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Figurative Language and Types of Poetry Mr. Pettine English 9 August 13

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  • Figurative Language and Types

    of Poetry Mr. Pettine

    English 9 August 13

  • Figurative Language and Literary

    Terms

    9/16/14

    English 9

    Mr. Pettine

  • Allusion

    A reference to a historical aspect, person, or a

    text.

    Example: No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be; Am an attendant lord, one

    that will do

    To swell a progress, start a scene or two,

    Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock T.S. Eliot

  • Simile

    A comparison between of two unlike things

    using like or as

    Example: My love is like a red, red, rose / Thats newly sprung in June Red, Red, Rose -- Robert Burns

  • Epic Simile

    Also known as Homeric Simile, is a detailed

    comparison in the form of a simile that is

    many lines in length

    Example: Think of a catch that fishermen haul in to a half-moon bay / in a fine meshed

    net from the whitecaps of the sea; / how all are

    poured out on the sand, in throes for the salt

    sea, / Twitching their cold lives away in

    Helios fiery air; / so lay the suitors heaped on one another

  • Metaphor

    A comparison of two unlike things not using

    like, as, than, or resembles

    EXAMPLE: All the world's a stage,/ And all the men and women merely players;/

    They have their exits and their entrances; As You Like It William Shakespeare

  • Hyperbole

    A figure of speech using extreme exaggeration

    EXAMPLE: I loved Ophelia. Forty thousand brothers / Could not with all their quantity of

    love / Make up my sum. -- Hamlet William Shakespeare

  • Idiom

    Expression peculiar to a particular language

    that means something different from the literal

    meaning of each word.

    EXAMPLE: That blouse costs an arm and a leg, and Youre pulling my leg!

  • Imagery

    Writing that appeals to the senses.

    EXAMPLE: Sling your knuckles on the bottoms of the happy tin pans, let your

    trombones ooze, and go husha-husha-hush

    with the slippery sand-paper. Jazz Fantasia Carl Sandburg

  • Oxymoron

    A combination of two contradictory terms,

    EXAMPLE: His honour rooted in dishonour stood, /And faith unfaithful kept him falsely

    true. Idylls of the King Alfred Tennyson

    EASIER EXAMPLES: Living dead, deafening

    silence, sweet sorrow

  • Personification

    The use of human qualities in non-human subjects

    EXAMPLE: There was no answer from outside, so Rikki-tikki knew Nagaina had gone away. Nag coiled himself down, coil by coil, round the bulge at the bottom of the water-jar, and Rikki-tikki stayed still as death. After an hour he began to move, muscle by muscle, toward the jar. Nag was asleep, and Rikki-tikki looked at his big back, wondering which would be the best place for a good hold. ``If I don't break his back at the first jump,'' said Rikki, ``he can still fight; and if he fights -- O Rikki!'' He looked at the thickness of the neck below the hood, but that was too much for him; and a bite near the tail would only make Nag savage. Rikki-Tikki Tavi Rudyard Kipling

  • Epithet

    Adjective or descriptive phrase that is

    regularly used to characterize a person, place,

    or thing.

    EXAMPLE: When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared The Odyssey Homer

    To his house went the goddess, grey-eyed Athena, devising a return for the great-hearted

    Odysseus. The Odyssey -- Homer

  • Euphemism

    Use of inoffensive words to replace something

    which is harsh, unpleasant, or possibly

    offensive

    EXAMPLES: a little thin on top bald

    Powder room go to restroom

    in the family way pregnant

    visit from the stork give birth

  • Dialect

    Regional variety of language, a regional

    variety of a language, with differences in

    vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation

    EXAMPLE: Jim: Wes safe, Huck, wes safe! Jump up and crack yo heels. Dats de good ole Cairo at las, I jis knows it. Huck: Ill take the canoe and go see, Jim. It mightnt be, you know. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain

  • Lyric Poem

    A lyric poem is a highly musical verse

    that expresses the thoughts, observations,

    and feelings of a single speaker.

  • Lyric Poem

    I hid my love when young till I

    Couldn't bear the buzzing of a fly;

    I hid my love to my despite

    Till I could not bear to look at light:

    I dare not gaze upon her face

    But left her memory in each place;

    Where'er I saw a wild flower lie

    I kissed and bade my love good-bye

    John Clare I Hid My Love

  • Ballad

    A ballad is a song that tells a story.

    Literary ballads are poems which often

    contain sensational stories of tragedy or

    adventure. Often feature repetition and

    have regular rhyme schemes

  • Ballad

    When John Henry was a little tiny baby

    Sitting on his mama's knee,

    He picked up a hammer and a little piece of steel

    Saying, "Hammer's going to be the death of me, Lord, Lord,

    Hammer's going to be the death of me."

    John Henry was a man just six feet high,

    Nearly two feet and a half across his breast.

    He'd hammer with a nine-pound hammer all day

    And never get tired and want to rest, Lord, Lord,

    And never get tired and want to rest. -- Anonymous John Henry

  • Sonnet

    A fourteen line lyric poem, usually in

    rhymed iambic pentameter. The

    Shakespearean sonnet consists of three

    quatrains (4 line stanzas) and a couplet.

    The Petrarchan sonnet consists of an

    octave (8 line stanza) and a sestet (6 line

    stanza).

  • Sonnet

    Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st; So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

    Sonnet 18 - Shakespeare

  • Narrative Poem

    A narrative poem is one that tells a story.

  • Narrative Poem

    The sneer is gone from Casey's lip, his teeth are clenched in hate; He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate. And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go, And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey's blow.

    Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright; The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light, And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout; But there is no joy in Mudville - mighty Casey has struck out

  • Epic

    An epic is a long narrative poem about the

    deeds of gods or heroes. An epic is

    elevated in style and usually follows

    certain patterns. An epic reflects the

    qualities and values of a society.

  • Oral Tradition

    Oral Tradition the passing of the songs,

    stories, and poems from generation to

    generation. Many folk songs, ballads, fairy

    tales, legends, and myths originated in the

    oral tradition.

  • Epic Simile Also known as Homeric Simile, is a

    detailed comparison in the form of a simile

    that is many lines in length

    Example: Think of a catch that fishermen haul in to a half-moon bay / in a fine

    meshed net from the whitecaps of the sea;

    / how all are poured out on the sand, in

    throes for the salt sea, / Twitching their

    cold lives away in Helios fiery air; / so lay the suitors heaped on one another