the art of portrait photography portrait studio lighting techniques: butterfly portrait lighting...

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  • The Art of Portrait

    Photography

  • Portrait Studio Lighting Techniques

    REQUIREMENTS:

    Portrait Studio Lighting Techniques:

     Butterfly Portrait lighting

     Rembrandt Portrait Lighting

     Split Portrait Lighting

     Rear Side Lighting

    1. A contact sheet of 20 images including each images’ lighting technique and the

    camera settings (ISO, F/Stop, Shutter Speed)

    2. A final edited image of each portrait studio technique sized of [email protected]

    3. Self Reflective Questions

    4. Rubric that demonstrates self-assessment by scoring your work with rubric

    Studio Lighting Techniques Project is worth 20 Major Project Points

  • Rembrandt Portrait Lighting – Rembrandt lighting is a name given

    to the lighting effect that the old master used to use for the lighting

    effects in many of his paintings. It’s basically short lighting where

    the shadow from the nose connects with the shadow on the side of

    the face, thus creating a triangle of light on the short side of the

    face. If the nose shadow does not connect with the cheek shadow,

    it’s not considered to be Rembrandt lighting, just short lighting.

  • Split Portrait Lighting – There will be a patch of light cast onto the shadow

    side of the face. If the main light is placed so far off to the side of the

    subject and only half the face is lit, then it is considered to be “Split”

    portrait lighting. With split lighting, it really doesn’t matter to which side

    of the camera the nose is pointing or if the lit or shadow side of the face is

    facing toward the camera. Either of these situations would be considered

    split portrait lighting.

    patch disappears and

    only half the face is

    lighting.

    camera the nose is

    pointing or if the lit

    or shadow side of

    camera.

    would be considered

  • Rear Side Lighting This is a good way to create hair-lights

    Can be done

    in studio or

    out of studio

  • 1. A contact sheet of 5 images including each images’ camera settings (ISO, F/Stop, Shutter Speed)

    2. A final edited image sized of [email protected]

    3. Self Assessment

    1. Magic Hour Portrait

    2. Candid Portraiture

    3. In-Direct Self-Portrait (NO ‘SELFIES’)

    4. Environmental Portrait

    5. Silhouette (Can be done in studio or out of studio)

    6. High Key Portrait (Can be done in studio or out of studio)

    7. Low Key Portrait (Can be done in studio or out of studio)

    Home Learning REQUIREMENTS:

    Each Portrait technique is worth 5 Points and is due every Monday

  • Magic Hour HOMEWORK 1

    Using natural light to create lighting effects…

    Sitting by a

    doorway and

    having an unlit

    room in the

    background is

    perfect lighting.

    The light is coming

    from an open door

    to camera left. The

    plain wall helps

    keep the viewer's

    attention on the

    Tibetan Monk.

    Using windows to

    create dramatic

    soft or strong

    lighting depends

    on your exposure.

  • Candid is an un-posed photograph;

    a moment in time: HOMEWORK 1

  • In Direct Self Portrait:

    HOMEWORK 2

  • In Direct Self Portrait cont’

  • In Direct Self Portrait cont’

  • Environmental Portrait:

    HOMEWORK 3

    The environment tells something about the model.

  • Silhouette

    4

    The photographer

    exposes for the

    back-lit

    area and not the

    subject

  • High key refers to a style of photography that utilizes

    predominantly light tones to create a dramatic looking

    image. High key lighting seeks to over light the subject

    to the point of reduced contrast.

    HOMEWORK #5

  • Low key refers to a style of photography that utilizes

    predominantly dark tones to create a dramatic looking image.

    Where high key lighting seeks to over light the subject to the point

    of reduced contrast, low key lighting intensifies the contrast in an

    image through intensely reduced lighting.

    HOMEWORK #6