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Answer — Ronald Wants To Know: Wapakoneta, Ohio Visit NIE online at www.sidneydailynews.com, www.troydailynews.com or www.dailycall.com Newspapers In Education Nourishing Ideas. Nourishing People. Proud Sponsors of Newspapers In Education One form per visit. Not valid with any other offer. No cash value.Valid at all Scott Family McDonald’s®: Tipp City, Troy, Piqua, Sidney, Greenville, Beavercreek and Fairborn. Expires Sept. 30, 2012. Word of the Week astronaut — a person engaged in or trained for spaceflight The Bookshelf Write On! One Giant Leap author: Don Brown Neil Armstrong:Young Pilot author: Montrew Dunham Neil Armstrong: One Giant Leap For Mankind authors: Tara Dixon-Engle and Mike Jackson Airplanes drew Neil Armstrong’s interest from the age of six, when he took his first airplane ride. He began taking flying les- sons at age 14, and on his 16th birthday he was issued a pilot's license. A serious pilot even at that age, Armstrong built a small wind tunnel (a tunnel through which air is forced at controlled speeds to study the effects of its flow) in the base- ment of his home. He also per- formed experiments using the model planes he had made. Through such activities he was preparing for what would be a distinguished career in aeronau- tics, or the design, construction, and navigation of aircrafts. If you could be an astro- naut right now, where would you like to fly to? We want to hear from you! Email: [email protected] Newspaper Knowledge Neil Armstrong was born in Wapakoneta, Ohio, on August 5, 1930. After serving in the Korean War and then finishing college, he joined the organization that would become NASA. He joined the astronaut program in 1962, and was command pilot for his first mission, Gemini VIII, in 1966. He was spacecraft com- mander for Apollo 11, the first manned lunar mission, and the first man to walk on the moon. He died in 2012. Military Service Astronaut Neil Armstrong developed a fascination with flight at an early age and earned his student pilot's license when he was 16. In 1947, Armstrong began his studies in aeronautical engineering at Purdue University on a U.S. Navy scholarship. His studies, however, were interrupted in 1949, when he was called to serve in the Korean War. A U.S. Navy pilot, Armstrong flew 78 combat mis- sions during this military conflict. He left the service in 1952, and returned to college. A few years later, Armstrong joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), which later became the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). For this government agency he worked in a number of different capaci- ties, including serving as a test pilot and an engineer. He tested many high-speed aircraft, includ- ing the X-15, which could reach a top speed of 4,000 miles per hour. Astronaut Program In his personal life, Armstrong started to settle down. He married Janet Shearon on January 28, 1956. The couple soon added to their family. Son Eric arrived in 1957, followed daughter Karen in 1959. Sadly, Karen died of complications related to an inoperable brain tumor in January 1962. The fol- lowing year, the Armstrongs wel- comed their third child, son Mark. That same year, Armstrong joined the astronaut program. He and his family moved to Houston, Texas, and Armstrong served as the command pilot for his first mission, Gemini VIII. He and fellow astronaut David Scott were launched into the earth's orbit on March 16, 1966. While in orbit, they were able to briefly dock their space capsule with the Gemini Agena target vehicle. This was the first time two vehi- cles had successfully docked in space. During this maneuver, however, they experienced some problems and had to cut their mission short. They landed in the Pacific Ocean nearly 11 hours after the mission's start, and were later rescued by the U.S.S. Mason. Moon Landing Armstrong faced an even bigger challenge in 1969. Along with Michael Collins and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin, he was part of NASA's first manned mission to the moon. The trio were launched into space on July 16, 1969. Serving as the mission's commander, Armstrong piloted the Lunar Module to the moon's surface on July 20, 1969, with Buzz Aldrin aboard. Collins remained on the Command Module. At 10:56 p.m., Armstrong exited the Lunar Module. He said, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind," as he made his famous first step on the moon. For about two and a half hours, Armstrong and Aldrin collected samples and conducted experi- ments. They also took photo- graphs, including their own foot- prints. Returning on July 24, 1969, the Apollo 11 craft came down in the Pacific Ocean west of Hawaii. The crew and the craft were picked up by the U.S.S. Hornet, and the three astronauts were put into quarantine for three weeks. Before long, the three Apollo 11 astronauts were given a warm welcome home. Crowds lined the streets of NewYork City to cheer on the famous heroes who were honored in a ticker- tape parade. Armstrong received numerous awards for his efforts, including the Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Space Medal of Honor. Neil Armstrong (1930-2012) Astronaut, Explorer, Pilot NIE Coordinator: Dana Wolfe / Graphic Designer: Scarlett E. Smith Word Search See if you can find and circle the words listed. They are hid- den in the puzzle vertically, horizontally, and diagonally — some are even spelled backwards. You can find the answer on today’s NIE page. Write your answer on the line. A FREE ICE CREAM CONE Ronald wants to know... Where was Neil Armstrong born? Bring in your answer for The Apollo 11 mission was to land men on the surface of the moon and then to return to Earth. The crew on Apollo 11 consisted of Neil A. Armstrong (commander), Michael Collins (command mod- ule pilot), Edwin (Buzz) E. Aldrin Jr. (lunar module pilot). These are perhaps the most famous men to have ever been in space.This was absolutely a great time in history. A lunar module camera pro- vided live television coverage of this monumental event. Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon at 10:56 p.m. EDT. Aldrin, being the second man to ever step foot on the moon set foot on the moons surface at 11:16 pl. EDT. The purpose of the Apollo 11 mission was to land men on the lunar surface and to return them safely to Earth. The mission was successfully accomplished. Fall Tab-a-pull-ooza for Miami & Shelby County Schools In observance of America Recycles Day on November 15th, the Green Gals are having a fall Tab-a-pull-ooza Contest. All monies raised will be given to the Dayton Ronald McDonald House. Any school can participate in this contest in either Miami or Shelby County. A drop-off location will be given to the contact person. Tabs will be collected through November 16th. Prizes will be awarded to the school with the most collected tabs by weight. Registration form for Tab-a-pull-ooza Please Print More information/paperwork will be sent to you after registration is received. Contact Name: __________________________________________ School/County: __________________________________________ Phone Number: ________________________________________ Email: ________________________________________________ Please Send Registration by September 30th to: Dana Wolfe Newspapers in Education 224 S. Market St., Troy Fax: 937-440-5211 Phone: 937-440-3552 Email: [email protected]

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  • AnswerRonaldWantsToKnow:Wapakoneta,Ohio

    Visit NIE online at www.sidneydailynews.com, www.troydailynews.com or www.dailycall.com

    Newspapers In Education

    Nourishing Ideas. Nourishing People.Proud Sponsors of Newspapers In Education

    One form per visit. Not valid with any other offer. No cash value.Valid at all Scott Family McDonalds: Tipp City, Troy, Piqua, Sidney, Greenville, Beavercreek and Fairborn. Expires Sept. 30, 2012.

    Word of the Weekastronaut a personengaged in or trained forspaceflight

    The Bookshelf

    Write On!

    One Giant Leapauthor: Don BrownNeil Armstrong: Young Pilotauthor: Montrew DunhamNeil Armstrong: One GiantLeap For Mankindauthors: Tara Dixon-Engleand Mike Jackson

    Airplanes drewNeil Armstrongsinterest from theage of six, when hetook his first airplaneride. He begantaking flying les-sons at age 14,and on his 16th birthday he wasissued a pilot's license. A seriouspilot even at that age, Armstrongbuilt a small wind tunnel (a tunnelthrough which air is forced atcontrolled speeds to study theeffects of its flow) in the base-ment of his home. He also per-formed experiments using themodel planes he had made.Through such activities he waspreparing for what would be adistinguished career in aeronau-tics, or the design, construction,and navigation of aircrafts.

    If you could be an astro-naut right now, wherewould you like to fly to?We want to hear from you!Email:[email protected]

    NewspaperKnowledge

    Neil Armstrong was born inWapakoneta, Ohio, on August 5,1930. After serving in the KoreanWar and then finishing college,he joined the organization thatwould become NASA. He joinedthe astronaut program in 1962,and was command pilot for hisfirst mission, Gemini VIII, in1966. He was spacecraft com-mander for Apollo 11, the firstmanned lunar mission, and thefirst man to walk on the moon.He died in 2012.

    Military ServiceAstronaut Neil Armstrong

    developed a fascination withflight at an early age and earnedhis student pilot's license whenhe was 16. In 1947, Armstrongbegan his studies in aeronauticalengineering at Purdue Universityon a U.S. Navy scholarship.

    His studies, however, wereinterrupted in 1949, when hewas called to serve in theKorean War. A U.S. Navy pilot,Armstrong flew 78 combat mis-sions during this military conflict.He left the service in 1952, andreturned to college. A few yearslater, Armstrong joined theNational Advisory Committee forAeronautics (NACA), which laterbecame the NationalAeronautics and SpaceAdministration (NASA). For thisgovernment agency he workedin a number of different capaci-ties, including serving as a testpilot and an engineer. He testedmany high-speed aircraft, includ-ing the X-15, which could reacha top speed of 4,000 miles perhour.

    Astronaut ProgramIn his personal life,

    Armstrong started to settledown. He married Janet Shearonon January 28, 1956. The couplesoon added to their family. SonEric arrived in 1957, followeddaughter Karen in 1959. Sadly,Karen died of complicationsrelated to an inoperable braintumor in January 1962. The fol-lowing year, the Armstrongs wel-

    comed their third child, sonMark.

    That same year, Armstrongjoined the astronaut program. Heand his family moved toHouston, Texas, and Armstrongserved as the command pilot forhis first mission, Gemini VIII. Heand fellow astronaut David Scottwere launched into the earth'sorbit on March 16, 1966. While inorbit, they were able to brieflydock their space capsule withthe Gemini Agena target vehicle.This was the first time two vehi-cles had successfully docked inspace. During this maneuver,however, they experienced someproblems and had to cut theirmission short. They landed in thePacific Ocean nearly 11 hoursafter the mission's start, andwere later rescued by the U.S.S.Mason.

    Moon LandingArmstrong faced an even

    bigger challenge in 1969. Alongwith Michael Collins and EdwinE. "Buzz" Aldrin, he was part ofNASA's first manned mission tothe moon. The trio werelaunched into space on July 16,

    1969. Serving as the mission'scommander, Armstrong pilotedthe Lunar Module to the moon'ssurface on July 20, 1969, withBuzz Aldrin aboard. Collinsremained on the CommandModule.

    At 10:56 p.m., Armstrongexited the Lunar Module. Hesaid, "That's one small step forman, one giant leap formankind," as he made hisfamous first step on the moon.For about two and a half hours,Armstrong and Aldrin collectedsamples and conducted experi-ments. They also took photo-graphs, including their own foot-prints.

    Returning on July 24, 1969,the Apollo 11 craft came down inthe Pacific Ocean west ofHawaii. The crew and the craftwere picked up by the U.S.S.Hornet, and the three astronautswere put into quarantine forthree weeks.

    Before long, the three Apollo11 astronauts were given awarm welcome home. Crowdslined the streets of New York Cityto cheer on the famous heroeswho were honored in a ticker-tape parade. Armstrong receivednumerous awards for his efforts,including the Medal of Freedomand the Congressional SpaceMedal of Honor.

    Neil Armstrong (1930-2012)Astronaut, Explorer, Pilot

    NIE Coordinator: Dana Wolfe / Graphic Designer: Scarlett E. Smith

    WordSearch

    See if you can find and circle the words listed. They are hid-den in the puzzle vertically, horizontally, and diagonally some are even spelled backwards.

    You can find the answer on todays NIE page. Write your answer on the line.

    A FREE ICE CREAM CONE

    Ronald wants to know...Where was Neil Armstrong born?Bring in your answer for

    The Apollo 11 mission was to land men on the surface of themoon and then to return to Earth. The crew on Apollo 11 consistedof Neil A. Armstrong (commander), Michael Collins (command mod-ule pilot), Edwin (Buzz) E. Aldrin Jr. (lunar module pilot). These areperhaps the most famous men to have ever been in space. Thiswas absolutely a great time in history. A lunar module camera pro-vided live television coverage of this monumental event. NeilArmstrong set foot on the moon at 10:56 p.m. EDT. Aldrin, being thesecond man to ever step foot on the moon set foot on the moonssurface at 11:16 pl. EDT.

    The purpose of the Apollo 11 mission was to land men on thelunar surface and to return them safely to Earth. The mission wassuccessfully accomplished.

    Fall Tab-a-pull-ooza forMiami & Shelby County Schools

    In observance of America Recycles Day on November 15th, theGreen Gals are having a fall Tab-a-pull-ooza Contest. All moniesraised will be given to the Dayton Ronald McDonald House.Any school can participate in this contest in either Miami or ShelbyCounty. A drop-off location will be given to the contact person.Tabs will be collected through November 16th.Prizes will be awarded to the school with the most collected tabsby weight.

    Registration form for Tab-a-pull-oozaPlease Print

    More information/paperwork will be sent to you after registration isreceived.

    Contact Name: __________________________________________School/County: __________________________________________Phone Number: ________________________________________Email: ________________________________________________Please Send Registration by September 30th to:Dana WolfeNewspapers in Education224 S. Market St., TroyFax: 937-440-5211 Phone: 937-440-3552Email: [email protected]

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    Visit NIE online at www.sidneydailynews.com, www.troydailynews.com or www.dailycall.com

    Newspapers In Education

    NIE Coordinator: Dana Wolfe / Graphic Designer: Scarlett E. Smith

    Word of the WeekAmazon a river in northernSouth America. The largest river inthe world volume to water carried.3,900 miles long.

    The Bookshelf

    10 Facts AboutSouth America

    The Rainforest Grew All Aroundauthor: Susan Mitchell and ConnieMcLellanA Pen Pal for Maxauthor: Gloria and Ted Rand

    From your histo-ry book, choosea historic eventand report it, usingthe inverted pyra-mid style of writ-ing.

    1.It is the fourth-largest continent inthe world.2.Amazon Basin in South America isconsidered to be the home of manyresources which include copper, ironore, tin and oil.3.River Amazon is one of the largestrivers in the world is situated here.4.Santo del Angel, the highest water-fall in the world is situated here.5.The continent is named afterAmerico Vespucci, the Italian explor-er.

    6.Mount Aconcagua in Argentina isthe highest mountain on the SouthAmerican continent.7.Most spoken language is Spanish.8.Amazon Basin in South America isthe world's largest and most famousrainforest.9.In South America each country hastheir own currency.10.South America is home to manyinteresting species of animals includ-ing parrots, tarantulas, snakes, andmammals.

    NewspaperKnowledge

    uenos dias, amigos, y bienvenidos a Sud America.The message is, Hello, friends, and welcome to

    South America! The language is Spanish, which isspoken by most of the people who live in South America,our neighbor to the south.

    South America is made up of 12 countries, one Frenchoverseas department, and one colony. Because most of thecontinent was conquered by Spain in the 16th century,Spanish is the primary language in nine of the countries.The major exception is Brazil, where Portuguese is spoken.

    Plus, there are as many as 82 Indian languages still beingspoken by small groups of people.

    South America is most often in the news because of theAmazon rain forest that covers nearly a third of the conti-nent. The rain forest is home to an unknown number ofspecies of plants and animals; the dense vegetation producesmore than half of all the oxygen in the world. Yet more andmore of the rain forest disappears every day because of clearing for development and for pasture land.

    All of the countries in South America have a small upper

    class of landowners, political and military leaders, and factory owners, and a large number of very poor people,who are mostly farmers. In recent years, though, a smallmiddle class of professional people and skilled workers hasbegun to form in the cities.

    Roman Catholicism is the primary religion in SouthAmerica. Only Guyana is predominantly Protestant.Argentina has the largest Jewish population 300,000 in1988.

    south america

    statisticsChoose one South American country and find out the following:

    Capital:_________________________________________

    Language:_______________________________________

    Type of government:________________________________

    Head of government:_______________________________

    Topography:______________________________________

    Major exports:______________________________________

    Major industries:__________________________________

    Typical dress:______________________________________

    What are the schools there like?________________________

    ________________________________________________

    5. Lets prepare a traditional SouthAmerican meal. First, do someresearch, decide on the menuas a class, then buy the ingre-dients youll need from ads inyour newspaper. Next, figurethe total cost. How many willyour feast feed? How muchdoes the meal cost per person?How does that compare to thecost-per-person of a traditionalAmerican meal?

    6. T he Pan American Highwayconnects all the capitals ofSouth America (and those ofNorth America, too). Imagineyou and your best friend aretaking a bus trip from one endof South America to the other.Write a travel article describ-ing your experiences.

    b

    its news to me:Using your newspaper or the Internet, write five original headlinesabout current events in South America.

    letsresearch it:The destruction of the Amazon rain forestis viewed by many people as one of thegravest environmental problems facing theworld today. Using your newspaper, news-paper archives, and other resources, findout whats being done to stop deforesta-tion in South America.

    Lake Titicaca, high in the Andes Mountains on the border of Bolivia and Peru, is the

    worlds highest navigable lake. It is 12,507 feet above sea level.6 tidbits

    PASSPORT TO: SOUTH AMERICA

    The arapaima, a giant Amazon river fish that can grow longer and heavier than a humanadult, is at risk of extinction, according to a new study. Overfishing and errors in classifica-tion are believed to have left the world's largest scaled freshwater fish critically endangered.

    The Amazon River.