strategic incrementalism & resource targeting for the revitalization of legacy city...

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Greater Ohio Policy Center's Manager of Research and Communications, Marianne Eppig, gave this presentation at the "Historic Preservation in America's Legacy Cities" conference in Cleveland on June 6th, 2014.

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  • 1. STRATEGIC INCREMENTALISM & RESOURCE TARGETING FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF LEGACY CITY NEIGHBORHOODS
  • 2. ABOUT GREATER OHIO POLICY CENTER An outcome-oriented statewide non-prot organization that develops and implements policies and practices to: Revitalize Ohios urban cores and metropolitan regions Achieve sustainable land use and economic growth
  • 3. INTRODUCTION In legacy cities, many neighborhoods hit hardest by abandonment and blight still have the bones to be quality places to live and work. Ohio and other legacy states are well-positioned to leverage these assets to attract and build markets.
  • 4. VACANT PROPERTY STRATEGIES Legacy cities will need both demolition and preservation to return vacant properties to productive reuse. The questions become, How do non-prots and local governments determine the right mix of these strategies? How do development ofcials determine which strategies are most appropriate given the unique situations they are confronting?
  • 5. STRATEGIC INCREMENTALISM & RESOURCE TARGETING To answer these questions, this panel will discuss how strategic incrementalism & data-driven resource targeting can be combined to create effective strategies to catalyze redevelopment in legacy city neighborhoods and maximize their historic attributes.
  • 6. RESOURCE TARGETING FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF LEGACY CITY NEIGHBORHOODS
  • 7. WHY RESOURCE TARGETING IS CRITICAL TO SUCCESSFUL REVITALIZATION Not all properties can or should be redeveloped Strategic and targeted activities maximize the impact of available resources Targeting key properties can have transformative effects for their surrounding areas
  • 8. STRATEGIC INCREMENTALISM The key to successful revitalization strategies is to begin at a scale that is targeted and doable, but that can lead to longer- term transformations.
  • 9. DATA-DRIVEN DECISION MAKING This presentation goes over how to build the underlying framework for resource targeting, such as: What metrics or indicators can development ofcials use to assess markets and select target areas for investment? What metrics or indicators can development ofcials use to guide decision making on the demolition or preservation of particular buildings?
  • 10. IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET AREAS BEST PRACTICES FOR RESOURCE TARGETING
  • 11. WHY HAVE TARGET AREAS? Targeting limited resources in areas that can make a comeback Greater impact when the rehabilitation of a building is in coordination with a broader district or neighborhood revitalization strategy Size of target area depends on available resources
  • 12. IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET AREAS The criteria in these sections of the chart can assist in the identication of target areas: Chart from Laying the Groundwork for Change: Demolition, urban strategy, and policy reform by Alan Mallach, Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, Sept 2012
  • 13. TARGET AREA PLANS Strategies for resource targeting should align with an appropriate neighborhood type.
  • 14. TIPPING POINT NEIGHBORHOODS In many cases, a communitys redevelopment resources should not be invested in heavily abandoned areas, but in areas where demo or rehab of buildings is likely to help stabilize neighborhood conditions and property values and create potential reuse opportunities. Tipping point neighborhoods are often the most responsive to targeted and coordinated resources.
  • 15. WHAT FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN ASSESSING NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS & TYPES To assess neighborhood condition, it can help to analyze the location and density of: Foreclosure activity Owner-occupied buildings Vacant properties Property values (such as clusters of high or low property values) Historic districts and properties Crime rates Building code complaints
  • 16. WHAT FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN ASSESSING NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS & TYPES Equally important, it helps to analyze the location and density of neighborhood assets, such as: Recent or proposed public or private investments Employment centers (e.g. local companies) Major institutions (e.g. local universities or hospitals) Community amenities (e.g. public parks and spaces)
  • 17. FACTORS TO CONSIDER IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET AREAS Neighborhoods that have the following features or ongoing activities are likely to benet the most from strategic resource targeting: A strong social fabric, reflected in strong neighborhood or civic associations or neighborhood-level institutions. Active CDC-led stabilization or revitalization activities, preferably but not necessarily grounded in a neighborhood or target area plan. Features that suggest greater market potential, such as distinctive housing stock or location in close proximity to a strong anchor institution. A significant planned public investment in an area, such as a new school or public transportation route. Source: Laying the Groundwork for Change: Demolition, urban strategy, and policy reform by Alan Mallach, Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, Sept 2012
  • 18. FACTORS TO CONSIDER IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET AREAS What are the set of priorities identied by the county and participating communities? Does the preservation or demolition strategy t into the local governments comprehensive plan of redevelopment for the overall community?
  • 19. IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET AREAS It is important to seek information and input from the community, as well as representatives of CDCs and other entities engaged in neighborhood revitalization to help evaluate specic target areas and buildings.
  • 20. TARGETING BUILDINGS FOR PRESERVATION OR DEMOLITION BEST PRACTICES FOR RESOURCE TARGETING
  • 21. TARGETING BUILDINGS A property can be strategic due to a combination of factors, such as: Location, market demand, structure, and historic value. Presence within an area targeted for revitalization activities (such as in historic districts or neighborhood gateways) or for their adjacency to redevelopment or reuse projects. Disproportionate impact on the properties around them, whether positive or negative.
  • 22. CRITERIA FOR DEMO & REHAB The criteria in this chart can assist in the selection of buildings for rehab or demo: Chart from Laying the Groundwork for Change: Demolition, urban strategy, and policy reform by Alan Mallach, Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, Sept 2012
  • 23. WHY USE CRITERIA? The use of criteria will not only legitimize rehab & demo decisions, but will also help to maximize resources. Quantifying metrics for criteria can help with decision-making. Metrics for criteria can also be used to describe how activities impact and aid target areas and their surrounding communities.

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