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OBOE REPERTOIRE/RECORDINGS Unaccompanied Oboe • Fantasy, Arnold Sequenza, Berio Suite Monodique, Bozza Six Metamorphoses After Ovid, Britten Parable, Persichetti Unaccompanied English Horn • Parable, Persichetti Solo from Tristan, Act III, Wagner Oboe and Piano Sonata in g minor, J.S. Bach Fantasie Pastorale, Bozza Insect Pieces and Temporal Variations, Britten Sonata, Dutilleux Sonata, Hindemith Sonatine, Milhuad Marceau de Salon, Kalliwoda www.johnbenzer.com

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  • OBOE REPERTOIRE/RECORDINGS

    Unaccompanied Oboe

    • Fantasy, Arnold

    • Sequenza, Berio

    • Suite Monodique, Bozza

    • Six Metamorphoses After Ovid, Britten

    • Parable, Persichetti

    Unaccompanied English Horn

    • Parable, Persichetti

    • Solo from Tristan, Act III, Wagner

    Oboe and Piano

    • Sonata in g minor, J.S. Bach

    • Fantasie Pastorale, Bozza

    • Insect Pieces and Temporal Variations, Britten

    • Sonata, Dutilleux

    • Sonata, Hindemith

    • Sonatine, Milhuad

    • Marceau de Salon, Kalliwoda

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  • • Epitaph, Lutoslawski

    • Variations and Concerto, Pasculli

    • Suite, Piston

    • Sonata, Poulenc

    • Sonata, Saint Saens

    • Three Romances, Schumann

    • Sonata, Wolpe

    English Horn and Piano

    • Divertissment, Bozza

    • Lied, Bozza

    • Pastorale, Carter

    • Concerto in c minor, Handel (transcription)

    • Sonatina, Hindemith

    • Sonata, Yvon

    Oboe with Orchestra or String Orchestra

    • Concerti, Albinoni

    • Concerto in d minor, F, double concerto (Ob. Vln.), J.S. Bach

    • Concerto, Carter

    • Concerto Cimarossa

    • Conerto, Corigliano

    • Flower Clock, Francaix

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  • • Concerto, Goossens

    • Concertos in Bb, g minor, Handel

    • Concerto in C, Haydn

    • Hummel, Introduction, Theme, and Variations

    • Symphony Concertante, Ibert

    • Concerti, Jacob

    • Concerto in c minor, Marcello

    • Concerto, Martinu

    • Concerto, Milhaud

    • Concerto in C, K314, Mozart

    • Concerto, Rochberg

    • Concerto, Strauss

    • Concerto in F minor, Telemann

    • Concerto, Vaughan Williams

    • Concerti, Vivaldi

    English Horn with Orchestra or String Ensemble

    • Pastorale, Carter

    • Quite City (with trumpet), Copland

    • Concertino, Donizetti

    • Rhapsody, Jacob

    • Concerto, Persichetti

    • Fantasy, Piston

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  • • Concerto, Reiche

    Oboe with Chamber Strings

    • Oboe Quintet, Bliss

    • Phantasy Quartet, Britten

    • Quartet, Mozart

    • Quartet, Jacob

    Miscellaneous

    • Arias/Sinfonias, Bach

    • Shepherds of Province (Ob, EH), Bozza

    • Trio (2 Ob, EH), Beethoven

    • Quatour (EH, vn, va, vc ), Francaix

    • Duo for Flute and Oboe, Ginastera

    • English horn Quartet, Mozart

    • Trio, Poulenc

    • Variations (for oboe and band), Rimsky-Korsakov

    Orchestral Excerpts, Oboe

    • Symphony #3, Beethoven

    • Symphony #4, Tchaikovsky

    • Tombeau de Couperin, Ravel

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  • • La Scala di Seta overture, Rossini

    • Don Juan, Strauss

    • Violin Concerto, Brahms

    • Symphony # 1, Brahms

    • Symphony #2, Brahms

    • La Mer, Debussy

    • Symphony #7, Beethoven

    Orchestral Excerpts, English Horn

    • Symphony #9, Dvorak

    • Roman Carnival Overture, Berlioz

    • Nocturnes, Debussy

    • Symphony in d minor, Franck

    • Tristan and Isolde, Wagner

    • Symphonie Fantastique, Berlioz

    • Three Cornered Hat, Falla

    • The Swan of Tuonela, Sibelius

    Performance Recordings

    • Albrecht Meyer

    • Eugene Izotov

    • John Mack

    • John De Lancie

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  • • Allen Vogel

    • Heinz Bolliger

    • Alex Klein

    • Hansjorg Schellenberger

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  • OBOE MAINTENANCE KIT RECOMMENDED ITEMS

    Oboe Reeds

    MSRP $21.95 @ doolywoodwinds.myshopify.com

    MSRP $15 - $25.00 @ mmimports.com

    MSRP $17.50 - $27.40 @ bocalmajoritystore.com

    • If a student cannot receive handmade reeds from their private instructor, Midwest Musical Imports has a wide selection of handmade reeds produced by professionals. Midwest tailors their reeds to the level of the player, and supplies reeds for beginners as well as advanced players.

    • Bocal Majority is another reed resource, and provides the option to order reed bundles that include ten reeds.

    • MG Reeds provides some of the best reeds in Texas. These reeds are carried in H&H stores throughout the state.

    • Ideally, students should receive reeds from their private instructors. Private instructors can tailor and adjust the reed to meet the needs of the student.

    One of the following reed cases can be chosen depending on socio-economic environment, availability, or preference.

    Reed Cases

    Holds 4 to 6 - $20.00 @ bocalmajoritystore.com

    • Refrain from purchasing peg-style cases for

    beginner students, as young students may accidentally pop the reed out of the case and damage the reed.

    • Tips of the reeds should face toward the hinges of the reed case to prevent students

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  • from damaging the tips of the reeds. • When looking for reed cases, look for well-

    ventilated cases. Cases with ventilation will have small openings on the sides adjacent to the hinged side. Ventilated cases prevent mold.

    One of the following can be chosen when assisting students with proper maintenance regarding corks.

    Selmer Tuning Slide and Cork Grease

    MSRP $4.60 @ wwbw.com

    • The Selmer cork grease is a liquid and lasts

    much longer than the normal ChapStick-style grease.

    • Caution should be used when using this because it is very sticky.

    • Must be stored in a plastic Ziploc bag as it may explode.

    • If it hits something in the case or if exposed to heat, it will damage other maintenance kit items.

    • To apply, squeeze a tiny bit of the grease up and down onto the cork. Then, making a ring with the thumb and forefinger, work the cork grease into the cork to create enough friction to properly lubricate the cork.

    Woodwind Cork Grease

    MSRP $2.25 @ wwbw.com

    • Must be stored in a plastic Ziploc bag as it may explode or melt.

    • Do not leave out at home unattended, as younger children may actually use it as ChapStick.

    • To apply, squeeze a tiny bit of the grease up and down onto the cork. Then, making a ring with the thumb and forefinger, work the cork grease into the cork to create enough friction to properly lubricate the cork.

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  • GEM Swabs Silk Oboe Swab

    MSRP $8.49 @ wwbw.com

    • Do not use a cloth swab or a “shove-it”

    (currently called “Pad Guard”), which are often found with “attic horns.” Neither of these items will take sufficient moisture out of the body of the instrument. They also tend to get stuck.

    • Very absorbent and features a tapered cut to limit the chance of getting stuck in the instrument

    • The oboe must be held upside-down so the swab can be dropped through the bell and through the bottom of the upper joint with slight tugs. When holding the oboe, one hand must be at the bottom of the upper joint. Do not yank or pull the swab from side-to-side, but rather up and down. Pulling the swab too forcefully or quickly may result in the swab getting stuck inside the upper joint of oboe.

    • Do not pull the swab completely through the oboe. Upon feeling any resistance, the swab should be removed from the bell end. Forcing the swab through may damage or warp the wood of the upper joint.

    • Hand wash the swab with dish soap or Woolite and warm water.

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  • 8x10 Plexiglass

    Binswangerglass.com

    • Roadman will not supply. • Prices vary depending on where mirrors are

    purchased. • Mirrors purchased through Binswanger can

    be purchased in bulk and cut to a desired size. They will also be made of plexiglass.

    • Purchasing mirrors at a home improvement store is also an option; however, mirrors will have to be individually cut by a band parent or yourself.

    • No matter where mirrors are purchased, it is vital that they are made of plexiglass and not glass. Students will not hurt themselves on the corners of the mirrors; nor will the mirrors shatter when dropped.

    • To receive a better price, attempt to find other band directors who would be willing to place an order as well. Assuring the company that you will place annual orders may also result in a discount.

    • Self-portrait mirrors from art supply stores are acceptable.

    • Car clip-on mirrors are not recommended because they are too small and the hinges break easily.

    • Makeup mirrors are not recommended because they are too small and oddly shaped.

    • It would be best if there was a box for the mirrors in each separate class location. Students can then easily obtain a mirror out of the box before class and return the mirror after class.

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  • OBOE MAINTENANCE KIT OPTIONAL RECOMMENDED ITEMS

    The Doctor’s Bore Oil

    MSRP $26.00 @ mmimports.com

    • To be used on wooden oboes only, not plastic

    • Only use bore oil once a year in colder climates. If teaching in the Midwest or anywhere that has a colder environment, have your students use bore oil. Bore oil keeps the wood from cracking.

    • Because bore oil is used only once a year in colder climates, it should be kept at home in a safe place away from young children.

    • Mineral oils block the “pores” of the wood and prevent moisture transfer, so avoid petroleum/mineral-based oils.

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  • Turkey Feathers

    MSRP 6 for $5.00 @ mmimports.com

    • The feather is used to apply bore

    oil to the interior of the oboe. • Only apply bore oil to wooden

    oboes. • Feathers are also a great

    supplemental measure to swabbing; however, the feather you use to apply bore oil is NOT the feather you should use to remove water on a routine basis.

    • Because bore oil is used only once a year in colder climates, the oil feather should be kept at home in a safe place.

    Harris Combination Oboe/English

    Horn Wooden Reed Case

    Holds 8 oboe reeds, 3 English horn reeds MSRP @ $60.00 at mmimports.com

    • For more advanced players with a

    greater number of reeds • Due to limited ventilation, ensure

    reeds are dry before closing the case.

    • The tip of the reed should be closest to the hinges.

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  • Oboe Reed Coffin

    MSRP $0.45 @ mmimports.com

    • Holds one reed. • This should only be used as a last

    resort. • The reed coffins are financially

    friendly; however, they are the least protective case. Because the reed coffins are made of relatively thin plastic, they are breakable and should be avoided.

    One of the following can be used depending on socio-economic environment, availability, or

    preference when selecting a suitable metronome.

    Qwik Time QT-5 Metronome

    MSRP $7.95 @ wwbw.com

    • This metronome does not have a subdivision function.

    • Credit card-sized • A-440 tuning tone • Low-battery indicator

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  • Korg MA-1 Metronome

    MSRP $24.99 @ wwbw.com

    • Beat-Counting display makes it

    easier to practice rhythm and phrasing.

    • Tap Tempo function makes it easier to quickly set the desired tempo.

    • Beat display offers from 1 to 9 beats, plus 8 rhythm types to practice any style of music.

    • Can tune any instrument using the 12-step (C4 – B4) chromatic reference pitch

    • Adjustable calibration setting (410 – 480 Hz)

    • Earphone jack with adjustable volume

    • Memory backup function and auto power-off function

    • Up to approximately 290 hours of continuous operation

    Korg TM-50 Digital Tuner/

    Metronome

    MSRP $29.99 @ wwbw.com

    • Offers both a tuner and metronome, which function simultaneously or independently

    • Contains 13 types of rhythms that cover 0-7 beats per measure as well as doublets, triplets, triplets with center beats omitted, quadruplets, and quadruplets with center beats omitted

    • Tempo is easily adjustable in a range of 40—208BPM.

    • Earphone jack with adjustable volume

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  • One of the following music stands can be chosen depending on socio-economic environment,

    availability, or preference.

    Hamilton Folding Music Stand

    MSRP $10.79 @ wwbw.com

    • Collapsible and easy to transport

    Selmer Music Stand with Bag

    MSRP $26.95 @ wwbw.com

    • Collapsible and easy to transport

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  • OBOE RESOURCES AND VENDORS

    Several of the items that should be a part of an oboe maintenance kit come from

    excellent resources tailored towards oboes and double reeds. For minor repairs and adjustments, a local repair shop is a convenient fix; however, if one of your students is facing a major crack or has sustained significant damage to their oboe/English horn, an experienced repairman is the way to go. Midwest Musical Imports has an experienced team of repairmen, and Carlos Coelho is famous in the oboe community of his service. Coelho is a highly-skilled repairman who has trained directly with Lorée. Larger cracks are likely to reopen if not properly glued or pinned, resulting in a significant amount of money spent in vain on multiple unsuccessful repairs.

    If you are not entirely confident in your oboe pedagogy, Bocal Majority has summer camps (Operation O.B.O.E.) to supplement and augment the information your student receives in the classroom. Whether your student is a beginning or an experienced player, Operation O.B.O.E. is relevant to every caliber of player. Beginning students will learn to make a characteristic oboe sound, make reeds last and maintain their instrument among other vital skills. Advanced players will receive reed making experience, gain unique chamber experience and work alongside college professors.

    Bocal Majority also has a band director boot camp over the summer, including workshops in Dallas, Austin, Houston, and San Antonio, so you can approach your double reed players with confidence.

    Additionally, you are not confined to getting your oboe materials from Midwest Musical Imports or the Bocal Majority store. The recommended items in this guide may not be financially feasible, but some guidelines are provided in the descriptions to assist you in finding suitable alternatives.

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  • OBOE METHOD BOOKS

    Essential Elements 2000 MSRP $8.99 @wwbw.com

    Standard of Excellence MSRP $6.95 @wwbw.com

    Best in Class MSRP $5.45

    @ wwbw.com

    Accent on Achievement MSRP $7.95 @wwbw.com

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  • SUPPLEMENTAL OBOE BOOKS

    Gekeler Method: Book One

    by Kenneth Gekeler MSRP $8.50

    @mmimports.com

    An introductory book for beginners.

    Gekelr Method: Book Two by Kenneth Gekeler

    MSRP $8.50 @mmimports.com

    A slightly more advanced book for students who are still honing fundamental

    skills

    Barret: Oboe Method by Apollon Barret, ed. Martin

    Schuring MSRP $32.25

    @mmimports.com

    For intermediate to advanced students. Provides

    bass accompaniment part for duets.

    Ferling: 48 Famous Studies by Albert J. Andraud

    MSRP $10.95 @ mmimports.com

    TMEA All-State Oboe etudes are taken from this book. Contains duets and

    trios.

    Rubanks Advanced Method: Oboe Vol. 1 by H. Voxman

    MSRP $7.99 @ halleonard.com

    For intermediate students

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  • Rubanks Advanced Method: Oboe Vol. 2 by H. Voxman

    MSRP $8.99 @ halleonard.com

    For intermediate to advanced students

    Selected Studies for Oboe by H. Voxman

    MSRP $7.99 @ halleonard.com

    TMEA All-State Oboe etudes are taken from this

    book.

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  • OBOE CASES, IDENTIFYING AND REMOVING PARTS, ASSEMBLY, AND

    INSTRUMENT/BODY RATIO

    General Information About All Woodwind Instrument Cases • Most cases have distinguishing marks somewhere on the case.

    Identify these marks, and their relationship to the top and bottom of the case. Most cases have the handles placed on the bottom section of each case. Check to make sure.

    • Place all cases on the floor in front of the student, or on a large table in the correct position. Flute and oboe cases are more easily opened from the top of a large table.

    • Be sure the student understands where each part of the instrument belongs in the case. Give detailed information on removing the parts from the case. Make sure the student waits for each instruction before performing the task. Be sure the parts of the instrument are returned to the case in the reverse order they were removed.

    • All instruments must be assembled in a specific order. Follow this procedure explicitly every time.

    • Never leave a closed case unlatched. Most latches open from the bottom up, but this is not always the case. Sometimes buttons slide from side to side, etc. Check each opening mechanism carefully before presenting the information to your students.

    • Cases should be protected at all times. Try to find a safe place in the classroom setup for each student’s case.

    Identifying Parts of the Oboe and Removing It Safely From Its Case

    • Look at the case in relation to the parts of the oboe. Most cases are molded to the shape of a particular part. Be specific when making this point to your students. Take your time, and repeat the information many times. Notice that the keys will be facing up when placed correctly in the case. Damage will occur if the parts are placed incorrectly in the case.

    • If the metal keys on the oboe are cold, the student must warm them with the hands.

    • A cold oboe with warm air going through it might crack. • Once the case information is understood, place the case on a flat surface.

    Never let the student place the case in his lap. • Open the case from its correct position. Remember, most latches will lift up.

    Some oboe cases have the buttons that slide side to side. • The oboe has an upper and lower joint, and a bell. • Identify the lower joint: there are three keys similar to the four clarinet keys at

    the end of the joint

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  • • Identify the upper joint: there are two octave keys that must be identified by the instructor.

    • SEND SEGMENTS OF THIS INFORMATION HOME TO PARENTS. CHOOSE THE INFORMATION YOU THINK WOULD BE HELPFUL FOR HOME PRACTICE AND INSTRUMENT CARE.

    Instrument Assembly

    • BE VERY SPECIFIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! • Corks must be prepared as with the clarinet and saxophone. Follow the same

    procedure as discussed in the handouts for those instruments. • Turn hand so that the back of the oboe joints face the student. It is easy to

    identify which keys that align. • Slide the left hand down to the lower joint, and pick up the bell with the right

    hand. • Push and twist the bell and lower joint together. Be careful not to touch a rod. • Place the upper joint in the left hand with the palm toward the ceiling. • Twist and push the upper joint onto lower joint and bell with the palm of the right

    hand toward the floor. • Line up the rods on the right side of the instrument. Be careful not to damage the

    bridge keys. Many repetitions are necessary to insure no damage is done. • The oboe is disassembled in the opposite manner it is assembled, and the parts are

    placed in their correct positions in the case. • The case is closed and latched.

    Instrument/Body Ratio

    • Familiarize the student with the instrument/body ratio by using the instrument without the reed.

    • The left hand should gently hold the upper joint in the same manner used to assemble the instrument--without putting pressure on the long keys.

    • The right hand should hold the lower joint in the same manner used to assemble the instrument--without putting pressure on the long keys.

    • Move the instrument up and down, side to side by using the elbows. Students are merely getting used to the weight of the instrument; the position of the instrument; and the angle of the instrument without using correct hand position. The student should not squeeze the instrument as these exercises are practiced. Keep the palms of the hands soft.

    • Familiarize the student in this manner for a few days before placing the fingers in their correct position.

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  • Created by Kyle Pastor

    OBOE REED DIAGRAM

    Tip

    Middle / Heart Spine

    Back / Windows

    Bark

    Thread

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  • OBOE REEDS AND REED PREPARATION

    The Reed • The oboe reed is a double reed made from cane called arundo donax that grows in

    the Var region of France. • The cane is split, gouged, shaped, profiled and tied on a tube with a piece of

    string. • Students should receive their reeds from a qualified oboe instructor when

    possible. • The student will not begin making their own reeds until the instructor is sure they

    are ready for the task. • Commercial reeds are available through several companies, and the teacher must

    make the decision on the vendor.

    Reed Preparation • Reeds should be stored in a safe case or box that allows for ventilation. • Students should use a reed holder that is durable and watertight. A pill bottle or

    film canister will do. • Soak the reed in water for two or three minutes. In more humid climates, soak the

    reed for one to two minutes. • Do not shake off excess water. • Always soak the reed with the tip down, so students do not smash the tip of the

    reed with their fingers. • Put it in the reed case while assembling the instrument. • Do not soak too long. • If the reed is too dry it will not vibrate correctly, and may crack. • Before playing, dip the reed into the water, blow through the staple (tube) to

    eliminate excess water. • The tip opening should resemble:

    a. Oval-shaped tips are not desired b. If the tip is too open, a student may close the tip with the pads of

    their fingers. c. Do not let a student grab near the heart of the reed. This will

    damage the reed. d. Oil from the hands or nose can be rubbed on the heart of the reed

    to improve sound quality. • Student can blow on the reed to check the quality. This is called “crowing”.

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  • OBOE EMBOUCHURE

    • Students must be able to use air correctly before beginning to learn the oboe embouchure. The balance of air to the resistance of the reed and instrument is very important for the oboe (possibly more than any other woodwind instrument).

    • The oboe embouchure is supported by the lips: not the teeth. • The lips must be dry. • The reed is soaked, but before playing, blow the excess water through the staple. • Place the reed one half onto the fleshy part of the lower lip. • Close the lower lip • Keep the teeth open and away from the lips in the “oo” position. • The lips should “pucker” around the reed with the corners forward. • Push the reed slightly toward the lips. • The tips of the blades must be past the lips, and into the chamber of the mouth.

    Both blades of the reed must be allowed to vibrate freely. Only the tip should be inside of the mouth—approximately ¼ inch.

    • The reed will sound or “crow” a “C” when used without the instrument. • Keep the body and face calm and still while learning the embouchure. • Watch the student’s face. A natural look within the adjustments for the

    embouchure is desired. All aspects of other reed instrument embouchure/face relationships hold true for the oboe.

    • The embouchure is a work in progress. The adjustment of the amount of reed into the chamber will be determined by the resonance of the sound.

    • When playing the oboe, air has a tendency to “back up” in the student’s body. The student should exhale on rests and inhale with new air.

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  • OBOE HAND POSITION

    Right Hand Position 1. Place the right hand first, with the lower joint and bell supported by the

    leg. The upper joint can be gently held by the left hand as you begin the awkward process of finding the correct place for every finger.

    2. Place the fleshy finger pads over the keys first. Without putting pressure on the finger tips, be sure all holes are covered.

    3. The hand will begin in a straight across angle, and will be in the “flat-C” position. Eventually, as with the clarinet, they will slant into the “V” position.

    4. Place the thumb on the thumb rest between the rest and the leg. The thumb nail touches the rest. Very little (preferably, no) flesh will touch the thumb rest. The thumb joint must always be to the right of the thumb rest, never behind it.

    5. Turn the oboe out in front of the student like a spyglass and make sure there is open space between the body of the oboe and the hand.

    6. The little finger rests on the most comfortable home key it will use later in this process.

    7. The middle finger will appear higher because it is longer than the other fingers.

    8. The middle finger should be very close to perpendicular to the joint. 9. No part of any finger should touch any rod. 10. Practice moving the fingers up and down from the big knuckles. Do not

    let the other two knuckles move. The finger pads should fall directly into the holes. In the beginning the little finger can move up and down also.

    11. Lean the oboe back on the shoulder and look at the right hand fingers as you do this. While doing this, the left hand must remain in its proper “baby” position holding the upper joint.

    12. Saying “squeeze….release” for finger movement will help the fingers move from the big knuckles and understand the “timing” of fingers.

    13. Make sure to feel all parts of the keys with the finger pads. 14. Do not include side keys in the initial hand position information. When

    asked by students, tell them once the hands can move using the keys correctly, they will be allowed to use the keys on the side.

    Left Hand Position

    1. ALWAYS KEEP ONE HAND ON THE OBOE AT ALL TIMES. NEVER SIMPLY LAY IT IN THE LAP.

    2. Keep the thumb perpendicular to the back of the instrument. 3. The middle knuckle of the index finger is placed over one of the octave

    keys. 4. The fingers are slightly slanted downward. 5. Place the index, middle, and ring fingers on the keys with holes.

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  • 6. Beginners can have “fly-away” fingers in the beginning as long as they fall back down to the correct rings. Always feel the palm of the hands to check for the softness of the fingers. There are more bones in this area of the hand than any other part of the body. If the palm is soft, all other parts of the hand will be as naturally soft as is possible. The little fingers should have comfortable “home keys” they touch all of the time in the beginning stages.

    7. Be patient with progress toward absolute correct hand position. It is best to have “double jointed” students not play the oboe.

    8. The body of the oboe is very small. Hand position can feel very awkward. The student should be made aware of the oboe’s double octave key system, and that the middle finger will appear higher because it is longer than the other fingers.

    9. No part of any finger should touch any rod. 10. Using the previously mentioned “squeeze….release” exercises, practice

    moving the fingers up and down from the big knuckles. Do not let the other two knuckles move. The finger pads should fall directly into the holes. In the beginning the little finger can move up and down also.

    11. Make sure to feel all parts of the keys with the finger pads. 12. Do not include side keys in the initial hand position information. When

    asked, tell students once their hands can move using the keys correctly, they will be allowed to use the keys on the side.

    Finger Exercises

    1. All fingers in each hand move together. Call out the hand you wish to move. The students move all of the fingers in that hand down to seat into the rings and tone holes. The right hand thumb obviously does not ever move when the teacher asks for “RIGHT,” but the left hand thumb can move with the fingers of the left hand when needed as the teacher asks for “LEFT.”

    2. Next, we move the fingers one at a time beginning with the left hand. The thumb and first finger are already down in this exercise, and each additional finger in both hands will be numbered two through six from top of the upper joint to the bottom of the lower joint. The fingers will move down or up depending on their starting position, as the number is called by the teacher. We do not use the little fingers when we first begin this exercise. Later, they will be numbered seven and eight.

    3. Watch the fingers to see that they move smoothly, cover the holes, stay in natural position and move up and down from the big knuckle only.

    4. Next, we move the fingers in combinations: one, two….one, two three…….one, two, three, four……one, two, three, four, five…..one, two, three, four, five, six………six, five, four, three, two, one……five, four, three, two, one…….four, three, two, one……three, two, one………two, one…… Later in the development the thumb movement is added.

    5. Using these exercises, the fingers move in all of the ways they move to play the oboe: all together, one at a time, and in combinations.

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  • 6. When learning to use the little fingers, number the keys. The teacher calls out the number, and the student moves the little finger in either hand in a circular motion to the numbered key. Call the numbers in order: call the numbers backward: call the numbers diagonally: call the numbers in any order you wish.

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  • OBOE – EVEN EXERCISE

    The “Even Exercise” is to instill even technique during the early stages of learning the instrument.

    • Students must think “squeeze, release” throughout the exercise.

    • This should be taught without using music at first and without a written rhythm. Instead, use the phrase “I must do this exercise” to express the rhythm.

    • As presented on this page, use note names before using notes in the staff. This

    allows the student to easily think “squeeze, release” and perform correct finger movement.

    OBOE EVEN EXERCISE PATTERNS

    1. C B C B C B C “I must do this ex- er- cise.”

    2. A B A B A B A

    3. G A G A G A G

    4. F G F G F G F

    5. E F E F E F E

    6. D E D E D E D

    7. C D C D C D C

    • On the following page, the exercises are the same except for the fact that the notes are on a musical staff.

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  • OBOE – EVEN EXERCISE (continued)

    The “Even Exercise” is to instill even technique during the early stages of learning the instrument.

    • Students must think “squeeze, release” throughout the exercise. • This should be taught without using music at first and without a written rhythm.

    Instead, use the phrase “I must do this exercise” to express the rhythm. • Use note names before using notes in the staff. This allows the student to easily

    think “squeeze, release” and perform correct finger movement. After the previous steps have been completed, the student may then read the patterns dictated on the staff. This also can be used as a Pre-Set to “OBOE SET 1.”

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  • & 44 œ œ œ œ1

    œ œ Ó

    & 44 œ œ œ œ2

    œ Œ Ó

    & 44 œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ Œ

    & 44 œ œ Ó4

    & 44 œ œ œ Œ5

    & 44 œ œ œ œ6

    œ œ œ Œ

    & 44 œ œ œ œ7

    œ œ Ó

    & 44 œ œ œ œ8 œ Œ Ó

    & 44 œ œ œ œ9

    & 44 œ œ œ Œ10

    & 44 œ œ œ œ11

    OBOE SET 1All exercises are performed on one airstream

    Make sure all sounds have the same resonanceMove from the center of the note to center of the note

    Be sure all fingers move easily and naturally and that the pads of the fingers stay on the keys.

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  • OBOE ARTICULATION

    • Do not attempt to teach articulation until all students are producing characteristic and consistent sounds on the instrument.

    • Teach articulation using the oboe. • The tongue is down 98% and up 2% of the time. • Have students say “luh luh,” without moving their corners. Students should then

    identify what part of the tongue actually moves. The back of the tongue should stay in position (for voicing). Use this method to touch the reed…..the lower blade…..and tip area.

    • When students articulate, start and continue doing it in 2’s—“luh luh” …….”duh duh” …..not moving their corners. Vocalize and then perform on the oboe. Repeat this process.

    • One taste bud of the student’s tongue should touch the bottom blade where it meets the tip.

    • Remember the student must always touch and interrupt a vibrating reed. • The articulation does not stop the reed vibration. • All that moves when the student articulates is the air and part of the tongue. • The tongue must touch in the same spot with the same energy every time. • Start the vibration, and articulate as fast as the student is able in 2’s. • Start the vibration, and then articulate with the snapped finger on command. • When pulse and foot pat are learned, articulate every time the foot touches the

    floor. • Then articulate when the foot touches the floor and as it comes up. • Once the student is able to read music, call the articulation “rhythmic

    articulation.” • Every day articulate as fast as the student can, use the “luh luh”….”duh duh”

    method, articulate on command, articulate with foot pat and articulate rhythms. • When the tongue is moving correctly, begin to coordinate finger movement with

    the articulation.

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