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UNIVERSITY OF DEBRECEN, CENTRE OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND SCIENCES, FACULTY OF ENGINEERING Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (BSc degree program) 2013.

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  • UNIVERSITY OF DEBRECEN,

    CENTRE OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND SCIENCES,

    FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

    Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering

    (BSc degree program)

    2013.

  • 2

    H-4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 95,

    Hungary

    Phone: +36-52-518-655

    Fax. +36-52-512-910

    Email:

    [email protected]

    Internet:

    http://englishstudies.sci.unideb.hu

    H-4028 Debrecen, Ótemető u. 2-4., Hungary

    Phone: +36-52-415-155/77775

    Fax. +36-52-415-155/77777

    Email:

    [email protected]

  • 3

    Objectives and Perspectives

    The aim of the Mechanical Engineering BSc program is to train professionals who possess

    - a well-grounded and broad knowledge that graduates of this Faculty can apply immediately in their

    work and also use as the basis for further studies on master level

    - an ethical philosophy of engineering and a respect for the human element respectively

    Our students acquire practical knowledge in technology, in system engineering, in designing software i.e.

    CAD, CAE, CAM and FEM.

    Through the learning of basic law, economics, quality management and maintenance strategies, students

    are capable to carry out projects concerning production and inspection.

    Requirements Duration of studies: 7 semesters

    Number of teaching (contact) hours: 2,590

    Number of required ECTS credits: 210

    Subjects Credits

    Basics of Natural Sciences

    Mathematics

    Technical Mechanics

    Engineering Physics

    Operation and Theory of

    Machines

    Thermodynamics and Fluid

    Mechanics

    Technical Chemistry

    13

    13

    2

    3

    10

    3

    Economics and humanities

    Economics for Engineers

    Microeconomics

    Basics of Quality Management

    Management for Engineers

    State Administration and Law

    Engineering Ethics

    4

    4

    4

    4

    2

    2

    Thesis 15

    Optional subjects 10

    Automotive Constructions

    Engineering Calculations with

    Matlab

    Engineering Experimentation

    Advanced Robot Applications

    Subjects Credits

    Specific Compulsory Subjects

    Informatics for Engineers

    Descriptive Geometry

    Technical Drawing

    Machine Elements

    CAD and CAE I.

    Material Science

    Technology of Structural

    Materials

    3D computer Aided Design

    Electrotechnics and Electronics I.

    Measuring and Automatics

    Thermal and Fluid Machines

    Manufacturing Processes

    Logistics I.

    Environmental Protection

    Industrial Safety

    Steel Constructions

    Hydraulic and Pneumatic

    Machines

    Fracture Mechanics

    Manufacturing Planning

    Diagnostics

    Finite Element Method

    Programmable Logic Controllers

    Material Handling and Robotics

    Drive Train Optimization

    Machine Repairing

    Maintenance Engineering

    6

    3

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    10

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    2

    3

    5

    7

    6

    11

    2

    2

    2

    3

    4

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    4

    3

    4

    4

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    7

    Background

    The Mechanical Engineering Program at the Faculty of Engineering began in 1965. The Faculty has a

    continuous and progressive 45-year history and from the 2010/11 academic year offers a 3.5-year

    Mechanical Engineering B.Sc. program in English.

    The Faculty of Engineering has about 40 staff member, a third of them are professors and associate

    professors with fluent English. The Faculty is well equipped with laboratories and workshops and has a

    technical library enjoying the technical support and database of the National University Library of

    Debrecen.

  • 4

    The aim of the teaching is to train mechanical engineers who are able to operate and

    maintain machines and mechanical devices, introduce engineering technologies and

    apply them, organize and control work phases, mechanical development, can solve the

    general problems of research and planning as expected by the labour market and they

    have in-depth theoretical knowledge to continue their studies in the second cycle.

    Students completing the undergraduate program will have developed competence or

    acquired knowledge in the following areas:

    - introducing and applying modern technologies and computational

    engineering methods and systems (manufacturing technologies, CAE)

    - operating and developing mechatronical systems (electrotechnics

    and electronics, measuring and automatics, hydraulics and pneumatics),

    - operating and maintaining machines and mechanical devices

    (mechanical system engineering, heat and fluid machines),

    - organizing and controlling operational

    processes, mechanical development,

    - planning the construction and designing the machine parts, devices and

    apparatus (machine element, CAD, finite element method),

    - solving the general problems of research and planning as expected by the labor

    market (studies of administration and law, basics of quality assurance,

    management for engineers, safety engineering),

    - carrying out diagnostic testing, assessing reliability of machines and devices

    (fracture mechanics, non-destructive testing and diagnostics),

    The syllabus contains the following subject groups:

    - Basic science subjects: 48 credits

    Mathematics, Technical Mechanics, Engineering Physics, Introduction to Mechanical

    Engineering, Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer, Technical Chemistry

    - Economics and human subjects: 20 credits

    Economics, Quality Management, State Administration and Law, Introduction to Ethics

    - Professional subjects: 117 credits

    Informatics, Descriptive Geometry, Technical Drawing, Machine Elements, CAD, CAE, 3D

    Computer Aided Design, Material Science and Testing, Technology of Structural Materials,

    Electrotechnics and Electronics, Measuring and Automatics, Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics,

    Manufacturing Processes, Logistics, Safety Engineering, Fracture Mechanics, FEM, Mechanical

    System Engineering, Loading Analysis and Damage Theory, Non-Destructive Testing and

    Diagnostic, Heat and Fluid Machines, Inspection and Maintenance

    - Optional subjects: 10 credits

    - Thesis: 15 credits

    Duration of studies: 7 semesters, contact hours: 2,352

    ECTS credits: 210, internship: 6 weeks

    Final Exam: Inspection and Maintenance, and one subject chosen by the

    student: Heat and Fluid Machines or Mechanical System Engineering

  • 5

    Description of the Mechanical Engineering, BSc Program

    The aim of the teaching is to train mechanical engineers who are able to operate and maintain

    machines and mechanical devices, introduce engineering technologies and apply them, organize

    and controll workphases, mechanical development, can solve the general problems of research

    and planning as expected by the labour market and they have in-depth theoretical knowledge to

    continue their studies in the second cycle.

    Having a BSc degree mechanical engineers are able to do:

    - the constructional planning and design of machine parts, devices and apparatus - plan and control the production and mounting technologies of machine, metal and/or

    polymer devices and their components

    - diagnostical examination, maintenance, reliability and work out the repair techonology of machines and devices

    - the control of engineering and technological processes, the organisation of mechanical devices service

    - operate and develop mechatronical systems - operate and develop logistics and material moving systems - do technological control of environmental protection tasks - apply environmental-friendly technologies, design industrial environment, plan and

    produce environmental protection technical tools

    - apply, operate and control - plan, prepare execution, organise and control of building engineering devices - plan, execute, supervise and control of heating and flow technology and chemical industry

    processes

    - plan and produce and maintain vehicles and mobile machines

    The goals of the Faculty's graduate BSc program

    The aim for the teaching is to train mechanical engineers who are able to

    - model machines and time-dependent processes based on solid and fluid mechanics,

    electronics and machinery (mathematics, technical mechanics, thermodynamics, fluid

    mechanics),

    - introduce and apply modern technologies and computational engineering methods and

    systems (manufacturing technologies, CAE)

    - operate and develop mechatronical systems (electrotechnics and electronics, measuring

    and automatics, hydraulics and pneumatics),

    - operate and maintain machines and mechanical devices (mechanical system engineering,

    heat and fluid machines),

    - organize and control operational processes, mechanical development,

    - plan the construction and design the machine parts, devices and apparatus (machine

    element, CAD, finite element method),

    - solve the general problems of research and planning as expected by the labor market

    (studies of administration and law, basics of quality assurance, management for engineers,

    safety engineering),

  • 6

    - carry out diagnostic testing, assess reliability of machines and devices (fracture

    mechanics, non-destructive testing and diagnostics),

    - continue studies in the second cycle.

    The syllabus contains the following subject groups:

    - basic science subjects (40-50 credits): 44 credits

    - economics and human subjects: (16-30 credits): 20 credits

    - professional subjects (70-103 credits): 121 credits

    - optional subjects minimum 10 credits: 10 credits

    - thesis 15 credits

    The evaluation system of the participants’ performance

    The checking system of knowledge is made up from the seminar marks and the exam marks of

    the – partly connected, partly independent – subjects of the curriculum, the making and defending

    of the chosen graduate thesis and the successful final examination.

    The diploma work

    The diploma work is the solution of a mechanical engineering task which the student should

    solve relying on previous studies and secondary literature under the guidance of a tutor in one

    semester. The diploma work must prove that the author can apply the acquired theoretical

    knowledge. The student can choose any topic for the diploma work suggested by the faculty or in

    occasional cases individual topics acknowledged by the head of the department. The topics of the

    diploma work should be given in completely uniform manner and based on the system of

    requirements set up by the head of the institute and the head of the department responsible for the

    training. The diploma works are written with the close collaboration of the candidate and the

    tutor.

    The formal requirements of the diploma work are detailed in the “manual for writing diploma

    works” which is handed out to every candidate when they decide upon their topic. The diploma

    works must be handed in to the department responsible minimum ten days before the beginning

    of the final exam period. The thesis paper is evaluated by an external graduate professional who

    gives a grade as well as a short written comment on it. The head of the department makes a

    proposal for the final evaluation of the diploma work based on the comments. The diploma work

    receives a grade from the final exam committee.

    The final examination

    The conditions for taking the final examination

    - 210 credit points as put down in the curriculum

    - the diploma work, accepted by the consultants

    Parts of the final examination

    - Introducing the results of the diploma work in an 8-10 minute presentation

    - Defending the graduate thesis by answering the questions of the Final Examination

    Committee

    - Final Exam: Compulsory subject of the Final Exam:

    Machine Failures

  • 7

    Optional subjects: one subject chosen by the student:

    Material Handling and Robotics or

    Maintenance Engineering

    The result of the final examination

    The arithmetic mean of the mark given by the Final Examination Committee for

    - the defending of the diploma work and

    - the two marks of the professional oral exams

    - the two marks of complete exams of Mathematics and Technical Mechanics

    The classification of the degree:

    The result of the final examination expressed by lettering

    EXCELLENT

    GOOD

    SATISFACTORY

    SUFFICIENT

  • 8

    Outline of the Study Program

    Nr. Prerequisite

    1 Mathematics I. MFMAT31X05-EN e 2 2 e 5 5

    2 Mathematics II. MFMAT32X05-EN e 2 2 e 5 5 Mathematics I.

    3 Mathematics III. MFMAT33X03-EN msg 1 2 m 3 3 Mathematics II.

    4 Mathematics comp. exam MFMAT30X00-EN ce 0 0 c 0 0 Mathematics II.

    5 Technical Mechanics I. MFMMC31G04-EN e 2 2 e 4 4

    6 Technical Mechanics II. MFMMC32G04-EN e 2 2 e 4 4 Technical Mechanics I., Mathematics I.

    7 Technical Mechanics III. MFMMC33G03-EN e 1 1 e 3 3 Technical Mechanics II., Mathematics II.

    8 Technical Mechanics IV. MFMMC34G02-EN msg 1 1 m 2 2 Technical Mechanics III.

    9 Technical Mechanics comp. exam MFMMC30G00-EN ce 0 0 c 0 0 Technical Mechanics III., Mathematics comp. Exam

    10 Engineering Physics MFMFI31G02-EN e 2 0 e 2 2

    11 Operation and Theory of Machines MFAGT31G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3

    12 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics I. MFHOA31G05-EN e 2 2 e 5 5 Mathematics I., Engineering Physics

    13 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics II. MFHOA32G05-EN e 2 2 e 5 5 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics I.

    14 Technical Chemistry MFKEM31X03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3

    15 Economics for Engineers MFKGZ31X04-EN e 3 0 e 4 4

    16 Microeconomics MFVGF31X04-EN msg 1 2 m 4 4 Economics for Engineers

    17 Basics of Quality Management MFMIN31X04-EN msg 1 1 m 4 4

    18 Management for Engineers MFMAM31X04-EN msg 1 3 m 4 4

    19 State Administration and Law MFJOG31X02-EN e 2 0 e 2 2

    20 Engineering Ethics MFTAI31X02-EN e 2 0 e 2 2

    21 Informatics for Engineers I. MFINF31X03-EN msg 0 2 m 3 3

    22 Informatics for Engineers II. MFINF32X03-EN msg 0 2 m 3 3 Informatics for Engineers I.

    23 Descriptive Geometry MFMAB31G03-EN e 1 2 e 3 3

    24 Technical Drawing MFMAB32G03-EN msg 2 1 m 3 3 Descriptive Geometry

    25 Machine Elements I. MFGEP31G05-EN e 3 2 e 5 5 Technical Mechanics II., Technical Drawing

    26 Machine Elements II. MFGEP32G05-EN e 2 2 e 5 5 Machine Elements I.

    27 CAD and CAE I. MFCAD31G03-EN msg 1 1 m 3 3 Informatics for Engineers II.

    28 Materials Science I. MFANI31G04-EN e 2 2 e 4 4

    29 Materials Science II. MFANI32G04-EN msg 2 2 m 4 4 Materials Science I.

    30 Technology of Structural Materials MFSAT31G02-EN e 1 1 e 2 2 Materials Science II.

    31 3D Computer Aided Design MF3DP31G03-EN msg 0 2 m 3 3 Machine Elements I., CAD and CAE I.

    32 Electrotechnics and Electronics I. MFELT31G05-EN e 3 2 e 5 5 Mathematics II., Engineering Physics

    33 Measurements and Automatics I. MFMET31G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Electrotechnics and Electronics I.

    34 Measurements and Automatics II. MFMET32G04-EN e 2 2 e 4 4 Electrotechnics and Electronics I. , Measurements and Automatics I.

    35 Thermal and Fluid Machines I. MFHOG31G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics I.

    36 Thermal and Fluid Machines II. MFHOG32G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics II.

    37 Manufacturing Processes I. MFGYT31G04-EN e 2 1 e 4 4 Materials Science I.

    38 Manufacturing Processes II. MFGYT32G04-EN msg 2 1 m 4 4 Manufacturing Processes I.

    39 Manufacturing Processes III. MFGYT33G03-EN msg 1 2 m 3 3 Manufacturing Processes II.

    40 Logistics I. MFLOG31G02-EN e 2 0 e 2 2

    42 Environmental Protection MFKOR31X02-EN msg 0 2 m 2 2 Technical Chemistry

    43 Industrial Safety MFBIZ31X02-EN e 2 0 e 2 2

    44 Steel Constructions MFACS31G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Technical Mechanics III., Technology of Structural Materials

    45 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Machines MFHPG31G04-EN e 2 2 e 4 4 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics II.

    46 Fracture Mechanics MFTMA31G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Technical Mechanics IV., Technology of Structural Materials

    47 Manufacturing Planning MFGYA31G04-EN msg 2 2 m 4 4 Manufacturing Processes III.

    56 Diagnostics MFDIA31G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Machine Elements II.

    50 Finite Element Method MFVEG31G04-EN msg 2 1 m 4 4 Technical Mechanics IV., 3D Computer Aided Design

    48 Programmable Logic Controllers MFPRL31G04-EN msg 0 4 m 4 4 Electrotechnics and Electronics I., Hydraulic and Pneumatic Machines

    41 Material Handling and Robotics I. MFARO31G03-EN msg 2 1 m 3 3 Logistics I.

    49 Material Handling and Robotics II. MFARO32G03-EN e 2 2 e 3 3 Material Handling and Robotics I.

    51 Drive Train Optimization MFHAT31G04-EN e 2 2 e 4 4 Machine Elements II., Manufacturing Processes III.

    54 Machine Repairing I. MFGPJ31G03-EN msg 2 2 m 3 3 Technology of Structural Materials

    55 Machine Repairing II. MFGPJ32G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Machine Repairing I.

    52 Maintenance Engineering I. MFUZM31G03-EN e 2 1 e 3 3 Manufacturing Planning, Internship

    53 Maintenance Engineering II. MFUZM32G04-EN e 2 1 e 4 4 Maintenance Engineering I.

    58 Thesis MFZDG31G15-EN msg 0 8 m 15 15 Machine Elements II., Manufacturing Processes III.

    Optional subjects I. msg 2 0 m 2 2

    Optional subjects II. msg 0 2 m 3 3

    Optional subjects III. msg 0 2 m 2 2

    Optional subjects IV. msg 0 2 m 3 3

    57 Internship MFTGY30G00-EN 0

    Credits total 27 32 38 33 32 22 26 210

    Number of lectures/practises in the semester: 13 12 14 14 21 12 13 16 16 15 11 12 5 11 185

    Number of exams in the semester: 7 5 7 5 5 4 2

    Number of msg in the semester: 1 4 4 5 5 3 2

    3. sem. 4. sem. 5. sem. 6. sem. 7. sem.1. sem. 2. sem.

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  • 9

    Subject programes

    1. Mathematics I

    Code: MFMAT31X05-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 5

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: The arithmetic of real and complex numbers. The algebra of vectors in 2 and 3 dimensions. Coordinate

    systems. Functions and their graphs. The composition of functions. Inverse functions. Sequences and

    series of numbers, and convergence criteria. Sequences and series of functions, power series, convergence

    criteria.

    Real functions. Polynomials. Limits, continuity. Interpolation.

    The arithmetic of matrices. Determinants. Systems of linear equations. Cramer's rule. Linear space,

    subspace, generating systems, bases, orthogonal and orthonormal bases. Linear transformations,

    eigenvectors, eigenvalues.

    Literature: 1. Thomas’ Calculus, Addison Wesley (11th edition, 2005), ISBN: 0-321-24335-8 2. S. Minton, Calculus Concept and Connections, McGraw Hill (2006), ISBN 0-07111200-6

    2. Mathematics II

    Code: MFMAT32X05-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 5

    Prerequisites: Mathematics I

    Topics: Derivatives, linear approximation. Differentiation rules. Applications in physics. Taylor polynomials.

    Extreme values. Monotony and convexity testing. Mean value theorems, l'Hospital's rule, Taylor’s

    theorem. Curve sketching for a function, local and absolute extrema.

    Antiderivatives. Integration by parts and by substitution. Integration in special classes of functions. The

    Riemann integral. The Newton-Leibniz theorem. Improper integrals. Applications of the integration in

    geometry and physics. Fourier series.

    Classification of differential equations. Initial value problems, boundary value problems. First order

    differential equations. Slope fields. Euler’s and Runge-Kutta methods. Problems leading to differential

    equations. Separable differential equations. Second order differential equations. The theory of linear

    differential equations, method of variation of parameters, method of undetermined coefficients,

    application of the Laplace transform.

    Literature: 1. Thomas’ Calculus, Addison Wesley (11th edition, 2005), ISBN: 0-321-24335-8 2. S. Minton, Calculus Concept and Connections, McGraw Hill (2006), ISBN 0-07111200-6 3. M. D. Greenberg, Fundamentals of engineering analysis, Cambridge University Press,

    ISBN 978-0-521-80526-1

    3. Mathematics III

    Code: MFMAT33X03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Mathematics II

  • 10

    Topics: Functions of several variables, scalar fields. Continuity, differential and integral calculus,

    partial derivatives, gradient, Young's theorem. Local and global extrema. Double integral, triple

    integral. Jacobi determinant.

    Vector valued functions, curves. Derivative. Linear approximation. Curvature, torsion. Motion in

    the space, velocity, acceleration.

    Vector fields. Derivative. Divergence and curl. Line and surface integrals. Theorems of Gauss

    and Stokes, Green formulae. Conservative vector fields, potentials. Application in physics.

    Literature: 1. Thomas’ Calculus, Addison Wesley (11th edition, 2005), ISBN: 0-321-24335-8 2. S. Minton, Calculus Concept and Connections, McGraw Hill (2006), ISBN 0-07111200-6 3. M. D. Greenberg, Advanced engineering mathematics, Prentice Hall (1998), ISBN 0-13-321431-1

    4. Technical Mechanics I. (Statics)

    Code: MFMMC31G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: The fundamentals of mechanics and statics. Newton’s three laws of motion. Force, moment, and couples.

    Reduction of a force system. Resultant forces and the classification of force systems. Equilibrium

    equations. Statics of material points. Statics of rigid bodies (moment of inertia, systems of planar forces).

    Static problems in planar systems. Internal force systems of rigid bodies. Loading of beams (cantilevers,

    freely supported beams, fraction lined beams). Determination of shear and moment functions, and

    diagrams of beams. Statically determined beam structures (hinged-bar systems, compound beams, truss

    systems). Practical structures (friction, pin-friction, rolling resistance, rope friction).

    Literature: Required:

    1. Joseph F. Shelley (1990): 800 solved problems in vector mechanics for engineers, Volume I: Statics. (SCHAUM’S SOLVED PROBLEM SERIES), McGraw-Hill, 1990, ISBN 0-07-056835-9

    Recommended:

    1. Russel C. Hibbeler (2006): Engineering Mechanics – Statics and Dynamics, Prentice Hall, 2006. ISBN-13 9780132215091

    2. Lakshmana C. Rao, J. Lakshminarasimhan, Raju Sethuraman, Srinivasan M. Sivakumar (2004): Engineering Mechanics: Statics and Dynamics, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., ISBN 8120321898,

    9788120321892

    3. Lawrence E. Goodman, Susan Goodman, William H. Warner (2001): Statics, Courier Dover Publications, ISBN 0486420051, 9780486420059

    4. Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., (1987): University of Connecticut, Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics (Package), 4th Edition, ©1987, ISBN-13 9780070045842

    5. Technical Mechanics II. (Strength of Materials)

    Code: MFMMC32G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Technical Mechanics I.

    Topics: Statics review. Mathematical preliminaries (vector, matrix and tensor algebra). Fundamentals of the

    strength of materials. Elastic and plastic deformation. Physical interpretation of strain terms. State of

    deformation. State of stresses. Principal values of normal stresses, principal axes. Strain energy.

  • 11

    Constitutive equations (Hooke’s law). Simple loadings (tension, compression, bending, torsion, shear).

    Sizing methods. Area moment of inertia and product of inertia. Polar moment of inertia. Determination of

    principal axes. Mohr’s circle. Combined loadings (tension and bending, inclined bending, eccentric

    tension, tension and torsion, bending and torsion). Buckling of columns. Energy methods (Betti’s

    theorem). Statically indeterminate beams (Castigliano’s theorem).

    Literature: 1. Stephen Timoshenko (1955): Strength of Materials: Elementary Theory and Problems, Van

    Nostrand

    2. Ladislav Cerny (1981): Elementary Statics and Strength of Materials, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0070103399, 9780070103399

    3. László Kocsis (1988): Brief Account of the Lectures of Mechanics, Strength of Materials, BME 4. Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russel Johnston, Jr., John T. DeWolf (2006): University of Connecticut

    Mechanics of Materials, 4th Edition, © 2006, ISBN-13 9780073107950

    6. Technical Mechanics III.

    Code: MFMMC33G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Mathematics II., Technical Mechanics II.

    Topics: Kinematics of particles: Description of motion with scalar and vector quantities. Examples: free motion

    with constant acceleration, circular motion. The Frenet-Serret frame.

    Dynamics of particles: Newton’s laws for particles. Force types (gravitational, spring, drag and reaction

    forces). The differential equation of motion. The impulse-momentum and work-energy theorems.

    Homogeneous, central and conservative force fields. The concept and calculation of potential energy.

    Kinematics of plane motion of rigid bodies: Basic concepts. Velocity and acceleration, analysis of

    translation, rotation and general plane motion. Instantaneous centre of velocity and acceleration. Rolling

    without slipping. Presenting general plane motion as rolling.

    Dynamics of plane motion of rigid bodies: Basic concepts (centre of mass, momentum, angular

    momentum, moment of inertia and kinetic energy). The Huygens-Steiner theorem. Calculation of moment

    of inertia. Newton’s laws for bodies. Impulse-momentum, angular momentum and work-energy theorem

    for the plane motion of rigid bodies. Rotation about a fixed axis, and rolling. General plane motion.

    Literature: Required:

    1. Joseph F. Shelley (1991): 700 solved problems in vector mechanics for engineers, Volume II: Dynamics. (SCHAUM’S SOLVED PROBLEM SERIES), McGraw-Hill, 1990, ISBN 0-07-

    056687-9

    Recommended:

    1. Russel C. Hibbeler (2006): Engineering Mechanics – Statics and Dynamics, Prentice Hall, 2006. ISBN-13 9780132215091

    2. Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., (1987): University of Connecticut, Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics (Package), 4th Edition, ©1987, ISBN-13 9780070045842

    7. Technical Mechanics IV.

    Code: MFMMC34G02-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 2

    Prerequisites: Technical Mechanics III.

    Topics:

  • 12

    This course presents periodic motion machines and investigates harmonic vibratory motion

    mathematically. Properties of vibrating systems. Single-degree-of-freedom vibrating systems. Free,

    undamped vibrations. Pendulums. Damped vibrations (dry friction, viscous damping). Forced

    (harmonically excited) vibrations of undamped and damped mechanical systems. Isolation of vibrations.

    Multiple-degrees-of-freedom systems. Application of Langrange’s equation. Natural frequencies and

    vibration modes. Normal mode analysis. Approximate solutions to the equations of motion: the Runge-

    Kutta method. Simulation methods for vibrating systems: use of MATLAB Simulink. Operation principle

    of the oscillation measuring apparatus.

    Literature: 1. Meirovitch, Leonard; Fundamentals of Vibration; McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, 2000;

    ISBN 0071181741

    2. Thomson, William T.; Dillon Dahleh, Marie; Theory of Vibration with Application; Prentice Hall, 1997; ISBN 013651068x

    3. Pfeiffer, Friedrich; Mechanical System Dynamics; Springer-Verlag GmbH, 2008; ISBN 3540794352

    8. Engineering Physics

    Code: MFMFI31G02-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+0 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 2

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: The basics of kinematics and dynamics of particles: Giving the position of a particle. Position-time function, velocity and acceleration. Newton’s laws. Types

    of forces. The concept of mechanical work, potential and kinetic energy. Work-energy theorem.

    The basics of electricity and magnetism. Transport processes.

    Electrostatics, electrical potential, electric fields around conductors, capacity and capacitors. Transport

    processes. Electric current, AD circuits. Heat transfer: thermal conduction, convection and radiation. The

    fields of moving charges, the magnetic field, electromagnetic induction and Maxwell’s equations, AC

    circuits, electric and magnetic fields in matter.

    Literature: Required:

    1. Alvin Halpern (1988): 3,000 Solved Problems in Physics (SCHAUM’S SOLVED PROBLEM SERIES), McGraw-Hill, 1988, ISBN 0-07-025734-5

    Recommended:

    1. Michael Browne (1999): Physics for Engineering and Science, McGraw-Hill, 1999, ISBN 0-07-161399-6

    2. Robert Balmer (2006) Thermo-dynamics, Jaico Publishing House, ISBN: 817224262X, 868 pages

    9. Operation and Theory of Machines

    Code: MFAGT31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: SI units, basic and derived quantities, prefixes. Translational and rotational motion, moment of inertia,

    torque, work, power. Conservation of energy, viscous friction, dry friction, rolling resistance. Efficiency,

    power loss of machines. Bernoulli's equation, law of continuity, Venturi tube, water jet force. Entropy,

    specific heat capacity, latent heat, temperature-entropy diagram for steam. Classification of machines,

    power drives. Drive gears, flywheels, breaks, springs, bearings. Otto engines, Diesel engines. Positive

  • 13

    displacement pumps, centrifugal pumps and gear pumps. Fans, compressors. Steam boilers, steam

    turbines, steam power plants, water turbines, wind power plants. Adaptation of prime movers and driven

    machines.

    Literature: 1. Mechanical Engineers’ Handbook, Volume 4., John Willey & Sons, 2006, 2. M. R. Lindeburg, Mechanical Engineering Reference Manual, 12th edition, Professional

    Publications Inc., 2006.

    10. Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics I.

    Code: MFHOA31G05-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 5

    Prerequisites: Mathematics I., Engineering Physics

    Topics: Thermodynamic properties. Definitions and fundamental ideas of thermodynamics. Changing the state of

    a system with heat and work. Change of phase. The zeroth law of thermodynamics. The isotherm, isochore

    and isobar, adiabatic and polytropic processes. The first law of thermodynamics: conservation of energy.

    Generalized representation of thermodynamic cycles. The Carnot cycle. Entropy. The second law of

    thermodynamics. Reversibility and irreversibility in natural processes. Technical work. Enthalpy. Exergy.

    Gas mixtures: partial pressures, Dalton's law. Real gases. Steam. Humid air. T-s diagrams. Energy cycles.

    Modes of heat transfer. Heat Flux, thermal conductivity. The general differential equation of heat

    conduction. Steady state and transient conduction. Thermal resistance. Conduction rectangular and

    cylindicar coordinates. Convection: concepts and basic relationships, boundary layers, the similarity

    concept. Heat transfer through gases, fluids and solids. Overall heat transfer coefficient. Moving heat

    source. Extended surfaces, fin performance. Radiative heat transfer. Heat exchangers.

    Literature: Required:

    1. Robert Balmer (2006) Thermo-dynamics, Jaico Publishing House, ISBN: 817224262X, 868 pages Recommended:

    1. James R. Ogden (1998) Thermodynamics Problem Solver, Research and Education Association, ISBN: 0878915559, 1104 pages.

    2. Warren M. Rohsenow, James P. Hartnett, Young I. Cho (1998), Handbook of Heat Transfer, McGraw-Hill New York, ISBN: 0070535558 / 9780070535558, 1344 pages.

    11. Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics II.

    Code: MFHOA32G05-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 5

    Prerequisites: Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics I

    Topics: Definitions, concepts and properties of fluids. Pressure and its variation, measurement, and forces on plane

    and curved surfaces (fluid statics). Velocity and acceleration representations, visualizing and describing

    motion, rotational motion (fluid kinematics). The control volume (integral) approach for property

    conservation (mass, energy, momentum). The Euler and Bernoulli equations. Dimensional analysis and

    similitude/modelling. Ideal fluid kinematics and dynamics (application to flow nets, pressure distributions

    and lift). Real fluid phenomena and description (resistance, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layers,

    separation) with application to the lift and drag on objects. Shear, pressure and velocity distributions in

    pipe flow, friction and fitting losses in pipe flow, analysis and design of single pipe systems, types and

    characteristics of open channel flow (the analysis of uniform flow).

  • 14

    Literature: Required:

    1. Frank M. White, Fluid Mechanics, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1979. Recommended:

    1. Bruce R. Munson, Donald F. Young, Theodore H. Okiishi, (2009) Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 978-0470262849, 776 pages

    2. Robert W. Fox, Alan T. McDonald, Robert W Fox, (1998) John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 978-0471124641, 762 pages

    12. Technical Chemistry

    Code: MFKEM31X03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: Basic definitions in chemistry: atoms, molecules, elements, compounds, mixtures, chemical symbols,

    chemical formulas, relative atomic and molecular mass, molar mass, the laws of definite and variable

    proportions, chemical equations, the classification of chemical reactions. Atoms and the atomic theory.

    Electron configurations and the periodic table. Chemical bonds. States of matter: ideal gases the gas laws.

    Avogadro’s and Dalton’s laws. The kinetic molecular theory of gases. Real gases and their behaviour, the

    van der Waals equation. The liquid state and its properties. The solid state and its properties. Units of

    concentration. Ideal and real solutions. Acids and bases. Chemical kinetics. The rate of a chemical

    reaction. Chemical technologies, modelling. The chemical basis of engineering materials such as cement,

    adhesives, polymers, fuels, metals and semiconductors.

    Literature: Required:

    1. Tom Holme, Larry Brown: Chemistry for Engineering Student, Publisher: Brooks Cole, Hardcover: 653 pages, 2006, Paperback ISBN-10: 0534389740.

    Recommended:

    1. James O. Glanville: General Chemistry for Engineers, Preliminary Edition (Paperback) Paperback: 663 pages, Publisher: Prentice Hall; Prl edition, 2000, ISBN-13: 978-0130325143.

    2. Darrell Ebbing, Steven D. Gammon: General Chemistry (Hardcover) Publisher: Brooks Cole; 9 edition, 2007, 1030 pages ISBN-13: 978-06188574871.

    13. Introduction to Economics

    Code: MFKGZ31X04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 3+0 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental context and terminology of

    macroeconomics, and to introduce the main concepts and theories about economic science so that students

    are able to understand economic processes and relationships. An overview of the modern market economy

    as a system for dealing with the problem of scarcity.

    This course focuses on the theory and application of the following: Measuring national income and output

    (real vs. nominal GNP, GDP, NNP NDP, the problem of double counting). Consumption and investment.

    The economic role of government (externalities). Fiscal policy. The role of money in the economy; the

    evolution of money, the development of banks and the financial system; the role of the Central Bank and

    commercial banks; the analysis of demand and supply; the money market. Monetary policy (varieties and

    problems of monetary policy). The labour market. Unemployment and inflation.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=James%20O.%20Glanvillehttp://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Darrell%20Ebbinghttp://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_2?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Steven%20D.%20Gammon

  • 15

    Literature: Required:

    1. Mankiw, Gregory: Principles of Economics. Fifth Edition. South-Western, Mason, USA, 2009. ISBN:9780324589979

    Recommended:

    1. Heyne, Paul – Boettke, Peter – Prychitko, David: The Economic Way of Thinking. Twelfth Edition. Pearson Education International, New Jersey, 2010.

    2. Samuelson P.A., Nordhaus W.D.: Economics, 18th edition, Academic Internet Publishers Inc., 2006. ISBN: 0072872055

    3. Parkin, M., Powell, M. & Matthews, K. (2008) Economics. 7th ed. Harlow: Addison, Wesley. ISBN-13: 9780132041225

    4. Parkin, M (2005) Economics, 7th edn, Addision Wersley: Pearson. ISBN: 0321248449

    14. Microeconomics

    Code: MFVGF31X04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Economics for Engineers

    Topics: This course aims to make students familiar with the basic concepts of microeconomic analysis. In

    particular, the course will be focused on the analysis of how economic actors, consumers and firms choose

    between different alternatives. By the end of the course, the student should be able to use the basic tools

    and models of microeconomics, and apply them in solving problems. The course focuses on the theory and

    application of the following: The basics of supply and demand. The elasticity of demand. Consumer

    behaviour. Firm’s production (factors), costs of production, profit-maximizing behaviour. Market

    structures (perfect competition, imperfect competition: monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition).

    Profit maximizing under perfect competition, and monopoly. The role of innovation. Investment, interest,

    profits and capital. The rate of return on capital; present value, net present value; internal rate of return;

    Investment decisions.

    Required:

    1. Besanko, David – Breautigam, Ronald R.: Microeconomics. Third Edition (International Student version). John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2008.

    2. Besanko, David – Breautigam, Ronald R.: Microeconomics. Study Guide. Third Edition. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 2008.

    or

    1. Gregory Mankiw: Principles of Microeconomics, 4th edition. South-Western College Pub, 2006 2. Gregory Mankiw: Principles of Microeconomics - Study Guide. South-Western College Pub,

    2006

    Recommended:

    1. Samuelson P.A., Nordhaus W.D.: Economics, 18th edition, Academic Internet Publishers Inc., 2006. ISBN: 0072872055

    2. Parkin, M., Powell, M. & Matthews, K. (2008) Economics. 7th ed. Harlow: Addison Wesley. ISBN-13: 9780132041225

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=books&field-author-exact=N.%20Gregory%20Mankiw&rank=-relevance%2C%2Bavailability%2C-daterank/102-3419914-6414520http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=books&field-author-exact=N.%20Gregory%20Mankiw&rank=-relevance%2C%2Bavailability%2C-daterank/102-3419914-6414520http://www.textbooks.com/BooksDescription.php?BKN=702901&TYP=SBJ&TXT=microeconomics%20mankiw&CSID=MCK0COO0DO0MQDUMKQCQC

  • 16

    15. Basics of Quality Management

    Code: MFMIN31X03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: This course focuses on making the theories and principles of total quality both practical and useful.

    Practitioners in a corporate setting will find it a valuable guide in helping them learn how to be effective

    agents of the total quality approach, understand and implement total quality. The topics covered include:

    Quality and global competitiveness. Strategic management: planning and execution. Quality management

    and ethics, and communication and interpersonal relations. Total Quality Management. Quality

    improvement techniques. Statistical concepts. Control charts for variables, control chart interpretation and

    analysis, other variable control charts. Fundamentals of probability. Reliability. Quality costs. Quality

    function deployment. Design of experiments. Quality systems: ISO 9000, Six Sigma.

    Literature: 1. David L. Goetsch, Stanley Davis: Quality management: introduction to total quality management

    for production, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006, ISBN 0131189298, 9780131189294

    2. B. G. Dale: Managing Quality, Wiley-Blackwell, 2003, ISBN 0631236147, 9780631236146

    16. Management for Engineers

    Code: MFMAM31X04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+3 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: The history of management (the classical school, bureaucratic management, scientific management,

    administrative management, the human relations school, the human resources school, integrating the

    management theories, emerging management positions). What managers and organizations do (managers

    and organizations, strategic thinking, planning and control, organizing work teams and structures,

    organizational culture). Managing people (perception, learning and personality, motivation and

    organizational learning). Managing relationships (communications, interpersonal relationships, building

    groups into teams). Leadership and management practices (problem solving, power and organizational

    politics). Managing change (stress at work, change and organizational development, origins and methods

    of management and OB theories). The basics of strategic management (strategic analysis, strategy

    formulation, strategy implementation). The basics of Total Quality Management (customer focus, process

    improvement, total involvement, developing the quality strategy).

    Literature: 1. Edit SZŰCS: Management of Complex Production Systems: Course Book, Debrecen: [University

    of Debrecen Faculty of Engineering], 2012, ISBN: 978 963 473 524 3, 316 p.

    2. Curtis W. Cook – Phillip L. Hunsaker – Robert E. Coffey: Management and Organizational Behavior, IRWIN, Chicago, 1997.

    3. Carry L. Cooper – Chris Argyris: Encyclopedia of Management, Blackwell Publisher Ltd., 1998. 4. Arthur R. Tenner – Irving J. DeToro: Total Quality Management, Addison-Wesley Publishing

    Company, Massachusetts, 1993.

    17. State administration and law

    Code: MFJOG31X02-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+0 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 2

  • 17

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: Introducing the law systems of the world, especially the common law and the e continental law system by

    explaining details of the main carahcteristics of the two systems. The constitutional basics of the

    municipality structure, state organization, municipality levels, basic civil rights, a historical overview of

    the civil institutions. Operation of municipalities, their organization system, statutory supervision, and the

    major rules and regulations of the municipal, state and administrative procedures. The characteristics of

    the Hungarian municipality structure in light of the EU municipality systems.

    The evolution, history and development of the European integration; The EU after Maastricht, new

    enlargements, the Amsterdam Treaty, and the Treaty of Nice, the further enlargements with the Eastern

    European countries, The Lisbon Treaty, the future of the EU. Introduction to the institutional structure of

    the European Union, the character of the institutional structure.

    Literature: 1. Fogarasi, Ivancsics, Kiss: The handbook of the local authorities Union Publishing house,

    Debrecen (1997)

    2. Zoltán Horváth: Handbook on the European Union, HVG-ORAC, Budapest, 2011

    18. Engineering Ethics

    Code: MFITE31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+0 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: The course is intended to introduce students to the study of ethics, the branch of philosophy that aims to

    understand what actions are right and wrong, what states of affairs are good and bad, and what traits of

    personality are desirable and undesirable. Our central question will be “What should I (morally) do?”

    Similarly, although it is impossible to separate discussion of ethical theory from its application to

    particular moral problems, this course will emphasize the former. The most well-developed and carefully

    formulated ethical theory that addresses our central question is utilitarianism: what I should do is to make

    the world a better place. In the second half we review of the growth and development of the profession,

    engineering ethics, obligations to employers and peers, limits of professional responsibility, codes of

    ethics and enforcement. Traditional function of engineering societies. Ethical engineers and the low, the

    public interest. Case studies.

    Literature: 1. Charles E. Harris, Michael S. Pritchard, Michael J. Rabins: Engineering Ethics: Concepts and

    Cases, 2008 - 313 pages

    19. Informatics for Engineers I.

    Code: MFINF31X03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 0+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: Introduction to informatics. Computer structures. Operating systems. Computer networks, the Internet.

    Theoretical and practical data structures. Algorithms.

    Spreadsheets: entering data, records, fields, creating a table, sorting and filtering data, expanding the

    database, formatting the database.

    Relational databases, SQL language, normalizing databases, securing databases (confidentiality, integrity

    and availability), keys, transactions.

    Literature:

  • 18

    1. J. Walkenbach, Excel 2007, Wiley Publishing Inc. 2. C. N. Prague, M. R. Irwin, J. Reardon, Access 2003 Bible, Wiley Publishing Inc.

    20. Informatics for engineers II

    Code: MFINF32X03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 0+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Informatics for Engineers I.

    Topics: Definitions and basics of CAD, blocks, customizing, dimensioning, drawing commands, drawing aids, file

    formats, images, paper space and model space, plotting, programming, rendering, sheet sets, tables, texts.

    Computer programs, program design, programming methods, program structures.

    Programming languages: basics, data types, variables, programming structures, subroutines, modules.

    Programming with LabVIEW, applications in engineering. Creating subVIs, loops, charts, arrays, clusters,

    graphs, case and sequence structures, data acquisition, instrument control.

    Literature: 1. AutoCAD 2010 User's Guide, Autodesk 2. LabVIEW Graphical Programming Course, National Instruments 3. LabVIEW Basics I Course Manual, National Instruments 4. LabVIEW Basics II Course Manual, National Instruments

    21. Descriptive Geometry

    Code: MFMAB31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: Monge’s method of projecting: methods of projection, image-plane system, representation of spatial

    elements, reconstruction.

    The fundamentals of intersection: line-plane and plane-plane intersection.

    Metrical problems: distance and angle tasks, perpendicularity, rotation of a plane to parallel to an image

    plane, method of the replacing image-planes, constructing a illustrative picture using new image-planes,

    visibility.

    Polyhedrons: their representation, their intersection with a line, plane and the other polyhedron.

    Curved surfaces: construction and representation of curved surfaces, their intersection with a line, plane

    and the other surface.

    Literature: 1. Vlasta Szirovicza: Descriptive geometry, Self-published, Zagreb, Croatia, 2007, ISBN 978-953-

    95667-0-6

    2. Paré, E. G.: Descriptive geometry, Prentice Hall, 1997 3. Gordon, V. O.: A course in descriptive geometry, Mir, 1980

    22. Technical Drawing

    Code: MFMAB32G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Descriptive Geometry

    Topics: The series of lectures are based on the operative standards.

  • 19

    It reviews the fundamental rules of the formal requirements of the technical drawing, the drawing

    of the projections, views and sectional drawing of the components. Auxiliary and sectional views

    Representations of threaded parts, and threaded fasteners, gears, splines and keys. After that it

    deals with the drawing of standardized machine elements and the concept of manufacturing

    tolerance and fitting, dimensional specification, geometrical and positioning tolerancing, surface

    roughness and the rules of elaboration of the workshop drawing and detail drawings of simple

    machine elements

    In seminar there are six tasks to elaborate: to elaborate the workshop drawing of different

    machine elements and components.

    Literature: 1. Ansel Ugural Mechanical Design: An Integrated Approach, 1st Edition Hardcover with access

    card©2004, ISBN-13 9780072921854

    23. Machine elements I.

    Code: MFGEP31G05-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 3+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 5

    Prerequisites: Technical Mechanics II., Technical Drawing

    Topics: The series of lectures are based on the topics of technical drawing and mechanics.

    It reviews the fundamental relations of the sizing procedure of machineries (stress analysis for

    static combined loads; dimensioning on strength at harmonically varying loads, fatigue and life of

    members.) and the concept of manufacturing tolerance and fitting. After that it deals with

    connections between components (connection with force transmission by friction, positive

    connection, bolted connection, welding), gaskets, elastic connections (metal springs, rubber

    spring) beds for machine eg. rolling bearings, plain journal bearings.

    In the laboratory, in line with the lecture the machine elements are studied and tests of them are

    carried out. In seminar there are two design tasks to elaborate: welded engine frame, and

    hydraulic power cylinder.

    Literature: 1. Joseph Shigley, Charles Mischke, Richard Budynas: Mechanical Engineering Design, 7th Edition

    Hardcover with access card, 1056 pages©2004, ISBN-13 9780072921939

    2. Ansel Ugural, NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE TECH: Mechanical Design: An Integrated Approach, 1st Edition Hardcover with access card, ©2004, ISBN-13 9780072921854

    24. Machine Elements II.

    Code: MFGEP32G05-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 5

    Prerequisites: Machine Elements I.

    Topics: The series of lectures review types of couplings, clutches and breaks and their sizing. It

    deals with classification and sizing of shafts, gives review of the components of the drive chains,

    and the construction of the drive chain:

    The operation methods of the belt and chain drive, mechanical relations of the sizing procedure.

    After that it deals with the types of gearing, gear tooth geometry, load capacity of gears, design of

    geared transmission.

    In the laboratory, in line with the lecture the machine elements are studied and tests of them are

    carried out. In seminar there are two design tasks to elaborate: external long-shoes drum break,

    and counterdrive containing V belt drive and chain drive.

  • 20

    Literature:

    1. Joseph Shigley, Charles Mischke, Richard Budynas: Mechanical Engineering Design, 7th Edition Hardcover with access card, 1056 pages©2004, ISBN-13 9780072921939

    2. Ansel Ugural, NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE TECH: Mechanical Design: An Integrated Approach, 1st Edition Hardcover with access card, ©2004, ISBN-13 9780072921854

    25. CAD and CAE I.

    Code: MFCAD31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Informatics for Engineers II.

    Topics: The lectures cover the following topics:

    Computer aided product development. Product Lifecycle system. Traditional engineering design and

    concurrent engineering process. Components of CAD, CAM, CAE systems. Computer graphics

    (coordinate systems projection, transformation and mapping of geometric models). Mirror reflection,

    hidden line and surface removal. Geometric modelling (wireframe, surface and solid models). Feature

    based modelling. Parametric modelling. Part modelling (sketching, creating features, sheet models).

    Assembly modelling. Numerical methods of CAD. Finite element method in engineering design.

    Literature: 1. www.autocad.com 2. Randy H. Shih (2009): AutoCad 2010 Tutorial. SDC Publications, ISBN 978-1-58503-498-7

    26. Materials Science I.

    Code: MFANI31G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: Lectures:

    Structure and composition of a material, including the type of atoms and their arrangement, as

    viewed over the range of length scales (nano-, micro-, meso-, and macro-scale). Crystalline

    structure of metals, crystal defects. Solid solutions, compounds, alloys. Equilibrium conditions of

    systems, binary systems, phase diagrams. The Iron-Carbon phase diagram. Austenite

    transformations, principles of transformation diagrams (isothermal, continuous cooling). Ferrous

    and non-ferrous metals, basic micro-structures. Polymers, ceramics, composites. Materials

    properties (physical, mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic).

    Practice:

    Calculation tasks on crystalline systems, phase diagrams, transformation diagrams.

    Literature: 1. J.-P. Mercier: Introduction to Materials Science, Elsevier, 2002. 2. W. Hume-Rothery: The Structure of Metals and Alloys, Metals and Metallurgy Trust, 1988. 3. R. Reed-Hill: Principles of Physical Metallurgy, PWS Publishing, Boston, 1994. 4. A. G. Guy: Introduction to Materials Science, McGraw-Hill, 1976. 5. ASM Handbook, Vol. 3: Alloy Phase Diagrams, ASM International, 1992.

    http://www.autocad.com/

  • 21

    27. Materials Science II.

    Code: MFANI32G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Materials Science I.

    Topics: Lectures:

    The performance of materials under various loading and environmental conditions. Static and dynamic

    material properties. Fatigue (low cycle, high cycle fatigue), fracture (ductile, non-ductile), plastic collapse.

    Corrosion (local, global, stress corrosion cracking, inter-crystalline, trans-crystalline, erosion-corrosion).

    Material testing. Destructive testing methods (tensile, impact, fatigue, fracture mechanics, hardness, etc.).

    Brief introduction to non-destructive testing (NDT) methods (visual, radiographic, ultrasonic, magnetic,

    eddy current, dye penetrant, acoustic emission, etc.). Physical principles and areas of application. Flaw

    detection and sizing. Automation of NDT processes.

    Practice:

    The performance and evaluation of various laboratory tests (tensile, fracture mechanics, hardness).

    Literature: 1. S. Suresh: Fatigue of Materials, Cambridge University Press, 1998 2. J. F. Knott: Fundamentals of Fracture Mechanics, Butterworths, 1973 3. Non-destructive Evaluation: A Tool in Design, Manufacturing and Service, ASM International,

    1996

    4. ASM Handbook, Vol. 17: Nondestructive Evaluation and Quality Control, ASM International, 1989.

    5. R. Singh (eds): Weld Cracking in Ferrous Alloys, Woodhead Publishing, 2009.

    28. Technology of Structural Materials

    Code: MFSAT31G02-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 2

    Prerequisites: Materials Science II.

    Topics:

    Definition and classification of technological processes applied for engineering materials. Basic

    principles of heat treatment (phase transformations; transformation without diffusion).

    Hardening, tempering, annealing. Surface heat treatment (case hardening), thermo-chemical

    treatment (nitriding). Joining technologies and their applications. Classification of welding, the

    major welding technologies. Heat sources, filler materials, machines for different welding

    technologies. Arc-welding processes (with consumable and non-consumable electrode),

    resistance welding, pressure welding, high energy welding, etc. The fusion welded joint (weld

    quality). Application fields of the various welding processes. Brazing and soldering.

    Literature: Required:

    1. K.-E. Thelning: Steel and its heat treatment, Butterworths, 1984 2. K. Easterline: Introduction to the physical metallurgy of welding. London, Butterworts, 1983 3. H.B.Cary: Modern Welding Technology, Prentice Hall, 1997. 4. S.Kalpakjian-S.R.Schmid: Manufacturing Processes for Engineering Materials, Prentice Hall,

    2003.

    Recommended:

    1. ASM Handbook, Vol. 3: Alloy Phase Diagrams, ASM International, 1992. 2. ASM Handbook, Vol. 6: Welding, Brazing and Soldering, ASM International, 1993. 3. ASM Handbook, Vol. 4: Heat Treating, ASM International, 1991.

  • 22

    29. 3D Computer Aided Design

    Code: MF3DP31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 0+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Machine Elements I., CAD and CAE I.

    Topics:

    Introduction of the usage of Solid Edge CAD software (document handling, user interface,

    material-, physical-, file properties). Ribbon bar, protrusion, revolved protrusion. Creating profile

    and sketch (sketch, drawing tools, geometrical and dimensional constraints). Designing parts

    (features, material table, physical properties, manufacturing features). Designing sheet metal part

    (tab, flange, flatten model). Creating technical draw (view generating from parts, dimensions,

    section views, part list, symbols). Assemblies (assembly configurations, exploded views).

    Integrated FEM analysis.

    Literature: 1. www.solidedge.com 2. Joseph Shigley, Charles Mischke, Richard Budynas: Mechanical Engineering Design, 7th Edition

    Hardcover with access card, 1056 pages©2004, ISBN-13 9780072921939

    3. Getting Started with Solid Edge Version 20, ©2007 UGS Corp. 4. Scott Hansen, L. Scott Hansen, Ph.D: Learning and Applying Solid Edge V20 Step-by-Step,

    Industrial Press, Incorporated, 2007, ISBN 0831133120, 9780831133122

    30. Electrotechnics and electronics I.

    Code: MFELT31G05-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 3+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 5

    Prerequisites: Mathematics II., Engineering Physics

    Topics: The laws of electromagnetism. Superconductivity. Single- and three-phase AC circuits. Transformers.

    Induction, synchronous and DC motors. The principles of electric and electronic diagrams. Semiconductor

    devices. Integrated circuits: processors, controllers, memories. Power electronics. Basic electrotechnical

    laws. Electrotechnical and electronic materials. Basic concepts and theorems in circuit theory. Kirchhoff’s

    and Ohm’s laws. Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems. Constant current. Other currents. RLC circuits.

    Unstable states, transient state analysis. Resonance circuits. Linking p-n-p and n-p-n.

    The aim is to get to know the basic electrotechnical laws in the field of system theory. The structure of the

    basic electrotechnical circuits in computer systems. Basic concepts of the theory of analogue signals, its

    characteristics. Basic operations in linear signals.

    Literature: 1. David Crecraft, David Gorham: Electronics The Open University 2003, ISBN:0 7487 7036 4 2. Ralf Kories, Heinz Schmidt-Walter: Electrical Engineering a pocket reference, Spriger, 2003,

    ISBN 3-540-43965-X

    3. Wai-Kai Chen Editor-in-Cheif: The Electrical Engineering Handbook Elsevier Academic Press, 2005, ISBN:0-12-170960-4

    31. Measurements and Automatics I.

    Code: MFMET31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Electrotechnics and Electronics I.

    Topics:

    http://www.solidedge.com/

  • 23

    The main objective is to familiarize students with basic concepts of the theory and practice of metrology.

    A special emphasis is put on measuring systems.

    Theory of measurement, analog and digital techniques. Characteristics of measuring methods.

    Measuring errors: classes of devices, systematic and accidental errors. Analog devices: magnetoelectric,

    electromagnetic, and electrodynamic. Inductive and electrostatic devices. Digital measuring devices. AC-

    DC conversion. Voltage and current measurement. Power and energy measurement. Resistance

    measurement: technical methods, direct current bridges.

    Variable current bridges. Comparators. Non-electrical quantities measurement. Measuring systems.

    Calibration and linear regression. Correlation and its applications. Polynomial curve fitting, the Wald

    method, smoothing spline.

    Literature: 1. Alciatore, David G. Introduction to mechatronics and measurement systems / c2007 2. Klaas B. Klaassen Steve Gee Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation (Hardcover)

    University press Cambridge 2006

    32. Measurements and Automatics II.

    Code: MFMET32G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Electrotechnics and Electrics I., Measurements and Automatics I.

    Topics:

    Methods of system analysis. Modelling and analysis of linear systems. Non-linear systems,

    linearization methods, soft computing approaches. Stability analysis. Synthesis of systems.

    Simulation as the tool for operating mathematical models. Simulation methods and software for

    engineering applications.

    Cooperation of digital devices with a computer. Computer measuring systems.

    NI LabVIEW Introduction:

    Learn how to develop applications in the LabVIEW graphical programming environment

    Audience: New users and users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW or NI

    Developer Suite

    Prerequisites: Experience with Microsoft Windows and writing algorithms (flowcharts, block

    diagrams)

    Recommended preparation for Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer certification

    Literature: 1. Robert H. Bishop: Labview 2009 student edition, 2009, Prentice Hall, ISBN-13:978-0132141291 2. Jeffrey Travis, Jim Kring: LabVIEW for everyone: graphical programming made easy and fun,

    Prentice Hall, 2007 ISBN: 0131856723

    3. János TÓTH: Electrical Actuators: Course Book, Debrecen: [University of Debrecen Faculty of Engineering], 2012, ISBN: 978 963 473 512 0, 301 p.

    4. János TÓTH: Electrical Actuators: Laboratory Handbook, Debrecen : [University of Debrecen Faculty of Engineering], 2012, ISBN: 978 963 473 513 7, 112 p.

    33. Thermal and Fluid Machines I.

    Code: MFHOG31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics I.

    Topics:

  • 24

    Energy conversion processes. Heat losses in different energy transformation processes. Steam and gas

    cycles. Internal combustion engines (Otto, Diesel). Thermal analysis of gas and steam turbine, gas motors.

    Schema, operation. Cycles of these machines, efficiency. Boilers: Structure, operation heat losses,

    efficiency of burning process. Gas and oil burners. Efficiency of boilers at partial load. Heat exchangers:

    types, parameters, efficiency, heat transfer processes, heat losses. Dimensioning of heat exchangers. Heat

    pumps: operation principle, types, parameters, coefficient of performance. Compressors: types,

    thermodynamic parameters, efficiency. Chillers. Absorption and adsorption machines.

    Literature: 1. D. Yogi Goswami, Frank Kreith (2008), Energy conversion, CRC PressINC, ISBN:

    9781420044317, 686 pages.

    2. Charles Fayette Taylor (1985) The Internal Combustion Engine in Theory and Practice: Vol. 1 - 2nd Edition, The MIT Press, ISBN 978-0262700269, 584 pages.

    3. Keith Herold, Reinhard Radermacher, Sanford A. Klein, (1996) Absorption Chillers and Heat Pumps, CRC-Press, ISBN 978-0849394270, 330 pages.

    4. Arthur P. Fraas (1989), Heat Exchanger Design Wiley, 9780471628682, 560 pages.

    34. Thermal and Fluid Machines II.

    Code: MFHOG32G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics II.

    Topics: Classification of Fluid Machines; Energy Transfer in Fluid Machines, in Turbomachines; Impulse and

    Reaction machines. Various components of Gas Turbine and Propulsion systems. Centrifugal Compressor,

    Velocity diagrams, Power input factor, Losses in Centrifugal Compressors, Compressor characteristics.

    Axial Flow Compressors, Velocity diagrams, Degree of Reaction, Compressor characteristics. Steam

    Turbines. Introduction, Flow through nozzles, Stagnation properties, sonic properties and isentropic

    expansion through nozzles. Steam Turbine; The Single-Stage Impulse Turbine. The Compounding of the

    Impulse Turbine (Velocity and Pressure). Reaction Turbines. Stage Efficiency and Reheat factor. Impulse

    Turbine: Pelton Wheel, Analysis of Force on the Bucket and Power Generation, Specific Speed and Wheel

    Geometry, Governing, Limitation. Reaction Turbine: Francis Turbine, Runner, Casing, Draft Tube, Head

    across a Reaction Turbine, Blade Efficiency. Kaplan Turbine, Introduction and the Shape of Francis

    Runner, Types of Draft Tubes, Cavitation, and Performance Characteristics. Pumps. Introduction,

    Pumping System and the Net Head Developed, Centrifugal Pump Impeller and Velocity triangles, Slip

    Factor, Losses and Characteristics of a Centrifugal Pump. Flow through Volute Chambers, Cavitation in

    Centrifugal Pumps, NPSH. Axial Flow or Propeller Pump, Velocity Triangle and Analysis, System

    Characteristics and Matching, Pumps in Series and Parallel. Fans. Working Principle of a Centrifugal

    Blower, Velocity Triangle and Parametric Calculations: Work, Efficiency, Number of Blades and Impeller

    size. Pumps connections and control. Fan Laws, Performance of Fans.

    Literature: Required:

    1. Terry Wright (1999) Fluid Machinery: Performance, Analysis, and Design, CRC Press, ISBN 978-0849320156, 376 pages.

    2. Michael W. Volk (2005) Pump Characteristics and Applications, Taylor & Francis Group, ISBN: 9780824727550, 533 pages.

    Recommended:

    1. Paul Hanlon (2001), Compressor Handbook, McGraw-Hill Professional, ISBN 978-0070260054, 720 pages

    2. Terry Wright, Philip Gerhart (2009), Fluid machinery: application, selection, and design, CRC Press, ISBN: 9781420082944, 437 pages.

  • 25

    35. Manufacturing Processes I.

    Code: MFGYT31G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Materials Science I.

    Topics: Basic principles of mechanical engineering. Overview of generally used raw materials manufacturing

    processes (steel-, copper-, alumina based and other alloys). Introduction of the basic material removal

    manufacturing processes. The basic concept of cutting, applicable tools and tool materials. Machining

    processes, turning, milling, drilling, planning, chipping, abrasive processes, gearing, and thread cutting

    technology. Methods of tool life analysis and management. Special machining, UP, HSC, electrochemical,

    laser-, and water-jet cutting.

    Literature: 1. L. Edwards, M. Endean: Manufacturing with Materials, Butterworths, London, 1990., ISBN 0-

    408-02770-3

    2. M. F. Ashby: Materials Selection in Mechanical Design. 3.rd edition. Elsevier. London, 2005. ISBN 0-7506-6168-2.

    3. DeGarmo's Materials and Processes in Manufacturing, 10th Edition DeGarmo, Black, Kohser, 2008.ISBN: 978-0-470-05512-0

    4. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials, Processes, and Systems, 3rd Edition, Groover, 2007. ISBN: 978-0-471-74485-6

    36. Manufacturing Processes II.

    Code: MFGYT32G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Manufacturing Processes I.

    Topics: Planning of technological methods in manufacturing. Introduction of the basic industrial design- and

    operation documentation procedure in manufacturing. Primary forming processes (casting, powder

    metallurgy, metallurgical, hot forming processes). Sheet metal forming processes and its technology

    (volume shaping, material separation processes, sheet forming). The main methods of forging and its

    manufacturing processes, forging machines. Manufacturing form plastics, ceramics, composites,

    technologies and applicable tools and machines.

    Literature: 1. L. Edwards, M. Endean: Manufacturing with Materials, Butterworths, London, 1990., ISBN 0-

    408-02770-3

    2. M. F. Ashby: Materials Selection in Mechanical Design. 3.rd edition. Elsevier. London, 2005. ISBN 0-7506-6168-2.

    3. S. Kalpakjian, S.R. Schmid, Chih-Wah Kok: Manufacturing Processes for Engineering Materials SI.

    4. John A. Schey:: Introduction to Manufacturing Procesesses (McGraw-Hill Series in Mechanical & Materialls Science)

    37. Manufacturing Processes III.

    Code: MFGYT33G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 1+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Manufacturing Processes II.

    http://eu.he.wiley.com/WileyCDA/HigherEdTitle/productCd-047005512X.htmlhttp://eu.he.wiley.com/WileyCDA/HigherEdTitle/productCd-0471744859.html

  • 26

    Topics: Introduction of material joint processes (welding, soldering, adhesive). Overview of welding processes

    and applicable technologies of designing and manufacturing of a welded joint. Weldability of metals and

    its alloys. Basic principles of industrial robots, and its basic kinematic characteristics. Designing the

    manufacturing process (in a CNC milling centre) of a product, applying the basic knowledge of

    Manufacturing processes I. & II. and using the EdgeCAM software to optimize the milling process.

    Literature: Required:

    1. Modern Welding Technology (6th Edition) Howard B. Cary, Scott Helzer. Publication Date: November 20, 2004 | ISBN-10: 0131130293 | ISBN-13: 978-0131130296 | Edition: 6

    2. A Guide to Lead-free Solders: Physical Metallurgy and Reliability, John W. Evans Publication Date: March 22, 2007 | ISBN-10: 1846283094 | ISBN-13: 978-1846283093 | Edition: 1st Edition.

    Recommended:

    1. Handbook of Adhesives and Sealants, Edward Petrie, Publication Date: December 12, 2006 | ISBN-10: 0071479163 | ISBN-13: 978-0071479165 | Edition: 2

    2. Nonlinear Dynamics of Production Systems, Günter Radons, Reimund Neugebauer, Publication Date: March 26, 2004 | ISBN-10: 3527404309 | ISBN-13: 978-3527404308 | Edition: 1

    38. Logistics I.

    Code: MFLOG31G02-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+0 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 2

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: This series of lectures is based on the topics of logistics. It covers the areas of logistics, construction of

    logistics systems and major construction units. Logistic systems management levels, functions, levels of

    development. Material handling systems and their role in the logistics system. Material handling systems

    characterization, classification, material flow characteristics. The choice of material handling systems and

    equipment. Storage systems, processes and the interpretation of break bulk storage systems. Warehousing

    systems, transportation systems, controlling and information systems, supply chain management,

    industrial and manufacturing logistics.

    Literature: 1. Alan Rushton, Phil Croucher, Peter Baker; The The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution

    Management; Kogan Page, 2006; ISBN 0749446692

    2. Michael B. Stroh; A Practical Guide to Transportation and Logistics; Logistics Network, 2001; ISBN 0970811500

    3. Issa Baluch; Transport Logistics: Past, Present and Predictions; Winning Books, 2005; ISBN 9948031393

    39. Environmental protection

    Code: MFKOR31X02-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 0+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 2

    Prerequisites: Technical Chemistry

    Topics: This series of lectures is based on the topics of environmental issues. Characterization of environmental

    elements. Green chemistry. Chemicals in the environment: their fate and transport. Transport processes in

    the environment. Conservation of mass. Conservation of mass in integral (control volume) form. The

    differential form of conservation of mass. Groundwater hydrology. Diffusion of an instantaneous, point

    source. Reactions and exchanges. Exchange across an air-water interface. Partitioning of a solid. Transport

  • 27

    of particles in the environment. Water resource systems. Aquatic chemistry. Water quality control. Water

    and wastewater treatment technology. Air chemistry. Air, water and soil pollution control, waste

    management, recycling, noise and vibration problems, environmental health engineering. Pollution control

    through different methods.

    Literature: Required:

    1. Andrew Farmer: Handbook of Environmental Protection and Enforcement: Principles and Practice (Hardcover), 294 pages, 2007, ISBN-13: 978-1844073092

    Recommended:

    1. Mukesh Doble: Green Chemistry and Engineering (Hardcover), 381 pages, 2007, ISBN-13: 978-0123725325

    40. Industrial Safety

    Code: MFBIZ31X02-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+0 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 2

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics: The Industrial Safety focuses on more of the real issues future safety and health practitioners will

    encounter, such as dealing with enforcement, protecting workers from ergonomic hazards, and

    accommodating the latest advances in process technology, health management, a modern perspective on

    compliance with mandatory standards for workplace safety and health, and a variety of solved problems

    Topics covered include workers' compensation, fault tree analysis, hearing protection, environmental

    protection, fire protection, workers with disabilities, OSHA violation policy. Literature:

    1. C. Ray Asfahl, David W. Rieske: Industrial safety and health management 6th ed. (Intern. ed.) Boston Pearson, cop. 2010

    2. Roger L. Brauer: Safety and health for engineers 2nd ed. John Wiley, cop. 2006

    41. Steel Constructions

    Code: MFACS31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Technical Mechanics III., Technology of Structural Materials

    Topics: Moving loads and their effects on structural members. Influence lines for beams. Influence lines for

    simple trusses. Energy methods in structural analysis. Castigliano’s theorems. The theorem of least work.

    Virtual work. The design of steel structures: dead loads and live loads, load combinations and factors.

    Allowable stress design (ASD) and load and resistant factor design (LRFD). The material properties of

    structural steel. Elementary plastic analysis and design. Compression members, buckling of columns.

    Lateral torsional buckling of beams. Web crippling. The connection of members: design of bolted

    connections, design of welded connections. Special loads and the design of crane runway beams. Local

    stresses due to wheel loads.

    Literature: 1. Luís Simões da Silva; Rui Simões; Helena Gervásio: Design of Steel Structures; ECCS -

    European Convention for Constructional Steelwork, 2010; ISBN 978-3-433-02973-2;

    (http://www.ernst-und-sohn.de/en/design-of-steel-structures?tab=2&ref=2644#rs)

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/279-6013395-8634546?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books-uk&field-author=Andrew%20Farmer

  • 28

    2. James Ambrose, Patrick Tripeny: Simplified Design of Steel Structures; John Wiley and Sons, 2007; ISBN 978-0-470-08631-5 (http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-

    0470086319.html)

    3. Frantisek Wald, Kang-Hai Tan, Sing-Ping Chiew: Design of Steel Structures; Research Publishing Service, 2007; ISBN 978-80-01-03580-1, (http://rpsonline.com.sg/rpsweb/dsswee.html)

    42. Hydraulic and Pneumatic Machines

    Code: MFHPG31G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics II.

    Topics: The fundamentals of pneumatics. The general structure of pneumatic systems. Control systems

    (directional control valves, dual-pressure valves, shuttle valves, pressure sequence valves, time delay

    valves). Simple pneumatic connections. Symbolic representation of pneumatic elements and devices.

    Build up of the circuit diagrams. Applications of the FluidSIM-P program. Introduction to the Festo

    Didactic education system. Pneumatics in the industry. Pneumatic machines. The fundamentals of

    hydraulics. The component parts of hydraulic machinery. Hydraulic pumps and engines. Hydraulic

    cylinders, valves. Hydraulic machines.

    Literature:

    1. Peter Croser, Frank Ebel: Pneumatics Basic Level, Festo Didactic GmbH Co., D-73770 Denkendorf 2002

    2. D. Merkle, B.Schrader, M. Thomes: Hydraulics Basic Level, Festo Didactic GmbH Co., D-73770 Denkendorf 2003

    43. Fracture Mechanics

    Code: MFTMA31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Technical Mechanics IV., Technology of Structural Materials

    Topics: Continuum mechanical approaches to describing the stress-strain circumstances in the vicinity of cracks

    where there are different constitutive laws. Possible fracture criteria. The plane (stress or strain) theory of

    elasticity. The basic principles of the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). LEFM solutions,

    the concept of stress intensity factor (SIF). Plastic field estimations at the crack tip. Non-linear fracture

    mechanics, J-integrals. Residual stress fields in fracture mechanics. Sources of residual stresses. Crack

    propagation sensitivity index concept and its practical use for quasi-static and cyclic loaded elements.

    Engineering procedures (R9, EPRI, COD, leak-before-break) for the handling of crack-like defects in

    engineering structures. NDT techniques and their reliability, applicability in detection of crack-like

    defects. Literature: Required:

    1. Broek, D.: The Practical Use of Fracture Mechanics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, London, 1988. Recommended:

    1. Fred Nilson: Fracture Mechanics – from theory to Application. KTH, 1993. 2. L.P. Pook: Linear Elastic Fracture mechanics for Engineers. Theory and Applications. WIT-Press

    2000.

    3. Norman E. Dowling: Mechanical Behavior Materials. Engineering methods for deformation, fracture and fatigue. Prentice-Hall International Editions.1993.

    http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470086319.htmlhttp://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470086319.html

  • 29

    4. Richard Hertzberg: Deformation and Frature Mechanics o Enginering Materials. John Willey and Sons.1989.

    5. M. Kocak, A.Webster, J.J. Janos, R.A Ainsworth, R. Koers: FITNET Fitness-for Service. Vol. I. and II. ISBN 978.-.3-940923-00-4. 2008.

    44. Manufacturing Planning

    Code: MFGYA31G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+2 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Manufacturing Processes III.

    Topics: This course is a study of the efficient and effective utilization of manufacturing resources. Course topics

    include: Optimization of technological data. Material requirements planning. Capacity requirements

    planning. The design of (Go - No Go) gauges; the function of gauges in production; the main types of

    gauges and their principle of operation. Production planning supported by computers. CNC programming.

    CNC control. Parts of the CNC documentation. Types and construction of NC and CNC machine tools.

    Programming exercises. Integrated material data processing systems. Integrated manufacturing systems. Literature: Required:

    1. Manufacturing, B. Benhabib, Marcel Dekker Inc. 2003. ISBN 0-8247-4273-7 2. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology, S. Kalpakjian, S. R. Schmid, Fourth Edition,

    Prentice Hall Publ. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0

    Recommended:

    1. Manufacturing Automation, Y. Altintas, Cambridge University Press 2000., ISBN 0-521-65973-6 2. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing, Mikell P. Groover, John Wiley & Sons. 2006. ISBN

    0471744859

    45. Diagnostics

    Code: MFDIA31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Machine Elements II.

    Topics: Basic maintenance philosophies and strategies: Diagnostics and condition based maintenance

    Vibration analysis: Oscillation, mass, spring, damper, sine waves, amplitude, frequency, phase, time and

    frequency domains, spectrum, displacement, velocity, acceleration, natural frequencies, resonance,

    Fourier transform, DFT, FFT, FFT analyzers, frequency resolution, acquisition time, averaging

    Condition monitoring of machines: Dynamic behaviour of rotating machinery, vibration based methods of

    data acquisition and analysis techniques, vibration signal measurement and recording instrumentation,

    vibration level standards, rolling element and journal bearing faults, gear wear detection, typical vibration

    problems: unbalance, misalignment, structural weakness, loose parts, sensors, transducers, shock pulse

    method

    Balancing: Balancing methods, trial weights, correction weights

    Shaft Alignment

    Acoustics for Machinery: Noise behaviour of a machinery, measurement of sound radiation of machines,

    determination of sound power, sound level meters and analyzers

    Infra-red thermography: Infrared radiation and its applications, thermal imaging for industrial inspections

    Literature: Required:

  • 30

    1. Maldague, X. P.: Theory and Practice of Infrared Technology for Nondestructive Testing, Wiley, 2001.

    2. Nagy, I.: Technical Diagnostics I. - Vibration Analysis, Delta3N Kft., 2010 Recommended:

    1. Taylor, J.: The Vibration Analysis Handbook VCI, 2000 2. Taylor, J.: The Gear Analysis Handbook, VCI, 2000 3. Taylor, J., Kirkland, D.W.: The Bearing Analysis Handbook, VCI, 2000

    46. Finite Element Method

    Code: MFVEG31G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Technical Mechanics IV., 3D Computer Aided Design

    Topics: The lectures cover the following topics:

    Finite element method in the product lifecycle. Fundamentals of elasticity (displacement field, strain field,

    stress field). Equilibrium equation, kinematic equation, constitutive equation. Boundary conditions. Primal

    and dual system. Principal of virtual work. Total potential energy. Variational principles. Ritz method.

    Structure of the displacement-based finite element method. Modelling considerations, element types.

    Approximation of the elastic problem. Finite element softwares. Beam structures. 2D problems of

    elasticity. Isoparametric finite elements. Interpolation, numerical integration. Meshing. Postprocessing.

    Literature: 1. O. C. Zienkiewicz, R. L. Taylor, J. Z. Zhu (2005): The Finite Element Method: Its Basis and

    Fundamentals, Butterworth-Heinemann, ISBN 978-0750663205

    47. Programmable Logic Controllers

    Code: MFPRL31G04-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 0+4 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 4

    Prerequisites: Electrotechnics and Electronics I., Hydraulic and Pneumatic Machines

    Topics: Introduction to the Programmable Logic Controller: hardware and software architecture. Installation of

    PLCs, wiring of power, sensors and actuators. Introduction to the Twido PLC family and programming

    methods: ladder diagrams, structured language, and block diagrams.

    PLC programming exercises: the application of logic, timer, counter and analogue functions. Application

    of advanced functions: real-time clock, calendar, and mathematical functions.

    Programming exercises: industrial applications.

    Requirement to fulfil the course: successful implementation of an industrial application.

    Literature: 1. W. Bolton: Programmable Logic Controllers, Newnes, 2009, ISBN13:978-1856177511 2. Max Rabiee: Programmable Logic Controllers, hardware and Programming, Goodheart-Willcox

    Co, 2009, ISBN-13: 978-1605250069

    3. Géza HUSI, Péter SZEMES, István BARTHA: PLC Programming : Course Book, Debrecen : [University of Debrecen Faculty of Engineering], 2012, ISBN: 978 963 473 518 2, 375, [1] p.

    4. Géza HUSI, Péter SZEMES, István BARTHA: PLC Programming : Laboratory Handbook, Debrecen : [University of Debrecen Faculty of Engineering], 2012, ISBN: 978 963 473 519 9,

    133, [1] p.

    http://www.amazon.com/W.-Bolton/e/B001ITVRF4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

  • 31

    48. Material Handling and Robotics I.

    Code: MFARO31G03-EN

    Lectures+Practice: 2+1 hours

    ECTS Credit Points: 3

    Prerequisites: Logistics I.

    Topics: Basic concepts for the conveyance of material. Continuous operating conveyors, belt and various other