise the tangible benefit to long-term response and ROI which better personalisation brings, and embrace it across all of their campaign activity. Royal Mail MarketReachs This Time Its Personal research includes many practical recommendations on how to make the most of what you know about your customers and prospects. A great case study is Homebases use of customer lifecycle data to develop personalised communication strategies, resulting in a 350% uplift in ROI.

    Another key factor in the success of the Homebase campaign was its integration with email and in-store campaigns. As noted in last years Fact Book, multi- and omni-channel marketing is fast becoming the norm in response to changing consumer behaviour and mail must be embraced as part of the modern marketeers armoury. At a brand level, mail can reinforce mainst