university of hawaii · it nvilcc 0. v i a' a (u m m 3 in 1 rm gs established 1904. vol 18. no. 6....

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It nvilcc 0. v I a' a ( mm 3 in 1 rm gs u ESTABLISHED 1904. VOL 18. NO. 6. LIHUE, KAUAI, TERRITORY OF HAWAII, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 7, 1922 SUBSCRIPTION RATES, $2.50 PER YEAR 5 CENTS PER COPY Irs. A. S. Wilcox Donates Public Library to Kauai Mrs. A. S. Wilcox of Honolulu lias announced thaf. she will erect a $75,000 library on Kauai as a mem orial to her husband, tho late Al- bert S. Wilcox. Tho plans for the library will be drawn up in tho very near future and work on tho build-in- g will start at the very earliest possiblo date. It Is rumored that tho Llhuo plan- tation will givo a tract of land be- tween tho plantation offico and tho law office of Philip. L. nice for li- brary purposes. The spot is said to bo very near the present band- stand. But In case no more suitable tract of land is definitely acquired in tho near futuro Mrs. Wilcox of- fers to furnish tho land also on which to erect tho building. The operation of the Kauai Public Library will not bo postponed until the building can bo completed how-er- . On January 3rd tho Kauai Li- - lirni-- v naanntnHnn wna 1 ncnrnnril i nil . Last Wednesday Uev. B. W. Bayless, who has been actively working for the library for tho past several months, nppeared before tho board of supervisors and got a contract for tho operation of tho library, as is required by the territorial law. The contract has been sent back to ! tho governor and as soon as he okehs it, the money will bo Immedi - ately available. ' At thoir regular meeting last Frl - day afternoon, tho Mokihana club offered its rooms for library pur - .1' Mioses until moro suitable quarters ' i . ... , ... .,, . . their offer will be accepted and tho regular library is completed. MISS ALICE MOORE, GIRLS' WORK HEAD, RETURNS TO HONOLULU Miss Alice Moore, head of girls' work department of tho Honolulu v r rt a ....... n ........ f ger for Honolulu last week. Miss, jpioore spent ten days on Kauai, coming over as a special speaker at tho annual meeting of tho Y. W. C. A. She also spoke at tho banquet meeting of tho Y. M. C. A., and with Miss Edith Hanson, our local tecretary, visited all tho Girl Re- serve groups and Y. W. C. A. clubs on tho island. On Saturday sho hold an all-da- y conferonco for leaders of clubs at Papalinahoa. Luncheon was served to tho group at noon. Plans were made for conducting tho club work on a uniform basis throughout the lpland- - with honors to bo earned by tho girls for performance of cer- tain duties at home or at school. Miss Mooro has many friends on Kauai and is a welcome guest. Wo hope sho may como again soon. I KAWAIHAU DISTRICT ELECTS DELEGATES J. M. Kaneakua, Henry Akl, H. j van Gleson and N. K. Hoopll will i represent tho Kawaihau district at the Republican convention in Hono- lulu on February 14th, these four lieing chosen at the meeting of tho precinct club held last Saturday night at tho Kapaa court house. Tho voting resulted as follows: Aki and van Gleson 71 votes each; Hoo- pll G7; Kaneakua CI; Kaahu and JVliinoi 60 each; Bettencourt 57, Kapoza 40; Ekekela 12, Rodrigues 10. Although a total of 228 names were on tho Republican roll, only 148 were cast. Keen rivalry existed among the candidates as tho vigorous campaign- ing indulged In for tho' past week had all tho voters talking 'about it, resulting in a meeting that was ex- ceedingly lively, although orderly. Kawaihau certainly does not have to play second fiddle to any dls- - trict when 'it comes to Interest in politics. 'According to old timers nover before has such interest boon shown . .lnioTofo- - to ,..! JU UV..th" W fcMW Villi' mention, and the crowded voting booths were rather unexpected. Tho last meotiug to select delegates ,..n held In 1912. before tho direct primary law was passed. . o Dr. G. S. B ss of Pearl Harbor,' arr,ved on the K.nau last Friday - to speak to the Mokihana Club. KAPAA NOTES J. F. Dettencourt Jr. homesteader and formerly bookkeeper of tho Makeo Sugar Co., has joined the staff of tho local branch of the Hawaii Dank of Commerce. He will specialize in savings and insurance. Miss Dona Maladinlch and Mias' Laura Rnpoza were tho hostesses at a dclichtftil farewell .nartv at tho Lizama homo at Kealia last Tues-- I day evening, given in honor of Al-vi- n Branco who left for Honolulu list been trans-o- Wednesday, having ..xho of Bank of Hawaii's of- - to tho lee-fic- e c(lness t0 SociaI Work." Both there. About 25 young Portugu- - turos woro niuatrat0li by iantcr .cse people from Kapaa and Kealia GXami,lcd slldeSi Dr. B1Iss also cas-wer- e present and tho evening was ,., ... , ,,,, liv ,,n(.lnra nn,i spent in dancing and games, not to i mention tho partaking of refresh- ments. Charles Kano, member of tho Ma- keo baseball team for tho past five years, is tho proud father of an- other boy. This is tho second son born to Mr. and Mrs. Kano. Simpson Decker, sales agent, who rtarted a clearance sale of tho dry goods stock of Van Leuvan's two weeks ago, departed last week for Honolulu, after disposing of the entire stock of tho store. A small portion remaining last week was disposed of to Alexander & West of Niumalu and taken there for sale. ' Battling for the 1021 champion- - ship in 1922 may perhaps seem a novelty elsewhere, but not in Ka- - aa. Tho Mills and the Sunrise earns of tho Kealia league aro still ed for the lead and next Sunday w111 se0 tuo en(1 of tl10 1921 sea" I8011, Tho courthouse was crowded to capacity on Saturday evening long oofore tho time set for the opening of tho balloting for the four dclc- - gates to represent tho local pre cinct at tho coming Republican con- vention in Honolulu. It was ladies tir3t though, and quick work by the police and inspectors enabled the election to bo finished, with time to spare, in the one hour alloieu '.in which to vote. Jonah B. Cummings, who .. helped the Makees to win their 1920-2- champ onsh ps. is no longer here but is now employed at Kiiauea plantation, and may- - not be back with tho team this year. Although local fandom will no doubt bo sor- ry to seo him go, they should re- member that baseball in these parts is always secondary to tho pursuit of worldly and Jonah no doubt owes it to himself to en- deavor to climb another rung in the ladder of success. KAUAI WILL SEND EIGHTEEN DELEGATES TO THE CONVENTION ! Following is the complete list af delegates from Kauai county to attend tho territorial convention to be held in Honolulu next Tuesday: Nlihau. E. K. Kahale; Kekaha, M. Costa; Walmea, W. O. Crowell; Ma Ikaweli, A. Q. Marcallino; Wahiawa. J W. D. McBryde; Koloa, James K. j IKula; Lihue, C. A. Rice, W. H. Rice Jr., H. D. Sloggett, A. G. Kau-- lukou, S. K. Kaco; Kawaihau, J. M. Kaneakua, Henry Aki, II. van Gic-son- i N. 1C. Hoopii; Kiiauea, L. D. Larson; Hanalei, W. F. Sanborn and A. Menefoglio. . FALSE FIRE ALARM IN KEALIA MILL Tho electrical room of tho Makeo mill was tho scene of considerable commotion' ono afternoon last week. Firo began shooting in all directions from tho electrical equipment. For a little while, judging from out- ward appearances! tho wholo mill was going to burn. Then somebody happened to think that It might be a good idea to pull out the switch, and tho fir.o was all "ver. A snort circuit nau lurmsneu tho excitement but had done no real damage. Li"'e Solomon, tho six year old Krandson of Rev. David Kaaeamoku, tho Hawaiian minister of Hanalei, ITT,' was burled last Tuesday in cemetery. He was sick only four, days. Death was duo to a fall which resulted in blood poisoning. A pa-- . thetlc scene was evidenced, as his former school mates sang their llt- - fn.ii'nll t.r.ntr mill il nntttt t n.l , ,. " Chag conducted thQ servlcc. Dr. George S, Bliss Gives Two Lectures nolatloiiBliIp Feeblemind-fsrro- d possessions, George S. Bliss, superintendent of tho Territorial Homo for Feeble- minded Persons, at Pearl City, Oa-lu- i. was a visitor to Kauai on Friday and Saturday of last week. During his stay ho gave two lectures ono to tho Mokihana Club on "What tho Presence of Feeblemindedness Means to Our Community," and tho oth- er to the Social Servico Association nurses In tho districts. Based on statistics gathered in the United States, ono per cent of the population at ho present time is feeble-minde- averred Dr. Bliss. To handle this situation adequately will bo a tremendous strain upon tho tax payers of tho country, and as tho inheritance of feoblemind-nes- s is established as a certain fact tho problem grows ever a large one. It Is now the greatest social problem confronting us. At least half the cases handled by our so olal workers and by our jails aro those of feebleminded persons. If, however, wo could segregate such casus so that no additional feeble minded children should bo born to them, wo could within 50 years re duce feeblemindedness by 75 per cent. Mr. and Mrs. E. Wood left for Honolulu last Saturday. Mr. Wood is takinK the plans for tho new Kauai Telephonic building to an architect and is taking his first de- grees in Masonry. GRAND JURY MEETS; FINDS TRUE BILLS Tho grand jury met at tho coun- ty court house yesterday and brought hi true bills against Eduardo and Santiago Clombro, charged with assault with deadly weapon; James Charman and Charles Wilson charg- ed with first degree burglary , and Felix Do Los Reyes, Kasamiro Ara-gon- Francisco Penado, Lucas Ara-gon- charged with first degree rob- bery. All tho indicted men will bo tried at the coming term of the circuit court. SPECIAL SERVICES AT LIHUE CHURCH Rev. R. W. Bayless, of the Li hue Union church , has arranged a series of sermons that will bo of special interest to the young- er peoplo of the community. Next Sunday, February 12, Rev. Bay- less will use as his subject, "Tho Religion of Abraham Lincoln." Tho following Sunday, "Wash- ington, tho Christian," will be tho theme. On February 2C, Rev. Bayless and Rev. Royal G. Hall will exchange pulpits. A series of special Sunday ev- ening missionary programs has been arranged. Tho general themo is, "The Kingdom and tho Nations." Sunday night. February 19, Rev. Bayless will give a lecture on India. His sermon will bo augmented by lantern slide scenes from that country. On tho night of February 20, Row M. E. Carver of Waimea will lecture on "Latin America." March 5, Prof. K. C. Leebrick, of tho University of Hawaii i will speak on, "What tho World Needs." On March 12, Secretary Rellly of tho army and navy Y. M. C. A., will uso as his theme, "Rus- sia's Special Need of Christiani- ty." March 19, Rev. Royal G. Hall of Koloa, will speak on "China" and tho last Sunday in Marcli Neil Locko of tho Y. M. C. A., will givo a lecture on "Africa." Two programs have been ar- ranged for April. Tho first Sun- day ovenlng Rev. J. M. Lydgato will speak on "Japan." TUo fol- lowing weok, April 9th, Miss Edith Hanson of tho local Y. W. C. A., ...will complete tho ser- ies, speaking on, "Islam and tho Near East." Teachers Appoint Pension Committee A committeo consisting of Messrs. Brodio and Simpson and Mrs. Wed-emeye- r, with the first named as chairman, was appointed last week by Presidont Ravmond of tlm Kn. ual Teachers' Association to repre-- l sent them in the matter of pen. slons for the teachers. Tho Hawaii Education Association ' (lay 0,1 1110 K,,,nM- - Mis3 Wilcox was 1,1 nnol,1I ' connection with Ka-sio- n is now active in drafting a now pen-- 1 bill ual scho1 affairs- - for Hawaii's public school leaciiurs, wiucn wui no introduced at tho next session of the legisla-- ' turo. and it is believed that the proposed bill will givo teachers ft worthwhile pension law. It is pro- posed that each teacher, principal or special instructor pay three per cent of their annual salaries into the pension fund and tho territory to put into it a sum equal to tho total paid each" year by the teach- ers. "Tho importance of this matter deserves the attention and consid- eration of all teachers,' said Presi- dent Raymond, "and each teacher has the opportunity to make sug- gestions and criticisms." Every teacher on this island will have an opportunity to read the proposed new pension bill and may obtain a copy from any ono of tho members. KAUAI BOY CHOSEN FOR IMPORTANT PLACE Mortimer Lydgate, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Lydgate, at a meeting of tho students of tho University of Hawaii hold a fow days at?o. was chosen the first president last FrIllay morning, tho Student Y. M. C. A. Persons acquainted with the work of the association in the colleges and uni- versities of the mainland recognize in this offico one of the most re- sponsible and important positions that can come to a student during his' academic years. Tho work of the student association has a largo bearing on tho moral and religious life of an institution and indirectly on the social and athletic activi- ties. The Student Y. M. C. A. stands for and promtes tho best there is in personal and collego life. Its of- ficers aro men of this type. Young Lydgato is well liked and a loader among tho students of tho univer- sity. Was a member of tho varsity football team last year. He has identified himself with Christian ac- tivities in connection with his school work, and President Dean, Dr. Leebrick and others who aro sponsoring tho now Y organizatiou aro confident that under his lead- ership it will develop into a pot- ent factor in tho llfo of tho univer sity, This is tho first formal organiz- ation of tho Y to bo started for work among collego men of tho ter- ritory. The territorial committeo wero fortunate in securing tho ser- vices of Dw.ight Rugh, son of Dr. Charles Rugh, head of tho educa- tional department of tho University of California, to do tho necessary preliminary work boforo an organ- ization could be perfected. Mr. Rugh in connection with his associ ation activities is taking somo post graduate work, has played end on this year's football squad and prov- en himself a regular fellow. The new is tlu culmination of soveral months of preparation and .;. MASONS HOLD THEIR REGULAR MEETING Tho regular quarterly meeting of the Kauai Masonic Club was hold at tho Llhuo Hotel anuox last Sat- urday night. Three new members wero added to tho roll, making a to tal of 70 Masons from lodges all over tho mainland in the local organlza- - tion. Following tho business meeting refreshments wero sorved and a so- cial hour was enjoyed. Considerable discussion as to tho wisdom of or- ganizing n bluo lodgo on Kauai took place. PRINCESS EXPRESSES HER Presldon' Rajmond of tlm Ka- uai Toachor:i' Association has a lettor from Princess Kala-nianaol- in which sho wishes to ex- tend to tho tcachors of Kauai her of thoir resolution of condolence. PERSONALS ofi"olulu organization demonstration. APPRECIATION appreciation Enoka Lovell Sr., returned from Honolulu last Wednesday where- ho had gone to attend tho funeral of his daughter, Mrs. Alice Friel. Mlss E' H wllcox- - educational commissioner of Kauai, returned lrom lne metropolis last Wednos- - c. E. S. Burns and family arriv-o- n C(i tho Claudlno last Fridav mnrnlnc . Mr n.,r,,0 t ti,,, .,. lnnnritrpr nf lio Ifnlnn Sntn r"n Charles Gay was an incoming pas- senger on the Claudlno last Friday morning. E. L. McTaaaart, senior student nt tho University of Hawaii, arriv- ed on tho Claudlno last Friday morning. Mr. McTaggart Is work- ing with tho experiment station of tho H. S. P. A. temporarily. R. E. Hodgson of tho American Factors is making his regular drum- ming tour of the Garden Island. A. J. Campbell, well known Ho- nolulu broker, made a short trip to the Garden Island last week, re- turning on the Saturday's boat. A. Horner Sr., territorial sugar expert, arrived on tho Garden Island last Friday to make his regular tour of the homesteads and to ad-vis- o the Kauai small fanners. Miss Margaret Lanowith, welfare worker of the Kiiauea Sugar Co.. returned from a short trip to Ho- - KAUAI POST HAS AN AN AMBITIOUS PROGRAM Many organizations which raino Into cxlstonce as one of the results of our past wars havo started with h'B" Weals on,y t0 discover after lew years that their chief func- - t' vs to give successful dances That this is not to bo the destiny of American Legion Kauai Post No. 2, can be seen by its ambitious pro- gram for 1922. At the first regular meeting of this year held on February 3rd in tho county building, Post Comman- der Englehard stated that there i would be no digging in and he gave mo objectives to Do reached during tho year. Americanization is the aim of tho Legion and that this may be accomplished in tho full sense of the word on Kauai soveral committees have been appointed. Philip L. Rico heads tho Ameri- canization and memorial commit- tee. Among the problems, that con front this committeo is tho matter of American citizenship of .all aliens one of the most difficult questions wo havo in tho islands today. Tho auxiliary committee is going to take an active interest in oth- er organzatious which foster Amer- icanization, such as the Boy Scouts and the National Guard. This com- mittee is headed by W. F. Homer. Frank S. Pugh will direct tho ed- ucation committee which intends to stimulate among the students of this island a desire for training that will fit them for usefulness in the industries of the terltory. With this end in view work in their voca- tion will bo secured for tho stud- ents while they are still attending school, for which scholastic credit will bo given. The work of these three commit- tees has a very important rela- tion to the welfaro and prosperity of this Island in particular and the territory as a whole. It Is obvious that Kauai has en- joyed overy social ovent that tho Legion has directed during Its short existence. In order that this good work may bo continued, Mr. Bag-go- tt heads the athletic committee and Mr. Forn tho amusement com- mittee. Vlco Commandor Dr. Hagood is in chargo of tho committeo on membership. It was brought out during tho meeting that Kauai Post No. 2 of tiio American Legion was badly in need of a homo where meetings could bo held and possibly used as club rooms. Tho lack of halls on this island makes this difficult and the only hope in sight Is the uso of a hall joiutly with somo othor organization. Bflakee Sugar Co. Employee Killed In Auto Accident Matsulchl Soma, an employco of tho Makeo Sugar Co., died at tho Kealia hospital last Wednesday ev- ening from internal injuries sus- tained as tho result of an automo- bile accident that afternoon on the first turn of tho government road Just opposite the Kealia hotel. According to oyo witnesses of tho fatal accident, about ,4:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, G. Hlronaka, a laboratory employee of tho Ma-kc- e Sugar Co., driving Ford No. 1209 owned by himself, accompan- ied by the unfortunate boy in tho front scat, was going toward tho Kealia hospital, and skidded on tho wet pavement just before coming to tho concrete bridge, tho front wheels of tho car breaking down tho low fence on tho right hand side of the road. In some strange manner, a long pleco of 2 x 4, which lined tho top of the fence, and loosened only at ono end by tho impact fell on the hood of the car, and ' then was forced through the windshield straight at the chest of the occupant of tho right front seat. Tho force of the impact flattened tho back of tho seat and tho pieco of 2 x 4 continued on Its way thru the back curtain of tho car, re maining in that position when tho car finally came to a standstill. The injury to Soma was not thought to be sevlous at first, as tho lad was conscious and could walk although not without support. He was rushed to tho Kealia hospi- tal but died at 8:30 p. m., four hours after the alcideut. A coroner's inquest over tho re- mains was held on Friday, but no verdict was rendered, tho jury de ciding to postpono tho Inquest un- til Tuesday to investigate the cir- cumstances surrounding the fatal accident more thoroughly before ar- riving at a verdict. Tho deceased was only ID years old and is survived by his parents both living at Koalla, and three younger sisters and a brother. Ho had been employed as truck helper at the Kealia store for the past ' year and also, was a member of tho Sunrise team of tho Kealia league. .j Y. W. C. A. LEADERS CONFERENCE Tho first Young Womcns Christian Association leaders' conference was held all day Saturday in Llhuo at Pa- palinahoa, delightful beach homo of tho Wilcox's. Miss Alico G. Mooro of Honolulu lead tho conferonce. and gave to all present a great deal of inspiration and help. The conferenco was particularly for leaders of girl reserve groups all over Kauai. In the morning Miss Mooro devoted tho timo to explain- ing tho Principle and Purposes of tho Y. W. C. A. and how they could best bo adjusted to tho needs on Kauai. Miss Hanson gavo a short demonstration in physical education showing a few simple corrective ex- ercises which will bo usdo by the leaders in the clubs. Miss Mooro told something of tho valuo of this work and of what tho G. R. clubs might mean to tho av-ora- girl. Miss Mabel Wllcox sorved a lunch on tho lanal after which some timo was spent wandering tho grounds. At 1:15 tho conferonco was call- ed to order again by Miss Hanson and the afternoon was spent in talk- ing over tho honor system of the G. R. program and Miss Mooro gavo many suggestions for a very interest- ing program whichcould bo used in the working out of tho honor sys- tem. The Y. W. C. A., or triangle pro- gram aro based upon health know- ledge .spirit and service and thru-ou- t tho reserve clubs wo aro empha sizing tills program for tho 'teen ago girl. Tho last halt hour was spent in learning games so that each lead- er might tako a now game or two back to her group. Miss Hanson hopes that next year Miss Mooro will como to Kauai to lead a conforenco of leaders for the Y. W. C. A., just twlco as largo because Miss Mooro has a wonder- ful inspiration and message for ov- ery ono of us.

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    nvilcc0. v

    I a'a (

    m m 3 in 1 rm gsu

    ESTABLISHED 1904. VOL 18. NO. 6. LIHUE, KAUAI, TERRITORY OF HAWAII, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 7, 1922 SUBSCRIPTION RATES, $2.50 PER YEAR 5 CENTS PER COPY

    Irs. A. S. WilcoxDonates Public

    Library to Kauai

    Mrs. A. S. Wilcox of Honolulu liasannounced thaf. she will erect a$75,000 library on Kauai as a memorial to her husband, tho late Al-bert S. Wilcox. Tho plans for thelibrary will be drawn up in tho verynear future and work on tho build-in- g

    will start at the very earliestpossiblo date.

    It Is rumored that tho Llhuo plan-tation will givo a tract of land be-tween tho plantation offico and tholaw office of Philip. L. nice for li-brary purposes. The spot is saidto bo very near the present band-stand. But In case no more suitabletract of land is definitely acquiredin tho near futuro Mrs. Wilcox of-fers to furnish tho land also onwhich to erect tho building.

    The operation of the Kauai PublicLibrary will not bo postponed untilthe building can bo completed how-er- .

    On January 3rd tho Kauai Li- -lirni-- v naanntnHnn wna 1 ncnrnnril i nil .Last Wednesday Uev. B. W. Bayless,who has been actively working forthe library for tho past severalmonths, nppeared before tho boardof supervisors and got a contractfor tho operation of tho library, asis required by the territorial law.The contract has been sent back to !tho governor and as soon as heokehs it, the money will bo Immedi -ately available. '

    At thoir regular meeting last Frl -day afternoon, tho Mokihana club

    offered its rooms for library pur -.1'Mioses until moro suitable quarters 'i. ... , ... .,, . .

    their offer will be accepted and thoregular library is completed.

    MISS ALICE MOORE,GIRLS' WORK HEAD,

    RETURNS TO HONOLULU

    Miss Alice Moore, head of girls'work department of tho Honoluluv r rt a ....... n ........

    fger for Honolulu last week. Miss,jpioore spent ten days on Kauai,coming over as a special speaker attho annual meeting of tho Y. W. C.A. She also spoke at tho banquetmeeting of tho Y. M. C. A., andwith Miss Edith Hanson, our localtecretary, visited all tho Girl Re-serve groups and Y. W. C. A. clubson tho island. On Saturday sho holdan all-da- y conferonco for leaders ofclubs at Papalinahoa. Luncheon wasserved to tho group at noon. Planswere made for conducting tho clubwork on a uniform basis throughoutthe lpland- - with honors to bo earnedby tho girls for performance of cer-tain duties at home or at school.Miss Mooro has many friends onKauai and is a welcome guest. Wohope sho may como again soon. I

    KAWAIHAU DISTRICTELECTS DELEGATES

    J. M. Kaneakua, Henry Akl, H. jvan Gleson and N. K. Hoopll will irepresent tho Kawaihau district atthe Republican convention in Hono-lulu on February 14th, these fourlieing chosen at the meeting of thoprecinct club held last Saturdaynight at tho Kapaa court house.Tho voting resulted as follows: Akiand van Gleson 71 votes each; Hoo-pll G7; Kaneakua CI; Kaahu andJVliinoi 60 each; Bettencourt 57,Kapoza 40; Ekekela 12, Rodrigues10. Although a total of 228 nameswere on tho Republican roll, only148 were cast.

    Keen rivalry existed among thecandidates as tho vigorous campaign-ing indulged In for tho' past weekhad all tho voters talking 'about it,resulting in a meeting that was ex-ceedingly lively, although orderly.Kawaihau certainly does not haveto play second fiddle to any dls- -

    trict when 'it comes to Interest inpolitics.'According to old timers nover

    before has such interest boon shown. .lnioTofo- - to ,..!JU UV..th" W fcMW Villi'mention, and the crowded votingbooths were rather unexpected. Tholast meotiug to select delegates,..n held In 1912. before tho directprimary law was passed.

    . oDr. G. S. B ss of Pearl Harbor,'

    arr,ved on the K.nau last Friday -

    to speak to the Mokihana Club.

    KAPAA NOTES

    J. F. Dettencourt Jr. homesteaderand formerly bookkeeper of thoMakeo Sugar Co., has joined thestaff of tho local branch of theHawaii Dank of Commerce. He willspecialize in savings and insurance.

    Miss Dona Maladinlch and Mias'Laura Rnpoza were tho hostesses ata dclichtftil farewell .nartv at thoLizama homo at Kealia last Tues-- Iday evening, given in honor of Al-vi- n

    Branco who left for Honolululist been trans-o-Wednesday, having ..xho of

    Bank of Hawaii's of- -to tho lee-fic- ec(lness t0 SociaI Work." Boththere. About 25 young Portugu- - turos woro niuatrat0li by iantcr

    .cse people from Kapaa and Kealia GXami,lcdslldeSi Dr. B1Iss also cas-wer- epresent and tho evening was ,., ... , ,,,, liv ,,n(.lnra nn,i

    spent in dancing and games, not to imention tho partaking of refresh-ments.

    Charles Kano, member of tho Ma-keo baseball team for tho past fiveyears, is tho proud father of an-other boy. This is tho second sonborn to Mr. and Mrs. Kano.

    Simpson Decker, sales agent, whortarted a clearance sale of tho drygoods stock of Van Leuvan's twoweeks ago, departed last week forHonolulu, after disposing of theentire stock of tho store. A smallportion remaining last week wasdisposed of to Alexander & West ofNiumalu and taken there for sale. '

    Battling for the 1021 champion- -ship in 1922 may perhaps seem anovelty elsewhere, but not in Ka- -

    aa. Tho Mills and the Sunriseearns of tho Kealia league aro stilled for the lead and next Sunday

    w111 se0 tuo en(1 of tl10 1921 sea"I8011,

    Tho courthouse was crowded tocapacity on Saturday evening longoofore tho time set for the openingof tho balloting for the four dclc- -gates to represent tho local precinct at tho coming Republican con-vention in Honolulu. It was ladiestir3t though, and quick work by thepolice and inspectors enabled theelection to bo finished, with timeto spare, in the one hour alloieu

    '.in which to vote.Jonah B. Cummings, who .. helped

    the Makees to win their 1920-2-champ onsh ps. is no longer herebut is now employed at Kiiaueaplantation, and may- - not be backwith tho team this year. Althoughlocal fandom will no doubt bo sor-ry to seo him go, they should re-member that baseball in these partsis always secondary to tho pursuitof worldly and Jonahno doubt owes it to himself to en-

    deavor to climb another rung inthe ladder of success.

    KAUAI WILL SENDEIGHTEEN DELEGATES

    TO THE CONVENTION

    ! Following is the complete listaf delegates from Kauai county toattend tho territorial convention tobe held in Honolulu next Tuesday:

    Nlihau. E. K. Kahale; Kekaha, M.Costa; Walmea, W. O. Crowell; Ma

    Ikaweli, A. Q. Marcallino; Wahiawa. JW. D. McBryde; Koloa, James K. j

    IKula; Lihue, C. A. Rice, W. H.Rice Jr., H. D. Sloggett, A. G. Kau--lukou, S. K. Kaco; Kawaihau, J. M.Kaneakua, Henry Aki, II. van Gic-son- i

    N. 1C. Hoopii; Kiiauea, L. D.

    Larson; Hanalei, W. F. Sanborn andA. Menefoglio. .

    FALSE FIRE ALARMIN KEALIA MILL

    Tho electrical room of tho Makeomill was tho scene of considerablecommotion' ono afternoon last week.Firo began shooting in all directionsfrom tho electrical equipment. Fora little while, judging from out-ward appearances! tho wholo millwas going to burn.

    Then somebody happened to thinkthat It might be a good idea to pullout the switch, and tho fir.o was all"ver. A snort circuit nau lurmsneutho excitement but had done no realdamage.

    Li"'e Solomon, tho six year oldKrandson of Rev. David Kaaeamoku,tho Hawaiian minister of Hanalei,ITT,'was burled last Tuesday in

    cemetery. He was sick only four,days. Death was duo to a fall whichresulted in blood poisoning. A pa-- .

    thetlc scene was evidenced, as hisformer school mates sang their llt- -

    fn.ii'nll t.r.ntr mill il nntttt t n.l, ,.

    "

    Chag conducted thQ servlcc.

    Dr. George S, Bliss

    Gives Two Lectures

    nolatloiiBliIp Feeblemind-fsrro- d

    possessions,

    George S. Bliss, superintendent oftho Territorial Homo for Feeble-minded Persons, at Pearl City, Oa-lu- i.

    was a visitor to Kauai on Fridayand Saturday of last week. Duringhis stay ho gave two lectures onoto tho Mokihana Club on "What thoPresence of Feeblemindedness Meansto Our Community," and tho oth-er to the Social Servico Association

    nurses In thodistricts.

    Based on statistics gathered inthe United States, ono per cent ofthe population at ho present timeis feeble-minde- averred Dr. Bliss.To handle this situation adequatelywill bo a tremendous strain upontho tax payers of tho country, andas tho inheritance of feoblemind-nes- s

    is established as a certain facttho problem grows ever a largeone. It Is now the greatest socialproblem confronting us. At leasthalf the cases handled by our soolal workers and by our jails arothose of feebleminded persons. If,however, wo could segregate suchcasus so that no additional feebleminded children should bo born tothem, wo could within 50 years reduce feeblemindedness by 75 percent.

    Mr. and Mrs. E. Wood left forHonolulu last Saturday. Mr. Woodis takinK the plans for tho newKauai Telephonic building to anarchitect and is taking his first de-grees in Masonry.

    GRAND JURY MEETS;FINDS TRUE BILLS

    Tho grand jury met at tho coun-ty court house yesterday andbrought hi true bills against Eduardoand Santiago Clombro, charged withassault with deadly weapon; JamesCharman and Charles Wilson charg-ed with first degree burglary , andFelix Do Los Reyes, Kasamiro Ara-gon-

    Francisco Penado, Lucas Ara-gon-

    charged with first degree rob-bery. All tho indicted men will botried at the coming term of thecircuit court.

    SPECIAL SERVICESAT LIHUE CHURCH

    Rev. R. W. Bayless, of the Lihue Union church , has arrangeda series of sermons that will boof special interest to the young-er peoplo of the community. NextSunday, February 12, Rev. Bay-less will use as his subject, "ThoReligion of Abraham Lincoln."Tho following Sunday, "Wash-ington, tho Christian," will betho theme. On February 2C, Rev.Bayless and Rev. Royal G. Hallwill exchange pulpits.

    A series of special Sunday ev-ening missionary programs hasbeen arranged. Tho generalthemo is, "The Kingdom andtho Nations." Sunday night.February 19, Rev. Bayless willgive a lecture on India. Hissermon will bo augmented bylantern slide scenes from thatcountry.

    On tho night of February 20,Row M. E. Carver of Waimeawill lecture on "Latin America."March 5, Prof. K. C. Leebrick,of tho University of Hawaii i willspeak on, "What tho WorldNeeds."

    On March 12, Secretary Relllyof tho army and navy Y. M. C.A., will uso as his theme, "Rus-sia's Special Need of Christiani-ty." March 19, Rev. Royal G.Hall of Koloa, will speak on"China" and tho last Sunday in

    Marcli Neil Locko of tho Y. M.C. A., will givo a lecture on"Africa."

    Two programs have been ar-ranged for April. Tho first Sun-day ovenlng Rev. J. M. Lydgatowill speak on "Japan." TUo fol-lowing weok, April 9th, MissEdith Hanson of tho local Y.W. C. A., ...will complete tho ser-ies, speaking on, "Islam and thoNear East."

    Teachers Appoint

    Pension Committee

    A committeo consisting of Messrs.Brodio and Simpson and Mrs. Wed-emeye- r,

    with the first named aschairman, was appointed last weekby Presidont Ravmond of tlm Kn.ual Teachers' Association to repre-- lsent them in the matter of pen.slons for the teachers.

    Tho Hawaii Education Association' (lay 0,1 1110 K,,,nM- - Mis3 Wilcox was

    1,1 nnol,1I ' connection with Ka-sio- nis now active in drafting a now pen-- 1bill ual scho1 affairs- -for Hawaii's public school

    leaciiurs, wiucn wui no introducedat tho next session of the legisla-- 'turo. and it is believed that theproposed bill will givo teachers ftworthwhile pension law. It is pro-posed that each teacher, principalor special instructor pay three percent of their annual salaries intothe pension fund and tho territoryto put into it a sum equal to thototal paid each" year by the teach-ers.

    "Tho importance of this matterdeserves the attention and consid-eration of all teachers,' said Presi-dent Raymond, "and each teacherhas the opportunity to make sug-gestions and criticisms."

    Every teacher on this island willhave an opportunity to read theproposed new pension bill and mayobtain a copy from any ono of thomembers.

    KAUAI BOY CHOSENFOR IMPORTANT PLACE

    Mortimer Lydgate, son of Mr. andMrs. J. M. Lydgate, at a meetingof tho students of tho Universityof Hawaii hold a fow days at?o.was chosen the first president last FrIllay morning,tho Student Y. M. C. A. Personsacquainted with the work of theassociation in the colleges and uni-versities of the mainland recognizein this offico one of the most re-sponsible and important positionsthat can come to a student duringhis' academic years. Tho work ofthe student association has a largobearing on tho moral and religiouslife of an institution and indirectlyon the social and athletic activi-ties.

    The Student Y. M. C. A. standsfor and promtes tho best there isin personal and collego life. Its of-ficers aro men of this type. YoungLydgato is well liked and a loaderamong tho students of tho univer-sity. Was a member of tho varsityfootball team last year. He hasidentified himself with Christian ac-tivities in connection with hisschool work, and President Dean,Dr. Leebrick and others who arosponsoring tho now Y organizatiouaro confident that under his lead-ership it will develop into a pot-ent factor in tho llfo of tho university,

    This is tho first formal organiz-ation of tho Y to bo started forwork among collego men of tho ter-ritory. The territorial committeowero fortunate in securing tho ser-vices of Dw.ight Rugh, son of Dr.Charles Rugh, head of tho educa-tional department of tho Universityof California, to do tho necessarypreliminary work boforo an organ-ization could be perfected. Mr.Rugh in connection with his association activities is taking somo postgraduate work, has played end onthis year's football squad and prov-en himself a regular fellow. Thenew is tlu culminationof soveral months of preparationand

    .;.

    MASONS HOLD THEIRREGULAR MEETING

    Tho regular quarterly meeting ofthe Kauai Masonic Club was holdat tho Llhuo Hotel anuox last Sat-urday night. Three new memberswero added to tho roll, making a total of 70 Masons from lodges all overtho mainland in the local organlza- -

    tion.Following tho business meeting

    refreshments wero sorved and a so-cial hour was enjoyed. Considerablediscussion as to tho wisdom of or-ganizing n bluo lodgo on Kauai tookplace.

    PRINCESS EXPRESSESHER

    Presldon' Rajmond of tlm Ka-uai Toachor:i' Association has

    a lettor from Princess Kala-nianaol-in which sho wishes to ex-

    tend to tho tcachors of Kauai herof thoir resolution of

    condolence.

    PERSONALS

    ofi"olulu

    organization

    demonstration.

    APPRECIATION

    appreciation

    Enoka Lovell Sr., returned fromHonolulu last Wednesday where- hohad gone to attend tho funeral ofhis daughter, Mrs. Alice Friel.

    Mlss E' H wllcox- - educationalcommissioner of Kauai, returnedlrom lne metropolis last Wednos- -

    c. E. S. Burns and family arriv-o- nC(i tho Claudlno last Fridavmnrnlnc . Mr n.,r,,0 t ti,,, .,.lnnnritrpr nf lio Ifnlnn Sntn r"n

    Charles Gay was an incoming pas-senger on the Claudlno last Fridaymorning.

    E. L. McTaaaart, senior studentnt tho University of Hawaii, arriv-ed on tho Claudlno last Fridaymorning. Mr. McTaggart Is work-ing with tho experiment station oftho H. S. P. A. temporarily.

    R. E. Hodgson of tho AmericanFactors is making his regular drum-ming tour of the Garden Island.

    A. J. Campbell, well known Ho-nolulu broker, made a short tripto the Garden Island last week, re-turning on the Saturday's boat.

    A. Horner Sr., territorial sugarexpert, arrived on tho Garden Islandlast Friday to make his regulartour of the homesteads and to ad-vis- o

    the Kauai small fanners.Miss Margaret Lanowith, welfare

    worker of the Kiiauea Sugar Co..returned from a short trip to Ho- -

    KAUAI POST HAS ANAN AMBITIOUS PROGRAM

    Many organizations which rainoInto cxlstonce as one of the resultsof our past wars havo started withh'B" Weals on,y t0 discover after

    lew years that their chief func- -t' vs to give successful dancesThat this is not to bo the destinyof American Legion Kauai Post No.2, can be seen by its ambitious pro-gram for 1922.

    At the first regular meeting ofthis year held on February 3rd intho county building, Post Comman-der Englehard stated that there

    i would be no digging in and he gavemo objectives to Do reached duringtho year. Americanization is theaim of tho Legion and that thismay be accomplished in tho fullsense of the word on Kauai soveralcommittees have been appointed.

    Philip L. Rico heads tho Ameri-canization and memorial commit-tee. Among the problems, that confront this committeo is tho matterof American citizenship of .all aliensone of the most difficult questionswo havo in tho islands today.

    Tho auxiliary committee is goingto take an active interest in oth-er organzatious which foster Amer-icanization, such as the Boy Scoutsand the National Guard. This com-mittee is headed by W. F. Homer.

    Frank S. Pugh will direct tho ed-ucation committee which intends tostimulate among the students ofthis island a desire for training thatwill fit them for usefulness in theindustries of the terltory. With thisend in view work in their voca-tion will bo secured for tho stud-ents while they are still attendingschool, for which scholastic creditwill bo given.

    The work of these three commit-tees has a very important rela-tion to the welfaro and prosperityof this Island in particular and theterritory as a whole.

    It Is obvious that Kauai has en-joyed overy social ovent that thoLegion has directed during Its shortexistence. In order that this goodwork may bo continued, Mr. Bag-go- tt

    heads the athletic committeeand Mr. Forn tho amusement com-mittee.

    Vlco Commandor Dr. Hagood isin chargo of tho committeo onmembership.

    It was brought out during thomeeting that Kauai Post No. 2 oftiio American Legion was badly inneed of a homo where meetingscould bo held and possibly used asclub rooms. Tho lack of halls onthis island makes this difficult andthe only hope in sight Is the usoof a hall joiutly with somo othororganization.

    Bflakee Sugar Co.

    Employee Killed

    In Auto Accident

    Matsulchl Soma, an employco oftho Makeo Sugar Co., died at thoKealia hospital last Wednesday ev-ening from internal injuries sus-tained as tho result of an automo-bile accident that afternoon on thefirst turn of tho government roadJust opposite the Kealia hotel.

    According to oyo witnesses of thofatal accident, about ,4:30 o'clockWednesday afternoon, G. Hlronaka,a laboratory employee of tho Ma-kc- e

    Sugar Co., driving Ford No.1209 owned by himself, accompan-ied by the unfortunate boy in thofront scat, was going toward thoKealia hospital, and skidded on thowet pavement just before comingto tho concrete bridge, tho frontwheels of tho car breaking downtho low fence on tho right handside of the road. In some strangemanner, a long pleco of 2 x 4,which lined tho top of the fence, andloosened only at ono end by thoimpact fell on the hood of the car,and ' then was forced through thewindshield straight at the chest ofthe occupant of tho right front seat.Tho force of the impact flattenedtho back of tho seat and tho piecoof 2 x 4 continued on Its way thruthe back curtain of tho car, remaining in that position when thocar finally came to a standstill.

    The injury to Soma was notthought to be sevlous at first, astho lad was conscious and couldwalk although not without support.He was rushed to tho Kealia hospi-tal but died at 8:30 p. m., fourhours after the alcideut.

    A coroner's inquest over tho re-mains was held on Friday, but noverdict was rendered, tho jury deciding to postpono tho Inquest un-til Tuesday to investigate the cir-cumstances surrounding the fatalaccident more thoroughly before ar-riving at a verdict.

    Tho deceased was only ID yearsold and is survived by his parentsboth living at Koalla, and threeyounger sisters and a brother. Hohad been employed as truck helperat the Kealia store for the past

    'year and also, was a member oftho Sunrise team of tho Kealialeague.

    .jY. W. C. A. LEADERS CONFERENCE

    Tho first Young Womcns ChristianAssociation leaders' conference washeld all day Saturday in Llhuo at Pa-palinahoa, delightful beach homo oftho Wilcox's. Miss Alico G. Mooroof Honolulu lead tho conferonce. andgave to all present a great deal ofinspiration and help.

    The conferenco was particularlyfor leaders of girl reserve groupsall over Kauai. In the morning MissMooro devoted tho timo to explain-ing tho Principle and Purposes oftho Y. W. C. A. and how they couldbest bo adjusted to tho needs onKauai. Miss Hanson gavo a shortdemonstration in physical educationshowing a few simple corrective ex-ercises which will bo usdo by theleaders in the clubs.

    Miss Mooro told something of thovaluo of this work and of what thoG. R. clubs might mean to tho av-ora-

    girl.Miss Mabel Wllcox sorved a

    lunch on tho lanal after whichsome timo was spent wandering

    tho grounds.At 1:15 tho conferonco was call-

    ed to order again by Miss Hansonand the afternoon was spent in talk-ing over tho honor system of theG. R. program and Miss Mooro gavomany suggestions for a very interest-ing program whichcould bo used inthe working out of tho honor sys-tem.

    The Y. W. C. A., or triangle pro-gram aro based upon health know-ledge .spirit and service and thru-ou- t

    tho reserve clubs wo aro emphasizing tills program for tho 'teen agogirl. Tho last halt hour was spentin learning games so that each lead-er might tako a now game or twoback to her group.

    Miss Hanson hopes that next yearMiss Mooro will como to Kauai tolead a conforenco of leaders forthe Y. W. C. A., just twlco as largobecause Miss Mooro has a wonder-ful inspiration and message for ov-ery ono of us.

  • 2

    Tourist Bureau

    Has Busy Year

    The report of the Hawaiian Tour-ist Bureau for the work done dur-ing the past year shows that muchhas been accomplished in the adver-

    tising of the islands. Under the cap-

    tion of "Twelve HeadLiners," thoexecutive secretary, George T. e

    reports:Twelve Head-Clner- s

    Opening branch office of Bureauat Pier 7 in January and continuingit throughout the year as success-ful additional service to passengerson through steamers.

    Securing appropriation of $45,000lor two year period ending June 30,1923, from legislature, largely thruearnest efforts of bureau committeemembers. Other subscriptions werealso increased over $300 a month.

    Sending secretary on mainland tripand visit to 18 of leading cities andfive national resorts, bringing bur-eau in close touch with leading ag-encies of mainland and greatly im-proving and enlarging the bureau'smailing list, besides giving the secretary a broader knowledge of tourist activities and publicity methodsgenerally.

    Compiling and publishing an en-tirely new four color booklet, ad-judged by many the most completeand attractive piece of literatureever brought out by the bureau.

    Expanding an advertising campaignin mainland magazines to includethe National Geographic Magazine,bringing hundreds of additional in-quiries to the bureau.

    Including' the largest tourist agencies in tiie world to give Hawaiimuch more extensive prominence intheir general display advertising.

    Introducing this community a fourpage rotary gravure stationery to useof the general public, .which hasbeen taken advantage of to the extent of over 20,000 sheets.

    Publishing a new bulletin, calledTourfax, giving monthly data of aconstantly changing nature, allowingthe same to be eliminated from thenew book.

    Inaugurating the system of fur-nishing about 1,500 agencies throug-ou- t

    the world, along with other lit-erature, a monthly letter containingnames of most likely prospectivevisitors to Hawaii who have written

    i

    IT. ..; - -

    the bureau during the previousmonth.

    Reorganizing the mainland officewith the intention of reducing over-head expenses to release more mon-ey for general display advertising,and affording- - the mainland agentmore freedom to travel on the Pa-cific coast in the efforts to directpublicity and service to agenciesat ports of embarkation for Hawaii.

    Directing tremendous preliminarypublicity obtained for Press Cong-ress of the World thru good officesof the assistant secretary, H. H.Yost, who took upon his shouldersthe added burden of the chairman-ship of the Press Congress publicitycommittee during the secretary's ab-sence on the mainland, and who car-ried his work to a successful andsatisfactory conclusion: It should beemphasized that literally thousandsof clippings about the Press Cong-ress were received by the bureauas a direct result of press noticessent out under the direction of thepublicity committee, and these clip-pings represent only a small partof all notices which appeared. Themass of clippings are to be seen atthe bureau office. The Press Congross publicity committee mailinglist has now been taken over by thebureau for mailing of a periodic article to over 1000 managing editorsof the leading publications throughout the world.

    And finally, in this initial list oftwelve headliners, making all pre-parations and arrangements for aHawaiian Products dinner to begiven this month in Seattle, wherebyHawaii, as an attractive goal forcommerce and visitors, will bebrought to the attention of the north-west with striking emphasis.

    Records show that 11 .236 touristsand passengers arrived in Honoluluduring the year. In addition to thisthere were an extra 20.540 throughpassengers who stopped off in thecity while their boats were at thedock. This gave a great deal of ad-ditional publicity to the territory.

    Under the head of General Pub-licity, Mr. Armitae writes:

    Letters and CardsDistribution of the bureau's publi-

    city material during 1921 was donepartially through 15,220 letters, including 3.725 printed letters to agencies and newspapers, also by theuse of 13,275 stamped and addressed double postcard 2,433 of whichwere reiurneu as answers or receipts.

    Kir I V v ?A I

    TIP

    MApyPICKF0RD

    SUDS

    TOP335

    VTHE OARDKNJSLAXn, TUKS1UY, 7. 1922

    Articles PublishedThe bureau prepared and sent out

    a large number of Illustrated arti-cles on Hawaii last year to vari-ous magazines, 24 of which werepublished.

    , Photographs FurnishedBy furnishing 1539 photographs of

    typical Hawaiian scenes, includingthose accompanying articles, to ma-gazines, to newspapers and to vari-ous writers, the bureau was able toobtain considerable publicity, thethe most valuable of which was frompictures published without charge !nthe Saturday Evening Post and ti eLiterary Digest, with a combinedreading public of several millionpeople weekly.

    Lending Service Films loanedIn continuing its policy or lending

    when available its motion picturefilms of Hawaiian scenes i tho bur-eau made 14 loans last year whichaccomplished considerable additionalpublicity through the medium of lec-tures.

    Slides LoanedIn the same manner and for the

    same purpose the bureau loaned5G5colored lantern slides.

    Cuts LoanedThe bureau has a small supply

    of cuts on hand, listed convenientlyfor lending. While most articles sent,out are' accompanied rather by pho-tographs, four articles published

    Hawaii last year were illus-trated by cuts loaned by the bureau.

    The bureau subscribed regularlyto a mainland newspaper clippingservice, which supplies us with allthe newspaper notices concerningHawaii which appear in the leadingperiodicals of the principal main-land cities. Clippings received in thismanner during 1921, representingonly a small amount of such publi-city htat appeared, totaled 19,166.

    In addition to the many activitiesof the local office, a new mainlandoffice has been opened with WillJ. Cooper, former editor of theMaul News, in charge. Mr. Cooperhas done much toward directing trav-el Hawaii-war- d and gave consider-able impetus to the 1922 Shrinerconvention that is to be held inHonolulu.

    Base Deceiveryou broken yourHave engage

    ment?""Yes. The wretch told me he

    was a book maker, but I found thathe was only an author."CopenhagenKlods Hans.

    ' ,

    . TIP j

    MARY SCREENS '"OP O'ME THUMB" UNDER THE

    FILM TITLE OF "SUDS"

    "Suds" the United Artists' cor-poration picture starring Mary Pick-for- d

    which will be shown at theTip Top next Tuesday, is a screenversion of " 'Op o' Me Thumb," theplay in which Maude Adams achiev-ed International success.

    As a stage production it createda most unusual sensation in Lon-don some years ago and immed-iately after its success there,Charles Frohman acquired the Am-erican rights for his leading star,Maude Adams. The play was usedby her during her most successfulengagement in the Empire theater,New York, and with exceptionalsuccess on her tours throughout thecountry. " 'Op 'o Me Thumb" is fromthe dual pens of two very cleverBritish playwrights, Frederick Fennand Richard Pryce .who have beenresponsible for a large number ofother brilliant stage successes.

    The central theme of the plot islaid in the slums of London andMiss I'ickford presents herself in acharacter totally unlike anything inwhich she has heretofore appeared.It is a study of character she hashad iji mind for sometime,--bu- t owing to the type of her previousstories has been unable to presentbefore.

    . The story of " 'Op 'o Me Thumb"runs the entire gamut of humanemotions, from grave to gay andfrom passionate protest to meek resignation. The plot is all laid abouta common ordinary shirt which isleft to be washed in a small laun-dry in the slums of London by oneHorace Greensmith, a cheap actor.The role played by Miss Pickfordis that of Amanda Afflick, the woo-begon- e

    slavey in the laundry. Aman-da, having received the shirt whenit is tossed over the counter forlaundering, promptly falls in lovewith its owner.

    4

    COMINGThe fallowing feature pictures are

    SATURDAY NIGHT

    MARYPICKFORD

    in a characterization of a little

    laundry drudge in

    "SUDS"builds the loveliest dream castles

    out of soap suds

    It is one of the rare productions thatgoes straight to the heart and awakensall sorts of human sympathy-stro- ng andmoving-a- nd with that measure of humorand that is inseparable from its

    THURSDAY

    TOP-IC-S

    pathosrealism.

    rij. .".TsUK ' "l

    i

    5 '1 w

    Muiiial

    TH E AT

    Their.CiiHcT

    MMiillh'.. 4JI

    scheduled to appear at the Tip Topin the near future:

    'i he Great Moment Gloria Swanson.

    Affairs of Anatol C. de Mille.Ten Dollar Raise All-Star.Greater Than Love All-Sta-.After the Show C. de Mille.Skirts Clyde Cooke.Great Impersonation's Melford

    production.Son of Tarzan Flayed by Sam

    Searlo, a Honolulu boy.

    They Go TogetherOur subscriber at Noah's, Ark.,

    wants to know whether, if Japan isallowed to keep battleship Mutsu,Uncle Sam will be allowed to builda Jeffsu. Arkansas Gazette.

    Knew His W.ayStranger (at Continental palace

    gates) This is visitors' day is itnot?

    Attendant Yes, sir. Shall I showyou around?

    Strangor Oh don't trouble. I usedto bo King here once. The PassingShow (London).

    E. C. MERRILL MARRIESMISS DIXIE PERKINS

    K. C. Merrill, assistant superin-tendent of the local lighthouse ser-vice, and Miss Dixie Louise Perk-In- s,

    a nurse who saw service withthe Red Cross in France, says theStar-Bulleti- were married Tuesdayat 7 o'clock at Central Union church,Rev. Mr. Shattuck performing theceremony, Mr. Merrill has been inthe islands for a number of yearsand is well known. His father wasa kamaaina clergyman. Mr. Merrillhas been in Honolulu for severalmonths, following her profession asa trained nurse. Mr. and Mrs. Mer-rill spend their honeymoon on Ka-uai and will mnke their home on10th avenue, Kaimukl, upon theirreturn.

    Considerate"Would you mind driving a little

    slower, old man?""Not getting scared, are you?""Oh, no, nothing like that; but I'd

    hate to take an unfair advantage ofmy life Insurance company." NowYork Sun.

    rs.'iii'.ii'.'.jjii'M LiunL'nuiinir'L' i$ ,",;T3;!'i.rnTfi;i;!i;"7;i,":i)':'i :ruT.'i nii3nntiniiTTi''JB7iiiTiirEnirJii'L'7 irjJuunnniTOiiinEjniTTiFiri''ff

    THE 11EHT PICTURE LOOKSItETTER IS A

    FRAMEYou will lie wonderfully jilcnscd with Hio

    t'ffcit lliat can be produced willi si cor-rect frame clio.sen from our attract-

    ive mouldings

    W. J. SENDA STUDIOTIP TOI' mTILlIX(i. LIIIUK KAUAI

    Kodak rilins, Kinisliinj; and Enlarging

    Fong Garage Co.KAPAA, KAUAI

    Will Open for BusinessNext Monday

    General Automobile RepairingAutomobile Accessories

    Welding

    We repair old tires and tubes like new.All kinds of rubber goods repaired.

    ALL WORK GUARANTEEDPRICES REASONABLE

    You Are Paying 15 Cents to20 Cents Too Much

    for Butter 1

    unlkss voir uuv

    Maile ButterYou'll enjuv ilie fresh (asle of MA ILK lU'T-TKI- J

    iH'cause it is the finest ju H. Terrilory.MAILK is our Crand for New Zealand's choicestdairy product. It sells in Honolulu for "." cents apound.

    METROPOLITAN MEAT MARKETHONOLULU

    3

  • &

    -- SPORTS-BASKETBALL

    Big Crowd Sees Fast

    Basketall Game

    LIhue defeated Makawell at theLlhue armory last Wednesday ev-ening in the greatest game ot bas-ketball ever played on Kauai. Thefinal score was 44 to 41.' It wasthe largest crowd that ever attend-ed a basketball game on Kauai andthey all rooted hard for their favor-ite team to win.

    The playing of both teams madea great many converts for the gam 3and interest was stimulated in thesport. Persons who were seeingtheir first game quickly caught onto the idea of the game and werekeenly Interested.

    The game opened with the strong-est line-up- s of both teams in th--game i as both were out to win.Both, teams Jought bard and al-though the first part of the gamswas rough and fouls frequent, itwas not long before Referee Mark-wel- l

    had the game going good.Makawell gave their rooters a fin?

    chance to cheer by getting the first'basket almost immediately after the

    whistle blew. .Lihue did not lingerlong and soon were in the lead,from Which place they neyer slippelalthough Makawell pressed themreal close in the last quarter amicame within one point of tying itup.

    Llhue led at the end of the firstquarter by the score of 11 to 5, andmaintained their pace, leading athalf time by . 26 to 15. Makawellcame back in the third quarter witha rush and fought hard, but were on-ly able to gain two points on Lihuewith the score of 37 to 26 in Lihue'afavor. Makawell started out to make

    f up for lost time in the last quarterand soon gave the Lihue fans heartfailure by getting four baskets in arow before Lihue got one. - Llhuethen dropped one through and afree throw gave them a three pointlead which they held until the endof the game. The .final - whistle hada mighty cheerful ring for Llhue, asMakawell was going strong.

    Damkroger was easily the Maka-well star-- , making 25 of Makaweli's40 points. Marcallino was the de-fensive star, holding Captain Lane

    1 of Lihue to two baskets. Fernandezwas the Lihue star, getting tenfeild goals, while Longstreth starredon defensibe when he held Beecroftto one lonely basket for the even-ing.

    The score:LIHUE G FG GLane, f .2 0 ' ' 0Fernandez, f .' .'...10 0 0Wedemeyer, c :.; 3 0 3Longstreth, g 0 0 2Fern., g 2 10 2

    Totals17 10 7

    MAKAWELI G FG FBeecroft, f ... 1 0 3Auld, f 6 0 2Damkroger, c 11 3 5Marcallino, c 1 0 1

    0 0 4Baldwin, g 0 0 0

    Totals

    9 U itiVtk ,

    If

    rr

    .

    5 ,

    KAUAI HIGH 46; WAIMEA 5

    Kauai High took Waimea Intocamp last Saturday night nt Maka-vei- l

    defeating them easily by thet core of 46 to 5 The high schoolboys played great basketball t'O'hon tte defense und offense. Thevork of the guards was especiallyr.i.tifodble when they held the fastWaimim forwards for one ficil foalluring the game

    GAMES THIS WEEKHanapepe will meet Makawell in

    the first game of the second roundat the Makawell court on Wednesdav evenine and Makawell shouldhave little trouble with the tailendera.

    Waimea will travel to Lihue thesame night and as the Waimea teamhas greatly improved and are playing a good game, should give 'theLiliue team a good run although theLihue boys Bhould win according topast performances. Lihue is not go-ing to be overconfident and willplay their best.

    On Friday night Lihue will meetKauai high school team at the ar-mory and a good game should bethe result. The high school boyshave a fast team and will maketheir heavier opponents hustle tobeat them.

    Monday night finds Hanapepe andWaimea tangling on the Makawelicourt. Hanapepe is bound to defeatthe Waimea boys this time and areout to win. Waimea is after thirdplace In the league and cannot af-ford to lose any games

    The second run of the Kauai Bas-ketball League is as follows:

    February 8 Waimea vs. Lihueat Lihue.

    February 8: Makaweli vs. Hanapepe at Makawell.

    February 10: Kauai High vs. Li-hue at ' Lihue.

    February 10: Hanapepe vs. Wai-mea at Makaweli.

    February 15: Makaweli vs. Wai-mea at Makawell.

    February 15: Lihue vs. Hanapepeat Makaweli.

    February 17: Makaweli vs KauaiHigh at Lihue.

    February 18: Kauai High vs. Ha-napepe at Makawell.

    February 24: Waimea vs,High at Lihue.

    February 25 :at Makawell.

    Kauai

    Makawell vs. Lihue

    BASEBALL

    KEALIA WINTER LEAGUEStanding of Clubs

    W L Pet.Sunrise 4 1 800Mill 4 1 800Beach House 2 3 400Kealia 0 6 000

    Results SundaySunrise 4; Beach House 2.Mill 9; Kealia 4.The Sunrise and the Mill both

    held their positions in the KealiaWinter League by winning theirgames. The Sunrise had a battleon their hands but managed to winout. Greorio pitched nice ball ag-ainst the Sunrise, but poor supportcost him the game. Yoshioka heav-ed for the Sunrise and deserves agreat deal of credit for the victory.

    The Mill team had very little

    TIIH OARDKN ISLAND. TUHXMAY, FKI.IU'ARY 7. 1922

    SOCCERPopcer fans have been ti'kin bf

    a f;&me between an all Haoa teamand an all Hawaiian team. 1 1! ho- -

    o' hf.ve announced their willingnos. to play and it is now u.i Icthe Hawallans. Both could ;ut upa fart team in the field anl Miuiildput up a good game.

    ': hr Hawaiian team would .strong on defense while ths hioloswou.d have a btrong forward iine.Uither team would be able to (lb

    feat any of the teams that p ay idin the league.

    ri he Hawaiians would hav i Wailaeale, Schimmel Phennlg, .vlock- -

    sing, Palama, and Pehu m theirforward line with Makanani. Atakaand Kealoha in the back half of I heline and the Lihue fullbacks andcoal keeDor. Fountain. Lovell andChristian.

    The haoles would have Jamioton,

    D. Sinclair, Bill Sinclair, Kay, Carmichael and Fernandes to picktheir forwards from. Breckenridgo,Duncan, Bedell and Smoke, for halfhnrka. Glaisver and Brenham forfulls, and Marcallino for goal.

    ROD AND GUN

    Eighty-fiv- e cock pheasants werebrought to Kauai through the effortsof the Kauai Fish and Game Club,were released by members of theclub last week. The pheasants wereshipped from Oregon and held InHonolulu until the season closed.The original amount totaled 100 but15 of the birds were donated byKauai to the territorial Fish andGame Commission to assist them instarting a game farm on Oahu.

    Mr. Brandt supervised the releas-ing of the birds In the Waimea dis-trict, Dr. Dunn in Makaweli, Dr.Waterhouse in Koloa, Dr. Kuhnsand Eddy Fountain in Lihue, JackHorner and Fred Trowbridge in

    and Mr. Menefoglio andWalter Sanborn in Hanalei.

    The club has also arranged forthe imnortation of twenty dozenArizona quail which will arrive either in the late spring or early fallThis type of quail are said to roost

    in trees which will be an advantageas the worst enemies of the quailare the rat and the wild cat. Theywill be quite a bit more difficult

    to stalk If they roost In trees.

    trouble with the Kealia boys andwon in an easy fashion.

    Next Sunday the Mill will playthe Beach House and a hard gamecan be expected. The Mill teamwill have to win to hold their leadas the Sunrise will be playing theKealia tailenders.

    A four team junior league thatmay have six teams will start inLihue next Sunday. The four teamsnow entered are Hanamaulu, Kapa-ia- ,

    Filipinos, and the Sunrise. Thetwo teams that might play are theLihue Junior and the Mill team.

    Next Sunday the Hanamaulu teamwill meet the Kapala team whilethe Filipinos will play Kapala.

    The American Legion indoor base-ball team will meet the Kealia teamat the Lihue baseball diamond nextSunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Allmen who played on the Legionteam in the Indoor baseball leagueare urged to be present. FrankBurns is captain of the Kealia teamand is bringing in a strong oufit torepresent the Makee Sugar Co.

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    This will also insure steady income for herself and the children.

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    TENNISThe singles elimination trophy

    won by Foster Horner last year hasarrived and is now on exhibitionat the Lihue Store. This trophy must

    won three times before becom-ing a permanent possession. It willlie contested for this year and somereal good tennis should be the re-

    sult.East side enthusiasts

    out already limbering up. Sunday ntMakawell Dwight Baldwin, Dr. Glais-yer- ,

    Dr. Dunn, Wilson Cannon, Lind-say Faye and Purser King of theHyades put on some fast tennis.

    H. LAWS OBJECTS TOWHARF ROOF CONTRACT

    ing contractor, has announcerahrtC- -Howard Lnws wpll known root

    ing contractor, has announcedintention to protest the action ofthe harbor board in awarding toRalph Woolley the contract for con-structing roofs on Piers 8, 9, andIn

    The protest, according to the Star-Bulleti-grows out of the fact that

    the board awarded the contract toWoolley on conditions that he employ Peter Higgins, for many yearsin the roofing business here, to laythe roof, which moans that Woolleycould undertake the contract only

    employing Higgins.

    FIFTH FLOOR OF BANKIS BEING RUSHED

    Work upon the fifth floor of theBank of Hawaii building in Honolulu has been progressing rapidly Inspite of the showers of the pasttwo weeks, and Is now nearly halfcompleted.

    When ready for occupancy ten-ants of the second floor will begiven first opportunity to reserveoffices upon the new floor, accord-ing to Clarence II. Cooke, presidentof the bank, the bank taking overthe entire second floor for ownuse.

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  • THE GARDENIssued Every TuesdayKENNETH C. HOPPER

    TUESDAY

    THE KAPAIA ROAD

    TW Wednesday. H. D. Sloggett, presidentof the Kauai Automobile Club, asked the-

    -

    RnntM nf Supervisors to cive some attentionto the daneerous Kapaia hill. Mr. Sloggettiminte.1 out the fact that tlio hill is in a dangerous condition for autoists, when the roadl wet and slippery and that the fence isalmost gone, so that a car could easily goto the bottom of the gulch should it startskidding.

    The work on the fence has already start- -p1. While the structure probably would notstop n heavy car if it should crash headlonginto it, it would detain a car skidding to tneside and might prevent a serious accident.The repairs are well worth while.

    While the good work is going on, it mightbe well to consider some means of corrugating the road so that skidding would be al-most impossible. This kind of work is being done on the mainland and it is just asnecessary here.

    WILCOX MEMORIAL LIBRARY

    Last Saturday's mail contained several letters from grateful Kauai people, to Mrs. A. .Wilcox, of Honolulu. Mrs. Wilcox has announced that she will give a fine, new public library to the Garden Island as a memorial to her husband, Albert S. Wilcox.

    It would be very hard, indeed, for Mrs.Wilcox to select a more suitable memorialthan an appropriate library building. Thislibrary will be open to all people of the island. Every paper, every book loaned, willbe a silent tribute to his memory.

    BEING AX EDITOR

    Most any man can be an editor. Allthe editor has to do is sit at a desk six daysin the week, four weeks in a month, andtwelve months in the year and edit suchstuff as this:

    "Mrs. Jones of Maua let a con-opene- r sliplast week and cut herself in the pantry. Amischievous lad of Waimea threw a stone andcut Mr. Pike in the alley last Tuesday. JoeDoe climbed on the roof of his house lastweek looking for a leak, and fell, strikinghimself on the back porch. While HaroldGreen was escorting Miss Violet Wise fromthe church social last Saturday night a sav-age dog attacked them and bit Mr. Green onthe public square. M. Suzuke, of Hanapepewas playing with a cat Friday when itscratched him on the veranda.

    Since the world war royal weddings havelost much of their magnificence. In fact theyare not as common as formerly, and the timeis not far distant when they will have noplace in a civilized nation. Royalty has hadits day. It is now in the afternoon of itsdazzling brilliancy. Its sun is well night set,and another generation will see it in the dis-card forever. The past decade has been a hardone for royalty. All over the old worldthrones have tottered and fallen, dynastieshave come to an end, and the people, theirnecks freed from the yoke of autocratic sur-veillance, have taken upon themsleves theduties of free citizenship. Crowns are nowjunk of curios, titles of little consequence,und manhood, character and education havebecome the standards of measurement in de-termining the value of a citizen to the com-munity. The titled drones must go to workas tlher men do, aud by the excellence of

    vi r achievements they v, i:l be known andvu; by the escutcheon of hereditary titles.

    A discovery of gold near Denver createda craze that equalled the old timerush for a new eldorado. In less than 21hours the newly discovered gold field wasstaked. Samples of the gold, running as bigas 1 1,300 to the ton, have raised the excite-ment to rever heat .Between the unprecedented flow of the oil wells and the new golddiscoveries, the western country is receivingan amount of advertising that bids fair toput some new cities on the map for the nextcensus.

    East Weymouth, Mass., is no place fora nervous man. It has been discovered thatfully 25 per cent of the population of thattown are addicted to at least one musicalinstrument. The disease has been diagnosedas "Musicalitis." Bands, orchestras and in-dividuals combine to make the old town adream-lan- d of harmony.

    A Boston doctor says exorcise will killgerms. But he doesn't tell us how we canget the germs to exercise.

    ISLANDManaging Editor

    : : : : : : FEBRUARY 7, 1922

    AMERICA SHOULD COLLECT

    Senator Borah went to the point whenhe said in a recent speech that the alliesshould provide for the payment of the inter-est on the debt of some !f 11,000,000 whichthey owe the United States. Withholdingthis interest, to say nothing of the principalis a rank injustice. The allies owe moneyto the United States, and they owe the inter-est as part of the obligation, and it is nothingmore than right that they should pay promptly and in full.

    The military establishments of Europeare eating too large a hole in the resourcesof those countries, and it is not in the lineof justice to ask the American people tomaintain thoes establishments, and that isjust what we are doing by iermitting theallies to withhold payment of their just obli-gations to this country.

    The majority of the allied nations are infavor of forcing Germany to pay in accord-ance with the terms of the treaty obligationsand if it is right for Germany to pay what isdemanded of her it is right for the alliesto pay what they owe to the United States,and especially .so, for the reason that it wasAmerican money and American flesh audblood that saved Europe from a terrible fate.

    America, of all nations, should receivedue consideration, and the rights, the sacrifices and the philanthropy of the Americantax payers and the American sympthizerswith Europe's afflictions should receive atleast thoughtful consideration of whatshould be an appreciative people, for not onlywe've loaned Europe money but we have senther valuable contributions in money, merchandise, medicine, food and clothing, andfurther more, we have sent them thousandsof nurses to minister to suffering humanity.

    So far, the American people have beenignored, and instead of showing due appre-ciation for American aid, Europe maintainsher expensive standing armies and pays noheed to America's needs or her just dues.

    Men clothed in uniforms and bearingarms are not producers. They are leeches intimes of peace, burdens upon the state, ob-structions in the way of industrial progressand demoralizing to the economic adminis-tration of government. They are not such oftheir own volition, however, for they are inthe military service because of the curse ofconscription that takes men unwillingly fromproductive labor to become burdens upontheir fellow men;

    Europe can pay her interest and herprincipal just as easily as Germany can paythe indemnities that have been assessed a--gainst her, and should be made to pay withjust Mich measures as are being applied toGermany to force payment when paymentsbecome due.

    When the nations, that are strugglingunder excessive burdens of debt throw offthwir military burdens and go to work theywill find it easy to pay their debts; butjust so long as they continue their suicidalpolicy they will have trouble and to spare.Exchange will be against them, industrial-ism will avail them little, as they conduct it;for the strength of their young manhood willnot be productive but burdensome.

    Compel Europe to pay and she will findncans of doing so, even if it becomes neces-sary to abandon militarism in order to recover from the depths of financial misfortune, and put to productive labor the strengthshe is now wasting in needless military andnaval institutions.

    Radical socialists who were sent to Rus-sia soon recover from their dementia andlong to return, converted to Americanism. Itis best however, that they remain long enoughfor a thorough convalstence, and yet a fewyears to impress upon their minds the dan-ger of yielding too readily to the germs of adisease that will unfit them for the associ-ation with the mentally healthy citizens ofthe United States. Some have been sentaway as incurables, and those pitiful casesof mental and moral degeneracy should nev-er again be permitted to set foot upon thesoil of free America.

    Dancing Masters' Association and theFederation of Women's Clubs have declaredwar upon jazz. It is about time for suchaction, and it is now hoped that we may soonhave some real music, something that is har-monious, pleasing, restful to the nerves. Jazzhas no place outside of the bugg-house- .

    As a usual thing when a man gets inhot water he has to be bailed out.

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    Kodaks $8.00 upBrownies $2,00 up

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  • SUPERVISORS HOLD

    REGULUR MEETING

    . The regular monthly meeting oftho toard of supervisors of thecounty of Kauat was held at its of-fice In Lihue, on Wednesday, Feb-ruary 1st, 1922 ,at 10 o'clock a. m.

    Present: H. D. WIshard, Chair-man; T. Brandt, J. I. Silva. FredMendes, A. Menefoglio.

    The following bids were receivedand referred by unanimous vote tothe county road supervisor, Mr. Mid-dleto-

    for report, to-wl- shop build-ing, Walmea:

    Shop Building, Waimea:Material

    Allen & Robinson Ltd $2 000.00City Mill Co., Ltd 1,833.00C. B. Hofgaard & Co 1,865.00Kauai Railway Co 1,780.00Lewers & Cooke Ltd. .... 1,910.00Lihue Store no bid

    ConstructionHarry Hoe 1,465.00Henry Wise 1,300.00Shop Building, Kapaa:

    ConstructionHarry Hoe 1,247.00Sam B. Goss 1,000.00John Hansen 1,090.00Kalaheo Principal Cottage, 2 Bed

    Rooms:Construction

    Harry Hoe 891.00Henry Wise 999.00Kauai High, 2 Bungalow Class---

    Rooms:Itfateria- l-

    Allen & Robinson Ltd 1450.00City Mill Co. Ltd 1,568.00C. B. Hofgaard & Co 1,365.00Kauai Railway Co 1,475.00Levers & Cooke Ltd 1,407.00Lihue Store 1,325.00

    ConstructionY. Akau, Lim Fat 450.00

    Later upon the report and' adviceof the county road supervisor thefollowing bids were unanimouslyaccepted:Shop Building, Walmea:

    MaterialKauai Railway Co 1,780.00

    ConstructionHenry Wise 1,300.00Shop Building, Kapaa:

    ConstructionSam B. Goss 1,000.00Kalaheo Principal Cottage:

    2 Bedrooms:Construction

    Harry Hoe 891.00Kauai High School, 2 Bungalow

    Classrooms:Material

    Lihue Store 1,325.00Construction

    Y. Akau, Lim Fat 450.00Hanamaulu, 8 Classroom Building:

    ConstructionConey & Morris 6,446.00Hanamaulu Teachers' Standard

    Cottage: 'Construction

    Harry Hoe 1,225.00Kllauea, 8 Classroom Building:

    ConstructionJohn Hansen . . 6.9CO.00Administration Building, Lihue

    Grammar School:Construction

    Coney & Morris 3,960.00Mr. Bayless of Lihue appeared be-

    fore the board m the Interest of afree county library, and after hear-ing him, the board upon the motionof Mr. Brandt, seconded by Mr. Stlva,and by unanimous vote, agreed topay monthly in the library of theKauai Public Library Association,now of Lihue j the sum of one dol-lar. The board by the same votealso authorized its chairman toexecute on behalf of the board ncontract with the above named li-brary association that the said

    association shall assume thefunctions of a county free librarywithin this county.

    The financial reports forthe month of January, 1922, beingthe treasurer's; auditor's trial bul-anc- e

    after close of books etc ; alsothe auditor's annual report to Jan-uary 15, 1922, and the treasurer'sannual report for the same period,were referred to Mr. Brandt for ad-vice while those for Dscember lastbeing the treasurer; treasurer-auditor- ;

    and the joint report were ap-proved upon the recommendation ofthe latter gentleman.

    The report of H. D. Sloggett,manager of the Samuel MahelonaMemorial Hospital for the year 1921was received and placed on file.

    A reguest on behalf of the boardof governors of the Kauai Automo-bile Club to change the presentcounty motor vehicle ordinance sothe rate of speed when passing an-other car shall be 25 miles wasbrought to the notice of the boardbut nothing was done.

    A request from the Koloa SugarCo., for permission to cross thegovernment road above Mr. Cockett's place at Koloa with a portabletrack was granted upon the motionof Mr. Silva, seconded by Mr. Men-des- .

    A petition from Hanalel for repairs to be given the public roadleading to Hanalei-uk- a homesteads,upon the motion of Mr. Menefoglio,was granted.

    A requisition on behalf of theKoloa school for a veranda to bebuilt on the back of the kitchen;and for a small wash house for theuse of the three cottages , was granted by unanimous vote,

    k A communication from H. D. Slog-Rett-president of the Kauai Automo

    bile club calling the attention ofthe board to the dangerous conditionof the fence on the curve lust below the residence of W. R. Hobbyand running down the pall side ofthe public road, and requesting thatthe fence be renewed and madestrong as a preventative of accidentswas received and the request grantedupon the motion of Mr. Brandt, seconded by Mr. Menefoglio. The clerkwas asked to notify Mr. Sloggett of

    ' this action.After having gone over the

    carefully the board approved thefollowing appropriations lor the current year:

    Statement of Appropriations 12 Mos.Meeting February 1, 1922:

    Accounts Budget 1922Salary Supervisors f4.500.00Milage, supervisors liOOO.OOIncidentals, supervisors , . . . 300.00Salary, attorney 3,600.00Salary, deputy attorney . . 1,500.00Incidentals 300.00Salary, auditor 3,000.00Incidentals, auditor 2,600.00Salary, clerk 3iO00.00Salary, deputy clerk ....... 1,600.00Incidentals, clerk 1,250.00Salary, treasurer 3,000.00Incidentals, treasurer . . . . 2,100.00Auditing county books .. .. 200.00Bd. Child Welfare 800.00Co. Law library 50.00Discount and interest .. .. 400.00District pounds 200.00Expense of election 2,500.00Freightage 500.00Incid. License col 1,000.00Official bond premium .. .. 150.00Public parks 300.00Weights and measures . . . . 250.00Salary, sheriff 3,600.00Incidentals, sheriff 2,400.00Salary, D. S. Waimea .... 2100.00Pay of Police, Waimea .. 4,920.00Salary, D. S., Koloa 2.040.00Pay of police Koloa 3,200.00Salary D. S. Lihue 2,400.00Pay of police, Lihue .. .. 4,440.00Salary D. S. Kawaihau .... 2,040.00Pay of police, do 3,960.00Salary D. S. Hanalel .. .. 1,800.00Pay of police Hanalei .... 3,000.00Special pay of police 4,440.00Coroners inquest 1,500.00Auto plates 800.00Exp., Exam, chauffeurs .... 1 500.00Exp., bureau identification ..1,620.00Salary D. M. of Waimea .. 1,440.00Dist. Ct. and jail, Waimea 1,000.00Salary D. M. Koloa 1,440.00Dist. Ca. and jail, Koloa .. 5,000.00Salary D. M. Lihue 1,500.00Salary D. M. Kawaihau .. 1,440.00Dist. Ct. and jail, do 600.00Salary D. M. Hanalei .. .. 960.00Dist. Ct. and jail, do 100.00Salary, Clerk Circuit Ct 2,220.00Salary., reporter, do . . . . 2,220.00Salary, probation officer, do 1,800.00Expense, Circuit court .. .. 7,600.00Law books, 5th circuit .... 1,900.00Support Juvenile Ct. dep... 1,000.00Exp. probation officer .. .f 500.00Sup. and Main, prisoners ...6 000.00Exp. witnesses 1,500.00County jail 7,000.00Water works

    Puukapele 600.00Kekaha 200.00Waimea 1,600.00Kalaheo 2 600.00Omao .! 600.00Lawai 750.00Kola 2,500.00Kapaa 3,000.00Anahola 350.00

    Salary Co. Rd. Sup 3,600.00Salary, Asst.. do 2,400.00Incidnetals, Rd. Sup 3,000.00Co. Rd. machinery 25,000.00uoaas and bridges

    Niihau 100.00Hospitals

    Waimea 1,200.00Eleele 600.00Kola 600.00Lihue 2,400.00Kealia .... 600.00Kilauea . . . - 600.00

    Co. Bldg. Janitor services . . 420.00Co. lot and building 1.600.00Fire Dept. Waimea .. .... 60.00Fire Dept., Kapaa 50.00Pension R. Puuki 720.00

    Total$186,620.00

    New buildings $10,000.00Water works 15,000.00

    Mr. Silva moved that J. J. Lopezof Kalaheo be given permission tomove a building across the publicroad there, nad being duly seconded the same was carried. '

    Of the board's 'own motion thechairman was given full authorityto countersign on behalf of the boardthe demand of Ripley & Davis, architects., for services rendered whenpresented duly certified to by theproper officer.

    A petition from Kawaihau . tnatsix incandescent lights at least beinstalled at proper intervals alongthe public highway in Kapaa townwas received and placed on file,

    A request from Henry W. Waiaufor the loan of the county's smalltractor when not in use, for theplowing of his two acre piece ofland at Niumalu, also to cross themain road leading to Niumalu forthe purpose of laying pipes wasgranted upon the motion of Mr.Mehdes, ..seconded by Mr. Silva.

    The road supervisor's report forthe last month was received andplaced on file.Waimea District.

    Cleaning of ditches and right ofway together with patching workwas done during the month.

    About 30 yards of stone wascrushed and delivered at Waimeafor patching. The terrace at the Ma-kawell new school lot was plantedwith grass and a pipe line installedfor watering same.

    40 yards of crushed rock and 20yards' of sand was delivered forthe proposed school building.Koloa District.

    Patching work on the main roadwas done during the first part ofthe month. The crusher at Kalaheowas operated for several days forsupplying the rock for patching andschool work.

    1000 gallons of crude oil was putdown on the Kukuiolono after patching with asphalt. 40 feet of concrete pipe was made for a culvertnear McBryde s store.

    A 24 foot wooden bridge on theshort-cu- t road was renewed. Thenew pipe line at Kalaheo was completed and connected with the oldline. Repair work was done at theKalaheo, Koloa and Eleele schoolsLihue District.

    Patching of the main road wasdone near the half-wa- bridge andaround Lihue, together with ditchcleaning. Some grading work wasdone on the Nalumalu. The crusherwas operated for several days tosupply rock for patching. The newcottage at the Kauai high school wascompleted the last of the month.Kawaihau District, Wailua Rock Fill

    Work continued on the fill untilnear the middle of the month. About650 yards of stone has been brokento be later placed in the fill. Patching of the road adjacent to the Anahola bridge was done together withthe repairing of the approach on the'north end of the bridge. Cleaning

    TI1R GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1922

    Oi (litCheS and right OI Way WHS y mjo c2zw"jisnaiaarmiiurmxnmiS0i TfcTwimimiMwiuiimiMBmvuiwpMzlii9Wiiilmi'$M,ii aumm:t,'ikmntm'. iHJ:n!i'jniamiauiiffi:..iatLar juuijij iimiujtuiidone at several places In the tils- -trlct. The bridge at Akulikull streamIs In bnd condition and posts havebeen placed underneath for temporary protection.

    The new Kapaa jail was completed and the old building moved.Hanalel District.

    Cleaning of ditches was done eatseveral places throughout the district. Work continued on the seawall at Haena.Kiakl Bridge.

    The forms were removed fromunderneath the bridge during thelatter part of the month. About aweek more work of cleaning up willcomplete the work.

    Pursuant to his report just received, the county road shpervlsorupon the motion of Mr. Menefoglioseconded by Mr. Mendes, was givenfull authority to repair the Akulikull bridge, Kapaa homesteads, firstseries.

    Upon the motion of Mr. Menefoglio, duly seconded, the county roadsupervisor was authorized to fix thewater works down to the Koloaschool.

    Upon the motion of Mr. Brandt,seconded by Mr. Menefoglio, thecounty road supervisor was by vote,given full authority to purchaseschool desks from Mrs. Hans

    The several demands submitted,were approved by the board againstthe several appropriations listedhereinbelow.

    List of appropriations, also amounts, affected by the approval ofthe demands hereinabove mentioned.Salaries:

    County road supervisor . . $300.00Asst. Co. road supervisor 200.00

    Pay of Police:Specials 360.00Walmea 410.00Koloa 250.00Lihue 370.00Kawaihau 330.00Hanalei 250.00

    Bureau Identification 125.00Board, Child Welfare .. .. 619.00Coroner's inquest 136.80County building

    Janitor's services 26.50Co. lot and building 100.05County jail 460.69Dist. Courts and jails:

    Walmea 70.00Kapaa 11.98

    Exam. Chauffeurs 125.00Exp. of election 153.15Exp. witnesses 30.00Hospitals:

    Eleele 60.00Koloa 150.00Kealia 50.00

    Incidentals:Attorney 39.25Auditor 280.66Clerk 17.40Sheriff 133.15Treasurer 129.85Co. road supervisor 225.30

    Schools:Janitor salaries 40.35Cottage furniture 28.75New buildings 3,262.41Repairs and maintenance 286.09Supplies 126.21School toilets 7.60

    Support of prisoners .. .. 381.50Water works 676.68Co. road machinery 113.84Waimea District:

    Puukapele 381.30Oiling 49E.85Roads and bridges 1.125.20

    Koloa Dist: Mac. Kukuiolono 258.00Road tax special deposit ..1892.36Liinue disc:

    Oiling 2,072.06Roads and bridges 734.44

    Kawaihau Dist.:Wailua rock fill 1,646.09Anahola homestead . . . . 2.10Mac. Olohena road .. .. 10.80Oiling 441.79Roads

    HanaleiOilingRoadsKeaklGrand

    and bridges 1,632.29district:

    244.72and bridges 1,062.81bridge 2,753.40total

    $25,095.17At 12 o'clock noon, the meetinor

    adjourned subject to the call of theChair.

    WAIMEABy Ellen

    GIRL RESERVESChong, Secretary.

    The Girl Reserves of Walmeamet to elect the following officersfor the year:

    President, Katsue Yamamoto.Vice president, Hazel Chong.Secretary, Ellen Chong.Treasurer, Chlyoke Okamoto.Members of the club had the hon

    or of hearing a talk by Miss Mooreof Honolulu. Interesting pictures ofOahu Girl Reserves were shown andmuch appreciated.

    THREE-- CLUB OF LIHUE

    Last Friday night the meeting ofthe Three-- Club was opened by RoyRogers giving the secretary's report

    The meeting was followed bymock trial and several interestinggames., such as ringetc. me meeting was closed byquick game of hot hand. C. G. Hopper.

    P. M. KodairaSANITARY PLUMBER

    P. O. Box 47 Lihue. Kauai

    Dr. T. L. MorganOSTEOPATHIC PHY8ICIAN

    Office on Wm. Hyde Rice Promises

    Phone 154 L

    uM --m-mSmell that Roast"What is as delicious and sat-isfying when you're really hungryas a thick, juicy steak, a savoryroast, or a tender breaded vealcutlet?

    MEATS THAT MAKE THE MEA-L-are the sort in which we specialize. Thechoicest cuts, sold to you at honestprices, are the goods upon which ourbig trade is built.

    ICE HOUSE GOOPS RECEIVEDBY EVERY COAST STEAMER

    LIHUE STORE MEATMARKET

    Floors Re-fini- sh Yours YourselfIt's a simple matter, if you cannot got a

    painter to refiuish any lloor fun, in fact,to do the work yourself.

    W. P. Fuller & Co. make the finest fin-ishes. They dry over night, so you canwalk on them in the morning.

    They are made for laymen's use as wellas painter's; they flow and spread easilyand cover well. The result is a smooth andlustrous finish, just the one you want toget, although you, an amateur, do the work.

    Women can apply these products as well. as men.

    5

    Fuller makes a famous floor paint, Rub-ber Cement Floor Paint, and two famousvarnishes called "Fifteen-for-Floors- " and"Fuller-wear.- "

    They are Fuller's Specifications for homefloors, each for a particular effect.

    W. P. Fuller makes also a special line ofpaints, varnishes, enamels, etc., for all kindsof interior decorating.

    Don't think you can't do work like thissimply because you haven't ever done it.

    Follow Fuller instructions and you'll getthe right effect.

    Lewers & Cooke, Ltd.Paint Department

    LUMBKPv and BUILDING MATERIALS 109-17- 7 SOUTH KING ST.

    3

  • e

    Neglected RoofsRob Your Profits

    Properly protected roofs should last Indefinitely.Unprotected roofs go to pieces sooner than anyother surface.

    W. P. Fuller & Co'sBarn and Roof Paint

    Is especially adapted to this climate, and Is un-equalled for protective and wearing qualities. ItIs prepared from pure linseed oil and the mostdurable of pigments.

    LEWERS & COOKE, Ltd.LUMBER andBUILDING MATERIALS

    169-17- 7 S. King 81,HONOLULU

    GOOD MEALS IN HONOLULU

    Await you at Child'sNew, modern, high class restaurant, cen-trally located. Cool and comfortable.Intelligent, courteous service. Europeanplan. Operated in connection with the

    Blaisdell HotelJ.F. CHILD, Proprietor.

    If you are not now receiving the REXALL MONTHLY

    MAGAZINE please send your name for mailing list. The

    Magazine has recently been enlarged, and improved by the

    addition of ' stories by prominent writers and pictures of

    current events.

    THIS SERVICE IS ABSOLUTELY FREE.

    Benson. Smith & Co., Ltd.

    The Rexall Store

    SERVICE EVERY SECOND

    420 Honolulu, T. H.

    Dealers in General MerchandiseAmerican Factors PaintsAmFac Red Label CoffeeYale Locks & Hardware

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    l TERRITORY OF HAWAII MIMGet our Utest pricoi

    f

    THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 7. 1022

    Physical Fitness

    To Be Emphasized

    The following letter has beenmailed from the County Y. M. C.A. office to the school principalsof the county ,

    "Because of the large percentageof rejections due to the physical con-dition of men examined tor thearmy and navy durrng the worldwar, the government has orderedprinted a set of "Keep Fit" chartsand has asked the representativesof the local Y. M. C. A. organizationsto exhibit them to the boys Inthe upper grades of every schoolunder the United States Flag.

    "A set of these charts are nowin the possession of the county Y.M. C. A. committee. Would you careto have the undersigned visit yourschool and show them to the boysof the 6th, 7th and 8th grades?

    "Signed NEIL LOCKE,"County Secretary."

    Dr. A. H. Waterhouse, chairmanof the county committee Bays "Thismovement on the part of the healthdepartment of the federal govern-ment Is most timely and important.Any person who had any conncetionwith the service si acquainted withthe examination of candidates,surprisingly large per cent of menwho were entirely rejected, or ad-mitted for limited service, 80 percent due to mechanical difficulties,such as decayed teeth, tonsils, adenoids, flat feet etc which could havebeen remedied or removed duringthe earlier years of life. It Is est!mated by medical authorities that inthe year 1914, $675,000,00 was spenton sickness that was preventable.

    Due to Better Baby movement thelives of more babies are being saved, but an intersting corallary isthat the people of maturel lfe aresuffering more than they ever did.Investigators claim that 60 per centof the school children of our public schools are remedial defects. Theseconditions are due to several causesamong them being:

    1. Failure to remove remedial defects in childhood.

    2. Failure to provide big muscleactivities.

    3. Failure to provide proper environment.

    4. Lack of utilization of the groupor mass schemes in play and athletics.

    6. Failure to see God's law operateProbably the most striking illus

    tration of the importance to the individual of this Idea of keeping fitis shown in the reports of the wardepartment regarding "causes of aviation deaths In France:"

    Two per cent were killed by theHuns;

    Eight per cent due to defectivemachines;

    Ninety per cent to personal causesY. M. C. A. representatives are

    glad to have the privilege of presenting these charts In the schools. Itis in line with the fundamentalprincipals of the Y. M. C. A. thatclean strong body is - essential tothe best all around development. Thefact that the government is askingthat the exhibit be made In theschools, is significant, and also inaccord with association ideas. Healthhabits as well as others must beginduring the formative years of aboy's life and physical defects mustbe remedied at this time if theindividual is to avoid the inevitableresults in later years."

    INCOME TAX PACTS

    No. 2Changes In the revenue law are

    of material benefit to the averacefamily man. Under the revenue actof 1921 a married person, living withwife or husband, whose net incomefor 1921 was $5,000 or less, is allowed a personal exemption of $2,500.Under the revenue act of 1918. theexemption allowed a married uersnnwas $2000, regardless of the am-ount of net Income.

    The normal tax rate is the same.four percent on the first ofnet income above the exemntions.and 8 per cent on the remainingnet income. Given his personal ex-emption of $2 500 plus $400 for eachdependent, a married man with threechildren the average American famuy will pay thh year on a net income of $4,000 a tax of $1Z. On th)same Income for 1921 he would havrpaid $56. ;

    Every cIUzpii and resident of iheUnited States must determine forhimself whether his income for 1921was sufficient to require that a re-turn be filed. Full instructions formaking out a return are contain.ed on the forms, a copy of wh'chwill be sent to tax payers who f ilnda return last year. Failure to receivea return, however, does not relievea taxpayer of his obligation to filea return on time, on or before March15, 1922. Forms may be obtainedfrom collectors of Internal revenueand branch offices.

    ro.'.v;-.-.:-- .

    . ". ". . m m m m m m m m m r Jt m m .it w jitii -

    and

    torn

    of

    of

    United (States Bonds and .Bonds of the ofOtbeir Bonds

    on !Cash

    TIyour

    with Cuptha

    pavements.also disappointing

    other tires mayhave you. BuyCup Tires only

    costsyou

    C. B. HOFGAARD & CO, Ltd., Agents, WAIMEA

    ErstBonkfo.Incorporate

    Honolulu, Territory Hawaii.Incorporated 1897.

    Statement of ConditionClose Business, 1921.

    RESOURCESLoans, Discounts Overdrafts

    CertificatesTerritory Hawaii

    equipVacuum Fabric

    forget

    Forgetmileage averages

    given Vacuum

    quality safety

    Hawaii

    December

    December

    Bank l'reuiises Honolulu Branchesunder LC

    Cash Hand $1,5:20,145.24with other Banks

    and

    trtj

    LIABILITIESCapital '.Burplus undivided I'rofitsTension FundReserve for Taxes and InterestLetters of Credit Outstanding

    , Dividends UnpaidDeposits

    THEN renewal timoV V comes, car

    orCord Tiresdangers of "skiddy"

    the

    you pay forthe the

    nothing.

    5

    17,

    At 31,

    andCustomers' Liabilities

    and

    --ft

    ..$10,115,209.30

    . 1,450,890.91719,041.00

    . 1,481,327.15250,1U4.SG

    . 307,139.4030,009.75

    1,731,307.90 3,251,513.20

    $17,000,015.03

    $ 1,000,000.001,303,374.09

    54,010.2543,210.03

    307,139.404,005.00

    14,893,009.00

    $17,GCG,015.63Territory of Hawaii,

    City and County of Honolulu. ss.I, 11. McCORRlSTON, being first duly sworn, do solemnly

    swear that the above is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.(Sgd.) R. McCORRISTON,

    Correct Attest : (Sgd.) Cashier.IUCIIARD II. TRENT,R. A. COOKE,P. C. ATHERTON,

    Directors.Subscribed and sworn to before me this 3rd day of Janu-

    ary, 1922.(Sgd.) M. L. STEWART,

    Notary Public, First Judicial Circuit, T. n.

  • Children's Pageconducted by

    GETTISG 1STO A SCRAPEThis is one of the phrases we

    so often use without exactlyknowing its real meaning or ori-0gi-

    In this case the phrase issupposed to have originated inthe game of golf, which thoughcomparatively new in some partsof the world, is very old in real-ity, having been played inland, where it originated, forgenerations.

    Some years ngo, in fact many,a law was passed that rabbitswere to be prevented from bur-rowing (or making scrapes, astheir holes were called) on thelinks at St. Andrews, for if aplayer's ball got into one, it wasserious handicap to him, and infact led to certain rules of thegame having to be altered. Koapparently, this phrase of "get-ting into a scrape" originatedwith the golfers and was passedon by them to the general pub-lic.

    HOW WE GOT MAllOGASYSir Walter Baliegh stands out

    in our minds very prominentlyon account of two things. One,that he was the hero of the gal-lant incident where he laiddown his cloak for Queen Eliza-beth to step on, so that herpretty shoes should not get soil-ed; and the other, for having in-troduced potatoes and tobaccointo England. But I wonderhow many of us knew that itwas owing to him, mahogany.the wood of which so much beautiful old American and Englishfurniture was made, was firstintroduced into England.

    It seems that when on oneof his voyages, he put into Trin-idad to repair one of his shipsand, the wood, not being veryvaluable, owing to its growingso freely there, also to their notbeing any outside market foit in those days, the planks heused for the repairs were solidmahogany.

    When the wood was being

    g worked on, he saw that it wasvery beautiful and brought oth-er specimens with him to Eng-land, where it was much ad-mired, but it was not made useof for furniture for over a hun-dred years, when in 1720, a Doc-tor Gibbons obtained some y

    from Trinidad or someother place in the West Indiesand employed a cabinet makerto make them into various arti-cles.

    oOYSTER SHELLS

    FOR WISDOWSLike most things in China, oy-

    ster shells are turned to goodaccount, for instead of throw-ing them away, the Chines jscrape them until t hey are asthin as glass and use them aswindows and other things forwhich we use glass.

    Of course they do not let inmuch light, but they are muchbetter, and last longer than thetaper which is usually put in-

    to window frames.As for the oysters themselv-

    es, the Chinese seldom eatthem fresh, as we do, they pre-fer them dried and very goodthe' taste this way.

    o

    EWDROPSThe Night has cried upon the

    lawnAnd spangled all the grass

    With lots and lots of little tearsThat glitter as you pass,

    he cried until the Morningcame

    And made a not her day,And the nthe great big Sun got

    upAnd kissed her tears away.

    Now this is what puzzled meEor many, many years,

    Why such a most enormousNight

    Should cry such tiny tears.May Howard.

    Ada W. Paul.

    .1 WHALE STORYA cable at 1 he bottom of the

    Pacific ocean went wrong. So,a repair ship was sent to repair the damage whatever itmight turn out to be. And, ifyou please, when the cable wasgrappled, it was found that ahuge dead whale was tangled upin it.

    1 wonder what he was tryingto do with that cable when itcanglit him? Po you think hewas trying to cat it?

    THE LAMEST OFTHE YOUSGEST BOY

    If I were a captain bold,And Bex was the midshipmite,

    Then he'd have to do what hewas told,

    And I should always be rigltt:And I'd wear the smart three-cornere- d

    hat,The sword, and the shield so

    fine,And gave him the horse's main

    to plait,And mend all the ships with

    twine.But I'm the youngest child of

    four,And Ilex is the oldest one,

    So he's always captain in thewar,

    And carries our only gun ;And 1 have to march, left, 'right,

    left, right,Until he will shout, "Advance"

    Ami how can I well and trulyfight

    With only a spoon for a lance?If I could be ten and Bex but

    five,How glad I would sometimes

    be.For I could tell him to "Look

    alive,"As he often says to me;

    And I'd wear that hat all trimmed with gold,

    The sword and the shield sobright ;

    For I'd be the gallant captain,bold,

    And Bex would be midship-mite.

    o

    ALPHABET HOUSEMr. A went out to playWith Mr. B a little while;Then Mr. B and Mr. C

    i Built up with bricks a lordlypile.

    Said Mr. 1) to Mr. E:"If we can do as we'll see."Said Messrs F, (1, II, and I:"At any rate we'll have a try."Said Mr. J to Mr. K,A good foundation let us lay."Said L and M to N and O:"Then straight to work we all

    will go."Said Mr. B to Mr. Q:"Great things our friends as-

    pire to do.""But, Mr. 11," said Mr. S,"The rainfall makes a horrid

    mess.""A rainproof house I'll build,"

    said T,"And U shall come and live with

    me;While W, X, Y, Z, you'll see,Will all most skilful builders be."

    HOPELESS CASESaid l'ompey to Bongo,

    "Old party from the Congo,How, tell me, should this song go,

    Come help me, sir, I pray!"But Bongo, l'ompey eying,

    Made a face, thereby implyingThat he really thought the t ey-

    ingWould be trouble thrown

    Then said l'ompey to the Bongo"At ome I'll home along go.

    My music will all wrong go,If here I longer stay."

    But this ape there was no best-ing.

    Waved his paw, thereby sug-gesting

    "Thi isn't interesting,You'd better run ami play!"

    An auto is necessary to some peo-ple simply because their neighborshave one.

    THK OARDKN ISLAND, TUKSDAY, I'KliHFAUY 7. 11122

    School Notes' HANALEI SCHOOL

    The boys of the Three-- Club ofour school had a lot of fun lastThursday In the regular meetingof the club. We had a try-ou- t forn debate we are going to have nextweek. The members are divided In-to two sections. One side said thatWashington was the greatest man,and the other side said Lincoln wasthe. greatest man. Mr. Locke 'andMiss Cooke were Judges and pickedout the three best speakers on eachside. These boys will debate together next week.

    After the debate Mr. Locke show-ed us some charts on "Care of theBody, 'and we learned many im-portant things about keeping well,exercising, eating, sleeping and oth-er things.

    We hope the weather will be goodat Easter time so we can take a hik-ing trip in the mountains. Our clubmeets every week and we have agood time. Clinton Shinaishi.

    l tHONOR ROLL OF THE

    KAUAI HIGH SCHOOL

    The following students of the Ka-au-high school by diligent applica-

    tion to their studies have earned aplace on the honor roll of that in-stitution.Freshmen.

    First Honor Kenneth Aloiau, AliceBroadbent, Daisy Chang, Nee ChangChock, Kam Chung Chong, NellieChong. Hisayo Dobashi, Klyoshi Ito,Eddy Kanoho, Hideo Miya, RisaburoMiyoshi, Kikue Nagata, Tamotsu Na-it-

    Edene Nalemaile, Tamayo Nishi-mot-Eleanor Peiler, Hideo Shiraki.

    Ellen Sisson, Margaret Sloggett, Fu-sa- oTanabe, Miki Tokita.

    Second Honor Ah Sao Ahana, Yo-shl- oNakamuro, Harriet Sheldon, Yu-tak- a

    Tsunehiro Bessie Wiebke,Stella Yoon.Seniors.

    First honor Chow Moi Chang,Shinkichi Nlshimoto, Edwin Kam,Ernest Wedemeyer, Kazu Cokan,Iwao MiyakI, Esther Tseu.

    Second honor Minnie Fukushima,Shinichi Nishimoto.Juniors.

    First honor Junichi Saklmae.Second honor May Wedemeyer,

    Giichi Yokomoto.Sophomores.

    Orme Cheatham, Takeshi Gokan,Masao Ito, Frances Jardin, WarrenKamezawa, Percy Lydgate, WilliamMoragne, Helen Muller, TsutomuNitta, Maggie Scharsch, Ling UngTarn. Helrtii Wedemeyer.

    Second honor Hale Cheatham, Ma-sar- uHamano, Kiya Kanemoto, Shige

    Miyoshi, Fusa' Mizutani, Richard Rice,Sophie Vierra, Teryo Wataya.

    KAPAA SCHOOLThe heavy rains damaged part

    of our gardens, but the strong winddid much more than the rain.

    The contract for the new shophas been let to S. B. Goss and con-struction is expected to start soon.

    The children in the lower gradesare being weighed to determinewhether any of them are underweight.

    Our humorists turned out the fol-lowing for last week: "I do notneed any speedometer on my car."said one. "How do you tell yourspeed?" asked another. The replywas, "When I go ten miles an hourmy lamps rattle, when I go fifteenmy fenders rattle, and when I reachtwenty, my bones rattle."

    Two men and a boy were walk-ing by the postoffice. One said,"What is that smell around here?"The boy said, "That is the smellot dead letters."

    Our teachers are taking a lot ofinterest in politics, judging fromtheir attendance at the Republicanprecinct meeting last Saturday. MissWong, Miss Ah Sing, Mrs. Sheldon,Mrs. Freltas and Miss Brady wereamong the first to cast their votes.Perhaps the others are all Demo-crats?

    LIHUE SCHOOLOn Thursday in the morning exer-

    cises, the childr