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Mount Allison and Sackville — a hub of culture and creativity R ECORD R ECORD Summer ‘08 Magazine for Mount Allison’s Alumni and Friends No. 88

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RECORDSummer 08 Magazine for Mount Allisons Alumni and Friends No. 88

Mount Allison and Sackville a hub of culture and creativity

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Be yourself. Belong. Be Better.

Be morein New BrunswickWith growth comes opportunity. Find your career or start your own business in a growing economy. Belong to a welcoming community in Canadas only o cially bilingual province. Be yourself and be better in a place where your dollar buys more, houses cost less and you are always close to family and friends. Be adventurous. Minutes away from your home, school or workplace, you can be shing, whale watching, cross-country skiing, gol ng, or cycling along quiet trails.

Think about it.Population Growth Secretariat www.gnb.ca/population NBjobs.ca

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Contents4 Events and Gatherings Campus Beat Spotlight on Students 2008 Reunion Photos Jump Update New Campaign Total Profile: GaRRy Williams (01) Profile: Eleanor McCain (91) Profile: Matthew Jocelyn (79) In Memoriam 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 6 10 13 18 19 20 21 22

21Bleacher Feature Sappy Records Music Festival Student fund raisers Staff Profile: Dan Steeves (81) Profile: Mike de Adder (91) Profile: Deanna Musgrave (05) Profile: John Haney (01) Class Notes Lots of pots on lots of burners

3020 Eleanor McCain has developed a soft, intimate style of song. 21 Matthew Jocelyn developed a national drama centre in France. 30 John Haney portrayed almost 100 Sackvillians in a series of stunning portraits.

31 36

Photo: Halifax Herald Limited

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Mount Allison Record Summer 2008 No. 88 New Series The Record is published three times annually. Editor: Sheila (Berridge) Blagrave (75) Assistant Editor: Laura Dillman Ripley Design, Layout: Shane McDonald Contributing Writers: Sheila (Berridge) Blagrave (75) Laura Dillman Ripley Mona Estabrooks (79) Lesley Johnson (94) Dean Lisk (99) (The Metro Halifax) Susanne MacDonald Alasdair MacLean (Music) Matt Mosher (Student Intern) Sue Seaborn Alison Smith (08) Barbie Smith (75) Sasha Van Katwyk (11) Deborah Wills (English) Photography: Nadine LeBlanc Susanne MacDonald Laura Dillman Ripley Sue Seaborn Send correspondence regarding editorial policy and subscriptions to: Mount Allison Record 82A York Street Sackville, NB E4L 1G2 Tel: 506-364-2600 Fax: 506-364-2623 [email protected] Contents Copyright 2008 by Mount Allison University and may not be reprinted without permission. Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Mount Allison University. Single Copy: $9.00 Subscription: $25 for three issues ISSN 1702-2525 Mailed under Canada Post Publication Mail Sales Agreement no. 40006414 Mailed by: Precision Direct Marketing Printed by: Advocate Imprimerie Maritime Press If you wish to make a donation to Mount Allison, please contact Susan Springer at 506-364-2341 or by e-mail ([email protected]) Please forward change of address information to Joy Wilbur ([email protected]) 506-364-2608. Cover Photo: Student Mio Yamane with artist,teacher, technician, and alumnus Dan Steeves.

Editors NoteSome things are timeless. Culture and creativity, the themes of this issue of the Record, are among them. In May, during an evening charged with expectation, Leonard Cohen played to a packed house at the Capitol Theatre in Moncton. My 18-year-old son was there, as blown away by Cohens mystique, machismo, and music as the largely 50-something crowd. As he put it, Cohen exceeded my expectations beyond my wildest dreams. I think the same was true for every member of the audience as this tireless 74-year-old gave encore after encore (eight songs in total) to thunderous applause. I was 18 when I first discovered Cohen, giving my first nervous and exhilarating presentation at Mount A, taking an audience of my peers and one supportive professor, through Cohens poetry, prose, and persona. So imagine my delight when my son discovered Cohen all on his own at the same age. Call it karma, or call it a universal response to the magic of music, live performance, and art that moves us all. This iconoclastic, quintessentially Canadian performer is one example of the creativity that abounds in this country. Mount Allison, as a microcosm of the country, has a seemingly inexhaustible supply of culture and creativity supported by our new Strategic Statement, and enjoyed by so many who live, study, and visit here. In fact, this campus hums with the same kind of ageless creativity embodied by Cohen, with just about as many encores and just as much affection and appreciation. A quick scan of Maritime headlines in May reveals the following: Musical Theatre Scholar wins Tucker Teaching Award Mount A Student Wins 2008 Atlantic Young Artist Competition Festival by the Marsh Offers Exciting Workshops in Voice, Musical Theatre, Pin-hole Photography, and Novel Writing Local Authors Debut Novel Delves into Silent Film Industry The Owens Art Gallery Salon Hanging is a Floor-to-Ceiling Feast for the Eyes. And this issue of the Record pays homage to some of the Allisonians who make art, in its many forms, their lifes work. Printmaker Dan Steeves has devoted 27 years to mentoring students at Mount A and is developing a major reputation as an artist through his books and exhibitions that span the country. Michael de Adder decided to become a political cartoonist when he was wandering the library stacks as a Mount Allison student. Deanna Musgrave has been called one of the young artists to watch in Atlantic Canada and she graduated from Mount Allison only three years ago. Songstress Eleanor McCain is wooing crowds with her mellifluous voice and even capturing the attention of such superstars as David Foster. GaRRy Williams, the artistic director of DaPoPo Theatre in Halifax, sees culture as a vital service to society, while Matthew Jocelyn has been the passionate theatre director of the National Theatre Centre in Paris. And John Haney, during a three-week residency for Festival by the Marsh, produced 92 photographic portraits of people in Sackville right in their own backyards, illustrating that culture and creativity surrounds all of us all of the time. And, of course, the other timeless, even abiding value of Mount Allison, is the affection its alumni show for their alma mater when they return for Reunion Weekend. Their smiling faces are shown in the pages ahead and in Alumni Online. We all thank you from the bottom of our hearts for turning out once again to elevate the excitement on campus even more and to show us how you are all making the world a warmer and better place always in creative ways. And hats off to our new 2008 grads who will soon make their way in a bigger world, armed with the skills they have learned here in critical thinking, creative thought, active engagement, and community involvement. You have made our world all the richer and there is no doubt you will enhance the communities in which you will soon become new or returning citizens. And before too long your reunion photos will appear in upcoming issues of the Record as you join the happy Mount Allison family that exists across this broad land. We know that you, too, will exceed our wildest expectations.

Sheila (Berridge) Blagrave (75)

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Alumni PresidentMount Allison so fair, beyond the marshes there Her fame spread far and wide to every shore. Barbie Smith (75) Forgive my sentimentality, but I have just returned from Reunion Weekend at Mount Allison. There I saw tears in the eyes of alumni who were participating in their 50th reunion pin ceremony and laughter in the faces of those celebrating their 25th anniversary after reliving their past in the local pub. Residing within my small town of St. Andrews, NB with a permanent population of only 1,800 people, I still manage to see many Allisonians creating opportunities for the young, the old, and everyone in between, even in such a small town. Last month, for example, I attended an opening of an exhibit that featured works from students and their mentors from Mount Allisons fine arts department. In attendance were those students and their teachers, as well as current Allisonians and prospective students. Generations of Allisonians past, present, and future were buzzing at the beauty surrounding them. And it was an alumnus who created this opportunity. Allisonians are spearheading this kind of opportunity, not only with the creative and dramatic arts, but also within various areas of their communities all over the world, enriching the lives of everyone they meet, wherever they are. If you take St. Andrews as an example of what is happening and has been made possible by an Allisonian and magnify this throughout the global community, you will hear a genuine creative hum. So, taking artistic license with our alma mater song, Mount A IS indeed a vibrant creative community beyond the marshes, spreading her beauty throughout the arts to every shore. I am now calling on your help. Like the Allisonians in St. Andrews, there are movers and shakers in your home communities who have contributed greatly to the improvement of the lives of others. The Contemporary Achievement and Lifetime Achievement Awards were created for people like these Mount Allison graduates who are now making a difference in their home communities. It is from you that we learn of their names and contributions. Please take the time to tell me about someone you know who has made such a difference. Your nomination of someone you know who has been making a difference will help the Alumni Board make more informed decisions about the important awards we bestow each year. This years winners are identified on the inside back cover. In closing I would like to publicly thank the two retiring members of the Alumni Board. Denise Schofield (90) and Beth MacMichael (78) have served you well for nine and eight years respectively. And I would also like to welcome our new Board members, Layton Fisher (57) and Sean Connors (81).

Mount Allison Alumni Board of DirectorsPresident: Barbie Smith (75) 506-529-4734 [email protected] Vice-President & Secretary: Andrew A. Clark (98) 416-465-7078 [email protected] Past President: David Greenwood (58) 506-387-4029 [email protected] Honorary President: Louise (Oates) Cooke (70) [email protected]: Robert (Bob) Benn (52) 506-459-4457 Sean M. Connors (81) 506-384-5570 [email protected] Anne-Katherine Dionne (88) 416-962-0100 [email protected] Gerard dEntremont (90) 902-365-2034 [email protected] Scott Ellison (92) 902-422-0415 [email protected] Layton Fisher (57) 506-939-2935 [email protected] Amy MacAdam (02) 506-642-9719 [email protected] Sharon (Smith) Moyse (67) 902-436-5157 [email protected] Paul Pergau (67) 519-434-2490 [email protected] Margaret (Doane) Poole (87) 902-443-1410 [email protected] David Rose (90) 613-231-4446 [email protected] Kathie Wheadon-Hore (80) 902-444-9127 [email protected] Executive Director: Carolle de Ste-Croix (90) Tel: 506-364-2348 Fax: 506-364-2262 [email protected] http://alumni.mta.ca Nominations Call Nominations are open for the Alumni Board. The Board works to promote and motivate the participation of alumni and friends of Mount Allison with the University, through effective communication, events, and special initiatives.

Barbie Smith (75)

Address nominations to: Carolle de Ste-Croix, Alumni Office 82A York St., Sackville, NB E4L 1G2 or [email protected]

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Play Up! Events GatheringsFor more photos from the events listed below, please visit the Chapter pages on Alumni Online: http://alumni.mta.ca

&

UK Alumni LuncheonAlumni enjoyed an amusing, interesting, and touching talk about Mount Allison presented by guest speaker, Alex Fancy (61), professor emeritus of Mount Allison and director of Tintamarre. Kyle Hill (06), Mount Allisons 46th Rhodes Scholar, was also present to talk about his experiences at Oxford University.

Ottawa Alumni ReceptionThe Workshop Studio and Boutique, co-owned by Bridget Remai (98) and Christina Ballhorn, provided a great venue to meet new friends and to catch up on the news with old friends from Mount Allison.

Left to right are: Kristin Shannon (99) and Meghan Ash (99).

Front row from left to right are: Leigh Hull (04), Melissa Prince (02); second row Kim Pryde (86), Michael Bumsted (06), Caitlin Wolfe-Liblong (05), Alex Fancy (61), Carolyn Rennie (02), Eric Brown (77); third row Margaret Fancy, Marylin (Russell) Smith (61), Foye (Organ) Weatherhead (61), Keti Cross, Barb Crowther (79); back row Ron Dawson (59), Donald Cross, Kyle Hill (06), Dave Henry (75); Missing from the photo: Megan MacDonald (00) and Michael Espinoza.

St. Andrews ReceptionAlumni and friends were invited to participate in a reception celebrating the exhibition Small Works by Mount Allison Fine Art students and faculty.

New York Alumni ReceptionNew York and area alumni joined Mount Allison Commerce students and staff who took a recent field trip to the Big Apple.

Sackville Alumni ReceptionCranewood provided a wonderful setting for Sackville and area alumni to meet and mingle.

Mount Allison students and faculty outside the Sunbury Shores Arts & Nature Centre for the launch of Small Works.

Osaka and Tokyo Alumni EventsLeft to right are Rannoch Harley (08), Dr. Ben O. Umeze (77), and Nick Harley (05). Dr. Lary Trites (81) and Ron Sutherland (78).

Alumni enjoyed get-togethers at the Hub English Pubs in both Osaka and

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Tokyo. Stephen McClatchie, VicePresident, Academic and Research, and Adam Christie (96), MASSIE program co-ordinator, were both in attendance.

EVENT CALENDAR:Please visit the Chapter pages on Alumni Online (http://alumni.mta.ca) for information about upcoming events.

July 19Alumni and friends join Dr. Kevin Lynch for a group photo!

Sixth Annual University Alumni Picnic in Victoria

Other Events This YearObviously having a great time at the Osaka event!

What are Allisonians reading this summer?

27th Florida Alumni Luncheon March 1, 2008 32nd Annual All-Canada Alumni Dinner in Washington, D.C. April 26, 2008 2008 ICAN Curling Bonspiel in Ottawa April 26, 2008

The Staircase Letters by Arthur Motyer, with Elma Gerwin and Carol ShieldsPublished by Random HouseIn late 07 I attended a reading of The Staircase Letters. Though intensely personal, I somehow felt a part of the story. After reading the book, I once again felt privileged to be given such an intimate glance at the lives of three people. Motyer brings the lessons he learned from two extraordinary women to a wider audience and complements them with his own insights. The result is a beautiful piece to which anyone can relate and from which all can learn. Alison Smith (08)

At the Tokyo event from left to right: Ryoko Nakanishi (06); Adam Christie (96), Hikari Ogawa (06), Ai Satoh (07), and Stephen McClatchie.

HIGHER EDUCATIONPROUDLY SERVING THE MOUNT ALLISON COMMUNITY. VISIT ARAMARK AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATION

Aramark

Beatitudes by Hermngilde ChiassonPublished by Goose LaneHermngilde Chiassons Beatitudes is a contemporary take on the well-known biblical blessings from the Gospel of Matthew. Like those familiar prayers, these also highlight the forgotten and downtrodden souls of the world and their eventual reward in the afterlife, in a brilliant litany describing a vast range of life experiences and states of mind. In what feels like an extended jazz improvisation of poetic expression, Chiassons acute perception and empathic wisdom hold a mirror up to our human condition. Alasdair MacLean (82), Assistant Professor of Music , Mount Allison University.

Saint John Alumni ReceptionMany thanks to Dick Daigle (89), owner of Boilerworks in Saint John, for hosting a great alumni reception.

IN JENNINGS HALL THE FLYING BEAN CAF IN THE RALPH PICKARD BELL LIBRARY (Monday-Thursday 8:30 am- 8:30 pm) (Friday 8:30 am- 3:30 pm) (Saturday 4:30 pm- 8:30 pm)

Silver Salts by Mark BlagavePublished by Cormorant BooksWhat sets Silver Salts apart is Lillie Dempster and her defining interactions with, resistance to, and submersion in the age and arts of reproduction. As an artists model, aspiring actress, and body double, Lillie is the object of multiple desires, her image circulating formally and endlessly through her world, often as a commodity over which she has no control andfromwhichshederiveslittlebenefit.Herrelationshiptoher own image and the ways in which she can and cannot control it is subtle, occasionally perplexing, and, like the moving pictures she falls in love with, always in motion. Dr. Deborah Wills , Associate Professor of English, Mount Allison University.

Left to right are Katie Bryniak (03), Gordon Jennings (93), and Stephanie (McIntosh) Sutton (93).

Ottawa Cocktail ReceptionAlumni enjoyed a wonderful talk by Dr. Kevin Lynch (72), Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet.

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CAMPUS BEATFor more campus stories please go to www.mta.ca/extrelations/campus_notebook.html

Atlantic Premiers hit the ice with the MountiesMount Allison welcomed the Atlantic Premiers along with cabinet ministers from all four provinces to campus this January. The high-profile contingent chose Mount Allison as the site for a Meeting of Atlantic Cabinets, the first in over a decade. The meetings proved productive with the provinces signing agreements in six different areas: energy; health and wellness; literacy; aquaculture; procurement; and transportation. During their visit, the politicians also hit the ice with the womens hockey team in a shinny hockey game that served as a fund raiser for the Sackville Food Bank.

Between Chancellor John Bragg, left, and President Robert Campbell, right, are honorary degree recipients Donald Sobey, Alda Landry, Kevin Lynch, and David Adams Richards.

Convocation 2008Approximately 385 new Allisonians joined the alumni ranks this year as campus buzzed with excitement during Spring Convocation held May 26. Among our outstanding grads were honorary degree recipients: Dr. Kevin Lynch (72), Chief Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet of the Government of Canada; David Adams Richards, a national award-winning author from New Brunswick; Donald Sobey, Chairman Emeritus of the Empire Company Ltd., and Alda Landry, a distinguished Moncton lawyer, business woman, and politician.

Tucker Award goes to Beatles fanMusic professor Dr. Elizabeth Wells is this years recipient of the Herbert and Leota Tucker Teaching Award, one of the highest teaching awards given at Mount Allison. Dr. Wells has taught at Mount Allison since 2001, engaging students in courses such as the popular Beatles course. Prior to coming to Mount A, Dr. Wells worked not only as a musicologist but also as a music programmer and producer and a production stage manager for the Eastman Opera Theatre.

Premier Shawn Graham and Mount Allison President Dr. Robert Campbell, (right) shake hands following the game. The NB/NS team beat the PEI/NL squad in a 4-3 shoot out.

For the latest alumni news, check out our Alumni Blog! http://mtaalumni.blogspot.com

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English professor named 3M FellowMount Allison English professor and performer extraordinaire Dr. Robert Lapp has been honoured as a 2008 National 3M Teaching Fellow. Only 10 fellowships are presented each year across the country and Dr. Lapp is one of two New Brunswick professors to receive the prestigious award for 2008. Mount Allison, with four 3M Fellows to date, has earned 20 per cent of the awards given to teachers in the Maritimes provinces since the inception of the award. According to a former student, Dr. Robert Lapp, an expert in 18th and 19th century literature, doesnt just teach, he dances!

A little art every day as directedIn March fine arts grads Jon Sasaki (96) and Kelly Mark in an exhibit curated by Owens gallery intern Mary MacDonald (06), delighted viewers and a crowd of fine arts and art history grads, including, left to right, Dennis Reid (06), Darlene Tehan, Lesley Johnson (94), Jessica Korderas (07), Johanna Amos (05), Evan Rensch (06), Amanda Fauteux (06), Lianne Zannier (06), Lucy MacDonald (98), Jon Sasaki (96), and Mary MacDonald.

Florida in the Winter...Celebrated academic and best-selling author of The Rise of the Creative Class and The Flight of the Creative Class, Richard Florida, delivered a Wilford B. Jonah Lecture this year entitled, The Creative Class: The Role of the Artistic Community in Building Towns and Cities. Florida, a prolific columnist, is head of the University of Torontos Martin Prosperity Institute and a professor of business and creativity at the Rotman School of Management.

Through rain, wind, and snow...Mount Allison President Dr. Robert Campbell was named Chair of a strategic review of the Canada Post Corporation by the Honourable Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Transport, Infrastructure, and Communities and Minister responsible for Canada Post. Dr. Campbell has studied postal systems around the world and is currently completing a study on the Universal Post Union.

Richard Florida chats with students during his visit to Mount Allison.

MABRG receives funds from the CIHRWhat to feed the baby? Pregnant women think long and hard about what is best to feed their babies and are often bombarded with conflicting messages and competing demands as they consider breastfeeding and bottlefeeding. Two Mount A researchers, anthropology professor Dr. Patricia Kelly-Spurles, pictured left, and sociology professor Dr. Judith Doyle are studying this decision-making process. They recently received an operating grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) valued at $81,356 for their study The Mothers and Babies Research Group (MABRG). The grant was the only one awarded to an undergraduate university in Canada in the Fall 2007 competition, and the first of its kind for Mount Allison researchers. The study has also received funding from the New Brunswick Medical Research Fund (NB Department of Health) and Mount Allison.

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IWD 2008International Womens Day 2008 saw the return of several young, successful alumnae to Mount Allison for a very special conference. Events included a panel discussion with Allisonians Sarah LeBlanc (06), Frances Ross (06), Katherine Austin-Evelyn (07), Roberta MacLean (07), Bridget Arsenault (08), Jessica Chapman (08), Julie OBrien (08), and Alison Smith (08) as well as the launch of the online publication, We Were Here: Exploratory Essays on Womens History at Mount Allison University. (www.mta.ca/wewerehere).

The Sweetest Night and SpringThe Owens Art Gallery, Struts Gallery, and the Faucet Media Arts Centre hosted their ninth and most successful ever Sweetest Little Thing event on Valentines Day, raising $10,000 for gallery programming. Almost 350 people packed into the Owens for an exciting evening that focused around a silent art auction. Many arrived clad in shades of red and pink pencils at the ready to bid on 108 artworks from artists across Canada. Other people took part in the oh-so-delectable-cake-walk, Bear Bingo, and the Instant Lovin Polaroid Photo Booth. After the auction, enthusiastic students and a DJ transformed the Colville Gallery, and danced the night away. Later this spring, the Owens received a grant of $200,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts in support of its program of research and presentation of contemporary Canadian art over the next two years.

Gloria Carnevale (08), left, and Jessica Chapman (08) fill out their silent auction ballots.

Habitat for Humanity hits the iceAt the opening of the Habitat for Humanity 3-on-3 Hockey Challenge, organizers and officials met at the Rotary Bridge by the Mount Allison swan pond where the event took place on a cold February day. Pictured left to right are: Mount Allison President Dr. Robert Campbell; main event organizer and Soccer Mounties goalie-captain, Corey Yantha; Sandra Dimock, member of the Moncton Habitat for Humanity Chapter; and Jill Fraser, President of Mount Allisons Habitat for Humanity Campus Chapter. A cheque for $1,000 was presented to Mrs. Dimock. Mount Allison students travelled to New Orleans to help build houses this spring.

Our goal is simple. Be indispensable.Imprimerie Maritime Press

w w w. m a r i t i m e p r e s s . c a 1-506-857-8790

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Anthropologist honoured by Aboriginal PeoplesIn recognition of her work and studies with indigenous communities, Mount Allison anthropology professor Dr. Marilyn Walker was made an Honorary Member and Elder of the Aboriginal People of the Maritimes in a recent ceremony held in Sackville. Members of the Mtis Nation from across the Maritimes came to campus to attend the traditional ceremony in Dr. Walkers honour. Dr. Walker is the first person in New Brunswick to receive this honour.Marilyn Walker was recently honoured by the Aboriginal peoples in the Maritimes.

Hunton House captures Presidents Spirit Award and C3 Challenge!The first-ever Presidents Spirit Award was announced this spring at Mount Allison and the small but mighty Hunton House residence was declared the winner. The Presidents Spirit Award is a new initiative on campus that has been raising great support and fans for the Universitys sports teams and school spirit. A joint project between Student Life and the Presidents Office, the friendly competition saw each residence on campus adopt a Mount Allison Mountie sports team to cheer at home games, encourage others to attend and cheer, and show general support for their Mounties. Hunton House took the inaugural award for their support of the womens volleyball team, and also won this years C3 Campus Climate Change Challenge.

President Campbell, left, presents the Hunton House executive with the first Presidents Spirit Award.

A Job Well DoneMany Allisonians were recognized for their hard work and accomplishments at the annual Employee Recognition Event held in May. Among those was Mount As sports information director Sue Seaborn, recipient of the 08 Purdy Crawford Staff Award of Excellence and retirees Jim Code, Cheryl and Peter Ennals, John Harpur, Rick Langler, Anne Miller, Art Miller, Bob Sealy, Irvin Sears, Bea Walker, Judith Weiss, and Eric Wheaton.

2008 Purdy Crawford Staff Award recipient Sue Seaborn with athletics director Jack Drover.

Dr. Robert Campbell, left, with 2008 retirees Eric Wheaton, Irvin Sears, Bea Walker, Robert Sealy, Jim Code, and John Harpur.

Lucky S.E. VENThird-year fine arts student Clare Halpine has been awarded a scholarship from the prestigious Boston-based Social Equity Venture Fund (S.E. VEN). Clare, who has spent the last three summers in New York City working as a student intern with the World Youth Alliance (WYA), is the only Canadian student to receive the award. Along with being an advocate for the end of global poverty, Clare is an artist, a Millennium scholar, and a varsity badminton athlete.

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SPOTLIGHT ON STUDENTS2008 Grad AwardsThe ever-popular Grad Banquet was held in Jennings this March with several of our newest Allisonians being recognized for their academic achievements and community involvement. International students were also recognized at the annual Society of All Nations (SAN) Banquet in March.

Don Norton Memorial AwardThe Don Norton Memorial Award is given annually to the graduating male student who has made the greatest overall contribution to Mount A in his final year. Scott Yorke, of Lower Debert, NS, has combined strong academic achievement with both an active participation in varsity sports and a commitment to volunteer activities. An honours chemistry student, he has served as a teaching assistant and tutor, and is a member of the Chemistry Society. An award-winning athlete, Scott was a member and captain of the Mount Allison varsity badminton team, twice qualifying for national championships, played club rugby, and many intramural sports, and served on the SACs Athletics Affairs Committee. He has volunteered with both the S.M.I.L.E (Sensory Motor Instructional Leadership Experience), the Youth Mentorship program, Mount A Orientation, and Leadership Mount A.

Kids. In addition, she has participated in many student theatrical productions, the Ultimate Frisbee team, and running club. Emily worked with ATLIS as its journal editor in 07, as editor-in-chief of the Argosy in 2005-06, and has been a web assistant for computing services.

Gil Latter Award recipientThis award, given out annually to a graduating student, recognizes community involvement outside of Mount Allison. From varsity athletics to music, Rebecca MacKenzie of Sydney and Amherst, NS has done it all, including volunteering with a Special Populations Music Program, working at the LA Animal Shelter in Amherst, and coaching under-12 boys soccer. While helping to manage the womens hockey team (and being named Manager of the Year three times!), she has rushed from the rink to the pit, playing in countless musical ensembles. Her breadth of involvement and commitment to improving community life in Sackville and beyond is commendable.

Frances S. Allison AwardEstablished by Frances S. Allison from the Ladies College Class of 1896, the Frances S. Allison Award is presented annually to the senior female student who has shown outstanding qualities of character, scholarship, personality, and leadership. This years recipient, Emily Shepard of Toronto, has been a student researcher and worked for the Meighen Centre as a Spanish tutor and a teaching assistant in the Gender and International Relations course. Emily has been a student ambassador, a residence monitor, a CHMA radio programmer, a chapel assistant, and a member of the Elliott Chorale. She is involved with Best Buddies, Free the Children, Conduct Becoming, the Special Populations Program, and was a founding member of both Journalists for Human Rights and Knit Mitts for

Gold A Awardof Beaver Bank, NS has been involved since she set foot at Mount A. Throughout her time here, she has been involved in the SAC not only as a councilor, but also as a member of the executive. Leading Best Buddies, Shinerama, and Habitat for Humanity, Jill has been an active force on campus, not only through extracurriculars, but also academically. Conducting research in the psychology department and also pursuing an honours degree, Jill has truly demonstrated outstanding contribution to the Mount A community.

Jill Fraser

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Dara MacDonald of Halifax, NS has been actively involvedin her program, advocating for cohesiveness within a multidisciplinary area of study. Involved in residence as a house treasurer, Dara has also been a member of the Mount A skating team since her first year. She has been heavily involved with WUSC on campus, and has been playing a strong role as a vice-president on the SAC this year. She has also been involved academically as a Spanish teachers assistant, while working on improving her trilingualism. Embodying the idea of the whole person, Dara has been committed to her extracurriculars, not only focusing on her own academics, but also helping other students whenever she can. Dara is Mount Allisons 47th Rhodes Scholar and will be studying at Oxford next year.

and helped initiate the Arts and Social Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research Fair. She reintroduced the Leadership Mount Allison Certificate Program and has been involved with other events on campus such as the Vagina Monologues, the SAC, and Habitat for Humanity. Her leadership capacity and determination have been demonstrated through the endless initiatives in which she is involved. Westbank, BC resident Alison Smith, who is trilingual, has been a politically-active voice at Mount Allison. Always working to uncover the leading story, she has been actively involved with the Argosy, as a features editor. Strongly involved in residence life, Alison was an assistant don in residence, and has demonstrated her leadership as a coordinator for S.M.I.L.E. Alison co-founded the residence reading group on campus, and has been actively involved on campus with ATLIS and as a Spanish teaching assistant, consistently demonstrating her strengths as a leader.

Jessica Chapman, from St. Margarets Bay, NS, has beenstrongly involved in the psychology department, where she studies as an honours student. She has conducted research

2008 Grad Award Winners, from left to right, are Alison Smith, Jessica D. Chapman, Jill Fraser, Scott Yorke, Emily Shepard, Dara MacDonald, and Rebecca MacKenzie.

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International Student AwardsMount Allison recently recognized three of its international students for their academic and extracurricular achievements this year. The Class of 33 Bursary, awarded to students in their first, second, or third year of studies, and the Barritt-Marshall Award, given to a graduating international student, were presented during the Society of All Nations (SAN) annual banquet held in March.

Class of 33 AwardsNakita Knowles, a biology student from the Bahamas, has been an active member of the African Heritage-Black History Society, helping to organize the activities and celebrations for Black History Month each year. She has sat on both the financial and services working groups of the Presidents Advisory Committee on International Students, and has twice been a volunteer facilitator for International Orientation. Most notably, she has been a very dedicated member of SAN over the years, having served twice as copresident. In this role, she has helped organize the weekly activities of SAN and the annual SAN Banquet. Leah Wofsy from Salisbury, NH is also known as the mainlife force behind the SAN club. She has been a member of SAN since her first year, played a pivotal role on the executive last year, and serves as co-president this year. She has put a lot of energy into co-ordinating fun activities for SAN and has been a driving force behind the successful organization of the SAN Banquet every year. As an upper-year biology student, she has also provided free tutoring for many international students.International student advisor Allison Broadbent-Codjo, left, presents Karen Chung with the Barritt-Marshall Award.

Barritt-Marshall AwardFourth-year drama student Karen Chung from Hong Kong is the recipient of the Barritt-Marshall Award this year. Over the last four years, Karen has promoted mutual understanding and collaboration through her active involvement in the theatre, reaching out to both the University and Sackville communities. She has participated in over 20 plays through Windsor Theatre, including a multicultural version of Shakespeares Antony and Cleopatra and a cross-cultural theatre exchange with Brooklyn Inner City Youth in New York. She is co-founder of the group Theatre for Social Change, which aims to bring drama out of the theatre and into the community. She also founded the Special Populations Drama Program for Sackvilles physically and /or mentally challenged citizens and last year she created the Marshview Project Planet Performers that gets kids involved in drama. Karen has been a student representative on the Presidents Advisory Committee on International Students, a volunteer for helping international students with their taxes, and a helper with the Canadian Red Cross. She has also helped design and facilitate the Mandarin Camp and Language Village at Mount A. The Barritt-Marshall Award is named for the Honourable Robert V. Barritt, JP, and the Honourable Ralph O. Marshall CBE, JP, both graduates of the Class of 50.

From the Argosy to the Globe and MailArgosy co-editor-in-chief Heidi Ebert is this years recipient of the Crake-Sawdon Award for excellence in student journalism. Heidi, an honours English student, graduated this spring and has secured an internship with the Globe and Mail in their Toronto newsroom. The Crake-Sawdon Award was established by the Crake Foundation to honour William Boyle Sawdon, former editor of the Argosy and founder of the Sackville Tribune Post.

Class of 33 Award recipients Nakita Knowles, left, and Leah Wofsy, present President Robert Campbell with the SAN Bridging the Gap Award at this years annual banquet.

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For Reunion photo captions please visit http://alumni.mta.ca

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JumpSpring 2008 denoted a significant period at Mount Allison University as the JUMP Mount Allison Campaign reached $55 million, about two-thirds of its $86-million objective. We celebrated many generous contributions, including two major gifts Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour Minister Ed Doherty announced $3 million in support from the Province of New Brunswick and Janis Sobey-Hames, chair of the David and Faye Sobey Foundation, announced that The David and Faye Sobey Foundation and the Sobey Foundation would contribute a combined total of $500,000 to endow the Sobey Performance Scholarship, which will be awarded to returning Mount Allison students. As with all campaigns that seek to transform a universitys reach, members of Mount Allisons Campaign Priorities Advisory Committee took some time to align Mount Allisons Strategic Statement (07) with the existing JUMP priorities. This provided the University community with some time to reflect on its successes and objectives that remain to be completed. The result of these deliberations can be found within Mount Allisons most

UpdateJUMP Mount Allison CampaignINVESTING IN PEOPLE Our students and faculty 1 - Student Success

JUMP Campaign total as of April 30, 2008: $55,415,957

recent Case for Support, available for download on our campaign web site: www.mta.ca/jumpcampaign Six general themes will now guide Mount Allisons External Relations Office as it seeks to attract philanthropic support for our Universitys most strategic priorities. This process of self-examination, which began with the Universitys Strategic Statement and continues with our newest Case for Support, is an exciting one. It compels us to reexamine what we do and how we think about the role of higher education in society and, most importantly, Mount Allisons role as a champion in teaching and learning. Our most recent donor report, included with this issue of the Record, is a testament to the fact that philanthropy is a big part of Mount Allisons spirit and offers a promise of stewardship for generations of future students to enjoy. We invite everyone to let us know what you think about the stewardship of your alma mater. These are exciting times for Mount Allison our future is now.

2 - Academic Enhancement INVESTING IN SPACES Where people will innovate and perform 3 - Centre for Business Studies 4 - Fine and Performing Arts Centre INVESTING IN STEWARDSHIP Of the world we live in 5 - The Greening of Mount Allison 6 - Mount Allison and the World

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Da Scoop DaPoPoBy Susanne MacDonald

Challenging convention seems to be the mantra of GaRRy Williams (01), the artistic director of DaPoPo Theatre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He teaches, acts, directs, sings, and is learning how to play the piano. GaRRy was born in Halifax and grew up mostly in Berlin, Germany where he witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall and has travelled widely in Europe, Kenya, and Japan. In addition to studying theatre, literature, and music in Germany, the US, and Canada, he has performed, dabbled in playwriting and composition, and attended various training programs and workshops. GaRRy describes his parents as incredibly loving and down-to-earth people. Watching student productions at Harvard, where his parents taught, led him to this career. I didnt choose a career in the arts, it chose me. I was lucky enough to see a few magical theatre productions in my youth. You follow the magic. Its life-altering. He has fond memories of outstanding experiences with faculty at Mount A, such as Dr. James Stark who GaRRy remembers as a fine scholar and a hands-on teacher. He completely opened up the world of bel canto and the operatic repertoire for me.After graduation, GaRRy was invited back to Mount A in 02 to direct Annie Get Your Gun for the Garnet and Gold Musical Theatre Society. He says the most important thing he learned while at Mount A was to persevere. It is discouraging when you have the ideas and energy to undertake new projects, but meet with opposition and a lack of administrative and financial support from granting agencies. Its hard when you dont fit the mold and I dont fit the mold. But, Im still producing, performing, and directing. In 04 GaRRy co-founded DaPoPo Theatre, an independent theatre, described on its web site as bringing the energy

on

and spirit of popular theatre to our work, while embracing the idea of a poor, political, and poetic theatre. We reject the commercial definition of art as product and see art as a vital service to society. The first DaPoPo cast included Mount A grads Steph Berntson (04), Christopher Cohoon (02), Amanda Jernigan (01), and GaRRy. Since that time the companys numerous productions have included Mount A alumni Nathan Pilon (04), Scott Hicks (00), Kristi Anderson (05), and Terry Drisdelle (02). An ongoing and unusual project is Caf DaPoPo, which features theatre la carte at Mollyz Diner in Halifax. For a nominal fee, diners have an opportunity to order a classical monologue, a Shakespearean sonnet, a song, or a theatrical scene performed at their table. In the spring of 08 GaRRy appeared in Biography: A Game. The previews for the production were held in private homes. After performing in previous Halifax Summer Opera Workshop productions The Magic Flute and Cosi Fan Tutte, GaRRy will be directing Le Nozze di Figaro this summer. He credits his musical training at Mount A for having allowed him to pursue such diverse projects. GaRRy gives back to his community and environment by using recyclable bags, not driving a car, and not owning a television. He teaches, listens when people talk, and supports human rights. I also offer art at an affordable price. All Theatre DaPoPo tickets are only five dollars. He says his greatest achievement has been becoming a decent human being and GaRRy admits that his mission is far from being accomplished. I have learned to love. Directors used to call me on my love scenes. I think I understand now what I didnt then.

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Between Motherhood and MelodyBy Sue Seaborn

What do the great vocalists Michael Bubl, Cline Dion, Chicago, Josh Groban, Natalie Cole, Whitney Houston, Lionel Ritchie, and others have in common with Mount Allisons talented, 1991 music graduate Eleanor McCain? All have caught the musical eye of and graced the stage with Canadian songwriter, multiple Grammy winner, and superstar David Foster. Performing at the concert charity gala Crescendo, in what she described as one of the most amazing musical events of her life, Eleanor McCain wowed the crowd. She walked out on stage at the Halifax Trade Centre singing Shenandoah, and raised the roof with a large standing ovation from a supportive and spontaneous audience. Once the crowd had settled, emcee David Foster asked of Eleanors parents, Margie and Wallace McCain, Do you own a plane? Good, because this young lady will be in need of it, as she is going to go places! Foster, who is known for discovering great talent worldwide, had discovered yet another huge gift at the gala soprano Eleanor McCain. Crescendo, which successfully raised $1.6 million for the David Foster Foundation, was a big event in Eleanors life. But even topping that has been her discovery of the joys of motherhood and the arrival of her baby girl, Laura, almost six years ago. Taking time out to raise a daughter in one way put a hold on Eleanors singing career, but in another way enhanced it. After launching her first album Intimate in 2001, the Florenceville, NB-born songstress released Bundle of Joy in 2007, which was recorded in Nashville and was filled with some of Eleanors favourite lullabies from her childhood, and which she was passing on to Laura. In fact, it was Eleanors mother Margie who was actually her first Voice Mom and who instilled the love of music in her daughter. An accomplished piano and organ player herself, Margie used to accompany Eleanor as a young girl in her singing at home and at various outings. It was as a nine-year-

old that Eleanor really got hooked on classics, though, after being impressed by the New York musical Annie. After that memorable occasion, it was just about raising the volume and pursuing musical notes of her own. To help Eleanor follow her dreams Margie took her 13-year-old on a 90-minute drive into Fredericton every week for music lessons, various musicals, and singing events. Following a long family tradition, Eleanor later attended Mount Allison and studied voice with the late music professor, Patricia Lee. Eleanor also worked with professors Willis Noble and the late Carleton Elliott (who incidentally also taught her mother). Like any normally busy Mount Allison student, Eleanor combined her academics with participation in various choirs, choruses, and chorales, and in her grad year starred as Laurie, in the Garnet and Gold production of Oklahoma. But the pinnacle of her Mount A musical career had to be when she received her music degree from a very special heroine in her life. In 1991 Eleanors mother wasnt just her voice mom she was Mount Allisons Chancellor and in May that year, she proudly conferred a Bachelor of Music degree Photo by Rob Waymen on her daughter. Eleanor felt touched to have received a degree from her musical mom and mentor, Chancellor Margie McCain. Currently living in Toronto, Eleanor now divides her time between the consuming job of motherhood and finding her place in the ever so competitive music world. She continues to develop her soft, intimate style of song, which, for her, has become a blending of all the best genres from her own life. Up until now her main inspiration and focus has been raising her daughterbut what if David Foster, Canadas musical icon and Grammy guru, came knocking on Eleanors door, in search of that McCain melody? Would she seize the opportunity to pursue her musical dreams further? In an instant, says Eleanor, in an instant!

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An accomplished and philosophical thespianBy Susanne MacDonald The life of Matthew Jocelyn (79) has been anything but conventional. Born and raised in Toronto, Matthew spent his summers in Quebec where his father taught English Immersion. Then he had an adventure that few children ever dream of and much less fulfill at such a tender age. He spent a year travelling through Europe with his parents. It was a fantastic way to discover the world at 12 years of age. When he was finishing high school, Matthew went to see his guidance counsellor about choosing a university. His eye was drawn to a calendar that featured a photo of a beautiful pond with swans. He applied to Mount A and was promptly offered a scholarship. We think we make the big decisions in life, but I am convinced they are made for us, muses Matthew. Although a music major, Matthew became interested in the cinema and theatre and decided to focus on French and theatre. He credits his many exceptional teachers and those he describes as agents provocateurs for continually provoking students to pursue and specify their interests and the encouragement to get out there and do it. Accordingly, Matthew spent his third year studying in Europe at a time prior to the establishment of institutionalized programs for international study. Matthew says, At Mount Allison I learned fundamental and important lessons such as cultivating friendships. I learned that nothing lasts things constantly change, die, and that other things come to life and that were part of that process. He says the years between 17 and 21 are critical to establishing ones life philosophy and for developing the lens used to look at the world. After graduating from Mount A Matthew went to Montreal to study theatre and French literature. He then went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. He became passionately involved with a theatre group in Poland and moved to Paris as part of his PhD studies. My career just came upon me, he says. Matthew has an impressive theatrical resum. As an actor, director, and producer he has been involved with many theatrical and operatic productions throughout Europe and Canada, and has often produced plays that he has translated from English to French. Matthew has also held part-time teaching positions at the University of Toronto, the American University of Paris, and the Universit de Toulouse-le Mirail, and has taught theatre at the Institut International de Chant Lyrique de Paris. In April 98 Matthew became the director of the city of Colmars Atelier du Rhin, a national drama centre. He was instrumental in establishing this as a centre for theatre, opera, and contemporary dance. He developed a program that gave the underprivileged an opportunity to express themselves through theatre. In June, after a decade at the Atelier, Matthew decided to leave his current position to freelance. I want to leave room for something else to come and surprise me a new adventure. I just turned 50 and if I dont do this now, I wont do it. Its good to put oneself in a vulnerable position so that fate can come and shake one up. Matthew has a unique and humble philosophy about success. If I manage to get through every day, staying faithful to my ethical beliefs, sharing what I have, and offering as much love as I can that day has been worthwhile. Every day is either an achievement or not.

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IN MEMORIAMThis list is compiled from information sent to External Relations from December 14 07 to April 18 08. Please submit memories of departed Allisonians you have known and loved and we will gladly print short versions in the Record and longer versions online (http://alumni.mta.ca). Keith Muir Nancy J. H. (Coleman) Sheldrick Margaret O. Rockwell Lois (Kempe) Aitchison Elizabeth (Morris) Pearce Killem Seaman Elaine (Rushton) Bigelow Elizabeth (Mulhall) MacTier Katharine E. (Risser) Miller James R. Baker Ruth A. (Kennedy) MacLean Harry G. Pretty Diana E. (Cochrane) Townsend Kathleen S. Knox John F. MacIntosh K. Ross Parker Jack M. Wilson Everett C. Barrett William W. Beach Thomas W. Dunch Norman R. Eastman Earl Johnson Ronald E. Wilson John M. Cook Harry J. Flemming David D. MacDowell Grenfell Douglas Alexander Daniel Graham Garnhum Robert L. Stoodley John Alden Spargo John H. Trethewey Arthur Murray John R. Snow Joanna Leslie Heather S. (MacKinnon) Marks James Dean Snowdon Susan W. (Ogelsby) Clarke Linda L. Karry Judith L. McElmon-Brady Sandra Diane (Joos) Baxter Allison A. Lees 1927 1927 1938 1939 1939 1942 1943 1943 1943 1944 1948 1948 1948 1950 1950 1951 1951 1952 1952 1952 1952 1954 1955 1955 1955 1955 1957 1957 1958 1960 1962 1963 1964 1968 1970 1972 1981 1985 1994 1996 2002

before serving in many senior administration positions at Mount Allison. PATRICIA LEESubmitted by Dr. Judith Weiss, Dr. Nancy Vogan (67), and Beverly True

Patricia Lee, who taught voice at Mount Allison from 82 to 99, passed away on Jan. 25, 08 in Sackville. A caring teacher, she performed regularly on campus and with opera companies in New York City, including the Metropolitan Opera. Upon retirement she taught privately and was a frequent guest panelist on CBC Radios Saturday Afternoon at the Opera. DR. GEORGE GORDON MANSONSubmitted by his son, Ross Manson (85)

I always thought of myself as a change agent, my father said just before passing. He had turned down a job at UVic to build Mount As department of education from scratch. He married Anne Laurie Forrester in 48 and had many close friends, including Stan Payne and Donny South. He loved life, enjoyed many activities, and, above all, being with my mother. He died a few months shy of their 60th anniversary, leaving behind sisters Helen and Pat, brothers Russ and Harold, sons Paul and myself, and his beloved wife, Anne. He will be dearly missed. ROBERT BRADBURY KILLAM (41; LLD 80) Submitted in loving memory by his daughters Susan, Shirley, and Sally Robert (Bob) passed away peacefully on Sept. 30, 07. After graduating from Mount Allison and McGill Universities, Bob taught mechanical engineering at McGill until 49, when he returned to Yarmouth to join the family firm, Killam Bros. He married Kathleen Mary MacAulay in 50 and ran Killam Bros. until 91, when he retired both himself and the firm. Bob was the third generation of Killams to attend Mount A (daughter Shirley who graduated in 75 was the fourth) and his commitment to the University continued throughout his lifetime. In 06, he received the Charles Frederick Allison Award in recognition of his almost 70 years as a

faithful alumni volunteer. Bob served on boards in the Wesley and Beacon United Churches for over 50 years, was the secretary-treasurer of the Old Ladies Home Society for 30 years, and was President of the Windsor Foundation for over 40 years. In Yarmouth he served as councillor, engineer, mayor, director of the Yarmouth Mountain Cemetery, a member of the town planning board, and a long-time director of the Grand Hotel as noted in a Yarmouth Vanguard editorial after his passing, he was a man who contributed to planning decisions based on sound reasoning and always for the betterment of the community in every sense of the word he was a true community leader. Bobs keen mind, integrity, quiet compassion, generosity, and sense of humour are fondly remembered by his family, friends, and community. MARION (WINDSOR) CLUFF (44)Submitted by her daughter Deborah Cluff

John Asimakos Former Faculty William Godfrey Former Faculty Patricia L. Lee Former Faculty Dr. George Gordon Manson Former Faculty Helen M. (Robertson) Lirette Former Staff Helen (Ferguson) Poisson Former Staff Robert MacLellan Friend Oscar E. Peterson Honorary Degree For longer tributes on some of the following Allisonians, please visit http://alumni.mta.ca Tributes.

Marion (Windsor) Cluff of Southbury, CT and formerly of Poughkeepsie, NY passed away Jan. 2, 08. She was born in Quebec to the late Warren and Alexandra Stuart Windsor. Following graduation from Mount A, Marion was employed as a medical secretary for the CPR in Montreal until marrying Milon Hilton Cluff and immigrating to Poughkeepsie. An avid golfer and bridge player, she loved to travel and share her adventures. Predeceased by Milon and sister Elizabeth McConkey, she is survived by daughter Deborah Cluff, her nieces, and many good friends. She will be sorely missed. RUTH ALLAN (KENNEDY) MACLEAN (48)Submitted by Rev. J. Piercey MacLean (49)

DR. WILLIAM GODFREYSubmitted by Dr. Hans vanderLeest

Dr. William Godfrey, who retired in 2006 after 36 years in the history department, passed away on March 19. Originally from Kitchener, Bill obtained a BA and an MA in history from the University of Waterloo and a PhD from Queens University

We sadly announce the passing of Ruth MacLean on Feb. 17, 08 in Victoria, BC. Born in Halifax, she was predeceased by four siblings and her beloved daughter, Leah Susan. Ruth is survived by husband Piercey, three daughters, and extended family Margaret and Ed Cann and nine grandchildren. Her mother Martha Jessie (Tuttle) Kennedy graduated from Mount A and her

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grandfather, William L. Tuttle, was a benefactor. She and Piercey served in the United Church Ministry, living across Canada, in Great Britain, and Germany. Much loved by her family, Ruth will live on in them. DR. KENNETH ROSS PARKER (51)Submitted by Kenneth Lund (51)

painted book covers, and created storyboards for films and television. For five decades he was a prolific illustrator and artist in Toronto, New York, and California. Norm produced hundreds of cover art paintings for major publishers and upon retiring continued to paint and exhibit his work. He is survived by wife Jane, sister Lois Moffatt, and brother Gordon (50). REVEREND HAROLD LOUIS HILDER (53)Submitted by his wife Kathryn (Johnston) Hilder (53; 70)

HEATHER STEVENS (MACKINNON) MARKS (70)Submitted by Don Marks (06)

Born in Kobe, Japan, Japanese was Rosss first language. In 41 he, his mother, and little brother fled to BC, leaving his father behind to pack. Perhaps because of this, he chose a vocation of service and healing. A lover of music, Ross studied violin, played in Mount As junior orchestra, and participated in Choral Society productions. He earned an Arts degree, excelled in football, was elected life president of the Class of 51, and met classmate Vodia with whom he shared 53 years of happy memories. He earned his MD at Dalhousie University and after pediatric training in Toronto spent a year in London, England, obtaining a diploma in child health. After eight years of pediatric practice in Charlottetown, he joined the faculty of McMasters new medical school in 69, retiring 25 years later as Professor Emeritus. JAMES DUNCAN SHARP (51)Submitted by Kenneth Lund (51)

Rev. Harold Louis Hilder died on Oct. 1, 07 in Fredericton, NB. Coming to Mount A from Toronto Centre Presbytery, he joined the Canadian Officers Training Corps as a chaplain. After graduating, he attended Pine Hill Divinity School and was ordained in 55. Harold served pastoral charges in both the Bay of Quinte and Maritime Conference and retired in 90 after 35 years. He then served as a supply minister in NB for 17 years, most recently at Wesley United Church, Lincoln. Harold is survived by wife and classmate Kathryn (Kay) Johnston, daughter Ruth, and sons John, Bruce, Peter, Robert, and their families as well as the family of son David, who died in 1993. Harold touched the lives and hearts of everyone he knew. HARRY JOHN FLEMMING (55) Harry John Flemming died peacefully on Feb. 16, 08. Born in Boston and raised in Truro, NS, he was a graduate of Mount Allison and later Dalhousie University Law School. A journalist for 50 years, he was an editorial writer for The Chronicle Herald and The Globe and Mail, a columnist for The Daily News, and a political commentator on CBC TVs First Edition. Most recently he recorded short commentaries on Halifax Information Radio. He also worked for the Atlantic Development Board, was executive vice-president of the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council, and acted as a political advisor. Harry was married to Glen Maureen (Perry) Flemming and is also survived by two daughters, a son, and three grandchildren. John Hilliard Trethewey (62)Submitted by his son Colin Trethewey

Heather passed away peacefully in Truro, NS on Jan. 18, 08. Survived by husband Donald B. and daughter Lorna Sibley (Mike), of Pembroke, ON, she was predeceased by sons Robert Bob (95) and Donald G. Don (06). Active in her church and athletic activities, Heather was employed at the Naval Dockyard, Halifax, and as an elementary teacher in Truro for 22 years. Upon retiring in 81 she developed Heathercrafts of NS. A member of the Truro Concert Band, Heather played piano and volunteered with the Canadian Red Cross and Canadian Cancer Society. SUSAN (OGELSBY) CLARKE (81)Submitted by Diana Sebera (81)

Susan (Ogelsby) Clarke died suddenly in July 07 of a cardio-pulmonary embolism, a complication of multiple sclerosis. She is survived by her husband Daniel, daughter Elizabeth, son Ronald who lives in Calgary, and parents Nancy and Jack Ogelsby in Ontario. A frequent traveller, Sue lived in Cairo for three years. Her perspective, optimism, humour, and faith in humans will be sorely missed. BRUCE MEREDITH (84)Submitted by Anne McLean Meredith (84)

Jim Sharp died in Toronto on Nov. 24, 07. Arriving at Mount A in 47 from New York, he made a major impact designing scenery for the Gondoliers, creating designs for the Junior Prom, and editing the Argosy. His father, then-editor of the New York Daily News, had been an Argosy editor and Jims sister Jean (53) continued the tradition. Jim graduated in 51 with a BFA, winning a post-graduate Beaverbrook Scholarship to study at the Courtault Institute, London. In 53 he became an advertising copywriter in Toronto, then moved to Hawaii for 25 years. He wrote two excellent travel books and pursued a career in public relations. Retiring in 87, he returned to Toronto and retained an interest in art. His company, wit, and insight will be missed. NORMAN ROBERT EASTMAN (52)Submitted by Kenneth Lund (51)

Bruce Meredith lived in Trueman Houses Dungeon, was a monitor on First West, and eventually became a townie. He was a campus policeman, a student rep to the Senate, a Choral Society member, and performed in Windsor Theatre productions where he met his wife, Anne McLean (84), who assisted with costumes. Bruce earned a masters in clinical studies from the University of Western Ontario in 92, then worked as a childrens speech language pathologist in Ontario. He and Anne adopted daughter Kyra in Russia in 97 and daughter Grace in 03 from China. Bruce had many passions and was creative, caring, and imaginative with a great sense of humour. After a long struggle with cancer Bruce, 46, died in Oct. 07. MELISSA GAIL ZOLLNER (96) Submitted by her family Melissa graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in sociology and devoted her life to working with the mentally challenged from the age of 16, until her untimely death on July 22, 06 in Glace Bay, NS. Melissas loves included family, all animals, photography, and gardening. She had a kind heart, a caring soul, and a willingness to help anyone in need. Melissa will always live in the hearts of those who knew her.

A Beaverbrook Scholar from St. Stephen, Norm Eastman died in California on Nov. 2, 07. At Mount A he played varsity hockey and served as Student Union President. He left Mount A in 52 with a BFA and a further Beaverbrook Scholarship to study in London. In London he continued his studies, played hockey with Oxford University,

John earned a BA in history and English from Mount A, was a varsity swimmer, water polo player, and married fine arts grad Wendy (Finch-Noyes) Trethewey (62) in 1963. After graduation, he joined the Canadian Armed Forces and accepted foreign postings in Australia and Germany. John had two sons and loved to play with his granddaughter Carolina.

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BleacherBy Sue SeabornA successful 2007-08 sports season culminated with the annual Night of the Mounties and the honouring of many Mount Allison athletes and coaches. The March 27th evening opened with a look at our sporting past, as the new archival virtual exhibit web site Three Cheers for Old Mount A! Sports at Mount Allison, 1843-1919 was launched. The site examines the development of sports at Mount Allison from its earliest origins, and looks at sports played, athletics facilities, prominent individuals, fans, cheers, and awards. Century-old songs and cheers are also featured, including a stirring rendition of Mount Allisons alma mater song. Please visit www.mta.ca/threecheers and explore our rich sporting tradition. Current athletes also celebrated at the event included record-breaking football MVP Gary Ross and volleyball MVP Lori Joyce. Both were All-Canadians and were selected as Mount Allisons Athletes of the Year. Gary was Canadas top Special Teams Player, while Lori was the conference MVP and led her team to the league finals. Volleyball coach, Andrew Kennedy, also won conference honours as Coach of the Year and was recognized with the prestigious Bubsy Grant Award that rewards a long-serving employee who has contributed above and beyond the call of duty to athletics. Also winning league accolades were badmintons MVP Braden Freeman, and the soccer teams MVP and top rookie, goalie Elissa McCarron. Braden was the MVP of the Atlantic Colleges Athletic Association

featureAnthony, MacKenzie Turner (basketball); Braden Freeman, Carrie Murray (badminton); Lori Joyce (volleyball); and Mandy Burgess (hockey). The dedicated individuals who received service awards were: Managers of the Year (Rebecca MacKenzie, Simon LeBlanc); Bill Johnstone Merit Awards (Roy Chineh, Maggie Doucet, Steve Ridlington, Wray Perkin); Trainer with Distinction Award (Ashlee Donaher).

(ACAA) league, while Elissa won conference Rookie of the Year honours for Atlantic University Sport (AUS) womens soccer. She was also Mount Allisons Rookie of the Year, along with linebacker Ben Halpern of the Football Mounties. Scholar athletes of the year were hard court stalwarts Mathew Finniss and Ali Duret, while the Sportsmanship winners were hockey goalie Shauna Neary, volleyball power hitter Laurel Carleton, and Scott Yorke, a semi finalist mens doubles player at the Canadian badminton championships who also won the national CCAA Fair Play Award. Recognized as the Outstanding Senior Athletes were Laura KarisAllen, last years badminton conference MVP; Doyle Anthony, a 2006-07 All-Canadian basketballer; and Zack Macaulay, a past AUS all-star Football Mountie. Team Rookies of the Year were: Akil Smith, Danielle Trenholm (basketball); Ben Halpern (football); MacGregor Grant, Tara Stokes (swimming); Shawn Cory, Elissa McCarron (soccer); Sarah McQuaid (volleyball); Andrea Switalski (hockey); and Lindsay Sherwood (badminton). Most Valuable team members were: Gary Ross (football, overall MVP); Scott Sheffer (football defence); Kelly Hughes (football offence); Mike Walker, Elissa McCarron (soccer); Brendon Smith, Judith Glania (swimming); Doyle

BLEACHER BITS AND SPORT SHORTS This May receiver Gary Ross, quarterback Kelly Hughes, and defensive back Jermaine Oram of the Football Mounties all made a big impact at the East-West Bowl. Kelly scored a touchdown and Gary led in receptions, as the East team, for the first time, defeated the West in the annual all-star game. Making the all-star lists this winter season were: Doyle Anthony, Kent Matheson, Shannon Parlee, MacKenzie Turner (basketball); Lori Joyce, Laurel Carlton (volleyball); Scott Yorke, Brent Barkhouse, Braden Freeman, Dan Wortman, and Carrie Murray (badminton). Under the guidance of the Mounties badminton coach, Janet Robinson, Mount Allison hosted a very successful and well-run national CCAA badminton championship tournament. The McCormack Gym was transformed into Badminton Central and was able to show the rest of the badminton nation a wonderful time in Sackville. In December 2007, hockey forward Kevin Foran was selected in the 60th anniversary special of The Hockey News as the nations third greatest Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) hockey player of all time. Kevin made print in several newspapers which covered his third-place ranking for notching 267 points in his five seasons with the Mounties, and securing a place in CIS history as the nations scoring leader.

Athletes of the Year: Lori Joyce and Gary Ross; Rookies of the Year: Ben Halpern and Elissa McCarron (left to right)

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By Lesley Johnson

Sappy winsIn 2007 Shotgun & Jaybird went their separate ways. Fred continues to back Julie on drums for her national and international tours and in reversed roles they perform as Calm Down its Monday. Shotgun Jimmie went solo, bringing in Ilse Kramer (07), and Jesse Baird (Feist, Baird Brothers), another recent addition to the Sackville music community. Jimmie released The Onlys on Delorean Records in Halifax and has continued to tour nationally. This surge was helped by students Tim Jones (07) and Mark Brownlee (08), who booked loads of bands while at Mount A, adding to the bands that were brought into town by Paul through Struts. The musicians and artists work together throughout the year and particularly at the OK. Quoi?! Contemporary Arts Festival. Jon, Paul, and Julie, in the midst of all this, gave new life to Sappy and started the Sappy Records Music Festival (Sappyfest) in 2006. The three-day festival of megavibes that reverberate through the winter, as roughly described by one festival participant, was intended to be small and remains small, though interest and attendance continue to grow. Highlights this year include another Erics Trip reunion, Polaris Prize nominees Chad Van Gaalen and Miracle Fortress, and one of the Baird Brothers rare performances not backing up Feist. Julies manager Peter Rowan, when asked how he sees Sackville on a national scale, likened Sappy to the goose who bee-lines it to the front of the gaggle and makes the journey easier for everyone else. If thats not sweet enough, Paul adds that it wasnt their intention to be music festival organizers. Like many things in Sackville, it came about as a reaction to what was being asked for. Jon goes on to say that even if Sappy were to double in size, it would still be the smallest festival in the world. Maybe less is more, and at the heart of the heart of the heart, as some like to call Sackville, greatness comes in many forms. Maybe thats whats so special about Sackville. This years Sappy Fest is August 1 3.

Allisonians and Sackvillians taking the national indie stageWhat IS so special about Sackville? CBCs Gian Ghomeshi asked John Murchie of Struts Gallery in March when interviewing and reporting on Canadian indie icon, Sackvilles Julie Doiron. John described location, landscape, art, music, and way of life. But specifics dont seem to illustrate what some of Canadas news sources are picking up on. Win or Lose with Sappy Records was the tag line that accompanied the first annual Sappy Records Music Festival (Sappyfest) in 2006. They win in creating a centre-line for a network of independent music and art for which Sackville has become a small nexus. The connections to its music and art scene abound Sackville draws them in, and, just as importantly, brings them back. While a fine arts student in the midnineties, Jon Claytor (01) worked with his then wife Julie Doiron in revamping their dormant label, Sappy Records. Releasing quality albums by Julie, Erics Trip, Elevator, and others, they produced and sold albums and CDs and organized crosscountry tours. This surge of independent music in Sackville culminated when the release of Julie Doiron and the Wooden Stars won a Juno for best alternative artist in 2000. After finishing his fine arts studies at Mount A, Jon, with Julie moved to Montreal and Sappy Records took another break. In early 2004, a new surge of independent music came to Sackville. Shotgun & Jaybird, comprised then of Fred Squire and Jimmie Kilpatrick, arrived in town when their car broke down. They decided to stay. Later that year, Jon and Julie moved back to Sackville and Julie began collaborating with and eventually joining Shotgun & Jaybird. They recorded several albums and toured the country twice with Julies solo act supported by Shotgun & Jaybird.

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Are we there yet?By Matthew Mosher (Grade 12 intern at Mount A)

Allison Colburne and Andrew Clairmont are second-year students at Mount Allison who walked from the border between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia to Ottawa last summer to raise money for children from lowincome families. They walked such distances so these children would be able to attend a summer camp, Christie Lake, where Allison and Andrew were counsellors for three years. Neither of them, even in their wildest dreams, thought that they could walk all the way from New Brunswick to Ottawa. In fact, neither of them had ever embarked on a journey like this before. The walk took 43 days to complete. The 1,200-km trip meant a 28-km trek every day. Allison and Andrews main goal was to raise $6,000 enough money to fill a whole cabin full of kids for two weeks. But they raised $7,500, exceeding their goal. Their secondary goal was to learn to play the harmonica one of the items they brought with them for the trip. Sadly the harmonica broke before they had a chance to master it. Other items they carried included two pairs of shoes each, camping gear, a camera, and dry oatmeal. In all, the gear weighed about 50 pounds for each of them. Andrew admits, The first few days of travelling were slow, but we began to pick up speed as we grew accustomed to carrying everything. When asked what the best and worst parts of the trip were, Andrew replied, Sleeping under a bridge was kind of neat. We were also interviewed on French TV and a restaurant owner saw us walking by and recognized us from the television, so he gave us free food. The part that wasnt so good would have to be the Appalachian Mountain chain and all its God-forsaken hills. He also announced that he wouldnt walk along that much highway again, but he might bike for a while or even hike along the Rideau Trail. Christie Lake, created by Judge Jack McKinley in 1922, used to be an allboys camp for juvenile and troubled

kids. It was called Ottawa Boys Camp and was created because the judge felt that most of the boys he saw didnt need discipline they needed direction. Now Christie Lake is a camp for over 800 campers every year, for boys and girls from ages six to16. At the camp children and youth from lowincome families can have fun and participate in activities they might not have been able to do before. They can take part in sports, arts, education, camping, and of course can just be kids. The philosophy at Christie Lake is that all kids deserve a safe, healthy childhood, and the opportunity to learn, to achieve, and to succeed. Teaching skills of all kinds not only builds those particular skills but it also builds self-esteem, social skills, and other positive qualities. Andrew and Allison believe that children from lowincome families deserve the same recreational and skill development opportunities as other children, and that caring for children and youth is not just a private issue, but a collective responsibility. This is the reason they decided to walk half way across the country, telling stories along the way in the hope that people would support their cause.

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Passionate about printmakingBy Susanne MacDonald

Dan Steeves (81) is not only passionate about the images he produces, but is also passionate about the traditional process by which he produces those images. A printmaker works from a matrix or surface from which we create multiple copies of the same image. Surfaces can include metal, wood, or stone. He notes that at one time commercial printers used many of the same processes that fine artists employ today. Dan, who drew as a child and completed his first etching during a high school art class, decided he wanted a career in art and etching. As a professional printmaker, he makes many refinements to each metal plate and produces numerous stage proofs until he is satisfied with the image. The whole process often takes 100 hours or more. The average size of the finished image is 18 inches by 24 inches and Dan generally produces six to 15 per year.

At the time of this early exhibition I really started to fall in love with printmaking even more, says Dan. The ink stands out on the paper it still excites me. I chose to work in black and white because of its intensity and richness, its rawness the primal nature of the images. I want my images, even of landscapes, to be more than simple representation. The shadows and contrast are more stark in black and white. Growing up near the Bay of Fundy influenced Dans choice of subject matter. His

visual art or fine craft by a person who has contributed significantly to the artistic community in the province of New Brunswick. More than anything, it was gratifying to be recognized by my peers for my achievements to date, says Dan. Its also a very humbling experience. Dans current exhibition at the New Brunswick Museum in Saint John is Navigating the Familiar: The Etchings of Dan Steeves and is a renewal of the series Get to

Born and raised in Riverview, New Brunswick, Dan chose Mount A for the quality of its reputation and graduated with a degree in fine arts, with a split major in painting and printmaking. Shortly after graduation, he took a part-time position at Mount A as a printmaking technician. Dan continued to draw, paint, make prints, and even opened a store in the basement of the Gairdner Fine Arts Building, which he ran for three years. In 1986, he became a fulltime technician and began teaching in 1991. Twenty-seven years later, Dan is still happily employed at Mount A. Along with his technical duties he teaches first-year students and tutors fourth-year students. My passion is my profession. I enjoy being an artist, interacting with students, and having the ability to pass on my passion for the medium. Its such a thrill to see a student get excited by what theyre doing they have such a desire to say something to the world. In 1989 artist and curator Dennis Gill curated a show that focused on Dans printmaking.

images often feature a house. I use the house as a symbol of sanctuary, shelter a primal object, he explains. The house is usually shown in an unusual setting. For instance, it could be sitting on rocks or floating in the water. The object, the house, becomes a metaphor for something else, says Dan. It evokes emotion. In May 2007 Dan Steeves was announced as the winner of the 2007 Strathbutler Award, a $15,000 prize that honours excellence in

Know Your Artist. A second show, Tantramar Gothic: New Works by Dan Steeves, will be displayed at the Station Gallery in Whitby, Ontario in September. For Dan, the power is in the images. The fact that Ive had over 100 shows isnt what is important, he explains. If your work is seen as a legacy that will inspire other people, that is what will last. Left to right are fourth-year student Mio Yamane and Dan Steeves.

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de CartoonBy Dean Lisk (99)While standing between the stacks in the Ralph Pickard Bell Library, Michael de Adder (91) decided to become a political cartoonist. The fine arts student pulled down a collection of works by Montreal Gazette cartoonist Terry Mosher who goes by the pen name of Aislin. I fell in love with it, de Adder says. It wasnt just a book of cartoons, it was a book of history. The former Halifax Daily News cartoonist currently working for a number of newspapers and CBC Television now has his own book of history with the November 2007 publication of deBOOK, a collection of some of his best works from the last five years. I think you always want to do a book when you are a cartoonist. Thats the goal. Your first exposure to cartoons are books, and my first exposure to cartoons was at the Mount Allison library. While growing up in Riverview, New Brunswick, de Adder had seen various cartoons like those of long-time Halifax Herald columnist Bob Chamber, but felt that Terry Moshers drawings were different and that they were of higher quality than the others. Terrys work was beyond graphics. It had a message and it was as close as you could get to being fine art, without it being fine art, de Adder says. You go into a gallery, and it only reaches a small percentage of the population, but a newspaper can reach past 50 per cent of the population, and that had a huge appeal to me. During his time at Mount Allison, de Adder regularly submitted a cartoon strip, The Un-Friendly Giant, to The Argosy. Free trade

was a big issue at the time among professors and students and de Adder decided to work it into his strip. The cartoon was rude, but it seemed to hit a nerve, and people put it on their doors. I became intrigued by editorial cartoons. I realized by their reactions how many people you can touch with one cartoon. People are still posting de Adders cartoons, which are now syndicated across Canada. Theyve earned him multiple Atlantic Journalism Awards. A good cartoon provokes a reaction; it could be negative or positive. When you arrive in the morning and you have 30 e-mails saying how wrong you were in a cartoon, thats as exiting as it is when you have 30 e-mails saying you did great. I am still learning the art of cartooning, adds de Adder. The 40-year-old is currently the president of the Association of Canadian Editorial Cartoonists and is on the board of the Cartoonists Rights Network. When it came time to release his collection, de Adder turned to an old friend from the library stacks to write the introduction for deBOOK Terry Mosher. When the book came back from the printer, it felt like things had come full circle. Dean Lisk (99) is an entertainment reporter with the Metro Halifax and a former writer for The Argosy.

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Young vision:The unique style of a young alumna is turning heads in the art worldBy Sasha Van Katwyk

Deanna Musgrave (05) is one 24year-old alumna who has already begun to make a name for herself as one of the up-and-coming artistic talents of Canada. Her vibrant, abstract paintings and thought-provoking films are rejuvenating a form of expression that examines the way we think, feel, and understand the world around us.

Burns, Deanna participated in exchanges with the medical humanities at Dalhousie University and ultimately presented a joint research piece on art as medical representations at the Universities Art Association of Canada conference in 2005. Deanna worked with professor Jinny Yu through the Crake Grant Internship, where she studied Asian style painting. Finally Virgil Hammock, her fine arts advisor, played a major role as Deanna tried to focus her new-found understandings of a variety of artistic media into her own personal style.

pieces to the minds eye. In some works I record directly with my brushwork the melodic contour of music for an entire work and then work with these marks to create a piece. At other times I aim to capture the general tone of the work with colour, which usually involves mood. The results are stunningly vibrant works of art, which allow the viewer to get lost in the piece and respond to them emotionally. Her original styling and assembling of these different elements of the human experience have earned Deanna a great deal of attention. Her art shows the interconnectedness of all elements of human expression and invites an intellectual and emotional response in the viewer. Regardless of recent media attention, however, Deanna continues to learn ardently about the issues that fascinate her. Being an artist is a 24-hour, seven days-a-week, life-long endeavour, she says. I will never retire from being an artist.

In her first years at Mount Allison Deanna passionately pursued a major in fine arts, primarily looking at the spiritual themes in realism. She realized various things that people believed to be possible could be illustrated through both abstract expressions and music. These personal realizations drove Deanna to pursue a more focused area of study the melding of art and music. As Deanna pursued her artistic ambitions she felt well supported. It is to her family that she attributes her original drive and ambition. Sackville itself, she found, was an artistic place, where she was able to make invaluable connections with other artists who affected her work. There were also certain professors whom she felt went above and beyond to give her encouragement and feedback to improve her work. In the fine arts department there were Jeffery Burns, Virgil Hammock, and Jinny Yu, who were really involved in my artistic growth, Deanna recalls. With Jeffery

Beyond her own department Deanna found support in the music department, where Dr. David Rogosin acted as her advisor while she studied synaesthesia in relation to the 20th century composer Oliver Messiaen. With the help of a Bell undergraduate award Deanna studied this subject in depth. I think I visited all the professors at the music department at one point or another but it was primarily my two department advisors, Drs. Janet Hammock and Rogosin, who made a significant impact on my artistic development. Through the use of colour, movement, texture, and contrast on the canvas Deanna has attempted over the last few years to transfer musical

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Heaven in SackvilleAnd John was amazed at the stories that came from the experience. He shares, People told me wonderful stories as we walked around in their yards. I made a photograph of two people under the same tree that theyd been married under 32 years before. Another couple posed beside their giant pumpkin (the one they grew the year prior to that was about 500 pounds) with their 27toed cat! There were definitely some memorable moments. John is originally from Ontario but now calls St. Johns, Newfoundland home. There he lives with writer, editor, and fellow Allisonian Amanda Jernigan (01), who recently completed her masters in English at Memorial University. The pair is engaged in a number of projects involving photography, writing, letterpress printing, and wood engraving. To see more of Johns photography exhibitions and projects, please visit www.johnhaney.ca The Hansen/Holownia family poses in their yard as part of John Haneys exhibit Heaven. By Laura Dillman Ripley ummer in Sackville it does sounds heavenly doesnt it? St. Johns photographer John Haney (01) had the opportunity to experience this and capture it on film, through the Festival by the Marshs first Philip Iverson Memorial Artist-in-Residence program in 2007. John returned to Sackville for a three-week residency to create and showcase an exhibition entitled Heaven photos of Sackvillians in their back yards, gardens, and other special outdoor spots.

S

Says John, I take every possible opportunity to return to Sackville. I figured if I could cook up a good project for the residency that would be perfect justification for spending a month in Sackville during high summer. My heart lies in three places and Sackvilles one of them. The idea to capture Sackvillians in their gardens, or other outdoor spaces in the summer, came naturally to John. During my last two years in Sackville I had a huge vegetable garden. I never thought I had much of a green thumb until I actually put in