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Piñon Project: Coaching and Mentoring. Learning Objectives. Identify practice standards for supervisors which align with Piñon Values Identify strategies for supervising workers at different levels of development Practice evaluating performance and giving effective feedback - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Page 1: Piñon Project:  Coaching and Mentoring

Piñon Project:

Coaching and Mentoring

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Learning ObjectivesIdentify practice standards for supervisors which align with Piñon ValuesIdentify strategies for supervising workers at different levels of developmentPractice evaluating performance and giving effective feedbackDemonstrate ability to structure casework supervisory conferences in alignment with practice modelCreate a plan to enhance worker performance

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AgendaIntroductionsSupervision in the Piñon FrameworkSupervisor as MentorUnderstanding DevelopmentSupervisor as CoachPutting it All Together

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Child Welfare Information Gateway

“Child welfare supervisors play a pivotal role in translating and fulfilling their agencies' missions and values. Effective supervision enhances staff performance and retention, and can lead to improved outcomes for children and families.”

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Child Welfare Supervision

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Improving Worker Performance through Supervision

“A core function of supervision is to assess worker knowledge, skills, and abilities against the mission, values, and practice standards of the agency, with the goal of strengthening worker performance.”

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Child Welfare Information Gateway

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PIÑON VISION, MISSION, & OUTCOMES

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Children and youth in New Mexico live in a family environment free from abuse and neglect.

VISION

MISSIONWe serve children, youth and families by protecting children and youth from abuse and neglect; pursuing timely permanency; and promoting well being.

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Safety:

• Children and youth are protected from abuse and neglect and live with their families whenever possible.

OUTCOMES

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Permanency: • Children and youth live in safe and stable

environments and maintain their connections with their families and communities.

• Children and youth live in family environments, preferably their own families, and when that is not possible, with stable relatives or adoptive families.

• Children and youth will achieve timely permanence.

OUTCOMES

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Well Being: • Children and youth are provided

appropriate services to meet their educational, physical and mental health needs.

• Families have enhanced capacities to provide for their children’s needs.

OUTCOMES

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PIÑON VALUES & PRINCIPLES

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SAFETY

Child and youth safety is paramount.

Managing safety begins with our first contact and continues throughout the life of the case.

We assess safety threats, child and youth vulnerabilities, and protective capacities and develop safety plans based on these factors.

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PRESERVING CONNECTIONS

All children & youth will have enduring relationships that provide a family, stability, belonging & a sense of self that connects them to their past, present & future.

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CHILDREN & YOUTH CENTERED PRACTICE

Our practice is centered on the best interests, well-being & needs of each child & youth we serve.

As age & developmentally appropriate, the child & youth’s views, thoughts & ideas are expressed & taken into consideration in planning & service provision.

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FAMILY FOCUSED

We recognize that all families have strengths and will have a voice in decisions about their children.

We work with and support the entire family.

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ORGANIZATIONAL COMPETENCE

Children, youth and families receive services from highly trained and skilled staff to engage and assist them.

Our staff will have a supportive, respectful and positive environment.

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CUSTOMER SERVICE

Customer service begins at the first point of contact & extends throughout all of our relationships.

We are respectful, courteous, communicative & professional with each other, our children, youth & families, our community partners & the public.

We engage our families, foster parents, & others as part of the team planning & caring for our children & young people to achieve positive outcomes.

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TRUSTWORTHY & ACCOUNTABLE

We are fair and compassionate & act with respect & integrity.

We are transparent & responsive to our children, youth & families as well as our partners & communities within the limits of confidentiality.

We avoid personal bias & reach factually supported conclusions in a timely & thorough manner.

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CULTURALLY COMPETENT PRACTICE

We understand, respect and serve children, youth and families within the context of their own family rules, traditions, history and culture.

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DATA DRIVEN DECISION MAKING

We collect and use reliable & valid data to inform decision-making, to direct continuous quality & practice improvement & to evaluate our efforts in terms of safety, well-being & permanency outcomes for children, youth & families.

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EVIDENCE-INFORMED PRACTICE

We use evidence-informed practices for effective service planning and service delivery for children, youth and their families.

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SHARED RESPONSIBILITY

The entire community shares the responsibility of keeping children & youth safe & protecting them from abuse & neglect.

Children & youth are best served when they are part of & supported by their community with services that are accessible & individualized.

We recognize that community partnerships are essential to ensure child & youth safety, permanency, & well-being.

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Supervision Practice Standards

Choose a posted flip chart with a value. Discuss: If we were to apply this value as a practice standard in terms of supervision, what would that look like? Write at least 2 ideas for each program in your group on the chart. (5 minutes) Move to the next chart & add 1 idea for each program represented in your group. (2 minutes)Repeat!

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GALLERY wALK

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Supervisor as Mentor

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Focuses on the process of change

Helps to expand worker’s empathy

Has a teaching perspective Highlights ethical issues Has an evaluative function Creates accountability Transfer of knowledge

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Mentoring DefinitionsMentoring (Shea, 1999):

A developmental caring, sharing and helping relationship where one person invests time, know-how, and effort in enhancing another person’s growth, knowledge, and skills.Responding to critical needs in the life of another person in ways that prepare that person for greater performance, productivity, or achievement in the future.

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Key Points About Mentoring

Mentors facilitate learning by listening, empowering, coaching, challenging, teaching, collaborating, aiding, assisting, supporting, easing, simplifying, and encouraging. Mentors do not have the answers; they encourage mentees to find them within themselves.

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DevelopmentWorkers develop at different ratesSome workers come to the job more developed than othersSome workers pick up new ideas or concepts more quicklyWhere are you workers developmentally with regards to the Piñon Model?

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Stages of Worker Development

Stages

Beginning Middle End

Time

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Beginning StageHigh levels of instruction, structure, and support

Variable sense of professional identity

Supervisees tend to be dependent, anxious, and insecure

Relationship is hierarchical

Usually use didactic, one-on-one instruction

Workers will imitate supervisor

Supervisee lacks confidence

Performance awkward or unnatural

Asks many questions

Naively optimistic about impact on clients

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Middle StageComfortable with job tasks

Expresses increasing confidence

Learning about the importance of self

Anticipates behaviors and plans accordingly

Recognizes patterns, makes intuitive decisions

Supervisee may become somewhat disillusioned

Supervisor-supervisee relationship is more collegial

Supervisor may use more confrontation and self-disclosure

Often the time when workers question their commitment to field/job and quit

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End StageBoundaries are fully-developed

Can use a flexible style

Developed a fully integrated understanding

More accepting of client participation in problem-solving

Greater acceptance of the complexity, ambiguity, and multi-causality of human behavior

Supervisee-supervisor relationship much more informal, increasingly collegial

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Applying a Developmental Approach1. Know the developmental stage of

the supervisee.2. Develop a repertoire of strategies

for dealing with supervisees at different developmental levels.

3. Stay motivated and energized to use a developmental approach.

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Applying a Developmental Approach (cont.)

Remember your role is critical in teaching, training, and developing workers in order to promote the Piñon practice model.

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Make a ListThink about the people you superviseRate each person on where they stand with regards to understanding and integration Piñon values and principles in their practiceIn small groups, brainstorm supervisory strategies for each stage of worker development

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Practice StandardsRate three workers in terms of each of the Practice StandardsDevelop some strategies for helping each worker become more competent in terms of the Practice Standards

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Supervisor as Coach

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Creating AwarenessSelf AwarenessSelf AnalysisSelf EvaluationSelf Modification

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Raising ResponsibilityOwnershipCommitmentMotivation

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The Coaching Process1. Let the worker know what is

expected.2. Provide a model of performance.3. Provide frequent feedback.4. Provide encouragement and

assistance.5. Recognize achievement.

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Elements of ExpectationsStrengthsNeedsPositive TermsGoalsBehaviors

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Getting Started with Your Unit

Complete the worksheet for the 3 workers you included on the last activity, who need the most help on the Piñon StandardsThink about each of the workers strengths and needsWhat goal do you want to focus on with each worker?What behaviors will be evident when they have achieved their goals?

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The Coaching Process 1. Let the worker know what is

expected.2. Provide a model of performance.3. Provide frequent feedback.4. Provide encouragement and

assistance.5. Recognize achievement.

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Model Of PerformanceDemonstrationTangible ExampleReview of what made the example a good model of performance

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PracticeFor the workers you rated as needing assistance in the previous activityWrite their names on the worksheetThink of models of performance you could use to help coach them on the standard you want to improve upon

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The Coaching Process1. Let the worker know what is

expected.2. Provide a model of performance.3. Provide frequent feedback.4. Provide encouragement and

assistance.5. Recognize achievement.

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Feedback & Job Performance

Effective feedback can:Maintain desired performanceChange undesired performance

This is done by creating specific:QualitiesConditionsPlans for effective feedback

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Quality of

Feedback

Job Satisfaction

High

Low

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Qualities of Effective Feedback

Tied to expectations

Specific and behavioral

Results oriented

Frequent

Well-timed

Direct

Helpful

Clear 49

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Defining Feedback

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Constructive Feedback: Information-specific, issue-focused, and based on something observed.

Positive Feedback – A statement about an effort well done.Negative Feedback – A statement about an effort that needs improvement.

Praise and Criticism: In contrast, these statements are personal judgments about an effort or outcome. Praise is a favorable judgment while criticism is an unfavorable judgment. (Source: Brounstein, 2000)

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Feedback, Praise or Criticism?

Review the list of feedback statements tied to each Piñon standard.Which are praise or criticism vs. positive and negative feedback?Take a minute and turn praise/criticism comments into effective feedback statements.

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PracticeDevelop feedback statements for three staff:

At least one must be positiveAt least one must be negative

Write them downShare with a partner

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The Coaching Process1. Let the worker know what is

expected.2. Provide a model of performance.3. Provide frequent feedback.4. Provide encouragement and

assistance.5. Recognize achievement. 53

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Active ListeningLeads to:

ClarificationReflectionSummarization (i.e., pulling out key points)Feedback

Coaching questions are open-ended:

What, Tell me, When, How, How Often, How Much, and Who

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Power of QuestionsStatements bring us into relationship with the other

Statements are often generated from anxiety - they do not invite curiosity

Questions invite the other to tell us something about themselves

Questions stimulate thinking

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Power of Questions

Questions give us information about ourselves and how we see the world.

Questions ask people to develop their listening skills.

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Value of SilenceDon’t rush to respond. Allow time for the person talking to collect his/her thoughts if necessary.

Give time for answering questions.

Silence allows person to hear himself and formulate thoughts more clearly.

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Sample Coaching QuestionsAssessmentClarificationEvaluation/

Exploration

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Sample Coaching QuestionsExampleElaborationFor Instance

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Sample Coaching QuestionsOptionsOutcomesPlanning

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Developing Coaching QuestionsTurn to the worksheet in your Manual.

Get out the Practice Standards for your program.

Look back at the three staff you have targeted to coach on the standards.

Identify some questions using the list in your Manual to help you discover how your staff member applies critical thinking, understands the principle, and applies it to practice.

Revise the questions to link directly to the practice standard on the worksheet.

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Role Play for Piñon Divide into triadsOne will play the supervisor, one will play the worker, and one will observe and provide feedbackWorker present a caseSupervisor practice using coaching questions you developedObserver give feedback to supervisorRemember you are trying to assure practice to the value and standard5 min per round

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Demand for WorkKeeping work on trackCompetencies to build and hold workers accountable

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Framework for Analyzing Performance Problems If it’s worth the effort, determine what’s behind the problem and develop a strategy accordingly.

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PracticeThink of a worker that you feel is struggling Choose a struggle that is related to the Piñon Practice (something you rated someone lower on)Use the chart to determine what is behind the performance problemDetermine next steps in addressing

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The Coaching Process1. Let the worker know what is

expected.2. Provide a model of performance.3. Provide frequent feedback.4. Provide encouragement and

assistance.5. Recognize achievement.

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Enhancing MotivationUse Appropriate Methods of Reinforcement

Point Out Improvements in Performance, No Matter How Small

Use Long-Term as Well as Short-Term Reinforcement

Make Sure that Accomplishment is Adequately Reinforced

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10 Sentence WorksheetComplete as many sentences as possible with your workerin mind. Link it to reinforcing the Piñon Standards you identified for workers in your coaching assessment

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SpeedplaysStand up and push in your chairsMove to a partner in the roomWhen I say go, you will share a statement with your partner and they will share a statement with youRepeat this process until the bell ringsWhen the bell rings, find a new partner and repeat!

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The Coaching Process Let the worker know what is expected. Provide a model of performance. Provide frequent feedback. Provide encouragement and assistance. Recognize achievement.

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Putting It All Together

Identify a worker’s developmental levelIdentify the Piñon Practice Standard to coach the worker onWrite out a coaching plan using all 5 steps in the process incorporating developmental needs and Piñon Standards

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Thank You