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It is the VIEWPOINT of this publication to provide articles that educate, engage, maybe even shock the reader. VPTAC contributors are experienced MIL, LE, PMC, Homeland, Intel, Trainers, Operators and more. They contribute because they feel the need to speak about their VIEWPOINT. Some will engage us with world events others the latest training observations... others may shed some light on things we know nothing about.

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  • VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM

    DEATHIN THE CORNBy Michael Yon

    AN IMMIGRATION VIEWPOINTBy Steven Krzyanowski

    VISION UNDER STRESSBy Aaron Cowan

    INTERVIEWAn interview with Dick Kramer

    WES TALKS TRAINING

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    OURVIEWPOINT

    It is the VIEWPOINT of this publication to provide articles that educate, en-gage, maybe even shock the reader. VPTAC contributors are experienced MIL, LE, PMC, Homeland, Intel, Trainers, Operators and more. They con-tribute because they feel the need to speak about their VIEWPOINT. Some will engage us with world events others the latest training observations... others may shed some light on things we know nothing about. Diversity is the name of the game here and the mission is simple.....to offer UNIQUE

    VIEWPOINTS from a diverse set of contributors from all aspects of the TACTICAL Community. Some of the topics that may be covered include:

    Global Operations, Charity, Intel, Psyops, Train-ing, TacMed, Maritime, EOD, Politics, Human Trafficking, Drug War, Canine, Job Creators, Comms, Survival, Sniper, Protection, Disabled Vets Speaking Out, Books and more.

    VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM

    WEL

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    VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM

  • THE NETWORKThe VPTAC Network is how the information is disseminated. Built upon the viral philosophy we

    feed the publication into networks which ensure a tactical readership. (published online at issuu.com we hope for organic growth as well)

    HOW TO SHARE YOUR VIEWPOINTIf you would like to become part of the VIEWPOINT TACTICAL group of Writers, Advertisers

    and Network Contributors please contact us. Your thoughts are very much welcome and we hope that we can build a relationship to further our mission.

    THE BASICS 48-64 page digital turn page magazine. CLICK THE LINK AND READ no apps necessary published at ISSUU.com (which has a large

    reader base) readable and downloadable on Windows, MAC, Ipad, Iphone, Android..etc. The Magazine is FREE! LARGER TYPE for better digital reading. 2 AD Sizes (full and half page) all ads are hot linked as are text links.

    SECTIONS World Overview: World Views and Politics Frontlines: Home and Abroad Learning Curve: Training of all types Drug Front: The world beneath Secret Squirrel: Intel / Psyops Perseverance: Disabled Vets Speak Workforce: Hiring Vets etc Lets talk!: Interviews By the Numbers: Facts about Everything

    ABOUT THE LOGO Raven: Messenger, Guide, Cunning, Swift Moving Intelligence Color: Black (Stength) White (Illumination) Shield: Protection Skull: Represents Mortality Sword: The Upright White Sword means Purity in Vigilance Key: Knowledge Oak Leaf: Strength Olive Branch: Peace and the Search of.

    VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM

  • CONT

    ENTS 8 DEATH IN THE CORN

    By Michael Yon

    20 AN IMMIGRATION VIEWPOINT By Steven Krzyanowski

    24 VISION UNDER STRESS By Aaron Cowan

    44 LEDET MEETS LEGEND By Dave Agata

    52 INTERVIEW An interview with Dick Kramer

    62 PERSEVERANCE By Mark Oravsky

    70 REALITIES IN TRAINING By Wes Doss

    ISSUE 2, JAN 2015

    VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM6

    CONT

    ENTS

  • ISSUE 2, JAN 2015

    Articles that appear in VIEWPOINT TACTICAL Magazine or on VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM are for informational purposes only. The nature of the content of all of the articles is intended to provide readers with accurate information in regard to the subject matter covered. However, some of the articles contain authors opinions which may not reflect a position considered or adopted by VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM. Articles are published with the understanding that VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM is not engaged in rendering ANY advice, instruction or opinions. VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM has taken reasonable care in sourcing and presenting the information contained in VIEWPOINT TACTICAL Magazine or VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM, but accepts no responsibility for any physical or emotional injury, damages of any kind, financial, or other loss or damage. There is no promise or warranty, either expressed or implied regarding the content of any published submission appearing in this publication or website.

    VIEWPOINT TACTICAL Magazine is published by MAD4ART International LLC., P.O. Box 56454, Virginia Beach, VA, 23456. Contributors, who wish to submit manuscripts, letters, pho-tographs, drawings, etc., do so at their own risk. We do not guarantee publication of unsolicited manuscripts. Materials submitted cannot be returned, and the contributor authorizes VIEWPOINT TACTICAL Magazine to edit for content and space. Please provide captions and credits for all photographs. By submitting all photos, logos and text to VIEWPOINT TACTICAL Magazine and VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM you certify that you have photo releases and or permission that you have the right to use and are giving permission to use all photos, logos and text. By submitting material, you certify that it is original and unpublished. If it has been published you have the rights to the work and rights to republish. Reproduction or reprinting in whole or in part of any portion of this publication without written permission is prohibited. The opinions and recommendations expressed by individual authors within this magazine are not necessarily those of VIEWPOINT TACTICAL Magazine, VIEWPOINTTACTICAL.COM or MAD4ART International. LLC.

    PUBLISHER:VIEWPOINT TACTICAL Magazine is published by: MAD4ART International LLC.,P.O. Box 56454, Virginia Beach, VA, 23456. / [email protected] / 757-721-2774 / MAD4ART.COM

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  • The soldiers are living like animals at a little rats nest called FOB Gibraltar. They call it Gib. Named after the lynchpin of British naval dominance in the Mediterranean, this clus-ter of mud huts in the middle of hostile territory is more like Fort Apache, Afghanistan. The British soldiers from C-Com-pany 2 Para live in ugly conditions, fight just about every day, and morale is the best I have seen probably anywhere.

    The few outside visitors arrive in helicopters that are sometimes spaced days apart, so that if a visitor stays overnight, he could be stuck for a week or more. The closest Afghan dwellings are a few hundred meters away, and each is surrounded by a mud wall. The Brits and Americans call these dwellings compounds, because in fact they are little forts. Most Afghans here are a primitive lot who live far outside of cities, and even villages. The Brits say that locals live as their ancestors dwelled in the fourteenth century. Iraq is by comparison extremely ad-vanced and familiar. Local homes are made of mud, straw, and poor-quality bricks that were

    DEATH IN THE CORN

    Reporter Michael Yons Diaryof his time spent in Afghanistan

    with British TroopsHelmand Province, Afghanistan

    Part I

    In September, the corn around Gibraltar is 10-11 feet tall. Crops grow close to the perimeter of the FOB, giving Terry Taliban plenty of concealment.

    FOB Gibraltar: made from an abandoned farmers compound.

  • dried in the sun, not fired in a kiln. Farmers in this area of Afghanistan keep their animals within the com-pounds, and so the families live in private zoos, and the Brits are in the middle of clusters of zoos that I call Jurassic Park. Though most compounds immediately around Gib are abandoned, crops grow nearly up to the concertina, trip-wires, claymore mines and forti-

    fications that form the perimeter of the base. Earlier this year, the farmers were growing wheat and opium poppy. Wheat is becoming more expensive than opium, so poppy production decreased this year for the first time since the war began. The brown stack amid the corn is poppy harvested earlier this season. The poppy provides less concealment for the Taliban, but helps pay for their operations. Whereas our supply chains origi-nate from places like the U.S. and U.K., with convoys at the mercy of

    Taliban in Pakistan, the Taliban supply chain starts right outside the bases. In ad-dition to terrorist and criminal interdic-tions of convoys, the Pakistan govern-ment can, on a whim, shut down most of our logistics convoys. The vast majority of US and NATO/ISAF forces and con-tractors conduct support/logistics func-tions, while a relatively small number actually fight. Meanwhile, the Taliban support/logistics functions are organ-

    ic. The corn grows 20 yards from the place they eat it. The farmers can dou-ble as informants, hoteliers, and fighters.

    Jurassic ParkHelmand Province is the largest pro-

    ducer of opium in the world. During the poppy season, Gib is surrounded by beautiful flowers. From the guard tow-ers, or out on patrols, the soldiers can see the full cycle. Farmers plant the poppy; it grows and blooms producing beautiful flowers like in the Wizard of Oz; the bulbs

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    Helmand Province is the largest pro-ducer of opium in the world. During the poppy season, Gib is surrounded by beautiful flowers. From the guard

    towers, or out on patrols, the soldiers can see the full cycle. Farmers plant

    the poppy; it grows and blooms pro-ducing beautiful flowers like in the

    Wizard of Oz; the bulbs are lanced and the opium harvested.

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    are lanced and the opium harvested. The final part of the opium cycle lasts all year, and can be seen almost every day, when the British soldiers at Gib take small-arms fire and RPG rounds paid for by the crop they watched growing just outside the wire.

    The soldiers at Gib have no interne