personal protective equipment

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Proprietary and Confidential PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Safety Leadership Training "Our loss control service is advisory only. We assume no responsibility for management or control of customer safety activities nor for implementation of recommended corrective measures. This presentation is based on information supplied by the customer and/or observations of conditions and practices at the time of the consultation. We have not tried to identify all hazards. We do not warrant that requirements of any federal, state, or local law, regulation or ordinance have or have not been met. ”

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Safety Leadership Training. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Page 1: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE  EQUIPMENT

Proprietary and Confidential

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Safety Leadership Training

"Our loss control service is advisory only. We assume no responsibility for management or control of customer safety activities nor for implementation of recommended corrective measures. This presentation is based on information supplied by the customer and/or observations of conditions and practices at the time of the consultation.  We have not tried to

identify all hazards. We do not warrant that requirements of any federal, state, or local law, regulation or ordinance have or have not been met. ”

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Do’s

• Actively participate by contributing– Ask questions

– Share experiences

– Request explanations

• Be supportive of your co-workers

• Apply what you learn to your job

• Pass on the information

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PPE Examples

• Safety glasses

• Goggles and face shields

• Respirators/SCBA

• Hard hats/bump caps

• Earplugs/earmuffs

• Leather/rubber gloves

• Insulated metal mesh gloves

• Protective clothing / aprons

• Safety shoes / boots

• Personal fall arrest system

• Full-body suits

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Key Elements of an Effective PPE Program

• Identify and evaluate workplace hazards– Written assessment

• Use engineering controls when possible

• Establish PPE policies and rules

• Select the proper types of PPE

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Key Elements (cont.)

• Purchase and supply PPE to employees

• Use medical evaluations and surveillance

• Train PPE users

• Enforce the use of PPE

• Inspect and maintain PPE

• Clean and properly store PPE

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Employer Paid PPE

• Effective Feb. 13, 2008 OSHA requires:– Employers to provide their employees with no cost

protective equipment

– Does not require employers to provide PPE where none has been required before

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Employer Paid PPE Exemptions

• Non-specialty safety-toe protective footwear

• Non-specialty prescription safety eyewear

• Integrated metatarsal protection

• Logging boots

• Everyday clothing

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Employer-Paid PPE

• Three safety benefits according to OSHA– Employees more inclined to use PPE

– Employers in the best position to identify and select correct equipment

– Rule will encourage employees to participate in employer’s safety and health program

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Employer Paid PPE

• Acceptable methods of payment– Employer purchase and distribution

– Allowances

– Vouchers

– Employee purchase with employer reimbursement

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Proper PPE Selection

• Ensure it meets or exceeds appropriate standards (NIOSH, ANSI, SEI)

• Determine types and degrees of hazards (via JSAs, MSDSs, IH testing)

• Purchase different sizes and styles to fit all users

• Test user fit and leaks

• Does the PPE create a hazard such as heat stress or breathing difficulty?

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Training

• Explain company PPE programs – Include cost of purchasing, maintaining, and replacing

PPE

• Workplace hazards & controls

• PPE design and limitations

• What to do in an emergency

• How to wear, use, clean and sanitize, maintain, store, dispose

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Hazards – Eye & Face

• Flying chips

• Grinding

• Chemical splashes

• Welding sparks

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Hazards – Respiratory

• Nuisance dusts

• Solvent vapors

• Oxygen deficiencies

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Hazards – Head & Ear

• Falling objects

• High noise levels

• Struck against

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Hazards – Hand & Arms

• Sharp objects

• Hot and cold objects

• Chemicals

• Electrical shock

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Hazards – Body & Legs

• Chemical splashes

• Hot work areas

• Falls from heights

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Hazards – Feet

• Crushing injuries

• Chemicals, liquids

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Enforcing Use

• Provide a choice when possible

• Set a positive example - wear PPE

• Discuss employee reluctance to wear PPE

• Fair rules, uniformly enforced

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Summary

• Types of PPE

• Key elements of an effective PPE program – Written assessment

• Employer paid PPE

• PPE selection

• PPE training

• Hazards

• Enforce use