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APPENDIX B StoryCorps Interview Project: Handouts Handout #1: Project Overview (separate Word file) Handout #2: Watching Interviews: What Works? What Doesn’t? Handout #3: About Interviews: Some Questions to Think About (p. 3) Handout #4: StoryCorps: Tips on Effective Interviewing Handout #5: First Interview Part 1: Preparing for the Interview Part 2: Doing the Interview Part 3: Reflecting on the Interview Handout #6: Rubric: Interviewing (separate Excel file) Handout #7: “Baskets” of Questions form StoryCorps Handout #8: Peer Interviews Part 1: National Day of Listening – Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide Part 2: StoryCorps: Suggested Questions for Peer Interviews Additional handouts will be provided as needed, as the context of this project unfolds.

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APPENDIX B StoryCorps Interview Project: Handouts

Handout #1: Handout #2: Handout #3: Handout #4: Handout #5:

Project Overview (separate Word file) Watching Interviews: What Works? What Doesnt? About Interviews: Some Questions to Think About (p. 3) StoryCorps: Tips on Effective Interviewing First Interview Part 1: Preparing for the Interview Part 2: Doing the Interview Part 3: Reflecting on the Interview

Handout #6: Handout #7: Handout #8:

Rubric: Interviewing (separate Excel file) Baskets of Questions form StoryCorps Peer Interviews Part 1: National Day of Listening Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide Part 2: StoryCorps: Suggested Questions for Peer Interviews

Additional handouts will be provided as needed, as the context of this project unfolds.

Handout #2 Watching Interviews: What Works? What Doesnt? Name: ________________________________________ Directions: During the coming week, watch two interviews. They can be on talk shows or news shows. These interviews can be in your first language. Immediately after you finish watching, quickly write down notes to help you remember what you saw and what you thought about it. We will be talking about what you saw in class next Thursday, so bring your notes to class! Interview 1 Name of program Who was interviewed? Who was the interviewer? What did you like about the interview? Interview 2

1. 2.

1. 2.

What didnt you like about the interview?

Is there a question you wish the interviewer had asked? If so, what was it? What were two 1. questions the interviewer asked? 2. What was the most interesting thing about the interview? Did the interviewer encourage the speaker to tell a story? How? 1. 2.

Handout #3 About Interviews: Some Questions to Think AboutDirections: Over the next few weeks, we will be listening to various types of interviews and talking about what we observed in small groups. At the end of three weeks, your group and the whole class will decide what it thinks a good interviewer should do and what a good interviewer should not do. Use this sheet to write down ideas from your group discussions that will help you think about what advice you might give to anyone who might want to do an interview, based on what you have seen in the interviews you have watched or listened to. We will be using this form for three weeks, so at the end of class each Thursday, leave it in your project folder. In what ways is an interview similar to conversation? How is it different?

What are the different parts of an interview?

What do you think makes an interview a good interview?

What makes a story that a person tells in an interview interesting?

What kind of things does a good interviewer do to get someone to tell a good story?

What kind of things does a good interviewer not do? Why

Handout #4

From StoryCorps: Tips on Effective Interview Techniques for Students

A. Tips from StoryCorps, Listening for Production:

Follow-up questions can also elicit detail from a storyteller for a more vivid telling. The question How did hat make you feel? is often effective. Sometimes, youll encounter a participant who, because of shyness , nerves, or something else, is somewhat stuck. In this case, you should ask questions to move the interview forward. If your question is of a sensitive nature, give the participants the option to not answer for example, Would you mind if I asked a question? You dont need to answer if you dont want to.

The key to making it a great interchange is to be curious and have an open heart.

B. Tips from Studs Terkel: The first thing Id say to any interviewer is Listen. Its the second thing Id say too, and the third, and the fourth. Listen listen listen. You dont have to agree with them or disagree with them. Dont push them, dont rush them, dont chase them or harass them with getting on to the next question. Let them take their time. The most important is that it shouldnt sound like questioning. Wha t time did you get up yesterday morning? What time did you go to bed? What did you do in between?none of that. So tell me, how was yesterday? Thats the right way of doing it. Making it sound like youre having a conversation.

From StoryCorps Lesson Plan Introduction to StoryCorps, p. 8 (StoryCorps: Listening for Production and Studs Terkel, with Tony Parker, Interviewing an Interviewer)

Handout #5 Your First Interview: With Your Child PART 1: PREPARING FOR THE INTERVIEW Directions for Part 1: (1) In groups of parents of children of around the same age, you will decide what questions each student will ask her/his child. Some sample ideas for questions are printed on this sheet . But you know your children best! What questions do YOU want to ask to encourage them to tell you a story that you can share with the class? Brainstorm possible questions in your group. Think how your child might respond to these question. Choose questions that are appropriate for your childs age. Write the questions your group comes up with in the spaces below. (2) As a group, decide on at least four questions that each member of the group will use to interview her child. Put a circle around the four questions you choose. (3) Discuss with your group different ways to begin and end the interview. Think ahead about any problems that might arise in an interview and how you might handle them. Part 1: Group Decision: Interview Questions Possible questions for children (adapted from StoryCorps): What was one of the happiest moments of your life? What was one of the saddest times in your life? What are you proudest of in your life? When in life have you felt most alone or frightened? What was the funniest thing that happened to you? What do you like to learn? How has your life been different than what youd imagined? What is your earliest memory? What do you think your future holds for you? Our own ideas for questions:

Directions for Part 2: (1) Fill in the first part of the sheet before you do the interview. Be sure to write down the questions your group decided all members would ask. Then add whatever other questions you want to ask (to remind you after your conversation with your child begins). (2) Follow the advice of your group in setting up the interview with your child. As the questions you agreed to in the group, and add any others that YOU want to ask. (3) Listen carefully to your child. (4) As soon as the conversation is over, take a few minutes to write down (in your first language or English) some notes about what your child said. Then think about how you might share this in English with your group looking up any words you may not know. (5) Bring this sheet back to class on Thursday to help you to share your childs story! Your Name: Childs Name: Date of Interview: Questions Asked: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Notes:

[Handout #5] PART 2: DOING THE INTERVIEW

[Handout #5] PART 3: REFLECTING ON THE INTERVIEW Directions: After doing something new, it is important to think about what you did and how you did it. Here is a form to help you to do that. It is based upon the Interviewing Dos and Donts our class developed plus a few ideas we talked about in class that came from StoryCorps and other places. YES Preparing for the interview I felt well prepared for this interview Things I could improve in my next interview: During the interview I was able to play the role of interviewer and get my child to respond and share a story. I was able to follow our class advice (our Interviewing Dos and Donts). I was a curious listener. Things I could improve in my next interview: After the interview I took good notes that helped me remember what the person said. Things I could improve in my next interview: NO SOMEWHAT

1 ..2.....34. .5

1 ..2.....34. .5

1 ..2.....34. .5 1 ..2.....34. .5

1 ..2.....34. .5

INSERT HERE: Interview Dos and Donts developed by classDOs .. .. .. .. ..

DONTs .. .. .. .. .

Handout #7 StoryCorps: List of Great Questions http://storycorps.org/record-your-story/great-questions/list/ These questions are merely suggestions for getting a good conversation going. We encourage you to use the ones you like and to come up with your own. This list is in no particular order. You may choose one of the categories below, read through them all. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Great questions for anyone Friends and Colleagues Grandparents Raising Children Parents Growing Up School Love & Relationships Marriage & Partnerships Working Religion Serious Illness Family Heritage War Remembering a loved one

1. Great questions for anyone What was the happiest moment of your life? The saddest? Who was the most important person in your life? Can you tell me about him or her? Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did that person teach you? Who has been the kindest to you in your life? Its been said that after they pass away, the most important people in our lives live within us. Is there anyone from your past that lives within you? What are the most important lessons youve learned in life? What is your earliest memory? Are there any words of wisdom youd like to pass along to me? What are you proudest of in your life? When in life have you felt most alone? How has your life been different than what youd imagined? How would you like to be remembered? Do you have any regrets? What does your future hold? Is there anything that youve never told me but want to tell me now? Is there something about me that youve always wanted to know but have never asked?

2. Friends or Colleagues If you could interview anyone from your life living or dead, but not a celebrity, who would it be and why? What is your first memory of me? Was there a time when you didnt like me? What makes us such good friends? How would you describe me? How would you describe yourself? Where will we be in 10 years? 20 years? Do you think well ever lose touch with each other? Is there anything that youve always wanted to tell me but havent? 3. Grandparents Where did you grow up? What was your childhood like? Who were your favorite relatives? Do you remember any of the stories they used to tell you? How did you and grandma/grandpa meet? What was my mom/dad like growing up? Do you remember any songs that you used to sing to her/him? Can you sing them now? Was she/he well-behaved? What is the worst thing she/he ever did? What were your parents like? What were your grandparents like? How would you like to be remembered? Are you proud of me? 4. Raising children When did you first find out that youd be a parent? How did you feel? Can you describe the moment when you saw your child for the first time? How has being a parent changed you? What are your dreams for your children? Do you remember when your last child left home for good? Do you have any favorite stories about your kids? 5. Parents Do you remember what was going through your head when you first saw me? How did you choose my name? What was I like as a baby? As a young child? Do you remember any of the songs you used to sing to me? Can you sing them now? What were my siblings like? What were the hardest moments you had when I was growing up? If you could do everything again, would you raise me differently? What advice would you give me about raising my own kids?

What are your dreams for me? How did you meet mom/dad? Are you proud of me?

6. Growing up When and where were you born? Where did you grow up? What was it like? Who were your parents? What were your parents like? How was your relationship with your parents? Did you get into trouble? What was the worst thing you did? Do you have any siblings? What were they like growing up? What did you look like? How would you describe yourself as a child? Were you happy? What is your best memory of childhood? Worst? Did you have a nickname? Howd you get it? Who were your best friends? What were they like? How would you describe a perfect day when you were young? What did you think your life would be like when you were older? Do you have any favorite stories from your childhood? 7. School Did you enjoy school? What kind of student were you? What would you do for fun? How would your classmates remember you? Are you still friends with anyone from that time in your life? What are your best memories of grade school/high school/college/graduate school? Worst memories? Was there a teacher or teachers who had a particularly strong influence on your life? Tell me about them. Do you have any favorite stories from school? 8. Love & Relationships Do you have a love of your life? When did you first fall in love? Can you tell me about your first kiss? What was your first serious relationship? Do you believe in love at first sight? Do you ever think about previous lovers? What lessons have you learned from your relationships?

9. Marriage & Partnerships How did you meet your husband/wife? How did you know he/she was the one? How did you propose? What were the best times? The most difficult times? Did you ever think of getting divorced? Did you ever get divorced? Can you tell me about it? What advice do you have for young couples? Do you have any favorite stories from your marriage or about your husband/wife? 10. Working What do you do for a living? Tell me about how you got into your line of work. Do you like your job? What did you think you were going to be when you grew up? What did you want to be when you grew up? What lessons has your work life taught you? If you could do anything now, what would you do? Why? Do you plan on retiring? If so, when? How do you feel about it? Do you have any favorite stories from your work life? 11. Religion Can you tell me about your religious beliefs/spiritual beliefs? What is your religion? Have you experienced any miracles? What was the most profound spiritual moment of your life? Do you believe in God? Do you believe in the after-life? What do you think it will be like? When you meet God, what do you want to say to Him? 12. Serious Illness Can you tell me about your illness? Do you think about dying? Are you scared? How do you imagine your death? Do you believe in an after-life? Do you regret anything? Do you look at your life differently now than before you were diagnosed? Do you have any last wishes? If you were to give advice to me or my children, or even children to come in our family, what would it be? What have you learned from life? The most important things? Has this illness changed you? What have you learned? How do you want to be remembered? 13. Family heritage

What is your ethnic background? Where is your moms family from? Where is your dads family from? Have you ever been there? What was that experience like? What traditions have been passed down in your family? Who were your favorite relatives? Do you remember any of the stories they used to tell you? What are the classic family stories? Jokes? Songs?

14. War Were you in the military? Did you go to war? What was it like? How did war change you? During your service, can you recall times when you were afraid? What are your strongest memories from your time in the military? What lessons did you learn from this time in your life? 15. Remembering a loved one What was your relationship to _____? Tell me about _____. What is your first memory of _____? What is your best memory of _____? What is your most vivid memory of _____? What did _____ mean to you? Are you comfortable/ can you talk about _____s death? How did _____ die? What has been the hardest thing about losing _____? What would you ask _____ if _____ were here today? What do you miss most about _____? How do you think _____ would want to be remembered? Can you talk about the biggest obstacles _____ overcame in life? Was there anything you and _____ disagreed about, fought over, or experienced some conflict around? What about _____ makes you smile? What was your relationship like? What did _____ look like? Did you have any favorite jokes _____ used to tell? Do you have any stories you want to share about _____? What were _____s hopes and dreams for the future? Is there something about _____ that you think no one else knows? How are you different now than you were before you lost _____? What is the image of _____ that persists? Do you have any traditions to honor _____? What has helped you the most in your grief? What are the hardest times?

Handout #8 Part 1 National Day of Listening

Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide(adapted from StoryCorps - http://nationaldayoflistening.org/downloads/DIY-InstructionGuide.pdf)The StoryCorps experience is not limited to our recording booths. We encourage everyone to conduct Do-It-Yourself interviews in your home, workplace, or community. Choose a friend, colleague, or loved one to interview, and find some recording equipment. Theres no wrong way to do it. Just listen closely, and ask the questions youve always wanted to ask. Heres how:

1. Select Your Interview Partner Start by selecting whom you wish to interview. A fellow student? A relative? A mentor? A local hero? Some people may be hesitant to participate; emphasize that everybodys story is important. Let your interview partner know that you would be honored to record the conversation. 2. Create a List of Questions Preparing ahead of time will greatly improve the quality of your interview. Think about what you would like to learn from your partner, then make a list of 5-10 questions. Here are some questions that have led to great conversations: What are some of the most important lessons you have learned in life? What are you most proud of? What was the happiest moment of your life? The saddest? Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did they teach you? How would you like to be remembered? 3. Begin the Conversation Start the interview by stating your name, your age, the date, and the location of the interview. For example, My name is Marissa Martinez. Im forty years old. The date is November 27, 2009, and Im sitting with my grandfather, Frank Jackson, in his living room in Hamilton, Missouri. Then ask your storyteller to do the same. Remember, the questions you prepared in advance are just suggestions. Trust your instincts and ask questions in whatever order feels right. If something interests you, ask more about it. Sometimes your storyteller may need to know that its okay to talk about a certain topic. Grant permission by saying, Tell me more. Take breaks if your storyteller needs them. Avoid saying uh huh or interrupting. Instead, use visual cues like nodding your head to encourage the storyteller to keep going. 4. Keep the Conversation Flowing Listen closely. Look your storyteller in the eyes. Smile. Stay engaged. Stick with the good stuff. Try to keep to the topics that move you. If the current topic isnt what you wanted to put on tape, gently steer the conversation in another direction.

Ask emotional questions. Asking How does this make you feel? often elicits interesting responses. Dont be afraid to ask. Respect your subject. If there is a topic that your interview partner doesnt want to talk about, respect his or her wishes and move on. Take notes during the interview. Write down questions or stories you might want to return to later. Be curious and honest, and keep an open heart. Great things will happen.

5. Wrap It Up

Weve found that 40 minutes is a good length of time for StoryCorps interviews, but you can talk for as long or as short as you like. (Note: The interviews in our class will take 10-20 minutes or so.) Before you turn off the recorder, ask the storyteller if there is anything else he or she wants to talk about. Then make sure to thank the person; opening up can be difficult. Express your gratitude, and let him or her know that it was a privilege to listen to the story. Finally, hit STOP on your recorder. Congratulations! You have just joined the StoryCorps Do-It-Yourself community

Handout #8 Part 2

From StoryCorps: Suggested Questions for Peer InterviewsQUESTIONS ABOUT THE PAST What is your earliest memory? Whats the most exciting thing youve done? What are the most important lessons youve learned in life? Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What was the happiest moment of your life? QUESTIONS ABOUT THE PRESENT Describe your perfect day. If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would it be? Why? If you could snap your fingers and make one thing better in the world, what would it be? Why? Whats the best thing about being a teenager? The worst? Tell me a story about your name. What are you proudest of in your life? QUESTIONS ABOUT THE FUTURE What does your future hold? What do you think your life will be like when you get older? Where do you see yourself in 10 years? 20 years? What are your goals and ambitions for the future? How would you like to be remembered?