the etiquette edge - your book

of 15 /15
The Etiquette EDGE Create Powerful Results! Maryanne Honeycutt

Author: others

Post on 21-May-2022

0 views

Category:

Documents


0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

Layout 1Edited by Robert Slade. Layout by FeedMyEyes.com.
© 2004 by Maryanne Honeycutt ISBN 1-59196-718-X
Introduction
Business Etiquette gives you the tools to Create Powerful Results
All Olympic contenders are winners; they may be outstanding in their field, but only one takes home the gold. They were better— often by only a length or a millisecond. It goes without saying that many times, it’s the little things that count.
In my role as a consultant and workshop leader, I have found that it’s also the little things that make a difference, allowing some- one in business to “take home the gold.”
When I first heard the term “business etiquette,” I immediately thought of social etiquette; in other words, answers to questions such as, “which fork do I use?”
While you do need good table manners at a business lunch or dinner, what about the rest of the time? What do people do to consistently show their credibility, influence and respect?
Business etiquette helps you communicate in a way that creates powerful results. It’s about being considerate and respectful to others. It’s the little things you do to show you care about other people.
All business is people business, and how you look and act is crucial to your success. Your savoir-faire can give you opportunities you might not otherwise have. This pocket book is designed to give you quick tips and ideas to reference easily—the bottom-line to business etiquette—so that you can build credibility and respect with others through a more polished, professional image.
Contents
P Peers/Co-workers .....................................25 O Odds and ends ...........................................29 W Writing the thank you note ......................31 E Events ..........................................................35 R Recorded Messages ...................................37 F Female/Male ..............................................41 U Understanding Diversity .........................43 L Listening .....................................................45
R Restaurant Etiquette...................................51 E Engage in dialogue ...................................57 S Supervisor ...................................................61 U Utensils of business ...................................63 L Leading Effective Meetings .....................67 T Telephone Tips ...........................................71 S Sticky Situations ........................................77
C is for Cubicle
The Cubicle—Home away from home?
The cubicle’s open design gives the impression that you are always available and that people are welcome to come in at any time—which is not always the case. This has created the need for some simple rules of common courtesy.
What is cubicle etiquette?
Visitors. If you are a visitor, respect your co-worker’s time and space.
Get permission. Don’t just walk into someone’s cubicle without asking permission to enter. (Saying “knock knock” is only funny occasionally.)
Ask first. If the cubicle owner is not pres- ent, do not enter! It will keep you from nosing around and borrowing items. If you have per- mission to enter and/or use something in the
The Etiquette Edge—1
C
cubicle, put everything back exactly as it was. (Do not change the settings on other people’s computers!).
Don’t hover. Avoid “hanging out” when someone is on the phone or in a meeting—it makes you seem rude. Come back later!
Be discreet. If privacy is necessary, find an empty office.
What did you say? Don’t eavesdrop, and if you happen to hear something, do not comment without being invited to do so. Nobody appreciates unsolicited opinions.
Watch the chatter. Keep socializing to a minimum; be thoughtful of your neighbors.
Quiet please. Keep voice and noise levels down—avoid speakerphones! Use head- phones if music is a must.
No “Prairie-dogging”. Poking your head above the walls to speak is rude and invasive. Plus, other people can’t admire your new out- fit (see “A—Appearance”) if they can’t see it.
Eat in the break room or kitchen. Avoid eating at your workstation—especially foods with strong odors.
2—The Etiquette Edge
The Cubicle Makeover What does your office say about you?
Yes, personalization is okay, just remember that your office makes a statement about both you and your company. How would you describe your office? Is it messy, cold, out- dated, upscale, sterile, warm, casual? Does it make people believe that you are dependable, lazy, trustworthy, scattered? What can be changed and what can’t?
Is your office sending the message that you want to make about yourself? Make sure that your messages are in agreement with your organization. If in doubt, don’t put it out! Look at the décor and surroundings of successful co-workers and managers. You don’t want to copy what they do but how they do it!
Note to self: Unless it was a gift from The Boss, there is no place in your space for a Rubber Fish Plaque that sings “Take me to the River” or a poster of Hugh Grant.
RUN screaming from: “Biggie” or oversized cups. Save them for
the drive-thru. The Etiquette Edge—3
Stinky Cheese. Foods with strong odors— even pleasant ones—are inappropriate. You don’t want your customers thinking they walked into a bistro rather than a bank!
Six-foot inflatable Santas. Minimize holi- day or other personal décor. Stay in sync with your office’s style.
The Trough. Don’t keep food within sight of customers.
Slobs. Jackets or sweaters go on hangers, NOT over the backs of chairs!
The Plague. When you sneeze or cough, use your left hand to cover your mouth (or, if you are left-handed, use your right hand).
Kodak Moments. It’s not your family room, so minimize the personal photographs or trinkets.
Vanity Fair. Avoid monopolizing the rest- room with excessive grooming—applying makeup, adjusting/changing clothing, fixing hair, shaving, cosmetic surgery, etc.
Play well with others…
Company events. Social events play a key role in maintaining good relationships in the office. So, go to lunch, attend parties, 4—The Etiquette Edge
contribute to office gifts, and volunteer to bring items for events. You don’t have to do everything, but think of them as a way to sus- tain a positive work environment. “The Hermit” is not a phrase you want applied to you.
TMI is TOO much information. You want to get to know your co-workers, but don’t share too much. Keep it simple by showing interest and appreciation. Don’t be passed up for a promotion because you have given the impression that since you can’t manage a fraz- zled personal life, you can’t handle additional responsibilities at work.
Treat co-workers as customers. Don’t get a bad reputation for being inconsiderate or rude to co-workers. Taking advantage of your working relationship is a recipe for disaster and you can quickly become someone others don’t want to be around. Can you say “down- sizing”?
The Etiquette Edge—5
R is for Respect
Do I show respect?
Business etiquette asks us to treat all peo- ple with respect; to be cordial. Cordial comes form the Latin cor, meaning heart. If you are cordial, you are behaving with sincerity and empathy from the heart. If you don’t mean it, people will sense your insincerity. Remember: • Give praise when due • Remember names correctly • Show respect to earn respect • Acknowledge people’s rights and private
space
Take care of your guests
We often “entertain” guests that may include clients, vendors and peers. Take responsibility for making the person comfort- able. Offer a beverage, or possibly a pen and paper. Escort your guest to the elevator or
The Etiquette Edge—7
R
reception area. Make a list of ways to be con- siderate and gracious to visitors. How would you like to be treated?
Avoid interruptions
Show clients and guests that you value their time by avoiding interruptions. Use voice mail for incoming calls and don’t make outbound calls until the person has left your office.
Empathy is the ability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes— to understand them.
8—The Etiquette Edge
E is for Electronic
How do I communicate using email and fax?
When emailing or faxing someone, apply the same guidelines you’d use for other forms of written communications.
Many people feel that since email and other electronic communication is more casu- al, it’s acceptable to pay less attention to grammar and typos.
However, your message says something about you and the quality of your work. Avoid email-specific language or symbols, since the recipient may not understand what they mean. U mebbe kool ina chatroomz but the CEO dunno alla th emoticons yer usin, brb. ;-)
Send messages in a proper memo or letter format and be short, precise and to the point. Choose your words carefully because you won’t be able to communicate using body lan- guage or tone of voice.
The Etiquette Edge—9
E
Email
How can I reach you? If you are unsure whether someone prefers email, ask how the person wishes to communicate. Some people may check email infrequently or have email overload.
What program are you using? Some peo- ple don’t utilize all of their email features, or may not have the specific software application needed to open certain attachments. Make adjustments at your end… you do want them to read it, don’t you?
Downsize. Never send a large attachment (anything over 1 MB) to someone unless you check with them first.
Re: Pending Merger. Your subject line should be clear in order to help your reader prioritize messages. Stick to one subject per email.
“Thank you for your response, Kelly.” Begin with rapport-building statements such as this, making your message more personal.
Just the facts, Ma’am. Get to the point and specifically, use short paragraphs since it’s hard to read long paragraphs on a computer screen. 10—The Etiquette Edge
You can reach me at (502) 555-5555. Even in a response to a message, always include complete contact information.
WHAT ARE YOU DOING? Using all cap- ital letters is the equivalent to screaming.
Oh, really? How amusing. Be aware that your tone in the written word may be difficult to communicate. If in doubt, or when dealing with a sensitive issue, pick up the phone.
Hello, Ed? I have some bad news… Serious messages deserve a phone call rather than email. Never reprimand or fire someone in an email message.
Mail Recipient Not Available. Use the “Out of Office” reply if you have one, which tells the sender that you aren’t able to answer. When you are in the office, check your email frequently and respond promptly.
Top 10 reasons to own a cat. Stay profes- sional and focused on the topic. Many people don’t like receiving jokes or stories while at work.
SPAMSPAMSPAMSPAM. Don’t give a client’s email address to anyone without his or her permission. Always ask before sending information on subjects other than your business.
The Etiquette Edge—11