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ExperienceCulture

Living History

Savor the Flavor

City of Markets

Outdoor Adventures

RSVP

Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

EXPERIENCE SANTA FEMAYOR

David Coss

CITY MANAGERRobert Romero

CITY COUNCILRebecca Wurburger, Mayor Pro Tem

Patti J. Bushee, Chris Calvert, Peter Ives, Bill Dimas, Chris Rivera, Carmichael Dominguez, Ronald Trujillo

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAUJim Bradbury, Executive DirectorChris Madden, Director of Sales

Cynthia Delgado, Marketing Manager

santafe.org/rsvp

Published by The Santa Fe New Mexican for the City of Santa Fe Convention & Visitors Bureau

PUBLISHERRobin Martin

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHERGinny Sohn

ADVERTISING DIRECTORTamara Hand

MANAGING EDITORRob Dean

CREATIVE DIRECTORDeborah Villa

MAGAZINE DESIGNERMelyssa Holik

MAGAZINE EDITORPatricia West-Barker

ADVERTISING SALESCristina Iverson, Art Trujillo

PRODUCTIONAl Waldron, Operations Director

Tim Cramer, Assistant Production DirectorDan Gomez, Prepress ManagerLarry Quintana, Press Manager

Brian Schultz, Packaging Manager

ADDRESS Office: 202 E. Marcy St., Santa Fe, NM 87501

Advertising information: 505-986-3082

ON THE COVERThe New Mexico Museum of Art on the Santa Fe Plaza

was the first building designed in the city’s iconic Spanish-Pueblo Revival style.

Photo by Gene Peach

YOU’RE INVITED Step out of the ordinary and into Santa Fe, New Mexico. Experience a difference you can see, hear, touch, taste and feel.

HISTORY YOU CAN SEESince the Spanish conquest, three nations have claimed this area and each governing power (and the settlers who followed in its wake) has contributed to the city’s rich history — a history still visible in the streets, architecture and museums of Santa Fe.

SAVOR THE FLAVOR OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICOChile is a way of life in Santa Fe: You’ll find it in our food, our gardens and our farmers’ markets. But our cuisine is also hot in ways that have nothing to do with chile. Nationally renowned chefs rub shoulders here with local cooks, and our wineries are enjoying a renaissance.

CULTURE SO RICH YOU CAN TASTE ITWorld-class museums? We’ve got a dozen. Art galleries? We have more than 250. Music? An internationally renowned opera and other classical music festivals share the stage with jazz, folk and rock.

BEAUTY YOU CAN TOUCH — AND TAKE HOMESanta Fe is a city of markets. Indian arts, Spanish Colonial arts, folk art from around the world, contemporary fine and decorative arts — all are on festive display and for sale here. One of the best farmers markets in the country makes its home here, too — as do an eclectic group of independent artists and markets.

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ROMANCE IS IN OUR DNASanta Fe is the perfect place to fall in love, marry, honeymoon or celebrate an anniversary. And we have everything you need to plan the perfect party for two, or two hundred and two.

BE A LITTLE ADVENTUROUSWalk, ride, bike, golf, hunt, fish, hike through hilltops and waterfalls. Natural beauty and unspoiled wilderness make Santa Fe your Rocky Mountain playground — without the Colorado crowds.

OR STEP UP YOUR GAMERiver rats, mountain bikers and road racers love it here, too.

RELIEF IS CLOSE AT HANDTake a deep breath, let it out slowly — and see why TripAdvisor rated Santa Fe the #1 destination in its Relaxation and Spa category.

SANTA FE IS IN SEASON ALL YEAR LONGFiestas, harvest festivals, winter markets, special holiday concerts and celebrations on nearby pueblos and in downtown Santa Fe bring color and joy to the fall and winter seasons. Bring your skis, snowshoes and snowboards to take advantage of winter snowfall.

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PRIZE INCLUDES:• Two nights at the Antigua Inn • A cooking class at Santa Fe School of

Cooking • Passes to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum • A private champagne and chocolate gallery

tour • Artisan chocolates from Cocopelli • A 3-hour private session with an artist• $100 gift card to Absolute Nirvana Spa • $50 dining card for Rio Chama Steakhouse

Need a change of altitude? Feeling lucky?

Step right this way!

The City of Santa Fe is giving away four luxurious weekend

trips to the City Different over the next year, with drawings

on June 1 and September 1, 2012, and January 1 and

March 31, 2013.

Each prize package is valued at $1,500

TO ENTERGo to santafe.org/rsvp and click on the contest banner (shown at left)

INSIGHTFOTO.COM

Digital version available at

4 Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

YOU’RE INVITEDOn foot or horseback, by wagon train, railway car, automobile and air, people have been coming to Santa Fe to explore, trade and refresh themselves for hundreds of years.

Called the Dancing Ground of the Sun by early Native American inhabitants and nicknamed The City Different by town fathers at the turn of the 20th century, Santa Fe is a paradise for art lovers, history buffs, cultural explorers and outdoor adventurers alike.

What makes us so special and so beloved by so many different kinds of people?

Santa Fe sits 7,000 feet up in the southernmost end of the Rocky Mountains — so we’re not only the oldest capital city in the U.S., but we’re also the highest. Tucked into a valley of the Río Grande, we’re surrounded by 1.5 million acres of unspoiled national forest. You won’t find a lot of cactus here; what you will find are juniper and piñon-covered hills, aspen and cottonwood groves and pine forests. Fruit trees, lilacs, rose gardens and hollyhocks are abundant too — a gift from past settlers preserved by present residents.

Our altitude also helps define our weather. Santa Fe is a four-season town, with snow in the winter. The air is clean and dry, the skies a clear, bright blue. The sun shines an average of 325 days a year. Our night skies are also beautiful, protected from light pollution; the stars and planets sparkle brightly — a sight lost to most city dwellers decades ago.

Santa Fe is a small town — just over 33 miles square, with about 70,000 residents. But it’s richer in history, arts and culture than cities five times its size. And less crowded. With more than 200 restaurants, 250 art galleries and a dozen world-class museums tucked into a relatively small space, it’s easy to explore.

A major marketplace for Native American, Spanish Colonial and international arts and crafts, our summer festivals and fiestas draw visitors from all over the world who are looking for the signature architecture, natural beauty and excitement they can only find here.

Santa Fe is less than 650 miles from Dallas, less than 900 miles from Houston. There are daily flights from Dallas to the Santa Fe Municipal Airport, and we’re an easy hour’s drive from Albuquerque International Airport.

There’s an adventure waiting in Santa Fe for everybody, for every age and every budget. We invite you to explore The City Different and discover for yourself why it’s been fascinating people for hundreds of years.

And please RSVP — Let us know when you are coming or what additional information you may need to plan a trip. If you want help selecting or booking a place to stay, we can help with that too.

Visit www.santafe.org/RSVP. We’re looking forward to seeing you!

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Santa Fe’s only Native American

Owned Hotel.Located in downtown Santa Fe

in the heart of the new Guadalupe Railyard District, our unparalleled personal service,

warmth and hospitality make you feel at home.

Our spa and fitness center is the perfect place to lose yourself in a Native American

inspired treatment that draws on ancient healing techniques.

[email protected] www.hotelsantafe.com

855-334-8895 www.innonthepaseo.com

Charming. Romantic. Santa Fe.

An inviting haven of traditional Southwestern hospitality awaits you at the Inn on the Paseo. Sophisticated city charm and laid-back country living create the perfect setting for your romantic get-away in downtown Santa Fe.

An elegant yet affordable alternative to Santa Fe’s upscale full-service hotels. Our charming inn located in downtown Santa Fe offers a host of studio and one-bedroom accommodations perfectly designed for couples and families alike.

The Secret of Authentic Santa Fe.

855-341-7179 www.laspalomas.com

For the ultimate pampering and luxury, stay in our Hacienda — with fireplaces in each room and on-call butlers to fulfill your most exacting requests.

855.341.7177 www.hotelsantafe.com

Unparalleled Personal Service in Santa Fe’s Most Intimate Setting.

6 Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

How old is Santa Fe? Think about this: There was a Plaza in Santa Fe 10 years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock. It’s the oldest capital city in the U.S. — a century older than San Antonio and Los Angeles — and the second oldest city in the country.

This year New Mexico celebrates its first 100 years of statehood, while the city has already passed its 400th anniversary.

Now think about this: Much of Santa Fe’s unique and colorful history is still here for visitors to see.

In 2009, the National Trust for Historic Preservation added the city to its list of “Distinctive Destinations,” noting that “Perched high in the foothills of the southern Rocky Mountains, Santa Fe, New Mexico … is one of the best-preserved cities in the United States …. an ancient city with a distinctive architecture borne out of its remote location and use of local materials.”

The story of Santa Fe is a complex tale of changing boundaries, conflicting loyalties and cycles of destruction and preservation. People intermarried, languages and customs mingled,

borders moved, religious practices intertwined and artistic endeavors influenced centuries of style.

The remains of some of the original Native settlements, some as early as 400 A.D., are still unearthed when ground is broken for new construction.

Three flags — Spanish, Mexican and American, have waved over Santa Fe — four if you count the time the Confederacy briefly held the town in 1862. Spanish soldiers and missionaries colonized the territory and by 1610 Santa Fe was a capital city governed by Don Diego De Vargas, who laid out the Plaza according to Spanish Colonial design. He also built the Palace of the Governors, the oldest public building in continuous use in the United States. A

major revolt by Pueblo warriors destroyed most of the city — except for the Palace of the Governors — in 1680. When the Spanish returned to reclaim the city in 1692, they also began to rebuild it.

By 1821, Santa Fe changed from an outpost of the Spanish Empire to an outpost under Mexican rule, growing larger and more diverse with the opening of the Santa Fe Trail. In 1848, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ceded the city (and the territory of New Mexico) to the United States, ending the Mexican-American War — and traders, trappers and other Anglo settlers poured into town.

You can learn much about Santa Fe’s

history simply by strolling around the city. Still standing are the Barrio de Analco; the San Miguel Mission Church, the oldest church in the U.S.; El Santuario de Guadalupe, built in 1781 as the first church to honor the Virgen de Guadalupe in North America; the Loretto Chapel, possibly the first Gothic structure built west of the Mississippi, with its world-famous “miraculous stairway”; the New Mexico Museum of Art, which ushered in the iconic Spanish-Pueblo Revival architectural style; the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi that dominates downtown Santa Fe, built by the French-born Archbishop Jean-Baptiste Lamy between 1869 and 1886; and many other buildings, both privately and publicly owned.

And not all our history is locked into buildings. A walk through the narrow, twisting streets following the path of the Acequia Madre, the Mother Ditch that brought water to the families and farmers of Santa Fe, is one of the most charming in town.

Outside of town, a visit to one of the eight Northern New Mexico Pueblos, where the history and traditions of the area’s first residents are interwoven into everyday life, is a special experience. El Rancho de Las Golondrinas, a living history museum, offers a one-of-a-kind look at life in the Spanish, Mexican and Territorial periods.

Visit once and we think you will agree: Santa Fe, New Mexico, is not only beautiful — it has a history and authentic sense of place found nowhere else in the United States.

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Experience The Lensic

Santa Fe’s Performing Arts Center

200 Extraordinary Annual Events in Theater, Classical and Contemporary Music, Dance, Film & Opera

FeaturingAspen Santa Fe BalletLannan Readings & ConversationsLensic Presents Santa Fe Chamber Music FestivalSanta Fe Concert AssociationSanta Fe Pro MusicaSanta Fe Symphony Orchestra & Chorus

Located in the historic Lensic Theater, two blocks from the Santa Fe Plaza

For Ticket & Event InfoCall: 505.988.1234Visit: www.lensic.org

8 Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

No, chile isn’t a stew in Santa Fe — and yes, we spell it the Spanish way, the way it’s been spelled here for hundreds of years. Chile isn’t just an ingredient, either — it’s a way of life that reaches from fields and gardens to the city’s kitchens to the Roundhouse, where it forms the state question — Red or Green? — referring to the chile sauces and salsas norteños slather on everything from eggs to beans to ice cream.

Santa Fe’s food is as special as its history — a blend of the Native American, Spanish and Anglo cultures that met and mingled here and the kind of crops that flourished in this high, dry land. So even though many of our dishes may look or sound like other Southwestern specialties, your first bite will tell you they just don’t taste the same.

In addition, Santa Fe can satisfy just about any taste. With more than 200 restaurants serving everything from informal, traditional New Mexican home cooking to contemporary fine-dining adventures created by nationally

acclaimed chefs, Santa Fe is a food lover’s paradise.

You can also sample our food by taking a class or two at one of our cooking schools. With a schedule that changes monthly, and classes taught by local and visiting chefs, hands-on cooking classes at Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe, under the direction of chef and food writer John Vollertsen, are eclectic, educational and entertaining.

The Santa Fe School of Cooking, a short stroll from the Plaza, supplements

classes featuring traditional and New Mexican, Native American, Mexican,

Spanish and contemporary Southwestern cuisine with restaurant walking tours that

introduce you to some of our signature dishes and the chefs who create them.

Craving more chile? Check out the Green Chile Cheeseburger Trail. Eight thousand people helped choose four dozen of the state’s best burgers topped with the state’s favorite vegetable — and 11 of the winning restaurants and cafes are right here in Santa Fe.

saVOR ThE flaVOR Of NORThERN NEw mExIcO

Spanish missionaries planted grapevines in New Mexico more than 100 years before they established vineyards in California, making New Mexico the oldest wine-growing region in the U.S. There are now 42 wineries and tasting rooms in New Mexico — a number of them near Santa Fe. Take a winery tour, or visit during one of two annual events celebrating the fruit of the vine.

Santa Fe Wine Festival at El Rancho de Las Golondrinas (July 7-8, 2012) Taste the vino produced by 16 New Mexico wineries at a 200-acre Spanish Colonial living history museum just 15 minutes south of the Santa Fe Plaza. Food booths, music and a show and sale of traditional arts and crafts round out the experience.

Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta (September 26-30, 2012) is a five-day event held in city hotels and restaurants featuring seminars, tastings, workshops, auctions, luncheons and wine dinners with local and nationally celebrated chefs. The fiesta — which is more about wine and less about chile these days — culminates in a Grand Tasting under tents at the Santa Fe Opera. With more than 75 Santa Fe restaurants and 90 national wineries participating, it’s a great way to get a taste of Santa Fe. But buy your tickets early — the event sells out every year.

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Auberge Resorts: Auberge du Soleil, Napa Valley, CA | Auberge Residences at Element 52, Telluride, CO | Calistoga Ranch, Napa Valley, CA Rancho Valencia, Rancho Santa Fe, CA | Esperanza Resort, Cabo San Lucas, MX | The Inn at Palmetto Bluff, SC

877.262.4666 198 State Road 592, Santa Fe, New Mexico encantadoresort.com

Enchanting sunsets included

1 0 Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

In Santa Fe, rainy days are rare, showers brief — so you shouldn’t wait for a downpour to sample our many indoor attractions. This is a historic city where ancient rock art lives happily with contemporary multimedia installations, so you can expect great cultural variety. In addition to early Indian tribes and Hispano and Anglo settlers, Arabs, Tibetans and many other immigrants have brought their cultures with them and had an impact on the art and architecture of the region.

You can hear chamber music, world-class opera, folk, blues, jazz and spoken word performances here. Our galleries display every conceivable art construction, from early pottery to contemporary sculpture in several clearly defined arts districts. And there are more museums, both art and history, here than you’ll find in most large urban areas — all close enough to explore easily.

MUSEUMSFour world-class museums, a cafe and an outdoor labyrinth are clustered together on Museum Hill, just a few minutes from downtown Santa Fe.

The Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian offers distinctive exhibitions of contemporary and historic Native American art. The museum is famous for its focus on little-known genres and for solo shows by living Native American artists. Downstairs,

the Case Trading Post replicates a historical store with an interesting selection of both vintage and fine contemporary work.

The Museum of Spanish Colonial Art is the only museum in the country dedicated to exhibiting and interpreting the art of the Spanish Colonial period, including Hispanic New Mexico. The museum houses more than 3,700 pieces, including historically significant and contemporary works. The building itself was designed in the Spanish-Pueblo Revival style by renowned architect John Gaw Meem in 1930.

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology, a premier repository of Native art and material culture, contains the artifacts and stories of the people of the Southwest from prehistory through contemporary times. The permanent exhibit, “Here, Now, and Always,” tells the story of the Southwest through the voices of 75 Native Americans.

Opened more than 50 years ago, The Museum of International Folk Art is home to more than 135,000

artifacts — the world’s largest collection of folk art. Galleries include a Hispanic Heritage Wing and a special space called the Gallery of Conscience, which explores issues that threaten the survival of the traditional arts.

You’ll find another grouping of museums clustered around the Santa Fe Plaza.

The New Mexico Museum of Art, founded in 1917, established the iconic

Spanish-Pueblo Revival architectural style for which Santa Fe is famous. The collection blends work from Native American, Hispano and European-based cultures.

The state-of-the-art New Mexico History Museum opened in 2009. Using innovative interactive technology coupled with unique artifacts — including diaries, oral histories, paintings, maps, photographs and videos — the permanent exhibit covers 500 years of the making of the American West from diverse points of view. Its large campus includes the Palace of the Governors — the oldest continuously occupied public building in the U.S. — Fray Angélico Chávez History Library and the Native American Vendors Program.

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum This collection of more than 3,000 works is housed in the only museum in the world dedicated to an internationally known woman artist. The collection of over 3,000 works includes O’Keeffe paintings, drawings and sculptures that date from 1901 to 1984, the year failing eyesight forced O’Keeffe into retirement.

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Georgia O Keeffe and the Faraway: NATURE AND IMAGE

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THE EXHIBITION THAT SHEDS NEW LIGHT ON THE ADVENTURESOME ASPECTS OF O’KEEFFE’S LIFE & ARTThe Museum of Contemporary Native

Art is part of the only four-year fine arts degree institution in the nation devoted to contemporary Native American and Alaska Native arts. Showcasing the latest trends in Native art, history and culture, there are close to 7,500 works in the collection, including paintings, works on paper, sculpture, ceramics, jewelry, photography, apparel, textiles, cultural arts, new media and installations. 

The Governor’s Gallery, on the fourth floor of the Roundhouse, New Mexico’s State Capitol building, presents six exhibitions a year featuring work by prominent living New Mexico artists. Clara Apodaca, first lady of New Mexico from 1975 to 1978, founded the gallery in 1975.

SITE Santa Fe is a contemporary art space that produces the only international biennial of international art in the U.S. Former curators have gone on to organize several Venice Biennales, and one has received the MacArthur Foundation “genius” award. Year-round exhibits and educational programs are dedicated to fostering avant-garde art.

El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe is a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving, protecting and promoting the Hispano art, culture and traditions of Northern New Mexico. This 31,000-square-foot warehouse facility houses galleries, exhibition spaces and a theater.

The Santa Fe Art Institute, housed in a distinctive building designed by Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta on the campus of the Santa Fe College of Art and Design, has a fellowship program that brings outstanding artists to town. Exhibitions, workshops and public lectures explore the intersections of contemporary art and society.

The School for Advanced Research (formerly the School of American Research) is committed to promoting the professionalization of anthropology and the recognition of Southwestern Native arts and artists. SAR houses a large collection of Native American art and artifacts and sponsors scholarly research and cultural exchange with symposia, fellowships, public lectures and publications. Residing in the former private adobe estate, El Delirio, the grounds and buildings are an aesthetic delight.

GALLERIES, OUTDOOR ART,WALKING TOURS AND MOREThere are more than 250 galleries in Santa Fe, most concentrated on world-famous Canyon Road, the downtown Palace Avenue and GALA Arts Districts and the Railyard Arts District, which has attracted a number of new contemporary galleries to the historical Guadalupe Street area. Outdoor sculpture is everywhere, so keep your eyes open as you walk around town.

MUSICIt’s all here, all summer long. In addition to established groups and special events, check out the free concerts and dancing on the Plaza, flamenco performances and other music available at Santa Fe’s hotels, bars and lounges.

Each season, The Santa Fe Opera offers patrons rotating performances of beloved classics and innovative contemporary operas between June 29 and August 25. The drama onstage is enhanced by the beautiful landscape surrounding the open theater, and lures both performers and music lovers from around the world to the company’s mountain home.

Santa Fe Desert Chorale brings singers from around the country together with colleagues from the Southwest to perform

new commissions representative of the eclectic cultures of Northern New Mexico as well as international classics. The Chorale has both a summer season and a holiday concert series in December.

Now in its 40th year, the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival features top-notch international performers in architecturally significant auditoriums between July 15 and August 20.

The New Mexico Jazz Festival brings top names in jazz to the Lensic Performing Arts Center in Santa Fe and Outpost Production Space in Albuquerque during the last two weeks of July.

The Santa Fe Thirsty Ear Festival brings blues, folk, roots rock, country and Americana artists to various venues between June 7 and 10, 2012.

Santa Fe Bluegrass and Old Time Music Festival, August 24 to 26, 2012, brings the clawhammer-style banjo playing called frailing to the Santa Fe County Fairgrounds.

St. John’s College “Music on the Hill” concert series is held on the school’s athletic field in June and July. Bring a blanket and sample local cuisine while enjoying jazz under the stars. The concert is free; the food is for sale.

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1 4 Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

In the mid-19th century, the Santa Fe Trail helped bring essential and luxury goods to the Southwest. Over time, wagon trains gave way to freight trains, railways to highways. Today there are potters’ trails, art-glass trails and fiber-arts trails crisscrossing Northern New Mexico, and Santa Fe is still an important destination for shoppers looking for goods that are hard — if not impossible — to find anywhere else.

Every day of the year, members of New Mexico’s pueblos and tribes display their jewelry and other artworks on blankets under the covered porch of the Palace of the Governors. Licensed by the Museum of New Mexico, these vendors sell only original, handmade work made with traditional materials.

NATIVE TREASURES INDIAN ARTS FESTIVAL May 26-27, 2012Hosted by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture at the Santa Fe Convention Center, the carefully curated Native Treasures show features more than 200 established and emerging Native American artists. nativetreasures.org

SANTA FE INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET July 13-15, 2012 Santa Fe’s folk art market is the largest international folk art market in the world — and a major force behind Santa Fe’s designation as a Creative City of Folk Art, Crafts and Design by UNESCO in 2005. During the two-day event, more than 120 traditional artists from around the world convene on Museum Hill to display and sell their handicrafts in a festive setting that includes food, music and demonstrations. folkartmarket.org

ART SANTA FE July 12-15, 2012 Now in its 12th year, this international art fair offers access to a full range of contemporary art for window shoppers and serious collectors alike. A gala opening, lectures and other events complement the show and sale. artsantafe.com

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TRADITIONAL SPANISH MARKETAND CONTEMPORARY HISPANIC MARKET July 28-29, 2012First held in 1926, Santa Fe’s Traditional Spanish Market is the oldest and largest juried Spanish market in the U.S. Hundreds of artists working in forms directly traceable to the Spanish Colonial period fill their booths with authentic tinwork, retablos, bultos, straw appliqué and other historically significant arts and crafts. Held at the same time as the summer market on the Santa Fe Plaza, Contemporary Hispanic Market — now in its 26th year — showcases original art created by regional Hispanic artists in a wide variety of styles and formats, including paintings, photography, jewelry, sculpture and prints. spanishcolonial.org and contemporaryhispanicmarket.com

SOFA WEST: SANTA FE August 2-5, 2012 Bridging the worlds of contemporary art and design, this show — now in its third year in Santa Fe — showcases the decorative arts. sofaexpo.com/santa-fe

THE RAG RUG FESTIVAL AND CRAFT SHOW August 11, 2012Funded and hosted by the New Mexico Women’s Foundation, this show features handicrafts from women’s cottage industries, including furniture, food, fiber and metal arts, pottery and jewelry.

SWAIA SANTA FE INDIAN MARKET August 18-19, 2012 Arguably the most important Native art market in the United States, if not the world, Indian Market — now in its 91st year — fills the Santa Fe Plaza and surrounding streets with hundreds of booths and thousands of the most gifted Native artists in the Americas. Traditional and contemporary art forms and jewelry are displayed against a backdrop of music, dance, a native dress competition and numerous special events throughout the city. swaia.org

MOUNTAIN MAN TRADE FAIR AND RENDEZVOUSAugust 9, 2012 The gathering in the courtyard of the Palace of the Governors recreates an 1830s event, complete with men and women dressed in period costumes, live music, children’s hands-on activities, games and food — be sure to try the Rocky Mountain oysters. Here, you can purchase elk, buffalo and cow pelts, beaded leather, hand-forged ironwork, Hudson Bay-style blankets, antique guns, tomahawks, knives and cups made out of animal horns.

SANTA FE FARMERS MARKETevery Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. How much can 100 small growers produce in 100 days? You’ll be amazed by the abundance you’ll find year-round at the Santa Fe Farmers Market. Ranked one of the top 10 farmers markets in the nation by The Huffington Post, the SFFM has been selling herbs, soaps, salves, honey, corn dolls, chile ristras and other farm-based crafts as well as fresh meats and produce for more than 40 years. Live music and special chef

and kids’ events round out the offerings. Open every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Santa Fe Railyard. santafefarmersmarket.com

RAILYARD ARTISANS MARKET every Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.On Sundays, the farmers market building hosts the Railyard Artisans Market, featuring a wide range of local artists and craftspeople. santafefarmersmarket.com/artisans-market/

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Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

LEWALLEN GALLERIESGroup Exhibition byGallery Artists

CHARLOTTE JACKSONFINE ARTAlfonso Fratteggianni Bianchi,Triptycon

ZANE BENNETTCONTEMPORARY ARTUnder Thirty-Five:Dunham Aurelius, Tamara Zibners,Heidi Pollard, and more

JAMES KELLYCONTEMPORARYOli Sihvonen,Energy Fields, Life as a Painter

GEBERT CONTEMPORARYDirk De Bruycker,Exhibition of International Artists

TAI GALLERYGeigoto: Photography byTaka Kobayashi

WILLIAM SIEGALGALLERYAncient + Contemporary

TONIGHT . JULY 30 . 2010 . 5-7PM

The Railyard Arts District (RAD) is comprised of nine prominent Railyard area galleries and SITE Santa Fe, a leading contemporary arts venue. RAD seeks to add to theexcitement of the new Railyard area through coordinated events like this monthly Art Walk and Free Fridays at SITE, made possible by the Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston.We invite you to come and experience all we have to offer.

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TONIGHT . JULY 30 . 2010 . 5-7PMIn Santa Fe’s Vibrant Railyard Arts DistrictL A S T F R I D A Y E V E R Y M O N T H

TONIGHT . FEBRUARY 24 . 2011 . 5-7PM

L A S T F R I D A Y A R T W A L K

Join us at SITE Santa Fe for Time-Lapse, a group exhibition that challenges the notion that an exhibition is a fi xed entity. With hourly,daily, and weekly alterations to the works in the show, no two days of Time-Lapse will be the same.www.sitesantafe.org

PASEO DE PERALTA

WAREHOUSE 21

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MARKET STATION

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CHARLOTTE

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TAI GALLERY 505 984-1387

www.taigallery.com

ZANE BENNETT GALLERY 505 982-8111

www.zanebennettgallery.com

SITE SANTA FE 505 989-1199

www.sitesantafe.org

The Railyard Arts District (RAD) is comprised of eight prominent Railyard area galleries and SITE Santa Fe, a leading contemporary arts venue. RAD seeks to add to the excitement of the new Railyard area through coordinated events like our monthly Last Friday Art Walk and Free Fridays at SITE, made possible by the Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston. We invite you to come and experience all we have to offer.

CHARLOTTE JACKSON FINE ART 505 989-8688

www.charlottejackson.com

GEBERT CONTEMPORARY 505 983-3838

www.gebertcontemporary.com

JAMES KELLY CONTEMPORARY 505 989-1601

www.jameskelly.com

LEWALLEN GALLERIES 505 988-3250

www.lewallengalleries.com

SANTE FE CLAY 505 984-1122

www.santafeclay.com

WILLIAM SIEGAL GALLERY 505 820-3300

www.williamsiegal.com

MORE SHOPS & MARKETSTwo well-established flea markets offer additional shopping opportunities. The Santa Fe Flea houses its 93 regular vendors — and more day traders — indoors at the El Museo Cultural in the Santa Fe Railyard through April and outdoors under huge tents at The Downs, a defunct racetrack south of Santa Fe, in summer and fall. The Pueblo of Tesuque Flea Market, 6 miles north of Santa Fe, is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from March through December. Both venues feature a wide range of locally crafted and international goods, from antiques to clothing, original art to yard sale finds.

Scattered throughout the city are shops and studios too numerous to list selling everything from traditional Southwest to ethnic to contemporary clothing, jewelry, tableware, woven goods, home décor and furniture, patio and garden furnishings. If you’ve shopped the rest, it’s time to shop the best — Santa Fe’s wonderfully diverse, independent artists and retailers.

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SWAIA SANTA FE INDIAN MARKETBRINGING NATIVE ARTS TO THE WORLD

Painting: Dyani Reynolds-White Hawk (Rosebud Sioux) / Photo: Kitty Leaken

Beauty, mystery, excitement, passion: It’s no wonder visitors fall in love with Santa Fe — and with each other!

Some of those lovers come back to marry or honeymoon here; others come for the first time to plan an unforgettable destination wedding.

We have everything you need to plan a memorable event: churches, chapels, centuries-old haciendas and modern rental houses, mountain trails and meadows, lodges, art galleries and large and small hotels to fulfill every fantasy — and accommodate a wide range of budgets. Experienced and diverse transportation specialists, traditional and alternative officiants, caterers, florists, photographers, musicians and wedding cake designers are ready to serve you — whether you want a simple ceremony for two or a mariachi procession around the Plaza followed by an elegant extravaganza for 250 or more of your closest friends. Wedding planners with more than 20 years of experience can help you pull it all together.

A word of warning: People love to come to Santa Fe, so don’t count on no-shows to whittle down your guest list.

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Call 888-488-6431Go to www.santafe.org/rsvp

Or scan the QR code

1 8 Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

Santa Fe sits in north-central New Mexico — a part of the state that’s been described as “north to adventure and central to everything.” And, with 1.6 million unspoiled acres of the Santa Fe National Forest just minutes from downtown, it’s easy to see why the city is considered a Rocky Mountain playground.

Santa Fe is the perfect base camp for outdoor activities — whether you are looking for an easy stroll or a lung-busting adventure. At least a dozen hiking trails are within a few miles of the city. You can choose a relatively flat trail or gradual uphill climb or a strenuous 2,000-foot gain, and you can wander through wildflower meadows or aspen vistas, forests of piñon, juniper or ponderosa.

Horseback riding, hunting, fishing, biking, river rafting, tennis and golf are among the sporty diversions. Rent bicycles, scooters and motorcycles or bring your own; make use of our outdoor adventure companies and experienced guides or strike out on your own. Santa Fe’s unpolluted air, bright blue skies and more than 325 days of sunshine make stepping outside that much more enjoyable.

You can take a hike or hook a trout at

the Nambé Lake Recreation Area just 15 minutes from downtown Santa Fe, on the Nambé Pueblo. An easy 15-minute hike brings you to the base of the beautiful Nambé Waterfalls. The 56-acre lake above the falls is well-stocked with mountain trout.

You’ll find hundreds of petroglyphs created by Puebloan people living in the area between the 13th and 17th centuries — as well as some left by travelers along El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the Royal Road to the Interior Lands that began bringing Spanish colonists to the region in 1598 — at the La Cieneguilla Petroglyph Site. It’s very close to the city, and a 10-minute walk from the site parking lot brings you to the basalt cliffs where the petroglyphs are located.

The Dale Ball Trail System starts within two miles of the Santa Fe Plaza. The well-maintained trails link together so you can plan short, moderate or long hikes; the network covers more than 32 miles and can be accessed from a number of points around the city.

The Nature Conservancy Trail is a 1.5-mile interpretive loop on 190 acres of open space in the Santa Fe Watershed area. Here you’ll pass through bosques

of cottonwood and willow trees and see ponds and streams and the remains of a Victorian-era dam. Birds are also abundant here.

Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary, at the end of Upper Canyon Road and nearby the Nature Conservancy Trail, offers guided bird walks, easy nature trails and a visitors’ center on site. The 135-acre preserve, which ranges from meadows to ponderosa pine forest, is located on the former estate of painter, printmaker and sculptor Randall Davey. Davey’s works, along with his original furnishings, can be seen during tours of his house and art studio.

New Mexico protects its night skies from light pollution. If you haven’t seen the stars and planets for a while, you can step outside your hotel or sign up for a guided night sky tour an easy drive from Santa Fe.

If lying under a tree in a shady park is more your thing, Santa Fe has more than 50 parks to choose from. Picnic, play, run your dogs, watch a soccer game or just sit back and smell the roses — there’s something for everyone in our open air playground.

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The same trails that make Santa Fe a hiker’s paradise make it a favorite destination for thrill-seeking mountain bikers, too. Paved roads that meander through small villages, abandoned mining towns, over mountaintops and through green valleys make cycling anywhere in the area an adventure to remember.

Now in its 27th year, the 100-mile Santa Fe Century on-road bicycle tour features organized rides that cover 25- and 50-mile options as well as 100-mile rides (May 20, 2012).

The International Mountain Bicycling Association will hold its World Summit in Santa Fe this year. The conference features a bicycling trade fair, a media contingent and organized trail rides designed “to experience the outstanding mountain bike terrain in Santa Fe.” Preconference activities begin on October 8 and 9; the conference itself is from October 10–13, 2012.

The fifth annual City of Santa Fe Triathlon (July 12, 2012) hosts a 3.1-mile

run, 12-mile bike course and 400-meter swim in the pool at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center, where the event starts and ends. This is a USA Triathlon-sanctioned event, so you must be a USAT member to compete.

The second annual Santa Fe to Buffalo Thunder Half Marathon (September 16, 2012) runs uphill for a couple of miles from its scenic start in the city, then begins a gradual 1,300-foot descent to its finish at Buffalo Thunder resort on Pojoaque Pueblo. A 5K run and 1-mile fitness walk also are held at Buffalo Thunder, timed to complete by the time the marathon runners arrive. Legendary Olympic Gold Medalist Billy Mills is the

official race starter, and will be on hand for the weekend.

Not all roads to adventure are packed or paved. Santa Fe is also a great base camp for river rafting on the Río Grande and Río Chama, one of America’s designated Wild and Scenic Rivers. A handful of rafting companies can handle the needs of novices and river rats alike.

on the plaza in santa fe NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART

IT’S ABOUT TIME: 14,000 YEARS OF ART IN NEW MEXICO MAY 11, 2012 - JAN 1, 2013

505.476.5072

NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM/PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS

ILLUMINATING THE WORD: THE SAINT JOHN’S BIBLETHROUGH DEC 30, 2012

505.476.5100

on museum hill in santa feMUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE

MARGARETE BAGSHAW: BREAKING THE RULESTHROUGH DEC 31, 2013

505.476.1250

MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART

FOLK ART OF THE ANDESTHROUGH MAR 10, 2013

505.476.1200

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Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR codeSANTA FE INTERNATIONAL

FOLK ARTMARKET

folkartmarket.org 505.992.7600

Major partners: New Mexico Dept. of Cultural Affairs, Museum of International Folk Art, the Museum of New Mexico Foundation, and City of Santa Fe. Partial funding provided by the City and County of Santa Fe Lodger’s Tax. Photograph © Eric Kaufman

Partially funded by the 1% Lodgers’ Tax and

July 13, 14 & 15, 2012Museum Hill • Santa Fe, New Mexico

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SANTA FE INTERNATIONAL

FOLK ARTMARKET

facebook.com/folkartmarket

April may be National Stress Awareness Month, but relaxation is always in season in Santa Fe. A dozen spas in or near the downtown area are another perk that makes our small city different — and our visitors feel rejuvinated. Massage and bodywork in a wide range of modalities, custom skin care and facials — for men as well as women — are available as single treatments and special packages. So take a deep breath and sink into a soothing hot tub in a luxurious or exotic setting, indoors or under the stars on a mountainside.

Need more? Take a yoga class or sit awhile in a quiet spot or in a meditation center. (Our natural beauty is soothing, too.) A wide array of chiropractors, acupuncturists, homeopathists, energy healers, curanderos (and other native folk healers), alternative and traditional integrative medicine practitioners call Santa Fe home — and offer an important resource for healing body, mind and spirit.

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Call 888-488-6431Go to www.santafe.org/rsvp

Or scan the QR code

S A N TA F E 2 1

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TA I G A L L E R Y1601B Paseo de Peralta

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

Across from SITE Santa Fe

505.984.1387

www.taigallery.com

Innocent Glitter

2011, 20 x19 x 23 inches

2 2 Call 888-488-6431 • Go to santafe.org/rsvp • Or scan the QR code

High in the foothills of the Rockies, fall slips in with the bluest of skies — the kind pilots call “severe clear” — bringing with it crisp, clear air and the enticing aroma of roasting chiles and piñon fires. The almost continuous sunlight brightens the spirits, despite the shortening days. Aspens flutter their golden leaves and cottonwoods splash color over the landscape. When the snow falls, the Sangre de Cristo Mountains are wreathed in the haunting, rose-colored blush that gives them their name. In the unpolluted night sky, the darkness is warmed by glittering stars — the kind you can’t see anymore in most large cities. What better time to plan a visit?

EVENTS THAT CAPTURE THE SPIRIT OF SANTA FEThe burning of Zozobra, or Old Man Gloom — an event originally created by artist Will Schuster in 1924 — puts the match to a giant papier-mâché marionette to banish the hardships of the past year. The event kicks off Fiesta de Santa Fe — now in its 300th year — on September 6, 2012.

Established by a proclamation commemorating the relatively peaceful 1692 resettlement of Santa Fe by the Spanish after the 1680 Indian revolt, Santa Fe Fiesta holds to its religious roots while celebrating with re-enactments, a children’s pet parade, food booths on the Plaza, a craft fair and a candlelight procession led by the crowned King and Queen of Fiesta the first weekend after Labor Day.

The Harvest Festival at El Rancho de Las Golondrinas (October 6–7, 2012) encourages visitors to bring in the harvest with villagers as they crush grapes for wine by foot, string chile ristras, make tortillas, bake fresh bread and participate in many more traditional activities. It happens annually in early October.

The Winter Indian Market (November 24–25, 2012) sponsored by the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts is held during Thanksgiving weekend. The show and sale feature more than 100 Native artists, award-winning artist demonstrators, a silent auction, a raffle and a fashion show featuring the work of Native designers.

Winter Spanish Market brings 100 Hispanic artists working in traditional Spanish Colonial art forms to the Santa Fe Community Convention Center December 1–2, 2012.

Eight of the 19 Indian Pueblos in New Mexico are in the northern part of the state — and within easy reach of Santa Fe. Most have dances and feasts throughout the fall and winter months that are open to visitors. The ritual performances are communal public prayers that involve dancing, singing,

percussive music, dramatic skits and elaborate dress. The dances have a relationship to the time and traditional activities of the year, but because they are sacred and religious in nature, the precise meanings of the events are kept private. To see these ancient rituals continuing today in places that are hundreds of years old is to sense the weight of history and feel awe at the power of tradition. If you go, be respectful and know that all published times (and sometimes dates) are approximate.

THE HOLIDAYS SPARKLE…Las Posadas, an annual re-enactment of the holy family’s search for shelter held on the Santa Fe Plaza in mid-December, features candlelight, music, devils on the rooftops and hot cocoa and cookies in the courtyard of the Palace of the Governors.

No matter how cold the night or how much snow packs the streets, the crowds always turn out for the annual Canyon Road Christmas Eve Walk. Farolitos (candles in brown paper bags) and luminarias (bonfires) light the road and illuminate paths to galleries and homes; hot cider, caroling, dogs and kids in strollers add to the warm camaraderie of a festive and dearly loved holiday celebration.

Special Christmas performances by the Desert Chorale and the monks from the Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert Monastery, candlelight services at local churches and the creation of an ice menorah sculpture on the beautifully lit Santa Fe Plaza round out the holiday offerings. Many of the hotels, ringed with farolitos, keep their fireplaces crackling, all the better to warm yourself after a lovely stroll around town.

… AND ADVENTURE BECKONSWith thousands of acres of wilderness just minutes from downtown, Santa Fe is a fall and winter paradise for hikers, snowshoers, skiers, snowboarders and other outdoor enthusiasts. At least a dozen hiking trails from easy to challenging are within a few miles of the city. The Santa Fe Ski Basin has 77 trails and gets plenty of snowfall. In fall, a scenic chairlift operates on the mountain. In winter, you can grab your skis, snowshoes or snowboard. Typically, the Ski Santa Fe season runs from Thanksgiving to Easter.

While the Santa Fe wilderness areas are easily accessible, it’s important to remember that many trails start at 7,500 feet and ski areas sit at 12,000-foot elevations. The altitude may test you — even if you are fit — so plan wisely to get the most out of your fall and winter visit.

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mclarryfineart.com505.988.1161

mclarrymodern.com505.983.8589

mclarryfineart.com505.988.1161

mclarrymodern.com505.983.8589

400 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 • 505-983-8815 • 800-746-8815 • www.ventanafineart.comVENTANA FINE ART JOHN AXTON, “Rainbow Falls” 18” x 84” Oil

CANYON ROAD100 Galleries, Boutiques & Restaurants

S A N T A F ES A N T A F E

100 Galleries, Boutiques & Restaurants

CANYON ROADvisitcanyonroad.com

435 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501

T: 505 982-8111 F: 505 982-8160 zanebennettgallery.com

ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART, located

in Santa Fe’s Railyard Arts District, provides a unique

environment for exhibiting art in all media. Its exterior

adobe architecture belies its interior with glass catwalks,

stairway, sky lights and central atrium. ZBCA’s roster

includes exceptional work by internationally-recognized

artists, “blue-chip” artists, regional and local artists.

Featured artists at Houston

and Dallas Art Fairs:

LARRY BELL

GEORGE CONDO

SUSAN DAVIDOFF

JIM DINE

MARK DI SUVERO

GÜNTHER FÖRG

HELEN FRANKENTHALER

SAM FRANCIS

JAMES HAVARD

DONALD JUDD

DAVID KAPP

FRANÇOIS MORELLET

ROBERT MOTHERWELL

MIMMO PALADINO

ED RUSCHA

MARY SHAFFER

TOM WESSELMANN

Visit us at the

DALLAS ART FAIR

April 13-15, 2012

The Fashion Industry Gallery,

Downtown Dallas

HOUSTON FINE ART FAIR

September 14-16, 2012

Reliant Center, Houston

WORKS BY MIMMO PALADINO