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    ank you to Fr. DePorres Durham, O.P Mr. PeterGroom,ary Marcotte, Mr. Art Chiapetta, The English

    ent of Fenwick High School, Father Michaelkels O.P, Mike Inzano for photo work beyond the

    f duty, Jake ODonnell, and Christie Spisak, forly Sunday morningwork.Moderator: Mr. JohnPaulett

    FenwickHighSchoolOakPark,IllinoisApril2011

    Editorial StaEditors

    Designers

    ProduceMelanie Kogo

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    ckRafferty

    MomoChapa 1

    GraceDuggan

    2

    Stephen

    Jake

    ODonnell

    3

    FelipeAlvaradoNicole

    Stark4

    Abbe

    y

    Sturw

    old

    5

    TaylorSojaAbbey

    Sturwold

    14

    JanConcepcionMadeleineNicholson

    7

    MadeleineNicholson

    MarlenaOrtiz

    8

    AnneKowalskiMarkYeakey

    10

    StephenJa ODonn

    9

    MarlenaOrtizJulieTentler

    ChristieSpisak

    MelanieKogolAbbeySturwold

    AllieWilliamsJohnKovak

    ClaireKelly

    MichelleVillegas

    12

    MichaelMcLean

    Katyana

    Palafox

    11

    NicholeGushurst

    AbbeySturwold

    6

    Theresa

    Steinmeyer

    WilliamDeMaio

    15

    JulieTentler

    Lauren Visco

    17Angel

    Rivera

    16

    Jenna

    Sullivan

    Claire

    Kelly

    18

    AllieWilliamsAbbeySturwold

    MomoChapa

    19

    KendallLivingstonGabriellaBomben

    20

    Jen

    Concepcion

    MarinaSinnott

    23

    PatriciaNeroAbbeySturwold

    22Daniel Murphy Kevin Bugielski

    21

    AndrewSchroederMichaelInzano

    24

    MelanieKogol Liam Douglass

    25OliviaCaputo

    AbbeySturwold

    26Michael

    McLean

    AbbeMo

    13

    Tierney

    VrdolyakJosephJacobs

    AnnaMariani

    28

    Sam

    Nicholson

    Gianna Marchetti

    29

    Stephen Jake ODonnell

    William

    DeMaio30

    27

    FelipeAlvarado

    AnnaDemesBiancaMariotini

    MichelleVillegas

    JakeODonnell

    PaigeNelson

    TheresaSteinmeyer

    MadeleineNicholson

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    I stand highab

    ovethesurfac

    e

    BelowmeIseeblu

    e,

    My friendsbelow

    me

    all

    did

    it,

    Is it the right thingto

    d

    o?

    I will admit, itwould

    bef

    un,

    Jumpand

    fall, I just might,

    Yet

    o

    nething

    still holds me bac

    k:Fearalw

    ayscomes with height.

    Fearis

    with us for are

    ason

    Itstobeovercome,Its

    atestofourstrength of m

    ind

    ,

    AndsoIstepup, an

    djum

    p. Photograph by Momo Ch

    Poem by Jack Rafferty

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    Heavy weight pressing down,Metal imprisonment, there is no way out.This raging dragon is rearing to roar.It climbs upward, ready to soar.

    The top of the tower, the peak of the mountain,Heaping over the edge,Clasping the cold, lifeless metal,

    That will either keep me alive or bring me to death.No more objections.This is it. There is no turning back.Surrender to this metal monster,And release my hands of this life pleading clench.

    Free falling down, wind dancing besidTwirling, spinning, out of control.An entirely different feeling this time

    Not of angst, but the freeing of my so

    Artwork and Poemby Abbey Sturwold

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    Be Quietby Taylor Sojae quiet. And listen to the silence of the water. Listen to the silent swish and the timid magic

    our bath, or the pool, or your kitchen sink; the spray of your backyard hose or the wave of i

    he water balloon breaks over your head. The sound brings solitude. It brings reflection, and c

    emplation, and nothing, all at once. Clear your thoughts and silence your heart-to listen wit

    our soul. Listen to the indescribable nothing that comes as you cover yourself in a flowing, c

    inuous blanket. You can hear nothing but the movement and see nothing but the bubbles thare your own breath. Your own life.

    t washes away the dust, and oftentimes the smiles; leaving you with only those things that ar

    more permanent. You are left only with raw memories, distilled down to the deepest emotions

    he moment. All the rest; the dust and details, get washed away, but are never gone. They are

    lowing around you- or maybe someone else by now; waiting for you to drink them up again.

    When youre thirsty.

    ecause often its not enough to survive on only that which is substantial; solid. We need the wer. We need to see, feel, and taste the beauty of the little things. So as water washes away all t

    s simple, and leaves us to contemplate what is left in a complicated silence; it also brings us

    ack. It brings us back to the truths of our lives; the things that are easily forgotten and easily

    aken away. What we lose is always returned. As we slide underneath the surface of the water

    et go of those trivial things, both good and bad. We lay submerged, left only with our raw joy

    ingular misery. Our lives. But as the pain starts to grow; as we run out of air, we can always

    up, we can set the hose down; we can run out of rainstorm. We can walk into the kitchen and

    glass of water. We can drink back in the little things; we can cancel out the silence.

    Photograph by Abbey Sturw

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    by Liam Douglass

    On the top of a precipice

    Stands a solemn sentry.

    A lone tall soldier at the peak.

    Whirling, he beams to sea.

    The weather-beaten soldier toils,

    Insures those out at sea

    From ruining on the rock-bound face

    Safe home to stray from thee.

    Photograph byMelanie Kogol

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    Adimlylit

    manor,lon

    emanatp

    iano

    Playingsongsofb

    lueandmi

    dnight

    Softrainfalls,bu

    tthehall

    mirrors

    Reflectnothi

    ngbutthecoldtwilight

    AllHallowsEve,a

    quietOctober

    Acandelabrasitsat

    opthepianoadimsp

    otlight

    Asangelsabovesing

    theirlament

    Marblefloorsechowiththequiet

    Atragicstoryonlythesilencecantell

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    Slice, slice, slice. Chop, chop, chop. Mix, smash, add a pinch of salt. I sit quietly in my brightly lit kitchendoing homework as my abuelita makes dinner. Her hands move easily as she sets out the deep green poblano

    peppers on the counter and begins the laborious task of holding each one over a slow fire until the pepper beginspeeling its outer layer. She carefully holds each pepper over the open fire as if she were creating a beautiful piece ofart. Chilles rellenos, poblano peppers stuffed with panela cheese, are a family favorite, and one of my abuelitasspecialty dishes.

    The process starts in the cold vegetable aisle at the Mexican grocery store. My abuelita puts each poblanopepper on trial for its life, making sure that it is in its deep green prime color, and that it is of good size. She picksthe ripe tomatoes, ready to be made into sauce, and the freshest panela cheese. She says that the ingredients areoften the secret to any great meal. So, now as I sit here enjoying the smells of the fresh tomatoes and the sound of

    the hot oil sizzling, my abuelita tells me that I must learn the family recipes to pass on to my children. And so,just like that Im out of my chair, math homework forgotten, and I watch magic happen before my eyes.Abuelita explains that first she does the busy work, chops up the tomatoes and onions and begins to heat the oil.She hands me the eggs and a bowl for me to separate the egg whites from the yolk. She watches as I beat the eggwhites until they begin to rise, all the while telling me stories of her mothers cooking, and the secrets that have beenpassed down through generations. Like this one, she says as she sprinkles water over the egg whites and mixes inthe yolk, while the whites stay risen. Incredible! I tell her. I make a mental note to write down this incrediblefamily secret. Who knew adding water to egg whites helped them rise even more when you add the yolk? Next,we take each pepper and hold it over the burner until the first layer of the pepper starts peeling off and we cantake the entire layer off easily. While I finish peeling off the skins my abuelita begins slicing open each pepperand carefully stuffs it with fresh panela cheese. Then we submerge each stuffed pepper into the magical egg batterand then into the hot sizzling oil, watching carefully so as not to overcook the pepper. My abuelita and I do thisquietly and in full concentration until all the peppers have been stuffed and cooked. Then we move on to thesauce. My abuelita explains that the sauce is where you make it or break it. It has to be red and rich so that itlooks appealing, but thin enough that it doesnt overpower the tasty green poblano peppers. She blends the cookedtomatoes and a few pieces of onion with a few pinches of salt and water. I watch in amazement as she pours thegleaming red sauce into a pan over the stove, hoping that someday I will be able to cook with her ease and

    confidence.The stuffed peppers, or, as my family calls them, chilles rellenos, were delicious. As my abuelita and I

    served dinner that night, I realized that sitting down to eat a home cooked meal every night is a such a fantasticgift in my life that very often goes unappreciated. I love the warm smell of the house after dinner and the tasteof fresh ingredients in every meal,