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RAMSES SLIDEDECK

Reconciling Adaptation, Mitigation and Sustainable Development for Cities

Reconciling Adaptation, Mitigation and Sustainable Development for Cities

With the global population projected to reach 8.1 billion in 2015 and 9.6 billion in 2050, the 21st century can be defined as the first urban century. This trend can be expected to continue, meaning that more than half of the worlds population will be living in cities in the near future. The environmental impacts of urban areas are therefore a growing concern.

A larger concentration of population, assets and activities in these areas -frequently achieved through rapid urbanization in previous decades- implies more risks derived from the potential impacts of climate change (EEA, 2012; IPCC, 2014). Furthermore, urban areas are the direct or indirect source for the largest share of environmental impacts. In particular, cities are held responsible for over 75% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide (UN-Habitat, 2011; World Bank, 2010).

Understanding these trends is thus crucial to avert potential damage linked to climate change and to minimize the impact of cities themselves on the global environment. But cities are not simple objects to analyze. Urban areas are shaped by the complex relations amongst the different sectors that integrate in the coupled human-environment urban systems. These include the built environment, the infrastructures, the human, social and natural assets, the production systems, etc. (Liu et al., 2007; Turner, Matson, et al., 2003). Whereas these overlaps enable synergies between various elements, they also pose an enormous challenge in terms of adaptation planning (IPCC, 2014). From a climate risk management perspective (IPCC, 2012), the links and interactions among these components and between each of them and the hazardous climatic events that might trigger disasters shape the susceptibility of cities to harm and their capacity to resist and recover from such events (Cardona, 2005; Cutter et al., 2010).

In the global context of climate change, the urbanized areas will be more and more vulnerable to extreme weather conditions, which will increase the main climatic risks such as heat waves.

Source: RAMSES D3.1 (p.14); D4.3 (p.1)1

Reconciling Adaptation, Mitigation and Sustainable Development for CitiesThe RAMSES SlidedeckThe RAMSES Slidedeck is meant to support cities (including municipal staff, policy makers and other stakeholders) to explain the importance of climate adaptation to different stakeholders by:

- Introducing the main topics tackled in the RAMSES Project

- Raising awareness on crucial policy-relevant aspects of climate adaptation

Available for downloading and consulting on the RAMSES website!

http://www.ramses-cities.eu/

In order to provide local municipal staff with a complete collection of resources to make the wide-reaching results of the RAMSES Project accessible and usable, a slidedeck summarizing the most policy-relevant project findings has been developed. This is meant to support cities (including municipal staff, policy makers and other stakeholders) to explain the importance of climate adaptation to different stakeholders. The slidedeck is available in .PPT format so that it can be downloaded and tailored to practitioners needs. For example, the slidedeck could be used during a workshop to introduce a topic on which a city would like to work practically by using the training package, or just to raise awareness on crucial aspects linked to urban climate adaptation. To improve usability, slides are accompanied by long notes further detailing and explaining their content and referencing it to the corresponding project deliverables so that these can be easily consulted in case additional information is needed.

The slidedeck can be consulted and downloaded from the RAMSES website at http://www.ramses-cities.eu/results/

Source: RAMSES D10.2 (p.87)

2

Reconciling Adaptation, Mitigation and Sustainable Development for CitiesThe RAMSES Slidedeck IIThe RAMSES Slidedeck is divided by topic and can be used flexibly by different stakeholders including:

Municipal staff; Policy makers; Adaptation practitioners; Researchers; Etc.

The slides are complemented by longer descriptions of the topics available in the notes window. The original sources of the information are always referenced so that they can be easily consulted.

In order to provide local municipal staff with a complete collection of resources to make the wide-reaching results of the RAMSES Project accessible and usable, a slidedeck summarising the most policy-relevant project findings has been developed. This is meant to support cities (including municipal staff, policy makers and other stakeholders) to explain the importance of climate adaptation to different stakeholders. The slidedeck is available in .PPT format so that it can be downloaded and tailored to practitioners needs. For example, the slidedeck could be used during a workshop to introduce a topic on which a city would like to work practically by using the training package, or just to raise awareness on crucial aspects linked to urban climate adaptation. To improve usability, slides are accompanied by long notes further detailing and explaining their content and referencing it to the corresponding project deliverables so that these can be easily consulted in case additional information is needed.

The slidedeck can be consulted and downloaded from the RAMSES website at http://www.ramses-cities.eu/results/

Source: RAMSES D10.2 (p.87)

3

Reconciling Adaptation, Mitigation and Sustainable Development for CitiesRAMSES Slidedeck III

SLIDEDECK INDEX:

Introduction, cities and climate change

Results and tools produced by the RAMSES Project

Understanding Risks in Cities

Adaptation Options

Health Adaptation to climate change

Estimating the health impactsof climate change (Health Assessment Tool)

In order to provide local municipal staff with a complete collection of resources to make the wide-reaching results of the RAMSES Project accessible and usable, a slidedeck summarizing the most policy-relevant project findings has been developed. This is meant to support cities (including municipal staff, policy makers and other stakeholders) to explain the importance of climate adaptation to different stakeholders. The slidedeck is available in .PPT format so that it can be downloaded and tailored to practitioners needs. For example, the slidedeck could be used during a workshop to introduce a topic on which a city would like to work practically by using the training package, or just to raise awareness on crucial aspects linked to urban climate adaptation. To improve usability, slides are accompanied by long notes further detailing and explaining their content and referencing it to the corresponding project deliverables so that these can be easily consulted in case additional information is needed.

The slidedeck can be consulted and downloaded from the RAMSES website at http://www.ramses-cities.eu/results/

Source: RAMSES D10.2 (p.87)

4

SlideDeckINTRODUCTION CITIES AND CLIMATE CHANGEReconciling Adaptation, Mitigation and Sustainable Development for Cities

The 21st century can be defined as the first urban century, with global population projected to reach 8.1 billion 2015 and 9.6 billion in 2050. This trend can be expected to continue, and the environmental impact of urban areas is a growing concern. This means that more than half of the worlds population will live in cities in the near future.

A larger concentration of population, frequently achieved through rapid urbanization in previous decades, implies more risks derived from the potential impacts as climate change, as population, assets and economic activities concentrates on these areas (EEA, 2012; IPCC, 2014). Furthermore, urban areas are the direct or indirect cause of the largest share of the environmental impacts. In particular, cities are held responsible for over 75% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide (UN-Habitat, 2011; World Bank, 2010).

Understanding these trends is thus crucial to avert potential damages linked to climate change and to minimize the impact of cities themselves on the global environment. But cities are not simple objects to analyze. Urban areas are shaped by the complex relations held among different sectors that integrate the coupled human-environment urban systems. These include the built environment, the infrastructures, the human, social and natural assets, the production systems, etc. (Liu et al., 2007; Turner, Matson, et al., 2003). Whereas these overlaps enable synergies between various elements, they also pose an enormous challenge in terms of adaptation planning (IPCC, 2014). From a climate risk management perspective (IPCC, 2012), the links and interactions among these components and between each of them and the hazardous climatic events that might trigger disasters shape the susceptibility of cities to harm and their capacity to resist and recover from such events (Cardona, 2005; Cutter et al., 2010).

In the global context of climate change, the urbanized areas will be more and more vulnerable to extreme weather conditions, which will increase the main climatic risks such as heat waves.

Source: RAMSES D3.1 (p.14); D4.3 (p.1)5

Climate Change Impacts in Europe

Reconciling Adaptation, Mitigation and Sustainable Development for Cities

The Arctic: - Temperature rise much greater than the global average- Decrease in Arctic sea ice coverage- Decline in Greenland ice sheet- Decreased permafrost areas- Increased risk of biodiversity loss- Intensi