powell/norwood shopper-news 060116

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POWELL/NORWOOD VOL. 55 NO. 22 June 1, 2016 www.ShopperNewsNow.com | www.facebook.com/ShopperNewsNow (865) 922-4136 NEWS (865) 661-8777 [email protected] Sandra Clark | Ruth White ADVERTISING SALES (865) 342-6084 [email protected] Amy Lutheran Patty Fecco | Beverly Holland CIRCULATION (865) 342-6200 [email protected] To page A-3 BUZZ 4127 East Emory Road, Knoxville, TN 37938 Located in the Halls Family Physicians Summit Plaza 922-5234 • Monday-Friday 9-6, Saturday 9-12 Also visit Riggs Drug Store at 602 E. Emory Road next to Mayo’s • 947-5235 9 am-7 pm, Mon.-Fri., 9 am-2 pm Sat. A subsidiary of RIGGS DRUG STORE NOW OPEN! • FREE HOME DELIVERY • PRESCRIPTION COMPOUNDING Pharmacist Matt Cox By Libby Morgan Union County will shut down Main Street this Saturday to cele- brate all things artistic – especial- ly music. Art on Main is set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 4, in historic downtown Maynardville, the Cradle of Country Music. The free arts and music festival will honor Chet Atkins and cel- ebrate the music of Union County. It is on, rain or shine. The Chet At- kins Tribute will be led by musicol- ogist and radio host James Perry. In the flavor of Chet’s legend- ary thumb picking-style of guitar playing, Parker Hastings will per- form. He is 15-years-old and holds the current title of national thumb picking champion – in the adult category. Tommy Emmanuel in- troduced Hastings to a Knoxville audience at his concert on May 21 at the Bijou when he invited Hast- ings to join him on stage. Parker will be performing on the noon- day WDVX Blue Plate Special on Friday, June 3. Songwriter Eli Fox will bring his original Americana music to the Back Porch Stage. He is a multi-instrumentalist who has ap- peared on the Blue Plate, Knoxville Stomp, and is scheduled to per- form at the 2016 Bristol Rhythm and Roots. Fox is a rising senior at Webb School in Knoxville. Knox County Jug Stompers, The Valley Boys, Knoxville Banjo Cotillion with Greg Horne and Kyle Campbell, Swamp Ghost and Virginia Faith also will perform. Union County veterans will kick off the day with an opening ceremony at 8:45 a.m. Fine arts and craft demon- strations will be throughout the grounds, including glassblowing by Matt Salley of Marble City Glass- works, metalsmithing by Amber Crouse, apple butter making, corn shuck dolls by Anne Freels, slab woodworking by David West, and fine art painting by Brian Whitson. There will be shade tree and porch pickin’ with everyone wel- come to join in. Shabby Chic 33 Boutique will Art on Main is this weekend This Saturday! MAIN ON DOWNTOWN MAYNARDVILLE Parker Hastings at the Country Music Hall of Fame earlier this year. Multi-instrumentalist Eli Fox has just signed on to the lineup for Satur- day’s Art on Main in Maynardville hold a Fabulous ’40s and ’50s fash- ion show, featuring female profes- sionals and officeholders of Union County modeling spring and sum- mer attire from Shabby Chic’s clothing and accessory lines. Student Art Competition will be held in the former office of the late Dr. Carr. Kids activities include the Art on Main train, face paint- ing, art projects and games. Sev- enty vendors will offer homemade and handcrafted goods, country food, concessions and live plants. Oakes Daylilies will give away daylilies while they last. There’s a farmers market at Wilson Park and a kids health day at the May- nardville Public Library. Art on Main is produced by the Union County Arts Council, a non- profit community organization dedicated to preserving and cel- ebrating the rich cultural heritage of Union County, Tennessee. Info on Facebook at Art on Main 2016 Lynnus Gill, the oldest living rela- tive of the Gill family, visited The Front Porch restaurant last week to see the restoration of his grandparents’ former home and eat lunch. Gill, who will be 96 this summer, said he remembers playing on the front porch of the home when he was 4 or 5 years old. Pictured with Gill (front) are Edward Jones investment counselor Noell Lewis and (back) John Gill and Nancy Breazeale. Lynnus Gill By Marvin West If my fuzzy math is correct, the elementary and high schools that originated in historic Powell Sta- tion are 100 years old. Dr. Chad Smith, high school principal, is already gearing up for an autumn celebration. He has ideas. He observed a similar festi- val in the Carter community. Powell schools are not exactly as they were in 1916. In the begin- ning, they shared a two-story brick building facing Spring Street, atop the hill overlooking the spring, railroad depot and the brickyard. Most of what I know about this came from comprehensive re- search by Dr. Joe Ben Moon, dis- tinguished Powell alum. Some of what he learned about 1916 devel- opments came from the dedication speech by Pearl Bishop Garrett. A copy of her remarks was placed in the cornerstone of the school. An opening was a big deal. A large audience actually listened to speeches. The main address was reported by the Knoxville Jour- nal. Alas, this happened before the Shopper News, or we would have been all over it. It cost $15,000 to build three Powell schools are 100 years old classrooms on the ground floor for elementary students and three upstairs for high school studies A largo combo room served as li- brary and study hall. Two sets of stairs (boys and girls) led to base- ment bathrooms. Now and then a supposedly misguided boy ap- proached the wrong stairs. Girls By Sandra Clark You might call it the Great Bear Scare of 2016. A displaced/misplaced black bear took a wrong turn and landed in Broadacres subdivision over the weekend. He would have left but, well, you know how those roads are in Broadacres. Facebook exploded. Some neighbors doubted it was a bear. “Probably a big dog,” wrote one. Then Janet Parlon Hubbard posted a picture of a huge, hulk- ing bear: “Here ya go … NOT a dog! Ate a breakfast of bird seed … upended the whole full feed- er into his mouth!!!!! This is on Stamps Lane near Camberly,” she wrote. Hubbard recently retired as owner/operator of Upper Cuts This photograph was made on Stamps Lane near Camberly in Broadacres. Bear visits Broadacres Hair Design and sold her home in Broadacres. People started reposting the picture, calling television stations and even driving through the neighborhood in hopes of seeing the bear. Another neighbor posted: “I live in Broadacres in Powell and this bear has been in our subdi- vision since last night. It was just two streets over from us. TWRA came this morning. … so hopefully To page A-3 Bike to Work Day The 16th annual Bike to Work Day was delayed by rain and rescheduled for 7:30-8:30 a.m. Friday, June 3, at Market Square. Stop by on your bike and grab baked goods from Wild Love Bakehouse and cof- fee from Trio Cafe! Want to bike to work, but aren’t sure about the best route? Or would you just like some company along the way for a change? Meet at one of these locations to join the movement: 6:30 a.m., Halls to down- town and UT. Meet at Halls Center, 6950 Maynardville Pike, near Ace Hardware. 7 a.m., North Knoxville to downtown and UT. Meet at Of- fice Depot/Food City parking lot at 4212 N Broadway. Longmire gets Lions Club honor The Lions Club of Inskip is proud to announce that member John Longmire has been recog- nized by Lions Clubs Interna- tional Foundation as a Melvin Jones Fellow. The presentation was made at an April meeting of Inskip Lions. A retired TVA architect, Longmire has been a Lion since 2004 and is a faithful and active member of the club. Everyone who knows him will agree that John would do any- thing he could to help anybody he is aware of needing help. Read Bonnie Peters on page A-3 fpKIDS Camp School is out and families are looking for ways to enjoy the summer while giving their kids great experiences. Faith Promise Church is supplying one fun option by educating kids in the spiritual sense while providing for their ma- turing physical needs as well. The fpKIDS Camp has been going strong since 2011. The camp meets at Ft. Bluff in Dayton, Tenn. Read Cindy Taylor on page A-7 Ly Lynn nnus us G Gil ill l, t th he he o old ld des est t li livi ving ng r r l el ela- a The Front Porc h Norwood notes Open letter to residents of Norwood, Inskip and points beyond. If you are getting this paper at your home, you’re in the designated Powell/Norwood area. And we want to do a better job of covering your commu- nity news. If you’ve got time to help or just offer free advice, give a call to 865-661-8777. We hope to hear from you! – S. Clark returns to

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Page 1: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

POWELL/NORWOODVOL. 55 NO. 22 June 1, 2016www.ShopperNewsNow.com | www.facebook.com/ShopperNewsNow

(865) 922-4136

NEWS (865) 661-8777

[email protected] Clark | Ruth White

ADVERTISING SALES(865) 342-6084

[email protected]

Amy Lutheran

Patty Fecco | Beverly Holland

CIRCULATION(865) 342-6200

[email protected]

To page A-3

BUZZ

4127 East Emory Road, Knoxville, TN 37938Located in the Halls Family Physicians Summit Plaza

922-5234 • Monday-Friday 9-6, Saturday 9-12Also visit Riggs Drug Store at602 E. Emory Road next to Mayo’s • 947-5235 • 9 am-7 pm, Mon.-Fri., 9 am-2 pm Sat.

A subsidiary of RIGGS DRUG STORE

NOW OPEN!• FREE HOME DELIVERY

• PRESCRIPTION COMPOUNDING Pharmacist Matt Cox

By Libby MorganUnion County will shut down

Main Street this Saturday to cele-brate all things artistic – especial-ly music. Art on Main is set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 4, in historic downtown Maynardville, the Cradle of Country Music.

The free arts and music festival will honor Chet Atkins and cel-ebrate the music of Union County. It is on, rain or shine. The Chet At-kins Tribute will be led by musicol-ogist and radio host James Perry.

In the fl avor of Chet’s legend-ary thumb picking-style of guitar playing, Parker Hastings will per-form. He is 15-years-old and holds the current title of national thumb picking champion – in the adult category. Tommy Emmanuel in-troduced Hastings to a Knoxville audience at his concert on May 21 at the Bijou when he invited Hast-ings to join him on stage. Parker will be performing on the noon-day WDVX Blue Plate Special on Friday, June 3.

Songwriter Eli Fox will bring

his original Americana music to the Back Porch Stage. He is a multi-instrumentalist who has ap-peared on the Blue Plate, Knoxville Stomp, and is scheduled to per-form at the 2016 Bristol Rhythm and Roots. Fox is a rising senior at Webb School in Knoxville.

Knox County Jug Stompers, The Valley Boys, Knoxville Banjo Cotillion with Greg Horne and Kyle Campbell, Swamp Ghost and Virginia Faith also will perform.

Union County veterans will kick off the day with an opening ceremony at 8:45 a.m.

Fine arts and craft demon-strations will be throughout the grounds, including glassblowing by Matt Salley of Marble City Glass-works, metalsmithing by Amber Crouse, apple butter making, corn shuck dolls by Anne Freels, slab woodworking by David West, and fi ne art painting by Brian Whitson.

There will be shade tree and porch pickin’ with everyone wel-come to join in.

Shabby Chic 33 Boutique will

Art on Mainis this weekend

This Saturday!MAINON

AdLiB.

DOWNTOWN MAYNARDVILLE

Parker Hastings at the Country Music

Hall of Fame earlier this year.

Multi-instrumentalist Eli Fox has just

signed on to the lineup for Satur-

day’s Art on Main in Maynardville

hold a Fabulous ’40s and ’50s fash-ion show, featuring female profes-sionals and offi ceholders of Union County modeling spring and sum-mer attire from Shabby Chic’s clothing and accessory lines.

Student Art Competition will be held in the former offi ce of the late Dr. Carr. Kids activities include the Art on Main train, face paint-ing, art projects and ga mes. Sev-enty vendors will offer homemade and handcrafted goods, country food, concessions and live plants.

Oakes Daylilies will give away daylilies while they last. There’s a farmers market at Wilson Park and a kids health day at the May-nardville Public Library.

Art on Main is produced by theUnion County Arts Council, a non-profi t community organizationdedicated to preserving and cel-ebrating the rich cultural heritageof Union County, Tennessee. Infoon Facebook at Art on Main 2016

Lynnus Gill, the oldest living rela-

tive of the Gill family, visited The

Front Porch restaurant last week

to see the restoration of his

grandparents’ former home and

eat lunch. Gill, who will be 96

this summer, said he remembers

playing on the front porch of the

home when he was 4 or 5 years

old. Pictured with Gill (front)

are Edward Jones investment

counselor Noell Lewis and (back)

John Gill and Nancy Breazeale.

Lynnus Gill

By Marvin WestIf my fuzzy math is correct, the

elementary and high scho ols that originated in historic Powell Sta-tion are 100 years old.

Dr. Chad Smith, high school principal, is already gearing up for an autumn celebration. He has ideas. He observed a similar festi-val in the Carter community.

Powell schools are not exactly

as they were in 1916. In the begin-ning, they shared a two-story brick building facing Spring Street, atop the hill overlooking the spring, railroad depot and the brickyard.

Most of what I know about this came from comprehensive re-search by Dr. Joe Ben Moon, dis-tinguished Powell alum. Some of what he learned about 1916 devel-opments came from the dedication

speech by Pearl Bishop Garrett. A copy of her remarks was placed in the cornerstone of the school.

An opening was a big deal. A large audience actually listened to speeches. The main address was reported by the Knoxville Jour-nal. Alas, this happened before the Shopper News, or we would have been all over it.

It cost $15,000 to build three

Powell schools are 100 years oldclassrooms on the ground fl oorfor elementary students and threeupstairs for high school studiesA largo combo room served as li-brary and study hall. Two sets ofstairs (boys and girls) led to base-ment bathrooms. Now and thena supposedly misguided boy ap-proached the wrong stairs. Girls

By Sandra ClarkYou might call it the Great Bear

Scare of 2016. A displaced/misplaced black

bear took a wrong turn and landed in Broadacres subdivision over the weekend. He would have left but, well, you know how those roads are in Broadacres.

Facebook exploded. Some neighbors doubted it was

a bear. “Probably a big dog,” wrote one.

Then Janet Parlon Hubbard posted a picture of a huge, hulk-ing bear: “Here ya go … NOT a dog! Ate a breakfast of bird seed … upended the whole full feed-er into his mouth!!!!! This is on Stamps Lane near Camberly,” she wrote. Hubbard recently retired as owner/operator of Upper Cuts

This photograph was made on Stamps

Lane near Camberly in Broadacres.

Bear visits BroadacresHair Design and sold her home in Broadacres.

People started reposting the picture, calling television stations and even driving through the neighborhood in hopes of seeing the bear.

Another neighbor posted: “I live in Broadacres in Powell and this bear has been in our subdi-vision since last night. It was just two streets over from us. TWRA came this morning. … so hopefully

To page A-3

Bike to Work DayThe 16th annual Bike to

Work Day was delayed by rain and rescheduled for 7:30-8:30 a.m. Friday, June 3, at Market Square. Stop by on your bike and grab baked goods from Wild Love Bakehouse and cof-fee from Trio Cafe!

Want to bike to work, but aren’t sure about the best route? Or would you just like some company along the way for a change? Meet at one of these locations to join the movement:

■ 6:30 a.m., Halls to down-town and UT. Meet at Halls Center, 6950 Maynardville Pike, near Ace Hardware.

■ 7 a.m., North Knoxville to downtown and UT. Meet at Of-fi ce Depot/Food City parking lot at 4212 N Broadway.

Longmire gets Lions Club honor

The Lions Club of Inskip is proud to announce that member John Longmire has been recog-nized by Lions Clubs Interna-tional Foundation as a Melvin Jones Fellow.

The presentation was made at an April meeting of Inskip Lions. A retired TVA architect, Longmire has been a Lion since 2004 and is a faithful and active member of the club. Everyone who knows him will agree that John would do any-thing he could to help anybody he is aware of needing help.

➤ Read Bonnie Peters on page A-3

fpKIDS CampSchool is out and families

are looking for ways to enjoy the summer while giving their kids great experiences. Faith Promise Church is supplying one fun option by educating kids in the spiritual sense while providing for their ma-turing physical needs as well.

The fpKIDS Camp has been going strong since 2011. The camp meets at Ft. Bluff in Dayton, Tenn.

➤ Read Cindy Taylor on page A-7

LyLynnnnusus GGililll, tthhehe ooldlddesestt lilivivingng rr lelela-a

The Front PorchNorwood notes

Open letter to residents of Norwood, Inskip and points beyond. If you are getting this paper at your home, you’re in the designated Powell/Norwood area.

And we want to do a better job of covering your commu-nity news.

If you’ve got time to help or just offer free advice, give a call to 865-661-8777.

We hope to hear from you! – S. Clark

returns to

Page 2: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

A-2 • JUNE 1, 2016 • POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news

NEWS FROM PARKWEST, WEST KNOXVILLE’S HEALTHCARE LEADER • TREATEDWELL.COM • 374-PARK

health & lifestyles

09

01-2

22

8

WOMEN IN TREATMENTAddiction Treatment that WorksWomen in Treatment is appropriate for uninsured women age

18-64 who are in addiction. Participants must be uninsured or

have exhausted available insurance benefits. (865) 374-7262

I am a woman in treatmentGrieving mother learns to cope without alcohol

There could be no price too high, and no sacrifi ce too great.

“I would give up everything I have in a heartbeat to have my son back,” Kimberly Cross says.

Cross sits quietly in an offi ce at Penin-sula Lighthouse, waiting for her next ses-sion with Women in Treatment, a substance abuse rehabilitation program for women who don’t have insurance or have exhaust-ed their benefi ts.

“I honestly don’t know where I would be if I had not found this place,” Cross says. “To be able to come here and talk to women who are going through the same thing that I am, it just makes you feel like you’re not alone.”

After waking up one morning to fi nd her son dead from a heroin overdose in her West Virginia home, Cross used alcohol to get through the grief.

“I just wanted to be numb,” Cross says. “I didn’t want to feel the pain.”

Cross remembers feeling embarrassed, and even humiliated as she walked into the liquor store. She kept telling herself it wasn’t where she belonged.

Those reservations weren’t enough to stop her. She soon discovered that buying a bottle of alcohol could ease her emotional pain for a little while, and it became her go-to method of getting through each sorrow-ful day.

Less than a year later, her husband of 19 years passed away as a result of cancer. The sorrow deepened, and so did her need for relief.

Cross believed she had been through enough, and didn’t deserve to feel pain, ever again. “So I told myself I would go to whatever lengths I had to go to,” Cross says, “to not feel pain.”

As time went by, she found she was able to adapt to life with no husband or son, but she could only do it with alcohol as part of the picture. She hid it well, even fi nding love, remarrying and making a new home in Knoxville.

But beneath the joy of the new life, there was the undercurrent of the old addiction that she hadn’t yet come to terms with. It was her new husband who fi nally called her out.

“I can’t count the number of times David came home when I’d been drinking, and he knew it,” Cross says. “He just knew, and it would frustrate me, so much.”

He told her she had a drinking problem, and she balked, fi ring back that she could quit, any time.

So David challenged her to go ahead and quit.

She couldn’t.

Kimberly Cross holds a picture of her

son, Jordan, and a poem he wrote

before he died as a result of a heroin

overdose in 2012. Cross used alcohol

to cope with her grief, and is now

using a program at Peninsula Light-

house to recover from addiction.

David Cross embraces

his wife after balloons

are released in memory

of Kimberly’s son.

‘If only I could afford to get help …’If you’re caught in an endless cycle

of paying for drugs or alcohol to fuel an addiction, fi nding the extra money to help you stop may seem completely impossible. Many women struggling with addictive issues may know they need help, but think they can’t afford it.

Peninsula offers help through Women in Treatment. It’s an intensive outpatient program exclusively for women who don’t have insurance or have exhausted their benefi ts.

This program offers a safe, compassionate, therapeutic environment for addicted women who want to reclaim their lives. Sessions are conducted by a master’s level clinician and cover a wide variety of addiction-related issues:

■ Relapse prevention

■ Self-esteem

■ Confl ict resolution

■ Parenting skills

■ Stress management

■ Body image

■ Symptom management/mental health

diagnosis

■ Communication techniques

■ Trauma

■ Relationship concerns

■ Co-occurring disorders

Sessions are held weekdays at the Peninsula Lighthouse campus on Dowell Springs Boulevard.

Women and addictionA report on gender and addiction from

Harvard University Medical School says while men are more likely to become ad-dicts, women tend to become addicted more quickly. Women also develop medical or social consequences of addiction faster than men.

For example, alcohol-related problems such as brain atrophy or liver damage oc-cur more rapidly in women than in men. Women often fi nd it harder to quit using addictive substances, and are more suscep-tible to relapse.

Women are more likely than men to be prescribed narcotic pain medication, and women are more likely to show up in hospi-tal emergency rooms for overdosing.

Substance abuse is the number-one health epidemic in the United States, and

the number of women who die from ad-diction-related illnesses is more than four times the number of women who die from breast cancer.

With statistics like these, the importance of treating addiction seriously and prompt-ly is evident. Women in Treatment is suc-cessfully striving to help keep East Tennes-see women from becoming statistics.

Women in Treatment is funded by the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, and is ap-propriate for women age 18-64 who are in addiction, and who are uninsured, or have exhausted available insurance ben-efits.

If you think this program could be right for you, call Peninsula Light-house at 865-374-7262.

Cross fi nally faced the addiction, and decided to get help. She got online, and began searching for low cost rehab, when she stumbled upon Women in Treatment at Peninsula Lighthouse.

In the program, she found the support she needed to break free from the grip of addiction, but she made one critical mis-take. She left too soon.

Cross relapsed and was arrested for driv-ing under the infl uence of alcohol twice. Her second arrest came with a 24-hour jail sentence.

“I hated it, I was scared,” she says. “It was the second worst thing that I have ever gone through, besides the death of my son.”

That was when she made the call to get back into therapy, and she’s been a partici-pant in Women in Treatment, ever since. “I learn something from each new person who comes in, and I hope they learn something from me,” Cross says.

Cross has been “clean” since March 10, the anniversary of her son’s death, which is also just a few days before his birthday. She thought she needed alcohol to get through the day, but after just a couple of sips she came to a realization.

“I realized in order to really live this life, I have to feel pain,” she says. “And there’s not enough alcohol in this world to numb the pain for me, so I dumped the rest of the

can down the sink.”She’s not proud of the temporary set-

back she had that day, but it didn’t takeaway from what became a victorious turn-ing point. It was the fi rst time she’d made itthrough the anniversary of her son’s deathand birthday sober.

Today, Cross is setting small goals, and relying on what she’s learned from Womenin Treatment to stay sober. She describesher alcohol addiction as something that’sconstantly picking at her brain, and she isfully aware she will have to live with it forthe rest of her life.

“I’m still trying to get there,” Cross says,“but I think I’m doing okay.”

With the love of her husband, and the help of Women in Treatment, KimberlyCross believes she’s on the right path to re-covery.

“I am a woman in treatment,” she says.

Page 3: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news • JUNE 1, 2016 • A-3 community

Powell schools From page A-1

giggled.Knox County hired S.H.

Thompson as the fi rst prin-cipal, $1,200 annual sal-ary plus $400 to rent a cot-tage. He never showed up. Thompson sent a telegram saying he had just returned from a thousand-mile trip and could not keep his ap-pointment.

G.W. Morton took the job

for $900. Glenmore Garrett was the other teacher. They had nine elementary stu-dents and 16 high schoolers at different levels.

Almost immediately the Powell Station Parents and Teachers Association orga-nized. Parents were in the majority. Mrs. A.O. Child was the fi rst president.

Next came the world fl u

happening. “Fessor” Fowler stayed 33 years. He taught agriculture and vocational skills. He loved and was loved by “his boys.” They all wanted to play on his Future Farmers of America basket-ball team.

Late in his career, Fowl-er spoiled his good-old-boy image. He emerged as teacher of physics.

Another famous name, Mildred Patterson, came in 1937. Amy Armstrong (later Moyers) arrived a year later.

Teachers took a pay cut during the Great Depres-sion. After economic recov-ery, Knox County published a scale: $105 per month for one year of experience, an extra $5 for a master’s de-gree; $150 per month for 10 years of experience; $170 for 25. Teachers who endured me deserved far more.

The new high school and I arrived on Emory Road in the late 1940s. W.W. Morris was principal. Eleanor Mc-Caskill and Floy Bell taught

English.At 15, I knew I could cut

it.Mr. Morris was big and

boisterous and once tried to stuff me into a hall locker. My peers cheered him on. Actually, the principal was my friend. He provided golden opportunities. He al-lowed me to skip his history class and escape study hall to sell ads for the annual.

Persuading merchants and business leaders to part with their hard-earned funds was an enriching experience. I set a sales record and con-sidered myself very success-ful. Only later did I under-stand that those good people supported school projects year after year. All I really did was not foul up the process.

Mrs. McCaskill was a disciplinarian. She once ordered me out of her class-room just for talking too much. She sent me to the principal’s offi ce. He said “Not you again!”

He wouldn’t let me in.

He made me sit outside hisdoor in public humiliation –and listen to the World Se-ries on my transistor radio,Yankees with Casey Stengel,Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggioand Phil Rizzuto against theDodgers.

Mr. Morris stopped byevery inning or so to checkon the score – as if he had abet on the game.

Mrs. Bell was an enthusi-astic booster – my 459 linesin the senior play made animpact.

Much later she admit-ted I was that teacher’s pet.She had some of the samephrases my grandmotherused. One of her themes wasunlimited potential. Longbefore the Nike commercial,she said “Just do it.”

There are a thousand oth-er stories about the schoolsin historic Powell Station.Keep in mind that I am lim-ited. I am not quite 100.

(Got a story to share?Marvin West’s address [email protected])

Bear From page A-1

they will catch him.”“This picture was posted

on our HOA page by a neigh-bor. He was in her backyard this morning. Super scary as Teagan would say.”

“Sometimes it’s nice to have moved,” Hubbard posted. “Broadacres has a new resident pet! Sure glad this isn’t out my window! But it is only a few blocks from where I did live until a week ago! He ate a morning snack ... upended a full bird feeder into his mouth!!”

Then Eric Billy Barnes posted: “The bear was hit on Clinton Highway.”

After a fl urry of frowny faces, Barnes posted that it was merely “tapped” by the car and ran off toward Walmart. “Probably looking for picnic supplies,” some-body else wrote.

The Broadacres HOA Facebook page was a trip. Interspersed with bear sightings were notes about needing a plumber or elec-trician. Somebody wanted to buy a basketball goal.

HOA president Steven Goodpaster came on to re-port vandals had stolen two letters off the entrance sign.

He showed a picture: “B_o_dacres” and men-tioned that those gold let-ters are expensive.

“We know it wasn’t the bear,” someone wrote, “because bears don’t have pockets.”

Bears also don’t need an R and an A. Had it been the bear the sign would now read: “_ro_dc__s” and Steven would be looking at even more expense.

Some neighbors walked or jogged on the subdivision’s wide streets, oblivious to the marauding intruder. Others scurried to take down bird feeders or bring trash cans and small pets inside.

Somebody observed that the bear was moving quick-ly. “Could be more than one bear,” someone said. “Naw, bears travel as the crow fl ies,” added another. Huh?

Why did the bear stay two days in Broadacres? Anyone who’s tried to fi nd an ad-dress here knows the answer. Without a map, the bear kept circling Shropshire.

epidemic. The school got sprayed with disinfectant to slow down the disease. Some of the girls held their noses.

World War I caused strain. The school stopped offering German as an elec-tive language.

Four were in the fi rst graduating class.

By 1923 historic Pow-ell Station was in a growth spurt. B. Frank Evans was school principal. Mrs. Evans, Leonard Brickey and Juanita Bradley were on the faculty. Classrooms and steam heat were added. The community pledged $3,000 for an annex.

Electricity arrived in 1926. Before that, batteries provided night light.

In 1929, A.G. Haworth came from Carson-New-man College to teach sci-ence. He became coach of everything. He was chair of the community committee that lobbied for a gymna-sium and chair of the build-ing committee that oversaw eventual construction.

Nobody said much about women’s rights. The coun-ty declined to hire female teachers unless they were single or had been married more than one year. Moth-ers were not hired until children passed age 2. This was the primitive defense against interruption for pregnancy and child care.

H.J. Fowler joined the faculty in 1932. This was a

Bonnie Peters

The Lions Club of Inskip is proud to announce that member John Longmire has been recognized by Lions Clubs International Founda-tion as a Melvin Jones Fellow.

John Longmire is super Lion

The presentation was made at an April meeting of Inskip Lions. A retired TVA architect, Longmire has been a Lion since 2004 and is a faithful and active member of the club. Every-one who knows him will agree that John would do anything he could to help anybody he is aware of needing help.

John’s wife, Mary Lou, is also a member of Inskip Lions. The club was de-lighted that some of John’s

family could attend the pre-sentation and dinner in his honor – daughter, Lou Ann Clabough and grandson, Philip Clabough; son and daughter-in-law, John and Patty Longmire; and sister-in-law Suzanne Matheny. Granddaughter, Suzanna Clabough, is away at college and could not attend.

Lions Clubs Interna-tional was founded in 1917 by Melvin Jones, a 38-year old Chicago business leader. He told members of his local business club they should reach beyond business is-sues and address the better-ment of their communities and the world. Jones’ group, the Business Circle of Chi-cago, agreed. After contact-ing similar groups around the United States, an orga-nizational meeting was held on June 7, 1917, in Chicago.

The new group took the name of one of the invited groups, the “Association of

Lions Clubs,” and a national convention was held in Dal-las in October of that year. A constitution, by-laws, ob-jectives and a code of ethics were approved. The rest is history.

As Lions approach their 100th anniversary in 2017, it’s a moment to look back on the long and proud tra-dition of service and the numerous achievements of our association and Lions around the world. Lions Clubs became international in 1920 by chartering a club in Windsor, Canada. In 1925 during the international convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, Helen Keller charged Lions to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.”

On April 6, 1949, a group of 39 civic-minded men from the Inskip community formed the Lions Club of Inskip. The club was spon-sored by neighboring Foun-

tain City Lions Club. From the very beginning, these men had the well-being of the community at heart.

In 1953, a major project of the club was to build a building next to the school to house a library to be used by the school and the commu-nity. This building was later used as the Inskip branch of Lawson McGhee Library. This building was in con-tinuous use until the branch was closed by the county.

The building was then given to the Inskip Lions Club and is now rented in the community as a ser-vice and as a fundraiser for the club. In 1958, the Club undertook the huge task of building a community swimming pool. The pool was offi cially opened on July 17, 1959, and was in opera-tion until sold to the city of Knoxville in July 1975. Dur-ing these years, the money realized from the operation

of the pool was used in thecommunity mostly to helppeople with vision problemsin paying for exams andglasses. Other needs werealso met as presented.

A member of the InskipLions Club would normallyspend 20 or more hourseach year working on com-munity service projects andperforming administrativeduties for the club. Sincethe club is an organizationof volunteers, the level of ef-fort and participation willvary widely due to the in-terests, work schedules andpersonal time demands ofthe members.

In May, the Inskip Lionsrecognized fi ve fi fth grad-ers at Inskip ElementarySchool for their leadershipskills and academic achieve-ments. The community sup-ports this event and atten-dance is extraordinary for asmall community.

Info: 687-3842.John Longmire with Melvin

Jones plaque

Page 4: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

A-4 • JUNE 1, 2016 • POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news

7700 Dannaher DrivePowell, TN 37849(865) 686-5771

www.morningpointe.com

Assisted Living at Morning Pointe

It’s notwhat youthink.

Call for a

TOURTODAY

Sandra Clark

Marvin West

Beware of coffee shop de-bates about Tennessee foot-ball. Bruises and even lac-erations are possible. Egos can be damaged. Feelings may be hurt beyond repair.

I innocently walked into one the other day and was immediately challenged to settle the disturbance.

“Speak up,” said one com-batant. “You know it all.”

“You’ve been around for-ever,” said another.

In commemoration of this year’s empty NFL draft, at issue was which former Volunteer, born in the state of Tennessee, played the most pro football games?

Under consideration were Doug Atkins, Bill Bates and Reggie White.

Right here, out of courte-sy, we pause for two seconds

Old Vols in the NFL

so you can vote.Pause over.Atkins, defensive end

from Humboldt, played in 205 pro games (mostly Chi-cago). He struck fear into the hearts of quarterbacks and sometimes alarmed rival linemen assigned to block him. He is one of the really big names in the col-lege and pro halls of fame.

Bates, defensive back from Farragut, played in 217 games, all with the Cow-

boys, and fi nished as one of the all-time stars of special teams. He has coached and also distinguished himself as a father of athletes.

White, a rare gladiator who included foes in his prayers and then dented their helmets, made the trip from Chattanooga to UT to Philadelphia to Green Bay and fi nally to Carolina. He played in 232 NFL games over 15 seasons.

Before anyone could ask, I told them Reggie inter-cepted three passes, scored two touchdowns and had 198 career sacks. That made an impression.

“You are pretty smart,” said one listener.

“There are reference li-braries,” said I.

The coffee caucus, three

cups in, seemed surprised to learn that homegrown Raleigh McKenzie from Austin-East played cen-ter and guard in 226 pro games, much for Washing-ton but two years each for Philadelphia, San Diego and Green Bay.

One budding genius sud-denly remembered that Raleigh works for his twin brother Reggie as a scout for the Oakland Raiders. Reg-gie is general manager and also a very famous father. His son, Kahlil McKenzie, defensive tackle, 6-4 and 319, is a Tennessee star-to-be.

Reggie is very smart but did not play nearly as many NFL games as Raleigh.

The discussion got side-tracked onto how Kahlil and

the current Volunteers will do and how good an idea was moving the opener to a Thursday night and would I attend the Battle of Bristol.

It took time to return to the subject, Tennessee-born Vols who survived the rigors of pro football for extended periods. If you are guessing, offensive linemen do have a better chance for longevity than backs, receivers and linebackers.

Judge Tim Irwin, former Central High tackle, played in 201 games, almost all with the Minnesota Vikings. Chad Clifton, from Martin, played in 158 for the Pack-ers. He is new to their hall of fame.

Mike Stratton of Tellico Plains played 156 for Buf-falo. Bruce Wilkerson, from Loudon, played in 147, mostly for the Raiders. Har-ry Galbreath, from Clarks-ville, made it through 141

with Miami, Green Bay and the New York Jets.

Nashville tackle John Gordy, teammate of John Majors, did 134 games for the Detroit Lions. Defen-sive tackle John Hender-son (Nashville) had 133. Cleveland’s Bob Johnson was Cincinnati’s center for 126 games. Linebacker Al Wilson (Jackson) lasted for 125. Linebacker Mike Cofer (Rule High, Knoxville) played 123.

Don’t set this list in stone. Jason Witten (Elizabethton to UT to Dallas) is gaining on 200 games. He holds the NFL mark for consecu-tive starts by a tight end and is third all-time to reach 10,000 yards in receptions.

One or more of the Colquitts (Knoxville) may kick forever.Marvin West invites additions and cor-

rections from other know-it-alls. His ad-

dress is [email protected]

= Neighborhood Engagement

= City Staff Work

Appendix F — Flow Chart / Neighborhood Traffic Safety Program

B Kick-Off Meeting Neighbors explain

traffic issues. Staff explains Traffic

Safety Program.

Further Study

Indicated?

E Evaluation Meeting

Neighbors detail traffic problems.

F Speed Data Collection & Evaluation

Data from hoses, collisions, KPD.

Qualifies for Engineering

on Point Scale

System?

A Neighborhood

Application Neighborhood

applies for Traffic Safety Study.

H Traffic Calming Feasibilty Study

More in-depth study and analysis.

J Concept Plan

Meeting City presents

plan for deploying

devices &/or route

modifications. Neighbors

provide feedback.

Threshold Met for

Enforcement &/or Further

Study?

yes

yes

yes

Priority Ranking Project Ranks High

or Low?

high

Project will be ranked again in next round.

C Alternate Solutions Staff may suggest

solutions outside the Traffic Safety Program.

D Neighborhood Petition

Impact area defined. Neighborhood gathers

signatures.

no

no

K Detailed Design

City prepares bid-ready detailed design of the

project.

ENFORCEMENT

ENGINEERING

L Bidding &

Construction Projects are bundled for lowest cost.

M Post-Construction

Evaluation

no

More than 50%

approve?

no

EDUCATION

G Speed Data Status

Meeting City shares data results

& analysis with the neighborhood.

yes yes

I Traffic Calming Status Meeting

City shares data results & analysis with the

neighborhood.

low Carl McDaniel

McDaniel was a Lion for all seasonsI can’t remember when I

didn’t know Carl McDaniel. He was just always around,

h e l p i n g folks with vision prob-lems or spearhead-ing some new fund-r a i s i n g scheme for the Halls Lions Club.

When he died on May 24 at age 80, the community lost a fi ne leader.

I connect Carl with George Davey; both were Lions and both lived on Co-chise Drive up by Beaver Brook Country Club.

George was from the north, I think, and was a more aggressive fund-rais-er. When George died, Carl led a delegation of Lions into the Fountain City Unit-ed Methodist Church. They were awesome in their Lion

regalia and we appreciated their show of respect.

Carl worked for KUB as a power operations super-visor for 33 years. As an adult, he earned a bach-elor’s degree (1989) and a master’s degree (1993) from UT. He then took a job with the state Emergency Man-agement Agency where he worked for eight years.

Carl was a charter mem-ber of Halls Community Li-ons Club for over 50 years. He was also the District Governor of the Lions Club International District 12-N Tennessee from 1998-1999.

I wrote a story when he got his master’s and another

when he and wife Jennie at-tended an international Li-ons convention in England or Scotland. Memory fails.

With all this involvement, it’s easy to see how Carl must have known half the town.

He grew up in Union County, graduating from Hor-ace Maynard High School in 1953. His parents were Silas and Lucille McDaniel.

Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Jennie Haney McDaniel; son and daughter Jim McDaniel and Kelly McDaniel; brothers, David and Eddie McDaniel; sisters, Judy McDaniel Paul and Wanda McDaniel Jack-son; special brother, Donnie Boles; and a host of friends.

Services were Friday at Sharon Baptist Church and the interment was Saturday morning at Sharon Baptist’s cemetery.

Arrangements were by Mynatt Funeral Home of Fountain City.

Traffi c calming, anyone?The city is doing wonder-

ful things to enhance Knox-ville, but the chart above is not among them.

Written by planner Don Parnell, the chart is an ap-pendix to the city’s Neigh-borhood Safety Program.

Want to get speed bumps on your street? Well, jump right in.

Looks like you start at the arrow on the left top – apply for a traffi c safe-ty study. Then meet with neighbors and staff to deter-mine whether further study is indicated. A half dozen additional meetings ensue.

If the city decides to go forward, consultants are hired and projects ranked.

Surveys and education are woven into the model. Speeders do not participate in such complex processes. Perhaps no one does.

This schematic is a plan-ner’s dream. Check back next year to see how many traffi c calming projects are completed.

– S. Clark

Page 5: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news • JUNE 1, 2016 • A-5 government

VictorAshe

Betty Bean

Very little blowback and lots of attaboys – that’s what Mayor Tim Burchett says he’s gotten for his re-cent criticism of the Haslam administration’s refusal to kick in money for a facil-ity to stabilize mentally ill and substance-addicted in-mates. He made the rounds of the Sunday talk shows last month denouncing the state for reneging on a com-mitment to help fund a be-havioral health urgent care unit (formerly known as the safety center).

Burchett says he’s con-fi dent that the project will move forward, one way or another.

“No hard feelings. It’s just politics. We’re going to move ahead. I understand the state didn’t want to fund any local projects, but we know it’s the right thing to do. In the end, I think ev-erybody’s going to be at the table. Our local legislative delegation’s been very sup-portive, and they under-stand (the issue) better than most. Every day I receive correspondence from one of them, and it’s a piece of the moving parts we’re dealing with.”

■ The announcement that Bearden High School principal John Bartlett is Tennessee’s High School Principal of the Year (named by the Tennessee Associa-tion of Secondary School Principals) came as a shock to many people.

Wonder how Bearden High School teachers who got put through the wringer when the school’s evalua-tion scores plummeted from the highest possible level to

Elizabeth “Liz” Savelli is completing 23 years run-ning a popular neighbor-hood restaurant, Savelli’s, in West Knoxville. She opened up on March 1, 1993, and has been at 3055 Sutherland Avenue ever since.

When interviewed, she said her most fa-mous guest was Willard Scott, whom HGTV introduced to Savelli’s. But other well-known patrons

have included Tommy Las-orda, former manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and Tim Love, UT graduate and chef. Former UT football coach Phillip Fulmer and South College president Steve South are regulars.

Savelli, 57, has worked the restaurant business her whole life, starting in Clearwater, Fla., work-ing for the Sub Shop. She moved to Knoxville in 1993 and found the current site, which she leased until purchasing it a few months ago. The site was a Time Out deli with 28 seats; Savelli’s now has 49 seats.

Meanwhile, she has raised four daughters: Kathleen, now 26; Re-becca, 28; Jessica, 30; and Christina, 33. She has six grandchildren, fi ve boys and a girl. Kathleen is the only one who works in the restaurant, and she makes all the cakes.

Liz Savelli says her most popular di sh for lunch is the blackened grouper sub and for dinner is the grouper picante. She says her hardest job is “keeping good employees,” but “we have done well.”

■ Alan Lowe, former head of the Baker Center at UT-Knoxville, has resigned from the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Archives in Dallas and accepted a position at the Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum in Springfi eld, Ill. Lowe moved to Dallas in 2009. He was the fi rst di-rector of the Baker Center.

■ Democrats are eager to win back control of the General Assembly. Their odds of achieving this are slim, but they are pushing it hard, including recruit-ing 23 women to run for the Legislature this November. The Democrats may gain seats, while failing to reach majority control in either house. Democrats claim that likely GOP nominee Donald Trump will alienate women voters from the

Burchett to Haslam: Sorry, not sorry; principal of the year award baffl es

rock bottom lows last year are feeling?

Knox County Education Association president Lau-ren Hopson probably spoke for a lot of them when she pointed out that teachers whose scores plunge to the lowest levels get assigned coaches and subjected to twice as many evaluations the following year, “and possibly get put on intensive assistance with the constant threat of losing their job hanging over their head...

“Meanwhile, a principal who runs a school where (scores) dropped from a 5 to a 1 in one year is named principal of the year?????”

And what about the Bearden parents whose daughters were members of the softball team before Bartlett summarily fi red the highly successful coach Leonard Sams last year?

“It makes us sick,” said Adam McKenry, Sams’ for-mer assistant coach and booster club offi cer who has fi led an ethics complaint against Barrett and athletic director Nathan Lynn.

The complaint charges that Bartlett and Lynn failed to inform the boost-ers that it’s illegal for pri-vate citizens to build sports facilities on school property, and that had they known this, the parents would not have gone forward with building a new indoor bat-ting facility on the Bearden

campus. And McKenry and another parent, Randy Su-song, wouldn’t be stuck pay-ing $700 per month on the note for the new building, which was named for Sams, who was abruptly canned after he led the team to the school’s fi rst-ever state tournament run. The school board also approved the project.

The softball boosters probably aren’t the only parents who are puzzled about Bartlett’s big honor, given the massive turnover among the Bearden coach-ing staff, across the board. Over the past four years, head coaches in soccer, ten-nis, golf, baseball, volley-ball, basketball and football have departed, as well as ev-ery assistant football coach from this last season.

McKenry, Sams and Su-song are scheduled to ap-pear at the school board’s Ethics Committee on June 6.

■ The Bernie/Hill-ary battle is still raging on the national scene, but here in Knoxville, the two sides are joining to campaign for Democratic County Com-mission candidate Evelyn Gill, whose primary victory over Rick Staples in District 1 surprised a lot of political observers.

“Bernie and Hillary sup-porters are canvassing the fi rst district for Evelyn Gill. We want to show our com-munity that while we have some disagreements, we are strongly supporting our lo-cal Democratic candidate, and we will be out in the district door knocking and getting out the vote for Ev-

elyn Gill,” said Paul Berney.Gill, a special education

teacher with Knox County Schools, is a Sanders sup-porter who rode the Bernie wave in the UT- and down-town-dominated wards of the district, while Staples carried the pro-Clinton wards in the district’s heart. She faces a challenge from Republican Michael Cov-ington, who is closely iden-tifi ed with local GOP regu-lars.

Participants will meet at the Knox County Demo-cratic Party headquarters for training at 10 a.m. and hit the streets at 11.

■ Tennessee’s sun-shine laws are among the strongest in the nation and require that almost all offi -cial communications should be open to public scrutiny. This is a frequent aggrava-tion for local elected of-fi cials, who resent the fact that state legislators ex-empted themselves from the laws they passed.

So they probably weren’t queuing up any sad trom-bones for GOP Rep. Susan Lynn, who’s been raising heck because emails dis-cussing plans to challenge the federal government’s “bathroom guidelines” for transgender students got leaked.

“Whoever did this – you know who you are – I im-plore you to act with more honor than that – to behave with Christian ethics,” she said in an email that also got leaked, prompting her to de-clare herself “shocked that the email about the leaked emails was also leaked.”

Savelli’s marks 23 years on Sutherland

GOP ticket, but that may be wishful thinking.

Three women are run-ning here in Knox County, starting with former state Rep. Gloria Johnson, seek-ing to recapture her old House seat against incum-bent Eddie Smith. Also being opposed by Demo-cratic women are Reps. Martin Daniel and Roger Kane in traditionally safe GOP districts. The Smith-Johnson race in November will be the most seriously contested local contest. Out-of-state PAC money will be evident for both.

It is a fi rst in Tennes-see political history that one party (Democratic) is fi elding 23 women for state House seats including a women opposing House Speaker Beth Harwell, the fi rst woman in Tennessee history to be house speaker. She is a credible opponent and Harwell will have to campaign actively in her own district to win another term.

■ Thackston School, located on Lake Avenue adjacent to the UT cam-pus, closed its doors after 95 years last week. No announcement was made. Parents were asked not to talk to the media about it when informed a few months ago.

Deborah Wofford has headed the school for many years, and it has had a stu-dent body of 100, starting at age 3 and going through fi fth grade.

Hundreds of Knoxville residents have attended Thackston over the years. The land it is on is being sold as this column is writ-ten. It is the end of an era. Prominent citizens attend-ing Thackston include long-time Knoxville attorney Arthur G. Seymour Jr.

■ Veteran General Sessions Judge Geoff Emery and his wife re-cently returned from a two-week trip to Europe focused on World War II history. They visited the beaches at Normandy in France, the site of the Battle of the Bulge in Belgium, and Germany.

■ Vice Mayor Duane Grieve celebrated his 70th birthday on May 25. Coun-cil member Finbarr Saun-ders is the oldest member of Knoxville City Council at 71. Marshall Stair is the youngest member at 37.

Liz Savelli

City secures grant to clean up two propertiesThe U.S. Environmen-

tal Protection Agency has awarded $350,000 in brownfi eld cleanup grants that will remediate contam-ination on two important city of Knoxville redevelop-ment sites: the former Mc-Clung Warehouses on Jack-son Avenue and the former Sanitary Laundry site, 625 N. Broadway.

EPA is funding $200,000 for the 15,000-square-foot, former dry-cleaning site in the heart of the Downtown North Redevelopment Dis-trict and $150,000 for the fi ve-acre former industrial site on Jackson Avenue. The city will be contributing a 20 percent match – a com-bined $70,000.

The Tennessee Depart-ment of Environment and Conservation is partnering with the city and EPA on the cleanups, according to a city press statement.

“We know that contami-nants are present at the Sanitary Laundry and Mc-

Clung Warehouses sites, and that’s a major roadblock in bringing these key prop-erties back into reuse,” said Mayor Madeline Rogero. “The great news is that we’ll be developing a strategy to remediate the sites, and now we’ve got the resources to move ahead.”

Anne Wallace, the city’s deputy director of rede-velopment, said the two brownfi eld properties are highly visible and strate-gically located in their re-spective corridors, with “signifi cant redevelopment potential.”

“Without remediation,

the contaminated sites would continue to dete-riorate, and that affects the value of neighboring prop-erties,” Wallace said.

Rogero said the cleanups will accelerate redevelop-ment throughout the Down-town North and Jackson Av-enue corridors. The impact will be wider than just the redevelopment of the two specifi c properties, she said.

“These cleanups will kick up a notch the amazing re-surgence that’s already hap-pening in these two redevel-opment corridors.”

Previous EPA brownfi eld assessment grants, totaling almost $500,000, identi-fi ed specifi cally what and where contaminants existed in multiple sites on Jackson Avenue and in Downtown North. This follow-up round of grant funding will go to-ward remediation.

The former Sanitary Laundry and Jackson Av-enue sites have unique re-development histories and

are unusual in that both are city-owned.

The city, motivated by blight-abatement and public safety concerns, purchased the McClung Warehouses portion of the Jackson Av-enue site in 2013 from a bankruptcy trustee. The warehouses, dating back to the 1890s, were destroyed in fi res set by vagrants in 2007 and 2014.

The city acquired the abandoned dry-cleaning site on Broadway in 2014 in a tax foreclosure. The busi-ness had been a leading employer in the 1920s and 1930s.

The details of the remedi-ation work will be fi nalized by the city, TDEC and EPA. Then, later this year, an en-vironmental consultant will be hired through a competi-tively-bid contract.

Once rehabilitated, the city intends to sell both sites to private redevelopers. A mix of uses is envisioned for both properties.

McClung warehouses pre-fi re.

The ornate structures were a

solid anchor on the north side

of downtown.

Page 6: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

A-6 • JUNE 1, 2016 • POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news

SENIOR NOTES ■ Karns Senior Center

8042 Oak Ridge Highway951-2653knoxcounty.org/seniorsMonday-Friday7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Off erings include: card

games; dance classes; exer-

cise programs; mahjong; art

classes; farkle dice games;

dominoes; a computer lab;

billiards room; outdoor grill

and kitchen area.

Register for: “Lunch

and Learn: “Clear Captions

Communication,” noon

Tuesday, June 7. “Estate

Planning,” 2 p.m. Wednes-

day, June 8. “General Nutri-

tion,” 11 a.m. Thursday, June

9. Snack and Learn: Cosmetic

Dentistry and Whitening, 2

p.m. Friday, June 10. Musical

performance: The Grace

Noters, 2:30 p.m. Wednes-

day, June 15.

■ Halls Senior Center4405 Crippen Road922-0416knoxcounty.org/seniorsMonday-FridayHours vary

Off erings include: card

games; exercise classes;

quilting, dominoes, dance

classes; scrapbooking,

craft classes; Tai Chi; movie

matinee 2 p.m. Tuesdays;

Senior Meals program,

noon Wednesdays.

Register for:Tennessee

Theatre’s Mighty Musical

Monday, 11 a.m. Monday,

June 6; box lunch, $5. “Best

Apps for Seniors” class, 10

a.m.-noon Monday, June 6;

$15; register/pay by Thurs-

day, June 2. “The Ins and

Outs of Your Camera Phone”

class, 10 a.m.-noon Monday,

June 13; $15; register/pay by

Thursday, June 9.

■ Morning Pointe Assisted Living7700 Dannaher Drive686-5771 or morningpointe.com

Ongoing event: Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Caregivers Support Group

meets 1 p.m. each last

Monday.

Dr. Paul YauLoren RiddickBlake McCoyJasen Bradley

Life Beyond Bingo

Sandra Clark

Year-in and year-out, our most loyal Shopper News readers are our seniors. That was true when I began publishing the paper in 1971 and remains true today. Re-spect for place becomes stronger as we age, and the Shopper is all about people and place.

For instance, Shannon Carey has a great tale in our new North/East Shopper this week about how retired Carson-Newman guy Jim Coppock celebrated his 80th birthday. He asked his kids to throw a party at Holston Hills Country Club for his friends from sixth grade at Chilhowee Elemen-tary School.

Incredibly, people came from across the country.

Beyond Bingo: So our sales manager, Amy Lutheran, and I decided to celebrate our senior

readers with a party of sorts. Val and Cassie Smith at Sherrill Hills Retirement Resort agreed to host the fi rst one and it’s this week!

A good turnout will guarantee other such events in other parts of town. There’s no cost or obliga-tion. We hope you can make time to attend!

Oh, yes, Sherrill Hills is at the top of the hill behind Academy Sports on Kingston Pike just west of Cedar Bluff. Info: 865-622-4059

By Sara BarrettThis week at Sherrill Hills Re-

tirement Resort, the Shopper News will present its fi rst Beyond Bingo event for folks interested in life af-ter their senior discount.

Everything is free, including lunch provided by Sherrill Hills. Door prizes will be given away and there’s a pretty good chance you’ll leave with a few other freebies.

Beyond Bingo will take place 11 a.m.-1 p.m. today and tomorrow (Wednesday and Thursday, June 1-2) at Sherrill Hills, 271 Moss Grove Boulevard.

In addition to numerous vendors that will be on hand, a number of speakers will share advice in their areas of expertise:

■ Jasen Bradley, CPT, man-ager and NASM certifi ed per-sonal trainer, Fitness Together

Jasen Bradley became a trainer more than 10 years ago.

“My own path to becoming a per-sonal trainer began after my father passed due to heart disease. It gave me the motivation to not only make my health a priority, but to help oth-ers do the same,” he says.

Bradley is now a trainer and manager for Fitness Together in Farragut. He plans to focus his pre-sentation at Beyond Bingo on the success of FT clients and how many of them started their new, healthy lifestyles after the perceived “nor-mal” age.

“I want our clients to spend as much time with their children, fam-ilies, and hobbies as long as they can without wasting their time on ‘fl y by night’ health fads.

“FT offers seniors a dedicated personalized program fi t around their interests and goals,” Bradley continues. “No program is the same and the results are guaranteed.

“Whether it’s improving your overall health and wellness, or seek-ing fi tness through strength train-ing, helping you get out of bed with-out pain, running faster, jumping higher, or learning about your weight management options to reach your fi tness goals, we’re eager to start you on a journey that will change your

Info: LorenRiddickTeam.com■ Paul Yau, MD, Tennessee

Orthopedic ClinicDr. Paul Yau, board certifi ed

physician, received his fellowship training in joint replacement and adult reconstructive surgery from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Yau currently chairs the ortho-pedic department at Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center and coor-dinates the hip fracture and joint replacement services there.

His specialty practice keeps him current with the latest surgical techniques and advances in ortho-pedic care including hip arthros-copy and anterior hip replacement.

Yau is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, and Arthroscopy Association of North America. Info: tocdocs.com

life forever.” Info: 671-2022.■ Blake McCoy, founder

and CEO, Independent Insur-ance Consultants

Blake McCoy had a close rela-tionship to his grandparents grow-ing up, and he feels that’s part of what inspired him to help seniors.

“I feel seniors don’t get treated properly,” says McCoy. “They have so much knowledge, and often they are ignored.”

McCoy would see agents only interested in helping themselves instead of doing what was best for their client’s situation.

He was inspired to get his insur-ance license at age 19. In Septem-ber, he will have had his license for 14 years.

McCoy plans to discuss the four parts of Medicare during his pre-sentation at Beyond Bingo. He also hopes to cover the difference be-tween an independent agency and a captive agency, and how to qual-ify for extra help with prescription drugs.

Info: medicareknoxville.com or call 691-5571.

■ Loren Riddick, branch manager, People’s Home Eq-uity, HECM division

Loren Riddick is an East Ten-nessee native who earned an as-sociate’s degree from Walters State Community College.

Riddick has been in the mort-gage arena since 1999 and currently heads the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) division of Peo-ples Home Equity. He has assisted clients with both forward and re-verse mortgages, and plans to dis-cuss and answer questions about

reverse mortgages during his pre-sentation.

“Questions I am commonly asked by seniors are ‘Do I still get to own my home?’ and ‘What hap-pens when I die or move out of the house in relation to my heirs?’” says Riddick.

The Loren Riddick Team has a nearly 100 percent repeat and re-ferral client base according to its website.

Page 7: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news • JUNE 1, 2016 • A-7 faith

Join the conversation at www.ShopperNewsNow.com

cross currentsLynn [email protected]

The memory of the righteous is a blessing. (Proverbs 10: 7a, NRSV)

Memories light the corners of my mind, misty, wa-ter-colored memories of the way we were.

(“Memories” Barbra Streisand)

Memories

I am still thinking about Memorial Day and memories.

There are memories we cherish, hang onto, re-visit time and again. There are others, of course, that we desper-ately wish to forget.

Then, there are the memories that are pain-ful, but worthy of remem-bering, lest we repeat our follies, our mistakes, our sins.

The only good that can come from the painful memories is that we heed the lessons learned. That applies to all of us: chil-dren, grown-ups, pets, communities and nations.

The sweet memories, the fun memories, the glowing memories, how-ever, can, with time, heal the raw ones, transcend the sad ones, make useful the h ard ones.

One of the treasures I have in my possession is a letter my maternal grand-father, Maston Dunn,

wrote to my grandmoth-er, Belle, when he was courting her. His love and respect for her were clear in every line, and because of the existence of that letter, his love lives on in history as well as in my memory.

On the other side of the family tree, we also have the letters that my father’s brother wrote to Daddy and Mother during World War II. They contain fi rst person accounts of some of the deadliest battles in the Pacifi c (Okinawa, Saipan and The Mar-shalls, his family learned later), carefully redacted by the censors who were in charge of keeping troop movements secret. Those letters are living his-tory, and provide at least some explanation of why my uncle came home a changed man, a man who refused to talk about his experiences in the war.

May God bless them all, with peace at last.

Community services

■ Cross Roads Presbyterian,

4329 E. Emory Road, hosts the

Halls Welfare Ministry food

pantry 6-7 p.m. each second

Tuesday and 10-11 a.m. each

fourth Saturday.

■ Dante Church of God, 410

Dante School Road, will

distribute “Boxes of Blessings”

(food) 9-11 a.m. Saturday,

June 11, or until boxes are

gone. One box per house-

hold. Info: 689-4829.

■ Ridgeview Baptist Church,

6125 Lacy Road, off ers Chil-

dren’s Clothes Closet and Food

Pantry 11 a.m.-2 p.m. each third

Saturday. Free to those in the

37912/37849 ZIP code area.

Classes/meetings ■ Fairview Baptist Church,

7424 Fairview Road, will

host Men’s Night Out, 5 p.m.

Friday, Aug. 5. Cost: $15. Din-

ner, 5 p.m.; conference, 6:45

p.m. Speakers: Johnny Hunt,

Senior Pastor, First Baptist

Church, Woodstock, Ga.; and

James Merritt, Senior Pastor,

Crosspointe Church, Duluth,

Ga. Info/registration: fairview

baptist.com.

■ First Comforter Church,

5516 Old Tazewell Pike, hosts

MAPS (Mothers At Prayer Ser-

vice) noon each Friday. Info:

By Cindy Taylor It’s that time of year

again. School is out and families are looking for ways to enjoy the sum-mer while giving their kids great experiences. Faith Promise Church is supply-ing one fun option by edu-cating kids in the spiritual sense while providing for their maturing physical needs as well.

The fpKIDS Camp has been going strong since 2011. The camp meets at Ft. Bluff in Dayton, Tenn. Kids can participate in wa-ter games, crazy challenges, putt-putt and more with daily scripture and an in-tentional focus on growing closer to God.

The theme for 2016 is “Walk This Way.” Gina Mc-Clain is the children’s min-istry director at Faith Prom-ise North Knox campus.

“This year we are focus-ing on Paul and his work in the early church,” said Mc-Clain. “We’ll dig into some

key questions he asked and discoveries he made along the way.”

McClain said that al-though the theme changes, the purpose of the camp remains the same – to lead kids closer to a relationship with their Heavenly Father. She says this camp is a great way to interrupt the regular routine and get kids focused on a single, life-changing message that can redefi ne the way they see themselves and their relationship with God. She says the camp cre-ates that kind of experience.

The fpKIDS Camp runs June 20-23. Any child who has completed grades 2-5 is invited to attend. The cost is $249 per camper. McClain says the camp is for believ-ers as well as those who may not have a personal rela-tionship with Christ.

“A kid who has never been to church before is go-ing to learn that they have a place to belong and that God loves them and wants a

Students at fpKIDS Camp enjoy water sports. Photo submitted

relationship with them,” she said. “A kid who claims to be a Christ follower is going to learn how to grow closer in that relationship with Him.”

Faith Promise is a multi-

site church with six cur-rent locations; West Knox-ville, Clinton, LaFollette, Maryville, North Knoxville and Lenoir City. Info: faith promise.org/fpkids

FAITH NOTESEdna Hensley, 771-7788.

■ Knoxville Aglow will meet

9:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, June

7, New Covenant Fellowship,

6828 Central Avenue Pike.

Speaker: Mike Vandergriff ,

pastor and founder of Vic-

tory Assembly of God in New

Tazewell and advisor of Ap-

palachian Aglow Lighthouse.

Refreshments and child care

provided. All are welcome.

■ Listening Hearts, A Gather-

ing of Bereaved Moms, will

meet 3 p.m. Saturday, June

4, Christus Victor Lutheran

Church, 4110 Central Avenue

Pike. All grieving moms are

invited. Info: listeninghearts

[email protected]; 679-1351;

listeningheartsmoms.org.

■ Powell Church, 323 W. Emory

Road, hosts Recovery at Pow-

ell each Thursday. Dinner,

6 p.m.; worship, 7; groups,

8:15. The program embraces

people who struggle with

addiction, compulsive behav-

iors, loss and life challenges.

Info: recoveryatpowell.com or

938-2741.

Position available ■ St. Mark UMC, 7001 S. North-

shore Drive, is seeking a part-

time Director of Children’s

Ministry. Position requires 20

hours per week and personal

faith in the Methodist tradi-

tion; experience working with

children is preferred. For a

complete job description and

qualifi cations, send resume to

offi [email protected].

Special services ■ New Hope Missionary Bap-

tist Church, 7115 Tipton Lane,

will hold Homecoming at 11

a.m. Sunday, June 5. Featured

singer: Dave Seratt. Everyone

invited.

By Cindy Taylor The Rev. Michael Thom-

as, lead pastor of Fellowship North Church, and associate lead pastor Steve Van Horn hold fast to the belief that the

Living the legacy“seasoned” members in the church become even more valuable as they age.

So they are working to bring the “Baby Boomers,” around 25 percent of the church, into more interac-tive roles, especially as it

pertains to younger genera-tions.

“Often the message to this generation is to relax,” said Van Horn. “This is not a Biblical concept and is one that the elders and other members of our church

body have decided to push against as they approach re-tirement years.”

The Legacy group launched on April 29 with a dinner meeting to cast a vi-sion for the group’s purpose

“Church elder Lee Bell has had a desire to start the min-istry for a while,” said Legacy member Greg Marshall. “He has been the driving force.”

The purpose of Legacy is four-fold; to build commu-nity among their age group and support each other in

what God has called them to do; to challenge one an-other to walk in the fullness of their calling; to create op-portunities to network and teach younger generations

skills that Legacy members possess; and to reach out individually and as a group to make a difference in the church, the community and anywhere God places them.

Page 8: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

A-8 • JUNE 1, 2016 • POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news

Story So Far: Though it doesn’t seem possible that S.O.R.’s dreadful special soc-cer team can get better, the boys try to be-lieve they can win.

“I’d like to see a few people,” said Ms. Ap-pleton when class started a couple of days later. She called up our fi ve team members.

Hamilton laughed, as if we were an au-tomatic joke. “They going to be traded to the elementary school?” he called out. “For a player to be named later?” That made the class laugh, even Lucy Neblet.

The fi ve of us managed to get to the front desk.

“I think it’s wonderful the way you guys

won’t give up,” Ms. Appleton said to us. Since we did want to give up, we looked at her blankly.

“I knew you were bright and hardwork-ing, all of you,” she said. “I didn’t know you had so much courage.”

We hadn’t noticed either.“I mean it,” she said. “I’d like to come to

your next game and root for you. Would you mind?”

“It’s ugly,” warned Lifsom.“Scary,” agreed Hays.“Don’t worry,” she said brightly. “You’ll

win.”“Why does everyone keep saying that?”

I asked her.“Because you work so hard. When you

work hard like that, you win.” She said it with such a nice smile, I almost believed her.

“When’s your next game?”“Thursday. Pennington Prep.”“Do you mind if I come?”“I could think of better ways to kill an

afternoon,” said Saltz.

“And we’re already dead,” I said.

Ms. Appleton giggled. Then she said, “Mr. Till-man wants to see you all.” Mr. Tillman was the school counselor.

“Now?” asked Porter. “I have my special read-ing project to work on.”

“That can wait.”

“I don’t want it to wait,” cried Por-ter.

“He’s expecting you all,” said Ms. Apple-ton, fi rmly.

The fi ve of us went to Mr. Tillman’s of-fi ce. The rest of the team was already there.

Mr. Tillman’s offi ce was a fairly small place, meant for only one loser at a time, not a whole team of losers. Still, we man-aged to squeeze in.

Walls were covered with cute posters sell-ing joy and happiness. I thought it depress-ing, as if you weren’t allowed to be anything but happy. For instance, there was a picture of a kitten about to be dropped down into the Grand Canyon, with the slogan “Keep Laughing, Baby.” The cat wasn’t going to laugh for long, even if cats could laugh.

There was another picture, a kid with a big smile. The message read, “It Takes Less Muscle to Smile Than to Frown.” I had an image of a mad surgeon fi guring that out. Some fun.

Mr. Tillman was not my favorite. A great big, huge guy; someone told me he played football and tried to make it with the pros. He was always dressed the same: turtle-neck sweater with happy beads around his neck. Actually, I never trust anyone whose neck is wider than his brains. But I didn’t think Mr. Tillman would put that slogan up in his offi ce.

Anyway, he got us all in, then had us sit down on the fl oor and be uncomfortable. Really happy-like, he said, “How you guys doing!” For a small room, he talked large.

“Okay,” said Radosh.Mr. Tillman leaned forward. “Honest?”“If you want the truth, Mr. Tillman,” I

said, “we aren’t feeling so great.”“Excellent!” said Mr. Tillman, jangling

his beads. “Now we’re talking truth! And you feel bad about it. Think miserable. Have bad dreams. Sense of defeat. Disappoint-ment. Any bed-wetting? Kids tease you about the games? Probably some of your parents yell at you for being so rotten all the time. Any of you guys have girlfriends?”

Eliscue, who’d had girlfriends from nurs-ery school on up, raised his hand.

“She pokes fun at you; never want to be seen with you?”

For the fi rst time, I saw Eliscue ashamed that he even knew girls.

“I know,” continued Mr. Tillman, “you guys are starting to hate yourselves!”

“Mr. Tillman,” I said, “what can you ex-pect? All we get from people is, ‘Keep on trying. You can win.’ I mean, we keep dis-appointing them. I am beginning to hate

myself.”“I love you for

saying that, Ed,” cried Mr. Till-man. “The trick is, do you believe in yourselves?”

“Not a bit,” said Root.

“Why not? Someone want to share his feelings with me?”

“Because we stink,” said Dor-man. There was a general murmur and nodding of approval.

“Nope,” said Mr. Tillman, “I

won’t buy that. I won’t let you run your-selves down. I believe you can do it. Let me share something with you guys. To win, you must trust yourselves.”

“Don’t you have to be a little . . . good?” asked Barish.

Mr. Tillman shook his massive head. “Heart!” he cried, thumping that mass of body where I guess he kept his heart. His happy beads bounced and rattled.

“Mr. Tillman?” asked Porter.“Yes?”“I have this reading project. It’s really

important to me. May I go work on it now?”Mr. Tillman looked as if he had been in-

sulted, or his mother and father had, or his little sister (she couldn’t have been bigger) or maybe his whole family. “Boys,” he said, “the bottom line is this, ‘Don’t avoid your responsibilities.’”

That was a new one.“Learn to accept your responsibilities!”

he bellowed. “Learn that, and it will be worthwhile!”

There was some more. Just as loud. Mostly it added up to the same thing: we owed them.

“Wish they’d just let us lose in peace,” said Radosh when we got out.

“Oh, good grief,” I said.They looked where I was pointing. A big

piece of brown paper had been put on the wall. In crude letters was written:

Support a Team in Big Trouble!Special Seventh-Grade Soccer Team!S.O.R. vs. Pennington Prep1:30If we care, they will!We all had the same reaction. A quick

check to see who might be looking, and rip, down it came. Plus the seven others we found around the school.

When we got back to class, I asked Ms. Appleton about those posters.

“A class project,” she said sweetly. “We’re going all out to support you.”

“Why?” I said, feeling sick.“S.O.R. has no losers,” she said fi rmly.“Yeah,” I said, “I believed in Santa Claus

too, once.”(To be continued.)

Text copyright © 2012 Avi. Illustrations copyright © 2012 Timothy Bush. Reprinted by permission of Breakfast Serials, Inc., www.breakfastserials.com. No part of this publication may be

reproduced, displayed, used or distributed without the express written permission of the copyright holder.

CHAPTER NINE: Words of wisdom from the school counselor

“a breakfast serials story”S.O.R. Losers Written by Avi and Illustrated by Timothy Bush

■ Beaver Dam Baptist Church, 4328 E. Emory Road,

9 a.m.-noon June 6-10. Ages:

preK through fi fth grade.

Theme: “Submerged.” Info/

registration: bdbc.org.

■ Buff at Heights Baptist Church, 2800 Mill Road,

6-8:45 p.m. June 5-9. Ages: 4

through sixth grade. Theme:

“Ocean Commotion.” Prereg-

ister: buff atheights.org. Info:

524-1204.

■ Christ UMC, 7535 Maynard-

ville Highway, 5:30-8:30

p.m. June 13-17. Ages: preK

through fi fth grade. Theme:

“Cave Quest.” Dinner pro-

vided. Info: 368-6115.

■ Church of God of the Union Assembly, 336 Tazewell Pike,

6:30-9 p.m. June 5-10. Ages:

3 through teens. Theme:

“Deep Sea Discovery.” Sup-

per served each night. Info/

registration: Linda Merritt,

992-0682.

■ City View Baptist Church,

2311 Fine Ave., 6-9 p.m. June

5-10. Theme: “Submerged.”

■ Milan Baptist Church,

1101 Maynardville Highway

in Maynardville, 6:45-9

p.m. June 5-10. Classes for

all ages. Theme: “Egypt:

Joseph’s Journey from Prison

to Palace.” Info: 992-8128 or

milanbc.org.

■ New Beverly Baptist Church, 3320 New Beverly

Church Road, 6-9 p.m. June

13-17. Theme: “Cave Quest.”

Info: 546-0001 or

newbeverly.org.

■ Salem Baptist Church,

8201 Hill Road, 9 a.m.-noon

June 6-10. Ages: 4 through

kids who have fi nished

fi fth grade. Theme: “Sub-

merged.” Info/registration:

mysalembaptist.com/events/

vacation-bible-school.

■ Sharon Baptist Church,

7916 Pedigo Road, 6-9

p.m. June 5-10. Ages: preK

through adults. Theme: “Sub-

merged.” Everyone invited.

Info: 938-7075.

■ Trentville and Pleasant Hill Church, 9215 Straw-

berry Plains Pike, 6:30-9 p.m.

through June 3. Theme: “The

Surf Shack.” Info: 933-5041.

■ Valley View Baptist Church,

3521 Old Valley View Drive,

6:30-8:30 p.m., June 13-17.

Theme: “SonWest Roundup.”

Info/registration: vvbcknox.

com or 523-0062.

■ Wallace Memorial Baptist Church, 701 Merchant Drive,

9 a.m.-noon June 6-10. Ages:

4 years through fi fth grade.

Theme: “Submerged.” Info/

registration: wmbc.net.

VBS NOTESREUNION NOTES

■ Bearden High School Class of ’66 reunion is Oct. 14 at

Hunter Valley Farm. Info: Joe

Bruner, 399-5951 or jobrun-

[email protected].

■ Central High School Class of 1964’s 70th birthday party,

6-10 p.m. Saturday, June 25,

Grande Event Center, 5441

Clinton Highway. Cost: $30,

includes full buff et. Info: David,

[email protected].

■ The Knoxville Central High School Class of 1966 50th

reunion, Saturday, Oct. 8,

Beaver Brook Country Club.

Info: Gail Norris Kitts, gnkitts@

yahoo.com.

Canaan Meleah Lind-say, a 2012 graduate of

Powell High School, has g r adu at e d from Ten-nessee Wes-leyan Col-lege with a bac he lor ’s degree in nursing. She

is vice president of the Ten-nessee Student Nurses As-sociation. Her parents are Chris Lindsay of Knoxville and Michele Scott Lindsay Chandler of Powell.

MILESTONE

Last week Dr. Jim Mc-Intyre appointed three new principals for area schools:

Jason Myers has been a p p oi nt e d principal of K n o x v i l l e A d a p t i v e E d u c a -tion Center (KAEC). He joined Knox C o u n t y Schools in 2008 as a

teaching assistant at Fulton High School. In 2009, he became a special education

teacher and was named lead teacher in 2011.

Myers moved to West High School as an admin-istrative assistant in 2012, and has held his current position of assistant princi-pal since 2013. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s degree from the University of Tennessee where he is also a doctoral candidate in educational leadership and policy stud-ies.

Janice Cook has been appointed principal of Paul Kelley Volunteer Academy.

She joined Knox Coun-ty Schools in 1997 as a district-wide inter-vention con-sultant. She is currently principal at the Knox-

ville Adaptive Education Center where she has served since 2008.

Cook holds a bachelor’s degree in music from the Royal Scottish Academy of Music in Scotland. She also

Janice Cook Leanne Hawn

Jason Myers

New principals at KAEC, Kelley, Career Magnet Academyholds a certifi cation in mu-sic and religious education from Morary House College of Education, also in Scot-land, and a master’s degree in administration and su-pervision from Lincoln Me-morial University.

Leanne Hawn is prin-cipal of the Career Magnet Academy. She joined Knox County Schools in 2006 as a math teacher at Fulton High. She was appointed an administrative assistant at Fulton in 2011 and became assistant principal there in 2013.

H a w n holds a bac he lor ’s degree in math and a master’s in math edu-cation f rom UT. She holds an educational

specialist degree in instruc-tional leadership from Ten-nessee Tech University and is a candidate for a doctor-ate in education leadership from East Tennessee State University.

Page 9: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news • JUNE 1, 2016 • A-9 kids

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By Sandra ClarkWhen Powell High

School principal Dr. Chad Smith spoke to the PHS alumni dinner this spring, he said a goal is to start a student-run store in the high school commons area, accessible to both students and campus visitors.

Thanks to a Tanger Kid Grant for $2,500, that store will open during the up-coming school year. Tanger Outlet general manager Angela Harness, along with Tanger’s tenant services manager Charisse Tinker, met with marketing teach-ers Susan Martin and Jen-nifer Morgan in early May to present the gift.

“Tanger Kid Grant is one way Tanger Factory Outlet Centers gives back to the communities it serves,” said Harness. “The grant is awarded to help schools fund specifi c programs that will impact our students’ education.

Martin and Morgan col-laborated on a T-shirt pro-motion last year. Martin

Pleasant Ridge awards daycelebrates top students

Pleasant Ridge Elemen-tary closed out the school year with an awards cer-emony celebrating students’ success and recognizing top award winners.

Teachers presented top class awards, principal Jes-

Carver Davis Magdos

McWhirt Ray Stanifer

Pleasant Ridge Elementary assistant principal Cindy Sanford cannot contain her excitement as the school PTO presents principal

Jessica Birdsong and Sanford with a check for $16,000 to be used for a new playground. Photos by R. White

Pleasant Ridge Teacher of the Year Tracy Riggs is recognized by

state Rep. Roger Kane during the awards day ceremony.

RuthWhite

sica Birdsong recognized six students as Presidential Award winners and the PTO presented the school with proceeds from school fund-raisers totaling $16,000 that will go toward the installa-tion of a new playground.

Honorees of the Presi-dent’s Education Award for outstanding academic excellence included Haylie Carver, Caleb Davis, Gianni Magdos, Anastasia Mc-Whirt, Austin Ray and Cay-dence Stanifer.

Tanger Outlet helps start Powell High store

Charisse Tinker and Angela Harness of Tanger Outlet with Powell High teachers Susan Martin

and Jennifer Morgan. Photo submitted

said the grant will be used to establish a school store to be operated by students in her marketing 2 class and Morgan’s entrepreneurship class.

“The enterprise will al-low students to experience managing and operating a real business. Students will be involved in merchandis-

ing the business, controlling inventory, recording sales, providing customer service and promoting the school store,” said Martin.

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers Inc. is a North Car-olina-based real estate com-pany which has grown to operate 42 outlet shopping centers in 21 states and in

Canada. Tanger centers are major tourist attractions that welcome more than 185 million brand-name bargain hunters annually, according to the company website.

The Sevierville center is at 1645 Parkway Drive with stores open daily 9-9 and 10-7 on Sundays.

Lincoln Memorial Uni-versity president B. James

D a w s o n took time during the spring com-mencement e x e r c i s e s to celebrate the career of Dr. John C op e l a nd , who is retir-

Copeland

ing from the University after nearly 40 years of service.

Copeland, the longest tenured faculty member at LMU, served as macebearer during the commencement exercises. He joined the fac-ulty on Sept. 1, 1976, and is now professor emeritus of biology.

He has been engaged in discovery research and conservation biology in the

Copeland retires from LMU projects throughout his ca-reer. Moreover, he counseled them as they entered the workforce or continued their education. He was awarded LMU’s Houston Award for teaching excellence in 2005.

state of Tennessee and the adjoining regions of South-west Virginia and Southeast Kentucky. He has conducted work with mammals, am-phibians and native plants. Copeland capped his career with a grant to survey fresh-water sponges in Tennessee. In that study he discovered and named a new genus.

Copeland mentored many students, providing op-portunities fo r students to join him in fi eld work and supervising their research

Page 10: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

A-10 • JUNE 1, 2016 • POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news

THROUGH FRIDAY, JUNE 3Registration open for Knoxville Youth Athletics

summer track and fi eld program. Open to all girls and boys between the ages of 5 and 18. Practices: 6:30-8 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through June 23. Track meets: Saturdays, June 4-25. Info/registration: knoxvilleyouthathletics.org/programs/summer-developmental-track-and-fi eld or 385-6237.

THROUGH FRIDAY, SEPT. 16Online registration open for the Marine Mud

Run, to be held Saturday, Sept. 17. Individual waves, 8 a.m.; team waves, 11:30 a.m. Course: 3 miles of off-road running, which entails some obstacles, hills and mud pits. Registration deadline: Friday, Sept. 16, or until total registrants reaches 3150. Info/registration: knoxmud.org.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1Chalk on the Walk, 11:30 a.m., Halls Branch

Library, 4518 E. Emory Road. Info: 922-2552.International Folk Dance Class, 7:30-10

p.m., Claxton Community Center, 1150 Edgemoor Road, Clinton. Info: Paul Taylor, 898-5724; oakridgefolkdancers.org; on Facebook.

Magician Michael Messing, 11 a.m., Burlington Branch Library, 4614 Asheville Highway. Info: 525-5431.

Submissions deadline for Appalachian Arts and Crafts Center jurying process. Three sample of work, $25 jury fee and completed forms must be submitted by noon. Info/forms: appalachianarts.net, 494-9854, 2716 Andersonville Highway.

THURSDAY, JUNE 2Beauford Delaney Celebration, 5:30-7:30

p.m., Beck Center Exchange Center, 1927 Dandridge Ave. Free and open to the public. Info/reservations: [email protected] or 934-2036.

Bee Friends beekeeping group meeting, 6:30 p.m., Tazewell Campus of Walters State Community

College. Guest speaker: Bodie Osborne, president of Backyard Beekeepers in Middlesboro, Ky. Topic: how to extract and bottle honey. Everyone welcome. Info: 617-9013.

Big Ridge 4th District Neighborhood Watch meeting, 7 p.m., Big Ridge Elementary School library. Info: 992-5212.

Coffee with the Candidates, Union County Chamber of Commerce, 1001 Main St., Maynardville. Info: 992-2811.

Computer Workshop: Introducing the Computer, 10:30 a.m., Halls Branch Library, 4518 E. Emory Road. Info/registration: 922-2552.

An Evening of “Radical Gratitude” with Will Pye, 6:30 p.m., Clinton Physical Therapy Center, 1921 N. Charles G. Seivers Blvd. Info: Kelly Lenz, 457-1649 or [email protected].

Knoxville Zoomobile, 4 p.m., Corryton Branch Library, 7733 Corryton Road. Info: 688-1501.

Magician Michael Messing, 11 a.m., North Knoxville Branch Library, 2901 Ocoee Trail. Info: 525-7036.

Shakespeare for Kids, 4 p.m., Mascot Branch Library, 1927 Library Road. Presented by the Tennessee Stage Company; featuring “The Merry Wives of Windsor” and “King Lear.” Info: 933-2620.

Storytime with the Tennessee Smokies, 10:30 a.m., Halls Branch Library, 4518 E. Emory Road. Info: 922-2552.

FRIDAY, JUNE 3First Friday Comedy, 7-9 p.m., Saw Works

Brewing, 708 E. Depot Ave. Free stand-up comedy showcase featuring Jenn Snyder from Columbia, S.C.

Opening night for “The Word” exhibit, 5-9 p.m., Broadway Studios and Gallery, 1127 N Broadway. Exhibit on display June 3-24. Info: Jessica Gregory, 556-8676, or BroadwayStudiosAndGallery.com.

“Plan to Can and Preserve Food,” 9-10 a.m., Union Farmers Co-op, 3035 Maynardville Highway. Free pressure gauge testing; free food preservation and nutrition information. Bring the canner lid, gauge and seal. Info/appointment: Becca Hughes, 992-8038, [email protected].

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JUNE 3-4Spring rummage sale, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Mount

Hermon UMC, 235 E. Copeland Road. Info: 938-7910.

SATURDAY, JUNE 4Art on Main Festival, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Main Street

and around Courthouse in Maynardville. Featuring: artists, crafters, food vendors, children’s activities, music concerts and music jams, train rides, student art exhibit. Supports the local arts.

“Food Preservation: Step-by-Step Canning,

Drying and Pickling,” 2 p.m., Halls Branch Library, 4518 E. Emory Road. Info: 922-2552.

Kitten and cat adoption fair, noon-6 p.m., West Town PetSmart adoption center, 214 Morrell Road. Sponsored by Feral Feline Friends of East Tennessee. Info: www.feralfelinefriends.org.

Saturday Stories and Songs: Miss Lynn, 11 a.m., Fountain City Branch Library, 5300 Stanton Road. Info: 689-2681.

Saturday Stories and Songs: Robin Bennett, 11 a.m., Powell Branch Library, 330 W. Emory Road. Info: 947-6210.

Statehood Day celebration, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Blount Mansion, 200 W. Hill Ave. Free admission. Info: 525-2375 or blountmansion.org.

Statehood Day celebration, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., James White’s Fort, 205 E. Hill Ave. Includes John Sevier re-enactor, free admission; donations accepted. Info: 525-6514 or jameswhitefort.org.

Statehood Day celebration, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Mabry-Hazen House, 1711 Dandridge Ave. Includes living historians and free admission; donations accepted. Info: 522-8661 or mabryhazen.com.

Statehood Day celebration, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Historic Westwood, 425 Kingston Pike. Free tours. Info: 523-8008 or historicwestwood.org.

T-Shirts to “Dye” For!, noon-1 p.m., Fountain City Branch Library, 5300 Stanton Road. Bring your own shirt. Info: 689-2681.

Union County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-noon, Wilson Park. Info: 992-8038.

MONDAY, JUNE 6American Legion meeting, 7 p.m., 140 Veteran St.,

Maynardville. All veterans are invited. Info: 387-5522. QED Experimental Comedy Lab, 7:30-9:30 p.m.,

The Pilot Light, 106 E. Jackson Ave. Free weekly comedy show blending stand-up, improv, sketch and other performance styles. Donations accepted.

Shakespeare for Kids, 2 p.m., Carter Branch Library, 9036 Asheville Highway. Presented by the Tennessee Stage Company; featuring “The Merry Wives of Windsor” and “King Lear.” Info: 933-5438.

TUESDAY, JUNE 7Casual Comedy, 7-9pm, Casual Pint-Hardin Valley,

10677 Hardin Valley Road. Free stand-up comedy showcase featuring Pittsburgh comedians Alex Stypula and Tim Ross.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8International Folk Dance Class, 7:30-10

p.m., Claxton Community Center, 1150 Edgemoor Road, Clinton. Info: Paul Taylor, 898-5724; oakridgefolkdancers.org; on Facebook.

Send items to [email protected]

ShoppernewseVents

Page 11: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news • JUNE 1, 2016 • A-11 business

BIZ NOTES ■ Joe Jarret has been named

“Author of the Year” and an

article he wrote on zoning risk

management was named “Ar-

ticle of the Year” by the Public

Risk Management Association,

a national organization dedi-

cated to public sector risk and

safety management. Jarret is

a former law director for Knox

County. He currently teaches

at UT while pursuing a doctor-

ate in political science.

■ Jason Riddle has been

named a partner of LBMC In-

formation Security, a division

of LBMC. He is an information

systems security expert with

broad technology expertise

and experience with a variety

of industries including health-

care, fi nancial services and

retail. Riddle has over 15 years

of experience in the informa-

tion technology and security

fi elds. He is a veteran of the

U.S. Navy, Submarine Force.

■ TDS Telecom will host a tech-

nology seminar at 9 a.m. and

noon Wednesday, June 15,

at 10025 Investment Drive in

West Knoxville. The seminar

will be led by a certifi ed VoIP

specialist and is designed for

small to medium size business

customers. RSVP to 865-288-

6266 or tdsvoip.com/

KnoxvilleDemo

■ Mayor Madeline Rogero

will host a business breakfast

7:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, June

14, at the Civic Coliseum, 500

Howard Baker Jr. Avenue. The

free breakfast is designed for

business owners interested

in bidding on city contracts.

Boyce H. Evans, the city’s

purchasing director, said

Knoxville enters into $55

million in contracts annually.

“We want to help match local

businesses with the right

project for their products and

services.” Register at knoxvil-

letn.gov/businessbreakfast

■ Susan G. Komen Knoxville

Joe Jarret Jason Riddle

The Rotary GuyTom King, [email protected]

The parallels are eerie. Heather McFall and Cara Vaughn start-ed college wanting to be attorneys, but both decided on teaching. Both place loving re-lationships with their students fi rst and fore-most. And on the same day, both were honored by the Rotary Club of Knoxville as its 2016 Teachers of the Year.

Heather is a kindergarten teacher at West Haven Elementary School. Cara teaches biology and chem-istry (including honors classes in both) at Bearden High School. Heather has been in the classroom for 15 years, Cara for nine years.

Here’s another parallel: Each received a $500 check from Knoxville Rotary and a $250 gift certifi cate from A&W Offi ce Supply at the club’s May 24 meeting at the Crowne Plaza Hotel.

“Our reward is our students’ success,” Heather said in her acceptance speech. “You have to be called to teaching and I can’t imagine doing anything else. Teaching for me is all about bringing love and compas-sion to the kids, every day.”

Cara’s grandmother was a kindergarten teacher for 27 years who taught her to let her students know they are loved. “I come into every class every day to give them love. They need love and they need to be chal-lenged,” she said. “It’s about relationships and that’s why I teach.”

■ Off to South AfricaFive members of Webb School’s Interact Club and

Club Adviser Liz Gregor and Rotarian Rob Johnson of the Rotary Club of Knoxville left yesterday (May 31) for Cape Town, South Africa.

“This will be the third Webb Interact trip to South Africa. We will partner with the Rotary Club of Stan-ford (one hour outside of Cape Town) and will volun-teer in schools, an orphanage, soup kitchens, a swap shop and a baby stork project,” Gregor said.

The students will visit Robben Island, where Nel-son Mandela was held prisoner for 27 years. Knoxville Rotary sponsors the Webb Interact Club.

Knox Rotary honors teachers

McFall Vaughn

has granted $347,988 to eight

programs to provide no-cost

breast health screening, treat-

ment support and educa-

tion programs throughout

the next year. In 2015, these

programs provided more

than 4,500 people with access

to breast cancer screenings,

diagnostic services and

fi nancial assistance while in

treatment.

By Ruth WhiteTennessee Army Na-

tional Guard has opened a recruiting offi ce in front of Halls High School, staffed by four guard members.

The team helps each in-dividual interested in sign-ing up to identify and meet needs. “The main benefi t is to serve their country,” said SFC Fred Mize.

In addition to service, those who sign up for the National Guard receive pay and college benefi ts.

The center is located at 7413 Maynardville High-way in Will’s Village and serves the Halls, Fountain City and Powell areas. In-dividuals 17-35 years old (high school juniors and seniors on track for gradu-ation) are eligible to enlist

Tennessee Army National Guard members Fred Mize, Ciji Dunn, Joshua Butler and Jeremie Lind-

sey work at the new recruiting center, recently opened in Halls.

Army National Guard comes to Halls

and will serve one weekend a month and two to three weeks in the summer.

The offi ce is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 5

p.m. on Friday. Info: 806-8774.

Thomas Hill

Hill gives tips for computer safetyBy Sandra Clark

Thomas Hill, owner of Computer Depot, brought advice to members of the Halls Business and Profes-sional Association last week at Beaver Brook Country Club.

“What is your identity worth to a computer hack-er,” he asked.

Guesses ranged from $10 to $100.

“Seven cents,” said Hill.He said hackers deal with

volume and easy-to-access

accounts. Individual com-puter users can avoid hack-ing by being smart.

“If it’s fun or free – be-ware,” he said.

Use a strong password, defi ned as: at least eight characters long; does not contain your user name, real name or company name; does not contain a com-plete word; is signifi cantly different from previous passwords; and contains characters from each of four categories: uppercase let-

ters, lower-case letters, n u m b e r s and sym-bols.

Hill sug-gested users upgrade to Windows 10 and enable encryption.

But once that’s done, do NOT lose that password

He also suggested en-abling encryption for mo-bile devices. Use screen lock

and install Sophos Mobile Security App, he said.

Upgrade older Spiny hard drives to newer, faster, more reliable SSD.

For virus protection for business, try Sophos Cloud free for 30 days at cdhelp.info

For free virus protection for home computers, go to sophos.com/home

Computer Depot has been around for 18 years and has four locations. Hill offers a free network assessment ($500 value) at cdinfo.info

Page 12: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

A-12 • JUNE 1, 2016 • POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news

■ The Front Porch – 1509 W. Emory

Rd. Phone – 865-859-9260

■ Dixie Roofi ng – 1703 Depot St.

Phone – 865-938-9880

■ Clover Cottage – 1905 Depot St.

Phone – 865-357-8953

■ Crystal's Automotive and Restora-tion – 1907 Depot St. Phone – 865-

947-8785

■ Aff ordable Car Care – 1744 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-859-0061

■ Bojangles – 1920 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-859-9247

■ Knox Gold Exchange – 7537 Brick-

yard Rd. Phone – 865-859-9414

■ Frontier Communications – 2104 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-947-8211

■ Weigel's – 2119 W. Emory Rd. Phone

– 865-938-9626

■ Marathon – 2116 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-938-9699

■ First Tennessee Bank – 2121 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-549-1780

■ Vaughn Pharmacy – 2141 W. Emory

Rd. Phone – 865-947-1581

■ Domino's – 2145 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-938-1717

■ Dr. Steven Aungst, Chiropractor –

2149 W. Emory Rd. Phone – 865-938-

6560

■ Powell Pediatrics – 2157 W. Emory

Rd. Phone – 865-938-8336

■ Orange Pearl – 2161 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-947-5050

■ Cash Express – 2301 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-938-2274

■ Steamboat – 2307 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-938-4800

■ Emory Animal Hospital – 2311 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-947-0437

■ The Purple Leaf – 2305 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-938-7883

■ Halftime Pizza – 2509 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-947-4253

■ Bailey & Co. Real Estate – 2322 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-947-9000

■ A-1 Finchum Heating & Cooling –

2502 W. Emory Rd. Phone – 865-963-

3032

■ Le Coop Salon – 2508 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-947-3222

■ Kennedy Dentistry – 2529 W. Emory

Rd. Phone – 865-947-2220

■ Appliance Repair Service – 2303 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-947-4100

■ Real Dry Cleaners – 2153 W. Emory

Rd. Phone – 865-947-4907

■ Powell Pet – 2309 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-947-0185

■ Summit Medical Group – 2125 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-938-7517

■ Community Chest of Knox County

– 2107 W. Emory Rd. Phone – 865-

938-3517

■ Senior Marketing Group – 2100 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-947-7177

■ Aff ordable and Unique Home Accents – 1904 W. Emory Rd. Phone

– 865-859-9509

■ Second Chance of North Knoxville

– 1900 W. Emory Rd. Phone – 865-

377-3344

■ Karen's Grooming – 1730 W. Emory

Rd. Phone – 865-947-1085

**Emory Barber Shop – 1708 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-938-1888

■ KJ Cookies – 1738 W. Emory Rd.

Phone – 865-659-2911

■ Nature's Fountain – 1719 Depot St.

Phone – 865-859-0938

■ Green Valley Nursery – 1716 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-947-5500

■ All-N-1 Construction – 1715 Depot

St. Phone – 865-978-7714

■ Effi cient Energy of Tennessee –

1707 Depot St. Phone – 865-947-3386

■ Southern Sass Salon – 1615 W.

Emory Rd. Phone – 865-640-7339

Visit the businesses in Historic Powell Station

To update this directory, phone

865-661-8777

AREA FARMERS MARKETS ■ Dixie Lee Farmers Market,

Renaissance|Farragut, 12740

Kingston Pike. Hours: 9 a.m.-

noon Saturdays through

Nov. 5. Info: dixieleefarmers

market.com; on Facebook.

■ Ebenezer Road Farmers Market, Ebenezer UMC,

1001 Ebenezer Road.

Hours: 3-6 p.m. Tuesdays

through late November.

Info: easttnfarmmarkets.

org; on Facebook.

■ Gatlinburg Farmers Market, 849 Glades Road,

8:30 a.m.-noon Saturdays

through Oct. 8.

■ Lakeshore Park Farmers Market, Lakeshore Park

across from the Knox Youth

sports Building. Hours:

3-6 p.m. Fridays through

October; 2-5 p.m. Fridays in

November. Info: easttn

farmmarkets.org.

■ Oak Ridge Farmers Market, Historic Jackson

Square. Hours: 3 p.m.-sell-

out Wednesdays; 8 a.m.-

noon Saturdays through

late November. Info:

easttnfarmmarkets.org.

■ Maryville Farmers Market: Church Avenue.

Hours: 9 a.m.-noon, Satur-

days through Nov. 17.

■ Market Square Farmers Market, 60 Market Square.

Hours: 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Wednesdays and 9 a.m.-2

p.m. Saturdays through

Nov. 19. Info: marketsquare

farmersmarket.org.

■ Maryville Farmers Market: First Baptist Maryville, 202 W. Lamar

Alexander Parkway. Hours:

3:30-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays

through August.

■ New Harvest Park Farm-ers Market, 4700 New

Harvest Park Lane. Hours:

3-6 p.m. Thursdays. Info:

knoxcounty.org/farmers

market; on Facebook.

■ Seymour Farmers Market,

lower parking lot of Sey-

mour First Baptist Church,

11621 Chapman Highway.

Hours: 7-11 a.m. Saturdays.

Info: on Facebook.

■ “Shopping at the Farm” Farmers Market, Marble

Springs, 1220 W. Gover-

nor John Sevier Highway.

Hours: 3-6 p.m. Thursdays

through Sept. 22. Info:

marblesprings.net.

■ Southern Railway Sta-tion Farmers Market,

300 W. Depot St. Hours:

3-6 p.m. Mondays. Info:

southernstationtn.com; on

Facebook.

■ UT Farmers Market, UT

Gardens, 2518 Jacob Drive.

Hours: 4-7 p.m. Wednes-

days through Oct. 19. Info:

vegetables.tennessee.edu/

UTFM.html; on Facebook.

Progress is grinding along day by day in our com-munities. At times progress can make for a fascinating spectator activity. So much so that downtown, they put little windows in the walls around big construction sites, so the “sidewalk su-perintendents” can follow the progress and come up with all sorts of ideas as to how things would be done if they were in charge. Out here in the country we can just drive by and see the ac-tion from our cars.

One project that I see every week or so, and that startles me every time I see it, is our new landmark HPUD 5-million-gallon sewer retention tank on Dry Gap Pike, fl anking the en-trance to Brickey-McCloud Elementary School. That’s the same school, you will recall, that was to have been the recipient of a really nice outdoor classroom until, in the Debacle of 2010, HPUD’s contractor summarily de-stroyed the lovely grove of woodland just to the east of the present mega-tank.

I wonder if HPUD got the idea for their colossus from the huge blue water tank that KUB perpetrated on the city of Knoxville, perched proudly on the city’s south-ern skyline amidst the de-veloping parks and trails of its Urban Wilderness.

There are a couple more projects that I’m following.

The huge Kroger store is going up at the former Pow-ell airport, which in earlier years showed up on the map as “Powell Marsh” and was visited by birders to see its ducks and herons and other wildlife.

More recently it was used as a large hayfi eld, complete with nesting meadowlarks and visited by night-herons and snipe foraging in the

‘Progress’ in Powell (and Halls and beyond)

Dr. Bob Collier

ditches. It was always a pleasant sight to drive by and see all those big bales of newly-harvested hay scat-tered across the landscape, like a Monet painting.

Other businesses are poised to join the Kroger store there and complete the transformation to suburbia. The Central Avenue-Emory Road intersection should become very interesting at that point. I notice that al-ready the poles and wires for yet another stoplight have gone up at the Kroger entrance; good luck to you folks living up Blueberry.

And speaking of the Central-Emory Road inter-section, the other project that I watch daily is that of the 220-apartment complex going up a half-block to the west. The apartments are on the former site of two nice homes with yards and trees, plus another small hayfi eld, now gone forever. Our 220 new family units will enter and exit their quarters via a single outlet onto Emory Road, into the long line of eastbound travelers who line up there every morn-ing, every afternoon, and every Sunday after church. Maybe the church crowd, at least, will be polite.

I won’t comment on the famous “multi-million-dollar left turn” project in the midst of the Halls com-munity, where the Nor-ris Freeway meets High-way 33, because in spite of those helpful signs that say “change in traffi c pattern” (no kidding), I can’t begin to

fi gure out what they’re do-ing out there all these years. Parts of it look more like a rock quarry than a highway. But, they undoubtedly know what they’re doing.

More entertaining to watch is the Maynardville Highway project out through Halls to the Union Coun-ty line. They’re removing mountains, fi lling chasms, running new power lines, and beautifying with huge brown mats that miracu-lously turn into lush green hillsides. Mind you, I have no objections to highway improvements, having been victim to any number of my fellow Americans travelling Highway 33, doggedly de-termined to not allow their vehicle to exceed 35 miles an hour in the 55 zone.

Highway construction does take its toll, though. When TDOT widened Em-ory Road from two lanes to fi ve lanes with sidewalks, beginning around 2001, for the 1,117 feet of highway along my property they took 0.97acre of land. That fi gures out to be about fi ve acres of land for a one-mile stretch of straight, level highway with very little roadside right-of-way. Imagine how many acres it’s taking for the High-way 33 project, with all its slopes and fi lls.

All is not lost, though, as it is when you fi ll in a marsh to build a shopping center, or a hayfi eld becomes home to 220 families. According to an article in the latest issue of National Wildlife Magazine, there are at least 17 million acres of roadsides in the United States – an area larger than Vermont, New Hampshire and Mas-sachusetts combined! And across the country, smart people are beginning to re-think roadsides.

Take the costs of mainte-

nance, for example. Road-sides need to be mowed, and many are sprayed with herbicides. Expensive. But also very bad for a lot of our natural things – plants, wildfl owers, birds, butter-fl ies. The National Wildlife article relates that a num-ber of state departments of transportation are changing right-of-way management practices in favor of wildlife. And they are saving money, beautifying the roadside scenery, and guess what – helping lots of critters.

Some of the pragmatic, life-is-a-real-thing west-ern states have realized for years how much hay they were bush-hogging along their highways, and have a system to allow farmers to cut and bale the hundreds of acres of roadsides, me-dians and interchanges in their states. What a win-win situation! State DOT doesn’t mow, farmers get loads of hay. Seems almost too rea-sonable to be true.

The article notes that these days, a number of state DOTs are getting into the act, and mentions Iowa, Indiana, Florida, and Ne-braska as examples. Flor-ida’s DOT is responsible for 186,000 acres of road-sides. They are reducing their mowing by 10 percent, mowing just fi ve feet up the roadside slopes, leaving the remaining 10 to 30 feet to grow in native grasses and wild fl owers. This allows the ground-nesting species of birds the whole nesting sea-son to raise their young, and us and the butterfl ies to en-joy the fl owers. Then in late fall the DOT mows it all, to keep down the bushes and general undergrowth. Iowa has 50,000 acres of road-sides planted in native fl ow-ers; Lady Bird Johnson has had Texas doing it for years.

But a reminder – you don’t need 17 million acres to have a habitat highly suit-able for birds and butter-fl ies. Every half-acre or two-acre yard can have trees and shrubs that provide nest-ing sites and safety from predators, produce fruits, berries and seeds for food, and serve as food plants that attract food items for baby birds – bugs, caterpil-lars, earthworms and the like. And the inchworms and caterpillars that don’t get eaten? They become all those butterfl ies and moths, that along with the spiders,

bees and beetles, make our gardens such fun and inter-esting places.

So at least one message can be: don’t despair about all that inevitable develop-ment. Those 220 apart-ments on a 12-acre space could have been 220 houses on one-acre lots, gobbling up another 200-acre farm somewhere. And we can all use our yards, our parks and our roadsides in better and more benefi cial ways. They all offer opportunities to give our fellow critters a better world. We’re all in this together, you know.

andd snsnipe foragigingng iinn ththe e (n(no kiddddining)g),, I can t begin to Ta

Fountain CityMan and Woman of the Year

By Sandra ClarkMark Enix and Kathy Cloninger

were named Fountain City’s Man and Woman of the Year at the an-nual Honor Fountain City Day in the Park on Monday. The event is each Memorial Day.

Mark Enix owns Fountain City Jewelers Inc. He is known for his generous support of many com-munity projects and his active in-volvement with the Fountain City Business and Professional Asso-ciation, where he served as presi-dent and remains on the board of directors.

Enix attended school in Clai-borne County and graduated from Halls High School in 1986, after his family moved to Knox County. His dad, Marvin Enix, owned and operated Enix Jewelers in Halls, which is now owned by Mark’s

brother, Bill.Mark Enix graduated from Par-

is Junior College in Texas, major-ing in jewelry technology. He is a member of the Independent Jew-elers organization which offers trade shows, educational seminars in such topics as gemology, and promotes consumer protection.

Enix’s major claim to fame, though, is his leadership in the an-nual Easter Egg Hunt in Fountain City Park. If you’ve not seen him there, it’s because he’s disguised as the Easter bunny.

The awards committee wrote, “His involvement and support have been continuous over the

years, and he makes Fountain City a better place for all of us.”

Kathy Cloninger has deep roots in Fountain City. Her grandfather, Dan Orndorff, built their home at 2823 Gibbs Drive in 1913, and a family member has lived there ever since.

Kathy’s parents, Joe and

Mark Enix and Kathy Cloninger

are Fountain City’s Man and

Woman of the Year for 2016. Photo by Ruth White

Blanche Orndorff, raised their children there. With husband Kenny and sons Michael and Patrick, Kathy has worked to preserve and improve the house, making it a gracious home for family and friends to enjoy.

Cloninger has been a leader in recent efforts by the Gibbs Drive Neighborhood Association to pre-serve the beauty of Gibbs Drive, which remains a highlight of the Fountain City Dogwood Trail each spring. She has volunteered at Fountain City ballpark, Foun-tain City Elementary and Gresh-am Middle schools and Dogwood Arts.

She works full-time as a con-tent specialist for Healthcare Source - Net Learning.

The awards committee wrote: “Kathy is the epitome of a good neighbor in a time when neigh-bors hardly know each other. … She and Kenny may retire in the months ahead, but they will never retire from their love and support for Fountain City.”

Page 13: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news • JUNE 1, 2016 • A-13

News from Tennova Health & Fitness

For additional information, call Tennova Health & Fitness Center at 859-7900or visit TennovaFitness.com

Located off Emory Road at I-75

Train to Run

The current training group at Tennova Health & Fitness Center’s Train to

Run program enjoys camaraderie and improved fi tness. Members are

(back) Jennifer Billingsley, Jean Miller, Bernice Conner, Kathleen Komar;

(front) Lori Cantrell, Amber Qualls, Julianna Reagan, Kelly Novarro, An-

gela Holmberg and coach Muna Rodriguez-Taylor.

Kathleen Komar checks her time

with coach Muna Rodriguez-Taylor.

“You should come run with us!”

she says.

Julianna Reagan and Lori Cantrell have

discovered that the Train to Run program is also

a good place to develop friendships.

Running coach Muna Rodriguez-Taylor and Group Fitness

Coordinator Danielle Quintanar are dedicated to the health

and well-being of the individual. Photos by Carol Z. Shane

By Carol Z. ShaneIt’s early evening and the

weather is nice. Outside the Tennova Health & Fitness Cen-ter in Powell, a group of run-ners gather around coach Muna Rodriguez-Taylor, ready for their orders. “You’re running the 10K? All right, do eight 400s and a mile.” Turning to another, Rodriguez-Taylor directs her to “do four 400s, two 800s and a mile.” She encourages a par-ticipant in her walking plan, re-marking, “she’s recovering from knee surgery.”

It’s this kind of personal, indi-vidualized attention that makes Tennova’s Train to Run program such a success.

Take Jean Miller, who has run for fi ve years following a diagno-sis of rheumatoid arthritis and a suggestion from her doctor to “keep moving.” The reasons she participates in Train to Run are many: “proper technique, some-body making me do it, the cama-raderie is great.”

Once bedridden for two months, Miller is now a half marathoner. She credits “our fabulous coach.”

Rodriguez-Taylor says with a smile that they also call her “the mean coach,” but it’s all in fun. “I get accountability,” says Miller. “I can’t cheat while I’m here.”

Bernice Conner agrees. “I wasn’t going to do anything if I didn’t have some accountability. I’m a couch potato!”

Nicole Yarbrough, Tennova’s fi tness manager, had wanted a running program “for a long time,” says Rodriguez-Taylor, a former accountant who now works solely in the fi tness fi eld.

After being told to “take this and run with it,” she developed her own training program based

upon principles she’s learned from 16 years of teaching fi tness. Having earned a personal train-ing certifi cate in 2008, her en-thusiasm for exercise is obvious, and she enjoys helping anyone who wants to discover the men-tal and physical benefi ts of run-ning. “We start with small steps, small goals,” she says. Within her current group, which includes a fi rst-timer, she has a wide vari-ety of athletes from walkers all the way up to marathoners and everything in between.

The monthly Train to Run program is open to anyone – be-ginner to advanced – interested in running. During each four-week session, participants learn to conquer initial discomfort and meet reasonable expectations, improving their speed, tech-nique and distance. Much at-tention is given to prevention of

injuries. Athletes gain confi dence and friend-ships as well as health benefi ts: lowered risk

of early death due to diabetes, some cancers and cardiovascu-lar disease. Mental health is also boosted by the release of endor-phins.

“Being part of a group is huge,” says Danielle Quintanar,

Tennova’s group fi tness coordi-nator. Rodriguez-Taylor agrees. “This is probably one of the most fantastic things I’ve ever taken part in. They are friends and not just clients. It’s awesome!”

Right now Tennova Health

& Fitness Center is offering a special on their Train to Run program: members pay $68 for four one-hour group sessions, and non-members pay $88. Give them a call to get started: 865-859-7900.

at Tennova

Health & Fitness Center

You’re invited June 6thYou’re invited to an Open House at Tennova

Health & Fitness Center.

All guests can take advantage of free classes

all day. In addition any guest who signs up for

membership that day will have the enrollment

fee waived. Bring your friends and family! All

guests must have a photo ID, and guests ages

13-17 must be accompanied by a parent or legal

guardian. Tennova Health & Fitness Center’s

Open House is 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday, June 6, at

7540 Dannaher Drive off Emory Road near I-75.

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“Domestics” rule!

Adopt from us and save a life!

Page 14: Powell/Norwood Shopper-News 060116

A-14 • JUNE 1, 2016 • POWELL/NORWOOD Shopper news

SALE DATES: Wed., June 1 -Tues., June 7, 2016

Items and Prices are specifically intended to apply locally where issue originates. No sales to dealers

or competitors. Quantity rights reserved.Sales tax may apply. 2016 K-VA-T Food Stores, Inc.

Food City is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

• KNOXVILLE, TN - N. BROADWAY, MAYNARDVILLE HWY., HARDIN VALLEY RD.,KINGSTON PIKE, MIDDLEBROOK PIKE, MORRELL RD. • POWELL, TN - 3501 EMORY RD.

Selected Varieties

Mayfield Dairy Pure

MilkGallon

With Card399

Selected Varieties, Food Club

Chunk or Shredded

Cheese7-8 Oz.

Selected Varieties, Food Club

Cereal or Toaster Pastries

11-18.7 Oz.

Pure

Crisco Vegetable Oil

48 Oz.

Selected Varieties

Powerade Sports Drink32 Oz.

Final price when you buy 2 in a single transaction. Lesser quantities are 6.99 each. Limit 1 transaction. Customer pays sales tax.

599With Card

Selected Varieties

Pepsi Products24 Pk., 12 Oz. cans

Final price when you buy 2 in a single t

85% Lean

Food City Fresh!Ground Round Per Lb. for 3 Lbs. or More

99¢Holly Farms

Split Chicken BreastFamily Pack, Per Lb.

With Card

Fresh Express

American orItalian Salad9-11 Oz.699

Wild Caught

Fresh FlounderFilletsPer Lb.

With Card

2/$4With Card

Sweet

Athena CantaloupeEach399

With Card

Selected Varieties

Frito Lay Doritos9.5-11.5 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 4.29 ON TWO SAVE AT LEAST 3.99 ON TWO SAVE AT LEAST 2.29 ON TWO

Selected Varieties, Classic or Natural

Kay’s Ice Cream

48 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 5.99 ON TWO SAVE AT LEAST 3.89 ON TWO

102Final price when you buy 10 in a single transaction.

Lesser quantities are 1.00 each. Limit 1 transaction. Customer pays sales tax.

59¢With Card

98th Anniversary Savings

SAVE AT LEAST 3.49 ON TWO

Product of