rainbow magazine autumn 2012

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Welcome to Rainbow Trust Children's Charity new look magazine. Read about how Rainbow Trust helps families like Rowan's and Lewis's and how one young boy, Ben, received a standing ovation when he raced 100m in a wheelchair at the Olympic stadium.

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  • Summer/Autumn 2012

    Mag

    azin

    eBEYOND Read about little Rowan Todd

    BRAVERY

    I run in memory of my daughter.

    MEET THE MADE IN CHELSEA STARS

    An Olympic Challenge

    High fashion for lessLittleBigCupcakes

    Hour

    Time to bake!

    One fathers amazing story

  • Celebs Trustin Fashion

    Clockwise from left, Made in Chelsea stars Jamie Laing, Oliver Proudlock, Francis Boulle, DJ Jesse Burgess and friends enjoy the show.

    What do you get when you have a glamorous London location, add a couple of up and coming fashion designers, a sprinkling of celebrities and Rainbow Trust? It is of course, Trust in Fashion, Rainbow Trusts answer to London Fashion Week!

    Hosted by Made in ChelseasJamie Laing, the show was held in association with Storm Model Management at Londons legendary Caf de Paris. The event raised a wonderful 33,000 overall and was enjoyed by everyone who attended.

    Rainbow Trust at Number 10

    To celebrate the end of our 25 year anniversary, Rainbow Trust held a very special reception at 10 Downing Street hosted by Mrs Samantha Cameron.

    Long term Rainbow Trust supporters and patrons rubbed shoulders with celebrities and Rainbow Trust families over drinks and speeches at the Prime Ministers official residence. The photo left shows (from left) Rainbow Trust Chief Executive Heather Wood, Actor Eddie Redmayne, Samantha Cameron, Rainbow Trust President Richard Stanley and Founder Bernadette Cleary with Ben and Emily Morris.

    Events and Celebrities

    All photography for Trust in Fashion taken by Kim Rix

    Rainbow Trust official Downing Street photo

    Left: the sumptuous surroundings of Caf de Paris in London.

    If you would like more information from our press office, please email:Jonathan.Bennett@rainbowtrust.org.uk

  • Supporting familiesThe death of a child is every parents worst nightmare. For Emma West and Mark Rowe, it is something they face for the second time, with the illness of their little boy.

    The Rowe Family were featured in our Raffle Appeal in March and their moving story captured your hearts. Emma West and Mark Rowes daughter Megan died of a rare chromosome disorder which caused her heart to

    fail. Emma later discovered in a prenatal scan that her new baby Lewis had the same condition. Lewis had major heart surgery at just 8 weeks old and now, aged 19 months has undergone many operations that have

    left him dependent on oxygen 24 hours a day. It has been a very traumatic and worrying time for the family.

    Thankfully, Rainbow Trust Family Support Worker Steve continues to support them every step of the way. As Megans condition deteriorated and in the years since her death he has continued to provide bereavement support, sharing memories with the family as well as providing practical help driving them to the hospital for Lewiss appointments.

    If you are inspired by the Rowe Familys story and would like to sell raffle tickets to help support them and other families needing support please call 01372 363438. The closing date for the draw is 21 September 2012.

    For more informationplease visit our website: rainbowtrust.org.uk or our Facebook and Twitter pages.

    Alternatively email enquiries@rainbowtrust.org.uk or call Rainbow Trust on 01372 363438.

    Welcome to our new look Rainbow Trust Magazine.

    We listened to your feedback and have created a magazine that gives you news on the valuable work youre helping to support and exciting ways to become involved.

    Take a moment to read how your donations help families like Rowans and Lewiss. Read about Bens 100m race at the Olympic Stadium which received a standing ovation and how the death of one supporters child spurs him on to complete marathons in aid of Rainbow Trust.

    Weve included ideas for fundraising as well as events and celebrity parties. Supporting Rainbow Trust is inspiring, fulfilling and challenging. Feel inspired to turn over a new leaf in Autumn and join a Rainbow Trust event!

    Welcome

    All photography of Lewis Rowe taken by The Independent Appeal

    Chief Executive

  • Running in Memory of my daughter46-year-old David Kennard took on the challenge of completing the Brighton, London and Milton Keynes marathons, on three consecutive weekends. David raised money for Rainbow Trust, who helped his family through the death of his daughter, Eloise. David first heard about Rainbow Trust in 1997 when his daughter Eloise was diagnosed with a terminal illness. David, from Harrow, said: My wife went into labour 10 weeks early and our twin baby girls were born premature, Eloise weighing in at just 1b 10oz and Naomi 2lb 5oz.

    At the time Naomi seemed the most sick of the two, suffering from a stomach infection. However, at one week old Eloise became seriously ill and was rushed to Great Ormond Street Hospital where she was diagnosed with Necrotising Enterocolitis - a disease that affects the intestines.

    She had many operations, each one removing more and more of her intestines, and suffered two brain haemorrhages from all the operations, medication and treatments. It got to a stage where we just thought, enough is enough, no more. Eloises condition was terminal and we just wanted to take her home and look after her as much as we could, rather than see her spend her whole, short life in hospital.

    During this time David describes Rainbow Trusts support as a God send. Great Ormond Street Hospital recommended the services of Rainbow Trust and David, his wife and daughters soon met Christina from the Surrey Care Team.

    Christina visited the family once or twice a week overnight and watched over Eloise and her twin sister Naomi while their parents got some much needed sleep.

    In September 1997, when she was 15 months old, Eloise died at home. David said:

    I was trying to hold down a full time job and Eloise needed our constant attention. We learnt how to administer her medication and the complicated process

  • of feeding her, but she needed care through the night. Just by enabling us to get a few nights rest a week, Christinas help was immeasurable.

    When David turned 40 in 2006, he signed up for his first marathon in aid of Rainbow Trust, and in memory of Eloise, as a way to fundraise for the charity which provided much needed emotional and practical support to his family. The family have also organised many fundraising events including cake sales, car washes, arranging horse racing nights and golf days, helping spread awareness of Rainbows work.

    Over the last six years, David and his family have raised over

    20,000 for the charity enough to cover over five continuous months of support for a family in need.

    Each year David tries to come up with new challenges to keep the money coming in for Rainbow Trust aiming to raise 2k a year and said: Ive asked my friends and family for support so many times over the last seven years that Im sure they must be getting tired of me! But I just keep plodding away, trying to come up with ideas and new challenges to inspire their continued support so the money doesnt dry up.

    Davids daughters Naomi (Eloises twin who is now 15 years old) and Sinead, who was born just a month after Eloise died, are always there, cheering their dad on during his marathon efforts. And David will continue to support Rainbow Trust in memory of Eloise.

    If Davids story has inspired you to dig out your running shoes and get fundraising for Rainbow, please visit rainbowtrust.org.uk/events for the latest list of sporting events you can get involved in.

    Tweets of the season

    Real Life Story

    If you would like to donate to Rainbow Trust in memory of a loved one, please visit: rainbowtrust.org.uk/inmemory

    Being part of the nations biggest cake sale is easy simply bake a cake, muffins, flapjacks or bread and sell them to people at work, school or to your friends during October to raise money for Rainbow Trust.

    The Big Hour will run from 22 October to 28 October and you can use the extra hour when clocks go back for winter to bake or sell your goodies. The money raised from The Big Hour Cake Sale will go towards giving the families we support the time and space they need to cope. Heres a recipe to get you started.

    The Big Hour

    RainbowTrustCharity @RainbowTrustCCCalling all workers in the Paddington area. Lock your boss up for half an hour with Jack! Its 50 to get them out or 100 to keep them in!

    Rebecca Dickinson @Beckydee1986Cupcakes iced, ready to be sold at street fair tomorrow. All proceeds going to @RainbowTrustCC

    Erica Cook @EricaCook1984@RainbowTrustCC you helped my best friend before he died in 2005 - my fianc and I did GNR in his memory. Thank you xx

    Inst. of Fundraising @ioftweetsCongratulations to @rainbowtrustcc for winning best fundraising organisation to work for!! #iofnc#iofncawards#iofawards

    BigCupcakes

    HourLittle

    Ingredients for 12 cupcakes:

    120g (4oz) soft margarine 120g (4oz) caster sugar 120g (4oz) self-raising flour 2 eggs Jazz them up with treats and

    Rainbow colours!

    Put all ingredients into a bowl and beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is combined. Alternatively, process in an electric mixer or food processor until smooth.

    Divide the mixture between a 12-hole muffin tray lined with cake cases.

    Bake in a pre-heated oven, 180 degrees Celsius, (350F) for 15-18 minutes.

    22 October to 28 October 2012

  • An Olympic

    Ben Morris is a bright, engaging 11 year old with a big smile and lots to say. He loves science lessons at school and cracking jokes. Ben also has Spinal Muscular Atrophy, which means that his muscles dont receive signals from his brain. The only part of his body he