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Version 4.0 January 2013 Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory HSE AND SITE INFORMATION FOR CONTRACTORS

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ASKAP Site Info & HSE Manual v2 - CSIRO StaffPage ii of 73
Image Cover: Artist's impression of ASKAP at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO).
Credit: Swinburne Astronomy Productions. Design data provided by CSIRO.
Page 3 of 73
2. MRO SITE INFORMATION AND HAZARDS ....................................................... 8
2.1 Natural Environment ................................................................................................. 8
2.3 Vehicle and Driving Considerations ........................................................................ 13
2.4 Heritage - Traditional Owners ................................................................................. 15
3. RISK MANAGEMENT & CONTROL OF THE WORKSITE ................................ 16
3.1 HSE Legal Requirements ....................................................................................... 16
3.2 CSIRO Roles & Responsibilities ............................................................................. 17
3.3 CSIRO HSE Organisation Chart ............................................................................. 18
3.4 CSIRO Control of Workplace Requirements .......................................................... 19
3.5 Emergency Preparedness and Response .............................................................. 20
4. EXPECTATIONS PRIOR TO ARRIVAL ON SITE.............................................. 23
4.1 ALL Contractors ...................................................................................................... 23
4.2 Infrastructure Contractor ......................................................................................... 25
5. AT THE MRO – CSIRO CONTROLLED SITE ................................................... 27
5.1 Rules of Conduct .................................................................................................... 27
5.2 OHS Requirements................................................................................................. 31
6.1 Rules of Conduct .................................................................................................... 40
6.2 OHS Requirements................................................................................................. 44
7.1 Rules of Conduct .................................................................................................... 51
7.2 OHS Requirements................................................................................................. 55
8.1 House Rules‘ and Information................................................................................ 62
Aim
This manual has been developed to assist CSIRO‘s contractors at the Murchison Radio-
astronomy Observatory (MRO) to understand CSIRO expectations for maintaining the
highest possible standards for a safe, healthy and environmentally sustainable working
environment.
This manual is to be read and acknowledged by all contractors to the MRO and Boolardy
Accommodation Facility. This document summarises how the MRO operates as a CSIRO-
run facility, the main hazards onsite and issues the Managing Organisation should ensure
are effectively managed with all of its staff and subcontractors.
The MRO is the location of various radio-astronomy telescopes, including the Australian
Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) and supporting infrastructure. The MRO is
moving towards becoming a new National Facility as part of the CSIRO Astronomy and
Space Science (CASS) business unit‘s suite of national facilities.
Background
CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, its management and staff members are striving for
Zero Harm in achieving zero injuries, zero illnesses, zero environmental harm, and zero
tolerance of unsafe behaviours. We recognise that health safety and environmental
sustainability must be integrated into everything we do. We also recognise the cultural and
heritage significance of the land on which the MRO sits, and will ensure that we meet our
responsibilities on this site in all that we do.
Safe and environmentally sustainable work practices are the responsibility of every person
(staff member, collaborator, contractor, Guest User and visitor). It is not the individual
responsibility of managers, supervisors and/or HSE personnel alone, it is the cooperative
action by all that will prevent incidents. It is CSIRO‘s position to encourage all personnel,
staff members, collaborators, contractors, Guest Users and visitors alike, to take the
initiative in anticipating, preventing and correcting conditions or practices which may
threaten the health or safety of the individual or harm to the environment.
Further Information
This manual may be freely reproduced or copied in the original format.
If in doubt about anything HSE, please ask your Contractor Coordinator or a CSIRO staff
member.
1.2 Executive Summary - HSE Requirements
The responsibilities for HSE differ depending on who is working on a particular section of
the site, who has control of the workplace and how access to the site is being managed.
NOTE: The word control‘ implies an overriding HSE responsibility. During the construction
phase, the MRO will have three arrangements:
a. CSIRO-Controlled Site. In this situation, CSIRO controls work within the
workplace and access to the site.
b. Contractor-Controlled Site. In this situation, CSIRO has handed over a
section of the MRO to a contractor – it is effectively under their control‘. The
contractor also controls access to this site and (typically) transits through a CSIRO
site to reach their site.
c. Infrastructure Contractor-Controlled Site. As for Contractor-Controlled
Site above.
Application
Sections 2 (Site Info) and Section 3 (Risk Management) of this manual apply to all
Contractors. Section 8 (Boolardy Accommodation Facility Rules‘) only apply to those being
accommodated at this Facility.
The reference table below is to be used as a guide to the HSE requirements and
expectations of Contractors; the numbers refer to the paragraph numbers within this
document.
HSE Topic CSIRO-Controlled
Insurance Certificates 4.1.2 4.1.2 4.1.2
Competencies – Licences & Certificates
4.1.3 4.1.3 4.1.3
Medical Disclosure Form 4.3.2 4.3.2 NA
1.2.2 Rules of Conduct
Alcohol & Drugs 5.1.2 6.1.2 7.1.2
Communication Expectations 5.1.3 6.1.3 7.1.3
Domestic Animals/Pets 5.1.4 6.1.4 7.1.4
Housekeeping & Site Tidiness 5.1.5 6.1.5 7.1.5
Incident Reporting & Investigation
5.1.6 6.1.6 7.1.6
5.1.8 6.1.7 7.1.7
Stop Work Authority 5.1.12 6.1.11 7.1.11
Working Alone 5.1.13 6.1.12 7.1.12
Working at Boolardy Accommodation Facility
5.1.14 N/A N/A
HSE Topic CSIRO-Controlled
Electrical Leads, Power Tools & Portable Electrical Equipment
5.2.3 6.2.2 7.2.2
Explosive Actuated Power Tools 5.2.6 NA NA
Hazardous Substances - Chemical Storage & Handling
5.2.7 6.2.4 7.2.4
Ladder Use 5.2.10 NA NA
Manual Handling 5.2.11 NA NA
Occupational Noise & Vibration 5.2.12 6.2.6 7.2.6
Permits to Work 5.2.13 NA NA
Personal Protective Clothing & Equipment
5.2.15 6.2.8 7.2.8
5.2.17 6.2.9 7.2.9
Page 7 of 73
HSE Topic CSIRO-Controlled
5.3.1 6.3.1 7.3.1
5.3.2 6.3.2 7.3.2
Weed Control – Earthmoving Vehicle Inspections
5.3.7 6.3.7 7.3.7
2.1 Natural Environment
2.1.1 Pastoral Station Considerations
CSIRO holds the lease for Boolardy Station and subleases the pastoral activities, but this
does not give us the right to interfere with pastoral activities, nor encroach on the staff
running the station.
CSIRO has established an Accommodation Facility in the vicinity of the Boolardy
Homestead. It is important that we are respectful of the Station Managers and their family.
Pastoral stations are very large sheep and cattle properties, which are steeped in Australian history. Pastoralists rely on natural vegetation to breed and run their stock in a sustainable manner to produce food and fibre for us all.
Many daily activities on pastoral stations, such as mustering, shooting, or burning off, can also be very dangerous to the public. Pastoral stations are busy enterprises and pastoralists may be away for some time on other parts of the station.
Just as you cannot do what you like on someone else‘s property in the city, pastoral stations
are people‘s homes and all the land on the pastoral station is used to run their business.
They have a legal right to their privacy and to run their pastoral business without
interruption. Please respect their rights.
General hazards on a pastoral station include:
Electric Fences. Take care near wire fences it is possible they are electrified without being
signposted.
Gates. The golden rule of outback stations is to leave all gates as you found them. It‘s likely
you do not know what the Station Managers are planning/doing with their livestock so leave
the gate as you found it.
Station animals. Do not interfere with the station livestock deliberately and give them a
wide-berth if they wander into the accommodation Facility. CSIRO staff and their contractors
should not ride any of the station‘s horses.
Station Property. Ruins and sheds are out-of-bounds to all Guest Users.
Water. Much of the water is drawn from bores and although it will not kill you may make you
ill. Always bring sufficient supplies of freshwater with you wherever you go in the outback.
NOTE
ACCOMMODATION FACILITY (WITTENOOM COTTAGE).
AS A GUIDE, CSIRO PLANS 10L PER PERSON PER DAY
Page 9 of 73
2.1.2 Climate and Weather
Overview
The MRO is situated, according to the climate classification of Australia, at the transition of
grassland‘ and desert‘, as such, the climate of the MRO is characterised by:
Hot Summers (max temp often >45 C)
Cool Winters (wind chill factor down to - 7 C)
Low year-round humidity
Low rainfall [<350mm annually falling in Autumn and Winter (typ.) ]
Occasional wild weather‘ (flash flooding and cyclones)
Wild Weather
The Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) warns that localised flash-flooding is possible near the
rivers and in other susceptible low-lying areas; while the geotechnical consultants suggest
that because the site is some 100m above the last major flood height (March 2006,
280mAHD) the risk of flooding is low.
From experience, CSIRO staff note that water does sheet across the open country and can
render the rural road network unpassable and downright dangerous at very short notice!
Drivers may check with the CSIRO Murchison Support Facility (MSF) at Geraldton before
travelling.
Cyclones are more likely to occur along the coast line, and it is estimated that a cyclone
impact causing wind gusts in excess of 90 km/h in the vicinity of Geraldton occurs about
once every six to eight years on average.
Cyclones have occurred near Geraldton from January to April although they are most
frequent in March. Cyclone Herbie (1988) occurred in May but only the indirect impact of
flooding affected the area.
Figure 1: Nowhere is the notion of 'personal responsibility' so applicable as in the Murchison
Page 10 of 73
2.1.3 Geology and Topography
Generally speaking the MRO is relatively flat, from a topography perspective, and, other
than isolated breakaways and a few low rounded granite hilltops much of the area
comprises of sandplains and hardpans.
The MRO is sited within an area of rare seismic activity with the origin of five seismic events
attributed to faults in the region around Mount Narryer (some 30-35km to the NW).
Soil Type
Geotechnical reviews define the surface soils as silty sand with gravel, fine to coarse
grained, red brown and dry. The gravel comprises trace amounts of fine to coarse sized
rounded ironstone nodules with [varied] sizes of subangular quartz fragments. Granite rock
outcrops are visible at some antenna sites at the MRO itself.
Bearing Capacity
When considering bearing capacity the consultants classed the material type as sand, very
dense with a high allowable bearing capacity.
NOTE
CSIRO ENCOURAGES ALL GUEST USERS TO UNDERTAKE RELEVANT AND PROPER
PREPARATORY STUDIES PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY
Page 11 of 73
2.2 Fauna - Local Wildlife
2.2.1 Pastoral Station Stock and Native Wildlife
Do not attempt to interact with native wildlife; in particular do not feed them. Some of them
may look cute, but could injure you if they think they need to defend themselves.
Be aware of kangaroos, emus, pastoral station stock, e.g. cattle and sheep when you are
driving as they may stray onto the road.
2.2.2 Insects
If visiting the site in warmer months of the year beware of the
large numbers of flies. Of note, the Murchison Shire Council
warns of the mosquito-borne disease called Ross River Virus‘.
NOTE
IT IS RECOMMENDED YOU COVER ALL EXPOSED SKIN AND APPLY MOSQUITO
REPELLENT WHEN WORKING IN THE TWILIGHT AND EVENING HOURS
2.2.3 Spiders
Many Australian spiders are poisonous, and some bites can, at least in theory, be deadly.
Each year in Australia as many as 4,000 people are bitten.
Of these 200 require anti-venom treatment and one bite
proves fatal. Don't panic if you see a spider, they won't attack
you unless provoked.
The Redback spider is the most dangerous spider likely to
be found in the Murchison, they like dry and dark places in
houses, sheds, outdoor toilets etc. Bites are painful and the
venom can stay in the body for months. Asides from its
distinctive markings, the Redback spider‘s web is notable for
being disorganised and irregular in appearance.
2.2.4 Lizards and Goannas
Goannas or lizards are a common sight in the MRO, and they can be over two metres long!
Goannas can rear up on their hind legs and will
appear threatening. Sometimes they do it to scare off
attackers. They also fight in this way. But mostly they
stand up when they hear/notice anything suspicious,
to look around for threats. They can run very fast
over short distances, sometimes using their hind legs
only. They are very good tree climbers, and that is
what they will often run for; give them a wide berth if
sighted.
Redback spider web [Source:
www.findaspider.org.au]
Perentie Lizard (up to 2m long) – Seen in Murchison Area [Source: www.wildherps.com]
2.2.5 Snakes
Most snake bites happen when people try to catch, corner or kill snakes. Look where you
put your feet and your hands. Apply caution before lifting up any large objects from the
ground where you cannot see underneath; snakes are least active during the cooler months
of the year. Snakes don't like or seek human company, allow them an escape path.
Snakes of the Gascoyne region include:
King Brown or Mulga snake
Spotted Mulga or Butler’s Mulga Snake (endemic to region)
Desert Death Adder
King Brown or Mulga Snake Spotted/Butler‘s Mulga
Western Brown / Gwarder Desert Death Adder
Source: Australian Venom Research Unit [http://www.avru.org]
2.3.1 Outback Driving
Driving to and from the MRO is manageable when tackled by well-prepared and competent people with the maturity to know their own and the vehicle‘s limits. When driving in remote regions be aware of the following:
Watch you speed. State speed limit is 110km/h and 100km/h if towing a trailer - drive at a speed appropriate to your:
o experience;
o the road qualities; &
o environmental conditions.
Washouts, wandering stock, native wildlife (especially at dawn and dusk), and other hazards are regularly encountered on the road to the MRO.
o Do not brake hard and turn to avoid an animal, it is better to hit it than roll the vehicle!
Be aware of trucks and road trains and be wary of their dust.
o Don‘t overtake blindly — be patient or call them up on UHF40.
Road Closures. The Murchison Shire Council often closes the roads after rain to minimise damage - never travel on a closed road‘ as they are closed for a good reason, and substantial penalties will apply.
o Up-to-date Road Info: http://www.murchison.wa.gov.au/road_conditions
Discuss your onsite access requirements with your CSIRO point of contact and stick to the designated access route.
If it looks like a shortcut that‘s too good to be true, it probably is!
Build up a good vehicle recovery kit on advice from a specialised 4WD centre.
Take breaks at least every two hours.
Plan to check-in with a responsible person at scheduled times and take advantage of inexpensive GPS satellite tracking technology such as SPOT GPS Messenger.
Figure 2: Beringarra Pindar Road in July [Image: Brayden Briggs, CSIRO]
2.3.2 Communications while Travelling – Call-In Procedures
CSIRO has established call-in procedures for staff members travelling to/from the MRO. Our process identifies a staff member‘s expected arrival time, contact numbers for any communications devices they have with them, and procedures for response if they do not arrive.
It is suggested that Guest Users establish a similar process to ensure you know which route your workers and contractors are travelling and establish contingency procedures.
NOTE
MOBILE PHONE COVERAGE STOPS AT APPROXIMATELY 30KM OUT OF MULLEWA
DEPENDING ON CARRIER, ATMOSPHERICS ETC.
CSIRO USES THE TELSTRA NEXT G ™
SERVICE; GOOD SERVICE IN THE REGION
2.3.3 Communications – Local Communication Channels
See Enclosure for list of Key Contacts, which includes details on local radio communication
channels used in the area, as well as satellite, mobile and landline phone numbers.
Page 15 of 73
2.4 Heritage - Traditional Owners
Figure 3: Dave DeBoer, former CSIRO ASKAP Theme Leader, with some of the Site's Traditional Owners
Heritage is not simply about sites and objects, but all that is passed down from one generation to the next. Language, stories and children‘s tales, places of significance, history, belief and memories. It‘s what connects the past with the present, and what continues to have relevance in the present. For Aboriginal people, it is especially rooted in kinship and country.
Aboriginal people are ever mindful of the many resources on their land, and hold a deep respect for all their sites, ancient and not so ancient. They all combine into a single cultural landscape full of meaning, of memory, history, legend and belief. Points to note:
All Guest Users must receive Heritage Induction.
Respect the land at all times, the Aboriginal people believe that they are custodians of the land and must look after it.
Be mindful of their obligations to the land when dealing with you and your requests.
All flora and fauna have meaning to the Traditional Owners, so do not pull up or cut flowers, break off branches/leaves from bushes/trees (even if burnt) unless approved through official channels.
Do not remove stones from any area other than those designated; they may have significance to the Traditional Owners.
Under no circumstances should any artefact or any item that may possibly be an artefact be disturbed and moved. Anything that may be human remains must be reported to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager.
If you find anything that may be of Aboriginal interest, mark off the area with safety cones (witches hats), note the map or GPS coordinates and notify the CSIRO MRO Site Manager.
NOTE: A HERITAGE INDUCTION IS REQUIRED FOR ALL UNESCORTED
VISITORS TO THE SITE
GERALDTON TO MAKE ARRANGEMENTS TO BE INDUCTED, OR FOR ANY
OTHER RELATED QUERIES
3.1 HSE Legal Requirements
CSIRO is a Commonwealth statutory authority and as such is required to comply with Commonwealth occupational health and safety (OHS) and environment legislative requirements, where they exist, as well as State and Local Council environmental legislative requirements.
3.1.1 Occupational Health and Safety Legal Requirements
Contractors must comply with occupational health and safety legislation that is applicable to
their organisational requirements. However, when working at the CSIRO Accommodation
Facility or MRO, contractors may also have to work to Commonwealth legislative
expectations as outlined in this manual. Commonwealth legislation does not affect the
operation of State or Territory laws promoting occupational health and safety.
3.1.2 Environmental Legal Requirements
From an environmental perspective, CSIRO seeks to conduct its business activities in an
environmentally sustainable manner, including reduced consumption of resources and
reduced production of wastes. As such, CSIRO expects its contractors to apply the same
principles.
Contractors must comply with environmental legislation that is applicable to their
organisational requirements. However, when working at the CSIRO Accommodation Facility
or MRO, contractors will also have to work within additional legislative expectations as
outlined in this manual.
Page 17 of 73
3.2 CSIRO Roles & Responsibilities
Roles Specific HSE Responsibilities
(Antony Schinckel)
Overall responsibility for ensuring that all relevant hazards and risks are identified, assessed and suitable controls are implemented to manage the risk to as low as reasonably practicable.
Managing the project implementation to ensure that various works undertaken via multiple IPT Leaders don‘t conflict and can be undertaken safety within the same time frame
Integrated Project Team (IPT)
Contractual Point-of-Contact for Contractors (Contractor Coordinator)
MRO IPT Leader is the Contractor Coordinator for Aurecon as Superintendent in relation to Infrastructure Works
MRO Site Manager
(Barry Turner)
Oversee the standard application of CSIRO HSE procedures at the MRO
Manage all people movements to/from the MRO, including any requests for changes to the accommodation schedule at the Accommodation Facility
Primary contact for all shipping/freight to/from the MRO
Act as MRO Site Manager , if necessary
MRO Site Manager Primary CSIRO point-of-contact for Contractors when on site at the MRO
Conduct a weekly meeting with all Contractors on upcoming activities, and HSE matters, including any incidents etc
Has the authority to stop work where a activity may cause harm to a CSIRO employee or contractor or the environment (this includes contractors not under our control who could harm CSIRO employees)
Monitors the overall site environmental (weather) conditions and where weather conditions may become hazardous, inform CSIRO staff and contractors to discuss a temporary halt of activities until the conditions alter
Emergency Coordinator for any emergency situations on site
HSE Officer – ASKAP
(Wilfredo Pena)
Advisor to IPT Leaders and other CSIRO staff engaged in the ASKAP project on legislative and procedural requirements
Implement and monitor site-based HSE activities and provide practical support on-site, as required
Proactively address HSE issues and resolve matters raised n a timely and effective manner
Provide direction to the HSE Officers meeting to support the MRO Site Manager
Monitor the status of HSE activities and collate information to prepare performance and statistical reports for the HSE Manager
Page 18 of 73
Ant Schinckel Theme Leader -
CONTRACTUAL MANAGEMENT
HSE ADVICE & SUPPORT
KEY
Communication Relationship
3.4 CSIRO Control of Workplace Requirements
The responsibilities for HSE differ depending on who is working on the site; who has control of the work place and how access to the site is being managed. CSIRO notes three different control of site distinctions: Greenfield Site, CSIRO-Controlled workplace, Contractor-Controlled workplace. There are no Greenfield Sites at the MRO.
3.4.1 Working on a CSIRO Site (CSIRO Controlled Site)
If the project work area of the contractor is intermingled with CSIRO staff work areas and cannot be isolated safely, then the work area remains under CSIRO control.
3.4.2 Access through a CSIRO Site (Contractor Controlled Site)
If an area of the project work area can be cordoned-off, delineated, or otherwise defined as
a specific area of the site where CSIRO staff have no or minimal need to enter the area,
then the work area can be identified as under Contractor Control.
However, for the contractor to access their worksite, they typically must transit through a
CSIRO site. This imparts obligations on CSIRO to ensure the contractor and their staff
have received an appropriate site induction, so they are aware of the hazards associated
with the CSIRO site and their access. Similarly, there are obligations on the contractor to
ensure that the health, safety and wellbeing of CSIRO staff in adjacent areas are protected.
ON INFRASTUCTURE TENDER AWARD, THE MRO WILL HAVE BOTH CONTRACTOR-
CONTROLLED AND CSIRO-CONTROLLED WORKPLACES
Page 20 of 73
3.5 Emergency Preparedness and Response
3.5.1 Conceivable Emergencies on Site
Some of the emergencies that may be encountered at or in the vicinity of the MRO or CSIRO Accommodation Facility include:
MEDICAL
Cuts/abrasions
Dehydration
Heat Illnesses
3.5.2 First Aid
Contractors are responsible for the provision of their own first aid equipment and for
treatment of minor cuts, burns and abrasions. If any contractor is unable to provide their
own first aid provisions the CSIRO MRO Site Manager must be made aware of this situation
prior to commencing work.
Many CSIRO staff members have received training in Remote Area First Aid. CSIRO
maintains an extensive quantity of first aid supplies at the CSIRO Site Hut and at the
Accommodation Facility. While it is an expectation that Contractors will be prepared to
provide their own first aid response for minor incidents, the CSIRO designated First Aid
Officer or another suitably competent CSIRO staff member may assist if requested.
For information only: CSIRO is establishing two well-equipped First Aid Posts‘; one at the
Accommodation Facility and the other at the CSIRO Site Hut in the central portion‘ of the
MRO.
Page 21 of 73
3.5.3 Emergency Control Organisation
The person(s) in-control of the worksite is/are responsible for responding to emergencies.
Where an emergency situation requires the attention
of Emergency Services the contractor should inform
the CSIRO MRO Site Manager of the situation.
Given the remote nature of the site, the first responders may need to control and respond to the situation for some time, with the order of response priorities being:
1. People
2. Environment
Communications
Coordinator
Emergency Response Team
or Senior First Aid trained)
Maintenance Responder (for equipment & utilities issues)
Fire Response Team (holding place for future)
escalation as required
Page 22 of 73
3.5.4 Emergency Coordinators Role
This position will generally be held by the CSIRO MRO Site Manager, who is responsible for the ongoing health, safety and wellbeing of CSIRO staff members and visitors during an emergency event.
The emergency coordinator (on becoming aware of an emergency) has responsibility for:
Ascertaining the nature of the event and determining appropriate action.
If necessary, coordinate a first aid response.
Notifying and liaising with the appropriate emergency services.
Preparing the airstrip for the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) aircraft arrival, as instructed.
Briefing emergency services on their arrival and advising CSIRO of their recommendations.
For emergencies within the accommodation Facility the Station Manager should be contacted immediately as it may impact upon their activities.
Briefing relevant person/s during and after the situation.
IT IS AN EXPECTATION THAT CONTRACTORS ARE WELL PREPARED TO
RESPOND TO EMERGENCIES WITHIN THEIR OWN ORGANISATION WITH THE
EMPLOYEES THEY HAVE ON SITE AT ANY GIVEN TIME.
THE CSIRO EMERGENCY COORDINATOR WILL SUPPORT CONTRACTOR
RELATED EMERGENCES WHEN ESCALATED BY THE CONTRACTOR FOR
ASSISTANCE.
4.1 ALL Contractors
Part of the contractor selection process includes provision by the contractors of the
documents listed in the following section, which must be received prior to the
commencement of any work. All necessary documents should be provided to your
Contractor Coordinator as far in advance of work commencing as possible. If there are any
changes to documentation, risk assessments or contractor employees expected to be part
of the work you are undertaking, please ensure that your Contractor Coordinator has the
most up to date information.
The Contractor Coordinator is your CSIRO Point-of-Contact; this may be one of the
Integrated Project Team (IPT) Leaders, the ASKAP Theme or ASKAP Project Leader, or the
CSIRO MRO Site Manager. Please ensure you can identify your CSIRO Contractor
Coordinator. The Contractor Coordinator will confirm the risk assessment documents
needed from you.
4.1.1 Risk Assessment Documentation
All contractors must provide either a HSE Management Plan or Job Safety Environmental Analysis documentation to CSIRO for approval prior to the commencement of any work. Safe Work Method Statements (SWMS) must be provided for all work defined by the Commonwealth regulations as high risk and for all work undertaken in any areas defined as construction sites by CSIRO.
CSIRO defines management and expectations of contractors in terms of the level of risk of
the work that the contractors will be undertaking. CSIRO defines the work risk levels in
three categories of High, Medium or Low risk. Overlaying the CSIRO definitions, are the
Commonwealth OHS Act regulatory requirements for areas identified as construction sites.
Below the contractor expectations are detailed in line with both of these requirements.
Risk Category Risk Management Documentation Required
HIGH RISK HSE Management Plan
Job Safety Environmental Analysis (JSEA) – for specific tasks
Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) - if working on the defined construction site
MEDIUM RISK HSE Management Plan
Job Safety Environmental Analysis (JSEA) – for specific tasks
Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) - if working on the defined construction site
LOW RISK or
Job Safety Environmental Analysis (JSEA)
Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) - if working on the defined construction site
CONSTRUCTION
SITE
Job Safety Environmental Analysis (JSEA) – for specific tasks
Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) - if working on the defined construction site
Page 24 of 73
HSE Management Plan is a site-specific document that details the HSE resources, responsibilities and procedures or practices for a particular project and shall cover all work undertaken by the primary contractor and/or subcontractors. The plan must include safety and environmental management procedures and practices used by the contractor.
Job Safety Environmental Analysis (JSEA) is a risk assessment process that identifies the task, process steps, potential hazards, risk control measures and the person/s responsible for ensuring the controls are in place. These shall be undertaken by the contractor(s) undertaking the works. A JSEA template is available at Enclosure 10
Safe Work Method Statement s (SWMS) are required for all high risk work, as defined in Schedule 12 of the Commonwealth OHS Act, and for all construction related work
4.1.2 Insurance Certificates
All Contractors must be insured for the work planned to be undertaken.
Copies of appropriate insurance certificates (e.g. workers compensation, public liability etc) must be forwarded to the IPT Leader/Contract Coordinator – the Contractor Coordinator may request an increase in the monetary value of a policy provided, where the risk of the work is considered to exceed the insurance coverage provided by the contractor.
4.1.3 Competency - Licences & Training Records
All persons undertaking work must be deemed competent or whilst under training be directly
supervised by a competent person. All work should be undertaken in accordance with
Australian Standards unless otherwise indicated in writing by the Contractor Coordinator or
other authority.
Copies of appropriate training evidence must be provided, for all individual contractor
employees that may undertake work requiring a licence or certification within the duration of
the project/task. This is especially applicable for high-risk work such as confined space,
rigging, and scaffolding. Copies of ALL relevant certificates, licences and/or competency
statements must be provided to the Contractor Coordinator prior to arriving on site.
NOTE:
Persons accessing areas designated as a “Construction Site” must hold a WA-
recognised Construction Safety Induction (White Card).
4.1.4 Security
CSIRO has a requirement to satisfy itself and the Commonwealth that those person(s) to be
engaged to access any Commonwealth premises are a fit and proper person(s) as defined
by the Commonwealth.
CSIRO reserves the right to determine who may access the site, or part thereof, and refuse
access to anyone who declines to undertake any requested screening or is deemed not a fit
and proper person. CSIRO maintains the right to review procedures and clearances.
CSIRO accepts no responsibility for the loss of or damage to property and tools that are
brought on site by the Contractor.
Page 25 of 73
4.1.5 Inductions
To fulfil CSIRO‘s legislative obligations to all persons working or visiting the MRO or staying
at the CSIRO Accommodation Facility, a General Site Induction has been developed, relying
on the contents of this manual.
Ideally the General Site Induction should be completed prior to arrival at the MRO, as it
includes details about the hazards of the site and the natural environment in which the MRO
is situated, however the induction can be obtained in a number of ways:
(a) On-line – link can be provided by your Contractor Coordinator
(b) Face-to-Face – advance arrangements must by made with the CSIRO MRO Site
Manager and/or CSIRO MRO Site Manager for an agreed time and location
(c) Contractor Delivered – with prior agreement the induction material may be provided to a
Contractor to deliver to all their employees and any sub-contractors and their employees
working at the MRO. This will require the Contractor to maintain records of the names,
company and date of induction for all persons they induct.
There are obligations on the contractor to ensure that the health, safety and wellbeing of
anyone entering their site. In a contractor-controlled site, the Contractor must provide an
induction to CSIRO staff members and others on their site, or otherwise fully escorted any
persons whilst on their site.
4.2 Infrastructure Contractor
4.2.1 Environmental Management Sub-Plans
In addition to the HSE Management Plans required for all high/medium risk or construction work, the Infrastructure Contractor must also provide a number of sub-plans based around environmental issues including, but are not limited to the following:
Air Quality, including dust control
Waste management, including management of Prescribed Industrial Waste, litter and waste minimisation and recycling strategies
Stakeholder and community relations, including complaint response
Soil and Waste Management, including Erosion and Sediment Control
Flora and Fauna, including weed management
Cultural Heritage
Hazardous Substances
Each sub-plan / procedure should consider the environmental risk, legal obligations, objectives and targets, control measures and monitoring and inspection programs. The Erosion and Sediment Control Plan shall be certified by a Certified Professional in Erosion and Sediment Control. The Contractor will be responsible for ensuring that all recommendations from specialist environmental studies and Permit conditions relevant to the construction phase are met. The Contractor will be responsible for providing all control measures required to meet its environmental responsibilities.
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The Contractor will be required to demonstrate its approach to a robust procedure for identification of aspects and impacts and risk assessment to ensure that those aspects with significant impacts are able to be captured.
4.3 Contractors staying at the CSIRO Accommodation Facility
4.3.1 Site Visit Application Forms
At the time of writing this manual, this remains a paper-based process using a Word format
document, please check with your Contractor Coordinator, as this process will soon move to
an online system.
No. of people Minimum notification
(days)
4.3.2 Personal Information Sheet
This is a CSIRO process used to support medical and emergency treatment and it is
recommended as a good practice to Contractors. In this remote area, first aiders may need
to stabilise you for some time until the RFDS arrive.
CSIRO does not need to view or obtain copies of this information, but it is STRONGLY
suggested that the Contractor collects this information and arranges for it to be held in a
central SECURE location onsite, e.g. for a small contractor group – with the team leader.
Refer to Enclosure 06 for an example of a Personal Information Sheet
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5. AT THE MRO – CSIRO CONTROLLED SITE
There are obligations on CSIRO to ensure the contractor and their employees have received appropriate information about hazards associated with the CSIRO site and also are aware of their obligations.
5.1 Rules of Conduct
5.1.1 Access/Entry to Site
All contractors must sign the contractors log book at either the CSIRO
Site Hut (MRO jobs) or at Wittenoom House (Accommodation Facility
jobs) before commencing work and sign out upon leaving the site.
Leave all gates as you found them; if open, leave open – if closed, close after
driving through.
5.1.2 Alcohol & Drugs
CSIRO will not permit any person clearly affected by alcohol or drugs to carry
out work within the site. If the Contractor is aware that an employee or
subcontractor is affected by alcohol or other drug, they are expected to take
immediate action to stop the work and remove the employee or subcontractor
from site. Any confirmed incident of the above will be recorded by the
Contractor Coordinator.
5.1.3 Communication Expectations
Communication is critical to working in a safe and environmentally sustainable
manner at the MRO. Communication ranges from letting someone know
where you are at all times, to ensuring that the CSIRO MRO Site Manager is
aware of any safety hazards, incidents or significant changes to planned work.
Specific communication forums include:
Toolbox Talk: CSIRO encourages all contractors to conduct toolbox talks with their employees and subcontractors
Weekly Meeting: CSIRO MRO Site Manager meeting with each Contractor to communicate any safety issues, hazards, incidents or significant changes to planned work.
Site Meeting: All meetings with a contractor working on a CSIRO- Controlled Site with relation to their Contract should discuss HSE performance.
5.1.4 Domestic Animals/Pets
Contractors may not bring pets to either the accommodation Facility or the
MRO site. Registered guide/companion/security dogs exempt.
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5.1.5 Housekeeping & Site Tidiness
Contractors are responsible for keeping their immediate work area free from
slip, trip and fall hazards. All worksites must be kept clean and tidy at all times.
5.1.6 Incident Reporting & Investigation
CSIRO must meet regulatory reporting expectations to Comcare within timeframes that are significantly shorter than most contractors would usually have to meet when working within State OHS and Environmental requirements.
Comcare incident reporting expectations apply to incidents on a CSIRO site (in this case the MRO) for CSIRO staff members, contractors and visitors alike regardless of who is in control of the workplace
CSIRO will be responsible for any regulatory reporting to Comcare; however it is essential that communication is received from contractors in a timely manner to ensure that regulatory expectations can be met. Comcare expectations are as follows:
Notifiable death: the work-related death of any person (member of the public, a contractor or an employee).
Within 2 hours
Serious personal injury: a work related injury to or disease for which the person needed: emergency treatment by a registered medical practitioner (including psychologist), or treatment in a hospital as a casualty, without being admitted to the hospital, or admission to a hospital.
Within 24 hours of first becoming aware of the incident
Dangerous occurrence: an occurrence at a workplace that could have caused (but did not cause) the death or serious personal injury to any person.
Within 24 hours of first becoming aware of the incident
Serious HSE Incidents must be reported to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager
within 24 hours and include:
a near miss that could have (but did not) result in the need for hospitalisation
an injury requiring more than first aid treatment
an injury resulting in lost time (an LTI)
any electrical incidents with the potential to have caused an electric shock or electrocution
Minor incidents must be reported to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager within 48 hours of the incident.
Incident report forms must be provided to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager with 48 hours of the incident. Incident investigation reports, including any corrective and preventative actions, must be provided to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager with 10 days of the incident.
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The CSIRO MRO Site Manager, Contractor Coordinator or delegate may
inspect CSIRO-controlled work sites with regard to HSE concerns. Contractors
will also be encouraged to perform self-inspections.
The Contractor Coordinator may seek an independent inspection of contractor
work before final commissioning to ensure the completed work is safe for use.
5.1.8 Risk Management – JSEA’s and SWMS’
Contractors must prepare JSEA for work undertaken in accordance with
Commonwealth and State legislative requirements, and likewise must prepare
SWMS for all high risk tasks to be undertaken at the construction site.
The CSIRO MRO Site Manager may also periodically assess adherence by the
Contractors to their JSEA and SWMS practices. A JSEA/SWMS template is
available at Enclosure 10.
5.1.9 Safety Breaches
CSIRO treats breaches of safety procedures and safe work practices very
seriously. For a CSIRO controlled site, all breaches will be recorded and
investigated. If a similar recurring breach is noted then CSIRO may request the
offending Contractor to leave the site.
5.1.10 Safety Signs
Safety signs are placed on site to protect the health and safety of staff and
others working on or visiting the site. Different colours and shapes of safety
signs mean different things. Contractors must display a safety signs, that
conform to the requirements of AS 1319 Safety Signs for the Occupational
Environment.
PROHIBITION SIGNS:
A RED CIRCLE with a LINE through it means that there is something that MUST NOT BE DONE.
WARNING SIGNS:
A YELLOW TRIANGLE is a DANGER or RISK TO PERSONAL HEALTH
MANDATORY SIGNS:
A BLUE CIRCLE means that persons working in the designated area must WEAR
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5.1.11 Station Animals
Do not interfere with the station livestock deliberately and give them a wide
berth if they wander into the accommodation Facility or other work site. CSIRO
staff and their contractors should not ride any of the station‘s horses.
5.1.12 Stop Work Authority
All CSIRO staff members retain the right to issue a STOP Work‘ authority to
any activity at the MRO or CSIRO Accommodation Facility. This authority will
only be invoked where there is imminent threat to health or safety of the
individual undertaking the task, or the CSIRO staff members, visitors or other
nearby contractors.
5.1.13 Working Alone
Working alone at the MRO is risky; CSIRO recommends there be a minimum
of two (2) people working in reasonable proximity of each other at the site.
This means you must be in communication with the other person – either
because you are in the same building, room or otherwise close by so the
second person is aware of what you are doing; or you are in communication by
UHF radio (or intercom) with an agreed call-in schedule.
5.1.14 Working at the Boolardy Accommodation Facility
CSIRO has established an Accommodation Facility adjacent to the Boolardy
Homestead. Contractors shall remain within the immediate vicinity of the
CSIRO Accommodation Facility. An escort is required for jobs that take the
contractor outside the Facility, e.g. jobs at the Homestead.
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The Contractor must supply and erect any necessary barricades, signage
and/or restraints appropriate for the work undertaken to prevent access to
hazardous areas, e.g. trenches, and to keep people away from hazardous
processes, e.g. sandblasting.
5.2.2 Electrical Work
Electrical work shall only be undertaken by authorised Contractors who have
the appropriate qualifications, licences and experience to meet the Australian
State and/or Territory licensing requirements for the work being undertaken.
High voltage areas (> 1000 volts ac or 1500 volts d.c.) are identified by
DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE warning signs. The Contractor must have
approval from the CSIRO Site Manager and be accompanied by a licensed
high voltage operator to access these areas.
Some equipment may be connected to ancillary power supplies such as UPS
or emergency generators. In isolation of equipment the contractor should
ensure that the equipment is also isolated from these sources.
5.2.3 Electrical Leads, Power Tools & Portable Electrical
Equipment
All leads and power tools must be tested and tagged in accordance with
relevant State legislative requirements and as per current AS/NZS 3760 (In
service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment).
Electrical leads must be located in a safe manner and be supported clear of
floors or placed under protective covers. Electrical leads are to be connected
to the nearest power outlet and must be removed from the power outlet when
not in use. Under no circumstances can leads be plugged into labelled
uninterruptible power outlets without approval.
All equipment and appliances must be connected to an approved residual
current device (RCD). The RCD should be tested as per AS/NZS 3760. The
contractor should ensure that the circuits are not overloaded; double adapters
are not to be used.
RFI tight equipment enclosures should not be plugged into RCD protected
outlets. Connection of this type of equipment should only be done in
conjunction with the CSIRO MRO Site Manager or delegate.
5.2.4 Electric Welding
It is the responsibility of the contractor to ensure electric welding is conducted
in compliance with the current AS/NZ 1674.2 (Safety in Welding and Allied
Processes Part 2-Electrical).
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5.2.5 Excavations and Trenching
Prior to the commencement of excavations or penetrating works into existing
surfaces or substrates, conduct an appropriate assessment of any likely
services such as power, gas etc., that may be present. Please note that site
diagrams may be inaccurate.
Generally, trenches over 1.5 metres in depth (check WA State Regulations)
must be protected against collapse and handrails or barricades must be
erected around the trench and remain in place at all times. Backfill of
excavated areas must be compacted. Consideration should also be afforded to
trapped animals with a means of escape built into the trench.
The Contractor must supply and erect barricades and fencing appropriate to
the trenching and/or excavation work that they are doing to ensure the safety
of people passing or working nearby.
5.2.6 Explosive Actuated Power Tools
Explosive actuated power tools must be strictly controlled and operated
according to a permit-to-work system. All relevant legislation must be identified
and complied with.
All hazardous substances and dangerous goods must be properly labelled,
handled, stored and disposed of in accordance with the Material Safety Data
Sheets (MSDS‘) relating to the substance/material.
All Contractors must have MSDS‘ for all hazardous substances and dangerous
goods brought on site, and maintain a register of all items.
5.2.8 Interruption of Services
The Contractor cannot interrupt services without prior approval from the
CSIRO MRO Site Manager. These services include electricity, gas,
telecommunications/data, sewage and water.
An assessment shall be undertaken to identify any new hazards that have
been introduced by the isolation of critical site services, including fire alarms,
safety showers, telephones, etc.
In the case of the Contractor accidentally shutting down service(s), the
Contractor must immediately contact the CSIRO MRO Site Manager.
5.2.9 Isolation and Tagging Procedures
Isolate ALL equipment, switches and controls required to ensure that the work
site is safe. Isolation means that the relevant switch, valve or main isolator is
turned off or switched off to prevent unexpected re-energisation of the
machine/device.
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Tags must be placed on all proper switches, valves, main isolators and key
rings at minimum, and where able a lock-out system should be used. A permit
to work may also be needed, depending on the item or area being isolated.
For the protection of others: Leave other tags alone. Never remove
someone else‘s DANGER tag. Do not operate switches, valves or equipment
that display a DANGER tag or OUT OF SERVICE tag.
5.2.10 Ladder Use
The most appropriate method of accessing areas at height must be considered
(e.g. use of an elevated work platform rather than a ladder) and implemented
where possible.
Ladders must be of an industrial type and must be regularly inspected and
maintained. Metal ladders must not be used when working near electrical
hazards.
restraining or repetition. Prior to carrying out the task consider:
Size, weight and frequency of the lift/load
Grip and footing (posture and stability)
Requirement for mechanical aids
5.2.12 Occupational Noise & Vibration
The contractor should notify the CSIRO MRO Site Manager if any equipment
will emit a sound level >85 dB(A) in close proximity to CSIRO staff members,
collaborators, visitors or other contractors.
Simply put, if anyone has to shout to communicate at a distance of 1 metre
then the noise is likely to exceed the national standard (in excess of 85 dB(A)).
Contractors are expected to comply with relevant noise and vibration
legislation; they should don all appropriate hearing and vibration-absorbing
protective equipment as required.
On CSIRO-Controlled sites, contractors must use the CSIRO permit-to-work
system. Forms are available in the Site Hut and in Wittenoom House. Jobs
requiring a permit include:
Work at height
Excavation/Digging (Penetrating Works)
Confined Space
At the completion of work, the Permit to Work is signed off to indicate the
satisfactory completion of work.
5.2.14 Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment (PPCE)
Contractors shall supply their own PPCE. They will ensure that their
employees use it correctly (e.g. hard hats, safety footwear, gloves, safety
glasses, hearing protection and clothing), as required by relevant legislation
and codes of practice.
recommended for use on site.
5.2.15 Plant, Equipment & Tools – Use of CSIRO Equipment
All Contractor-owned plant and machinery is expected to be well-maintained
and in a serviceable condition. It is the Contractor‘s responsibility to ensure that
their plant and equipment complies with the relevant legislative requirements
(e.g. State Plant regulations), codes of practice and Australian Standards.
CSIRO plant and equipment must not be used without approval from the
CSIRO MRO Site Manager.
5.2.16 Scaffolds and Platforms
The Contractor must ensure that any scaffold conforms to the requirements of
AS 1576 Scaffolding: general requirements. Platforms must conform to the
requirements of AS 1657 Fixed platforms, walkways, stairways and ladders –
Designs, construction and installation.
Scaffolds and platforms must be erected and dismantled by individuals who
have the appropriate certificate of competency. Competent persons may erect
scaffolding up to a height of 4 metres. Scaffolding higher than 4 metres must
be erected by a licensed scaffolder.
The use of a Scaff-Tag system is recommended and used should be affixed
at the entry point to the scaffolding. The Scaff-Tag should indicate whether
the scaffold is safe to enter and when the next inspection is due.
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Contractors should note the Murchison Shire Council preferred Driving Route
(earlier in the manual).
Vehicles should only be parked on site where directed by the CSIRO MRO Site
Manager.
Delivery drivers may require White Card induction, depending on where the
goods are delivered to i.e. if inside an operational construction zone.
5.2.18 Working at Height
Contractors and their employees working at heights must be trained in risk
assessment and fall prevention systems. Control measures, such as fall
prevention, must be implemented prior to the commencement of the work. In
addition, control measures must be assessed with the aim of eliminating or
reducing the need to work at heights.
On CSIRO-controlled sites, a permit is required before working at height.
Signs and barricades must be placed to alert others to work being undertaken
at height. If there is a risk of objects falling from the work area then physical
barricades shall be placed to prevent access to these areas.
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practices that minimise resource consumption and waste production. All
contractors are expected to comply with applicable Commonwealth and State
Environment legislation when working onsite.
5.3.1 Chemicals – Storage, Management & Spill Response
Hazardous Substances and Dangerous Goods are to be stored in accordance
with relevant legislation and Australian Standards. Environmental legislation
governs this area as well as OHS legislation.
Fuel storage at the site shall be in accordance with AS1940. All fuel tanks
shall be self-bunded.
Drums of chemicals, fuels and lubricants shall be stored on bunded pallets or
within concrete lined bunded areas.
All static vehicles and plant likely to drip oil, petrol or diesel must have a drip
tray / bund placed under the source.
Chemicals are not permitted to be dumped or allowed to enter any
watercourse.
Contractors shall have an Emergency Spill Response Plan (and provisions for
activating the plan, i.e. an appropriate spill kit, training and PPE) for all
chemicals brought onto the Station.
5.3.2 Dust Generating Work - Erosion and Sediment Control
Vehicle speeds are to be kept to a maximum of 40km/hr on access tracks to
minimise dust generation.
Contractors must ensure measures are taken to minimise dust generation,
especially during earthworks.
Where excavation of soils is required for establishment of buildings or
equipment footings, ensure topsoil with seed stock is separately stockpiled for
site rehabilitation works.
Ensure temporary stockpiles of soils are covered with a temporarily sterile seed
cover, such as rye or millet to minimise dust and erosion.
All erosion and sediment control measures to be monitored for effectiveness.
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5.3.3 Environmentally Sensitive Areas - Flora
All persons must not deviate from the vehicle tracks already available.
Should any rare or threatened species of plant be found during construction
then clearing is to stop in the particular area until a management strategy has
been put in place.
Protected Species
With regards to the EPBC Act 1999, CSIRO committed to the following: …no
individuals of the following flora species will be cleared as a result of any
activities…
Leucopogon marginatus (Thick-margined Leucopogon)
Wurmbea tubulosa (Long-flowered Nancy)
Additionally, no individuals or habitat of the following flora species will be
cleared as a result of any activities…
Caladenia hoffmanii (Hoffman’s Spider-orchid)
Caladenia wanosa (Kalbarri Spider-orchid)
Threatened Species
In addition to the species listed above there are threatened species in the
region that must not be cleared without authorisation by the Dept of
Environment & Conservation, WA.
region only one has been identified
on-site (Ptilotus beardii) around the
proposed tracks and antenna sites;
care is to be taken when operating in
the vicinity of:
identification and map extent of Ptilotus Beardii
NOTE: WHILE ONLY PTILOTUS BEARDII HAS BEEN LOCATED AT THE
MRO YOU SHOULD APPLY CAUTION BEFORE CLEARING ANY FLORA
Ptilotus beardii
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5.3.4 Groundwater
Pollutants are not permitted to enter the groundwater or any other watercourse.
Non-potable water may only be sourced from bores, Turkey‘s Nest Dams etc
unless otherwise stipulated in the contract.
5.3.5 Vegetation – Clearing & Revegetation
No clearing activity outside the scope of formally approved works may occur.
Contractors must only clear vegetation in strict accordance with their governing
contract, taking before and after photos.
Revegetation (site rehabilitation) of the areas includes, planting a range of
locally occurring native shrubs, trees and groundcover plants.
CSIRO has held discussions with the Environment Protection Agency,
Department of Environment and Conservation and the Department of the
Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts regarding the choice of species,
particularly in areas where the revegetation is adjacent to existing patches of
native vegetation. Revegetation also covers
inclusion of logs, dead trees and stumps in the landscaping/rehabilitation works where appropriate
linking of vegetation remnants
management of exotic weeds through a Weed Management Sub-plan as part of the Construction Environmental Management Plan
exclusion of stock from these areas
temporary site establishment areas are restored to original condition or better.
5.3.6 Waste Management and Recycling
All contractors are expected to take their own trade, construction and other
waste with them.
All waste should be contained as it is produced (e.g. avoid windblown waste)
Construction materials such as timber and formwork that can be reused may
be stockpiled on site and off the ground to minimise termite damage. These
materials shall be removed on completion of works.
The transport and disposal of contractor generated wastes must be in
accordance with the requirements of the Commonwealth and State regulatory
authorities.
Where waste can be recycled or reused, it is CSIRO‘s preference that waste
materials are transferred to recycling and/or reuse facilities/designated areas.
The bins provided at the CSIRO Accommodation Facility are for the exclusive
use of guests at the DONGAs.
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5.3.7 Weed Control - Earthmoving Vehicle Inspections
To prevent the spread of weeds into the region, all earthmoving equipment
originating from outside the region must be subject to inspection and wash-
down (where required) prior to arrival at the MRO. The vehicle will be subject
to reinspection if it subsequently leaves and returns to region.
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6. AT THE MRO - CONTRACTOR-CONTROLLED SITE
There are obligations on the contractor to ensure that the health, safety and wellbeing of CSIRO staff in adjacent areas are protected. Contractors must notify their nominated CSIRO Contractor Coordinator or the CSIRO MRO Site Manager of any risk likely to affect CSIRO staff, visitors or other contractors
Contractor‘s who are in-charge of a section of the site will have a nominated person with whom CSIRO staff should liaise.
6.1 Rules of Conduct
6.1.1 Access/Entry to Site
All contractors must sign the contractors log book at either the CSIRO
Site Hut (MRO jobs) or at Wittenoom House (Accommodation Facility
jobs) before commencing work and sign out upon leaving the site.
Contractors must establish appropriate site access/entry arrangements for
sites under their control.
Leave all gates as you found them; if open, leave open – if closed, close
after driving through.
6.1.2 Alcohol & Drugs
CSIRO will not permit any person clearly affected by alcohol or drugs to carry
out work within the site. If the Contractor is aware that an employee or
subcontractor is affected by alcohol or other drug, they are expected to take
immediate action to stop the work and remove the employee or subcontractor
from site. Any confirmed incident of the above will be recorded by the
Contractor Coordinator.
6.1.3 Communication Expectations
Communication is critical to working in a safe and environmentally sustainable
manner at the MRO. Communication ranges from letting someone know
where you are at all times, to ensuring that the CSIRO MRO Site Manager is
aware of any safety hazards, incidents or significant changes to planned work.
Specific communication forums include:
Toolbox Talk: CSIRO encourages all contractors to conduct toolbox talks with their employees and subcontractors
Weekly Meeting: CSIRO MRO Site Manager meeting with each Contractor to communicate any safety issues, hazards, incidents or significant changes to planned work.
6.1.4 Domestic Animals/Pets
Contractors may not bring pets to either the accommodation Facility or the
MRO site. Registered guide/companion/security dogs exempt.
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6.1.5 Housekeeping & Site Tidiness
Contractors are responsible for keeping their immediate work area free from
slip, trip and fall hazards. All worksites must be kept clean and tidy at all times.
6.1.6 Incident Reporting & Investigation
CSIRO must meet regulatory reporting expectations to Comcare within timeframes that are significantly shorter than most contractors would usually have to meet when working within State OHS and Environmental requirements.
Comcare incident reporting expectations apply to incidents on a CSIRO site (in this case the MRO) for CSIRO staff members, contractors and visitors alike regardless of who is in control of the workplace
CSIRO will be responsible for any regulatory reporting to Comcare; however it is essential that communication is received from contractors in a timely manner to ensure that regulatory expectations can be met. Comcare expectations are as follows:
Notifiable death: the work-related death of any person (member of the public, a contractor or an employee).
Within 2 hours
Serious personal injury: a work related injury to or disease for which the person needed: emergency treatment by a registered medical practitioner (including psychologist), or treatment in a hospital as a casualty, without being admitted to the hospital, or admission to a hospital.
Within 24 hours of first becoming aware of the incident
Dangerous occurrence: an occurrence at a workplace that could have caused (but did not cause) the death or serious personal injury to any person.
Within 24 hours of first becoming aware of the incident
Serious HSE Incidents must be reported to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager
within 24 hours and include:
a near miss that could have (but did not) result in the need for medical treatment
an injury requiring more than first aid treatment
an injury resulting in lost time
any electrical incidents with the potential to have caused an electric shock or electrocution
Minor incidents must be reported within 48 hours of the incident.
Incident report forms must be provided to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager with 48 hours of the incident.
Incident investigation reports, including any corrective and preventative actions, must be provided to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager with 10 days of the incident.
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Contractors must record all incidents on site in a log, and provide a copy of this
log to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager at each Site Meeting, between the Contractor and CSIRO. NOTE: Serious HSE Incidents should also be recorded on this log, but must have been reported to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager within 24 hours.
6.1.7 Risk Management – JSEA’s and SWMS’
Contractors must prepare JSEA for work undertaken in accordance with
Commonwealth and State legislative requirements, and likewise must prepare
SWMS for all high risk tasks to be undertaken at the construction site.
JSEA‘s and SWMS‘ must be available on site. CSIRO may ask to view these
documents, where any Stop Work or imminently unsafe actions have been
identified. A JSEA/SWMS template is available at Enclosure 10.
6.1.8 Safety Breaches
CSIRO treats breaches of safety procedures and safe work practices very
seriously. CSIRO expects the contractor in-control of the relevant worksite to
record and investigate safety breaches on their site(s).
6.1.9 Safety Signs
Safety signs are placed on site to protect the health and safety of staff and
others working on or visiting the site. Different colours and shapes of safety
signs mean different things. Contractors must display a safety signs, that
conform to the requirements of AS 1319 Safety Signs for the Occupational
Environment.
PROHIBITION SIGNS:
A RED CIRCLE with a LINE through it means that there is something that MUST NOT BE DONE.
WARNING SIGNS:
A YELLOW TRIANGLE is a DANGER or RISK TO PERSONAL HEALTH
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MANDATORY SIGNS:
A BLUE CIRCLE means that persons working in the designated area must WEAR relevant SAFETY EQUIPMENT
HAZCHEM SIGNS:
6.1.10 Station Animals
Do not interfere with the station livestock deliberately and give them a wide
berth if they wander into the work site. Contractors may not ride any of the
station‘s horses.
6.1.11 Stop Work Authority
All CSIRO staff members retain the right to issue a STOP Work‘ authority to
any activity at the MRO or CSIRO Accommodation Facility.
For contractor-controlled work site, this authority will only be invoked where
there is imminent threat to health or safety of the individual undertaking the
task, or the CSIRO staff members, visitors or other nearby contractors.
6.1.12 Working Alone
Working alone at the MRO is risky, CSIRO recommends there be a minimum
of two (2) people working in reasonable proximity of each other at the site.
This means you must be in communication with the person – either because
you are in the same building, room or otherwise close by so the second person
is aware of what you are doing; or you are in communication by UHF radio (or
intercom) with an agreed call-in schedule.
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6.2.1 Boundary Identification, Barricades and Fencing
The Contractor must supply and erect any necessary barricades and fencing
appropriate for the work to ensure the contractor‘s own safety and that of
people passing or working nearby.
For large areas of land, such as those at the MRO, it is impractical to fence the
whole area. Contractors must clearly identify the boundary of any area under
their control.
Equipment
All leads and power tools must be tested and tagged in accordance with
relevant State legislative requirements and as per current AS/NZS 3760 (In
service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment).
Electrical leads must be located in a safe manner and be supported clear of
floors or placed under protective covers. Electrical leads are to be connected
to the nearest power outlet and must be removed from the power outlet when
not in use. Under no circumstances can leads be plugged into labelled
uninterruptible power outlets without approval.
All equipment and appliances must be connected to an approved residual
current device (RCD). The RCD should be tested as per AS/NZS 3760. The
contractor should ensure that the circuits are not overloaded; double adapters
are not to be used.
RFI tight equipment enclosures should not be plugged into RCD protected
outlets. Connection of this type of equipment should only be done in
conjunction with the CSIRO MRO Site Manager or delegate.
6.2.3 Excavations and Trenching
Prior to the commencement of excavations or penetrating works into existing
surfaces or substrates, conduct an appropriate assessment of any likely
services such as power, gas etc., that may be present. Please note that site
diagrams may be inaccurate.
Generally, trenches over 1.5 metres in depth (check WA State Regulations)
must be protected against collapse and handrails or barricades must be
erected around the trench and remain in place at all times. Backfill of
excavated areas must be compacted. Consideration should also be afforded to
trapped animals with a means of escape built into the trench.
The Contractor must supply and erect barricades and fencing appropriate to
the trenching and/or excavation work that they are doing to ensure the safety
of people passing or working nearby.
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All hazardous substances and dangerous goods must be properly labelled,
handled, stored and disposed of in accordance with the Material Safety Data
Sheets (MSDS‘) relating to the substance/material.
All Contractors must have MSDS‘ for all hazardous substances and dangerous
goods brought on site, and maintain a register of all items.
6.2.5 Interruption of Services
The Contractor cannot interrupt services without prior approval from the
CSIRO MRO Site Manager. These services include electricity, gas,
telecommunications/data, sewage and water.
An assessment shall be undertaken to identify any new hazards that have
been introduced by the isolation of critical site services, including fire alarms,
safety showers, telephones, etc.
In the case of the Contractor accidentally shutting down service(s), the
Contractor must immediately contact the CSIRO MRO Site Manager.
6.2.6 Occupational Noise & Vibration
The contractor should notify the CSIRO MRO Site Manager if any equipment
will emit a sound level >85 dB(A) in close proximity to CSIRO staff members,
collaborators, visitors or other contractors.
Simply put, if anyone has to shout to communicate at a distance of 1 metre
then the noise is likely to exceed the national standard (in excess of 85 dB(A)).
Contractors are expected to comply with relevant noise and vibration
legislation; they should don all appropriate hearing and vibration-absorbing
protective equipment as required.
6.2.7 Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment (PPCE)
Contractors shall supply their own PPCE. They will ensure that their
employees use it correctly (e.g. hard hats, safety footwear, gloves, safety
glasses, hearing protection and clothing), as required by relevant legislation
and codes of practice.
recommended for use on site.
6.2.8 Plant, Equipment & Tools – Use of CSIRO Equipment
All Contractor-owned plant and machinery is expected to be well-maintained
and in a serviceable condition. It is the Contractor‘s responsibility to ensure that
their plant and equipment complies with the relevant legislative requirements
(e.g. State Plant regulations), codes of practice and Australian Standards.
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CSIRO plant and equipment must not be used without approval from the
CSIRO MRO Site Manager.
Contractors should note the Murchison Shire Council preferred Driving Route
(earlier in the manual).
Vehicles should only be parked on site where directed by the CSIRO MRO Site
Manager.
Delivery drivers may require White Card induction, depending on where the
goods are delivered to e.g. if inside a construction site.
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practices that minimise resource consumption and waste production. All
contractors are expected to comply with applicable Commonwealth and State
Environment legislation when working onsite.
6.3.1 Chemicals – Storage, Management & Spill Response
Hazardous Substances and Dangerous Goods are to be stored in accordance
with relevant legislation and Australian Standards. Environmental legislation
governs this area as well as OHS legislation.
Fuel storage at the site shall be in accordance with AS1940. All fuel tanks
shall be self-bunded.
Drums of chemicals, fuels and lubricants shall be stored on bunded pallets or
within concrete lined bunded areas.
All static vehicles and plant likely to drip oil, petrol or diesel must have a drip
tray / bund placed under the source.
Chemicals are not permitted to be dumped or allowed to enter any
watercourse.
Contractors shall have an Emergency Spill Response Plan (and provisions for
activating the plan, i.e. an appropriate spill kit, training and PPE) for all
chemicals brought onto the Station.
6.3.2 Dust Generating Work - Erosion and Sediment Control
Vehicle speeds are to be kept to a maximum of 40km/hr on access tracks to
minimise dust generation.
Contractors must ensure measures are taken to minimise dust generation,
especially during earthworks.
Where excavation of soils is required for establishment of buildings or
equipment footings, ensure topsoil with seed stock is separately stockpiled for
site rehabilitation works.
Ensure temporary stockpiles of soils are covered with a temporarily sterile seed
cover, such as rye or millet to minimise dust and erosion.
All erosion and sediment control measures to be monitored for effectiveness.
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6.3.3 Environmentally Sensitive Areas - Flora
All persons must not deviate from the vehicle tracks already available.
Should any rare or threatened species of plant be found during construction
then clearing is to stop in the particular area until a management strategy has
been put in place.
Protected Species
With regards to the EPBC Act 1999, CSIRO committed to the following: …no
individuals of the following flora species will be cleared as a result of any
activities…
Leucopogon marginatus (Thick-margined Leucopogon)
Wurmbea tubulosa (Long-flowered Nancy)
Additionally, no individuals or habitat of the following flora species will be
cleared as a result of any activities…
Caladenia hoffmanii (Hoffman’s Spider-orchid)
Caladenia wanosa (Kalbarri Spider-orchid)
Threatened Species
In addition to the species listed above there are threatened species in the
region that must not be cleared without authorisation by the Dept of
Environment & Conservation, WA.
region only one has been identified
on-site (Ptilotus beardii) around the
proposed tracks and antenna sites;
care is to be taken when operating in
the vicinity of:
NOTE: WHILE ONLY PTILOTUS BEARDII HAS BEEN LOCATED AT THE
MRO YOU SHOULD APPLY CAUTION BEFORE CLEARING ANY FLORA
Ptilotus beardii
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6.3.4 Groundwater
Pollutants are not permitted to enter the groundwater or any other watercourse.
Non-potable water may only be sourced from bores, Turkey‘s Nest Dams etc
unless otherwise stipulated in the contract.
6.3.5 Vegetation – Clearing & Revegetation
No clearing activity outside the scope of formally approved works may occur.
Contractors must only clear vegetation in strict accordance with their governing
contract, taking before and after photos.
Revegetation (site rehabilitation) of the areas includes, planting a range of
locally occurring native shrubs, trees and groundcover plants.
CSIRO has held discussions with the Environment Protection Agency,
Department of Environment and Conservation and the Department of the
Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts regarding the choice of species,
particularly in areas where the revegetation is adjacent to existing patches of
native vegetation. Revegetation also covers
inclusion of logs, dead trees and stumps in the landscaping/rehabilitation works where appropriate
linking of vegetation remnants
management of exotic weeds through a Weed Management Sub-plan as part of the Construction Environmental Management Plan
exclusion of stock from these areas
temporary site establishment areas are restored to original condition or better.
6.3.6 Waste Management and Recycling
All contractors are expected to take their own trade, construction and other
waste with them.
All waste should be contained as it is produced (e.g. avoid windblown waste)
Construction materials such as timber and formwork that can be reused may
be stockpiled on site and off the ground to minimise termite damage. These
materials shall be removed on completion of works.
The transport and disposal of contractor generated wastes must be in
accordance with the requirements of the Commonwealth and State regulatory
authorities.
Where waste can be recycled or reused, it is CSIRO‘s preference that waste
materials are transferred to recycling and/or reuse facilities/designated areas.
The bins provided at the CSIRO Accommodation Facility are for the exclusive
use of guests at the DONGAs.
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6.3.7 Weed Control - Earthmoving Vehicle Inspections
To prevent the spread of weeds into the region, all earthmoving equipment
originating from outside the region must be subject to inspection and wash-
down (where required) prior to arrival at the MRO. The vehicle will be subject
to reinspection if it subsequently leaves and returns to region.
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CONTROLLED SITE
There are obligations on the contractor to ensure that the health, safety and wellbeing of CSIRO staff in adjacent areas are protected. Contractors must notify their nominated CSIRO Contractor Coordinator or the CSIRO MRO Site Manager of any risk likely to affect CSIRO staff, visitors or other contractors
All communication with the Contractor/s regarding work undertaken on site, should be conducted via the Superintendent, with the exception of work that is immediately threatening to the life or health of someone on site. There are very clear conditions in the contractual relationship between CSIRO and the Infrastructure Contractors regarding communication pathways. This document outlines some of the formalised communication channels below.
7.1 Rules of Conduct
7.1.1 Access/Entry to Site
Contractors must establish appropriate site access/entry arrangements for
sites under their control. For the construction period undertaken by the
Infrastructure Contractors, they must manage and control the access to the
area/s designated as being under their control.
Leave all gates as you found them; if open, leave open – if closed, close
after driving through.
7.1.2 Alcohol & Drugs
CSIRO will not permit any person clearly affected by alcohol or drugs to carry
out work within the site. If the Contractor is aware that an employee or
subcontractor is affected by alcohol or other drug, they are expected to take
immediate action to stop the work and remove the employee or subcontractor
from site. Any confirmed incident of the above will be recorded by the
Contractor Coordinator.
7.1.3 Communication Expectations
Communication is critical to working in a safe and environmentally sustainable
manner at the MRO. Communication ranges from letting someone know
where you are at all times, to ensuring that the CSIRO MRO Site Manager is
aware of any safety hazards, incidents or significant changes to planned work.
Specific communication forums include:
Toolbox Talk: CSIRO encourages all contractors to conduct toolbox talks with their employees and subcontractors
Weekly Meeting: CSIRO MRO Site Manager meeting with each Contractor to communicate any safety issues, hazards, incidents or significant changes to planned work.
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Site Meeting: CSIRO MRO Site Manager meeting, typically bi-weekly with Infrastructure Contractor Superintendent to discuss contractor HSE performance in accordance with the Contract.
HSE Coordinator Meeting. Immediately following the Site Meeting, a specific HSE Coordinators meeting relating to discuss HSE incidents and issues in more detail, and ensure any follow up actions are identified and assigned. This requires appropriate HSE/Safety representation from CSIRO and the Infrastructure Contractor to be present.
Issues, Hazards, Concerns – Identified Outside of Formal Meetings: Must be communicated to the Infrastructure Contractor via the Aurecon Superintendent.
7.1.4 Domestic Animals/Pets
Contractors may not bring pets to either the accommodation Facility or the
MRO site. Registered guide/companion/security dogs exempt.
7.1.5 Housekeeping & Site Tidiness
Contractors are responsible for keeping their immediate work area free from
slip, trip and fall hazards. All worksites must be kept clean and tidy at all times.
7.1.6 Incident Reporting & Investigation
CSIRO must meet regulatory reporting expectations to Comcare within timeframes that are significantly shorter than most contractors would usually have to meet when working within State OHS and Environmental requirements.
Comcare incident reporting expectations apply to incidents on a CSIRO site (in this case the MRO) for CSIRO staff members, contractors and visitors alike regardless of who is in control of the workplace
CSIRO will be responsible for any regulatory reporting to Comcare; however it is essential that communication is received from contractors in a timely manner to ensure that regulatory expectations can be met. Comcare expectations are as follows:
Notifiable death: the work-related death of any person (member of the public, a contractor or an employee).
Within 2 hours
Serious personal injury: a work related injury to or disease for which the person needed: emergency treatment by a registered medical practitioner (including psychologist), or treatment in a hospital as a casualty, without being admitted to the hospital, or admission to a hospital.
Within 24 hours of first becoming aware of the incident
Dangerous occurrence: an occurrence at a workplace that could have caused (but did not cause) the death or serious personal injury to any person.
Within 24 hours of first becoming aware of the incident
In fr
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Serious HSE Incidents must be reported to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager
within 24 hours and include:
a near miss that could have (but did not) result in the need for medical treatment
an injury requiring more than first aid treatment
an injury resulting in lost time
any electrical incidents with the potential to have caused an electric shock or electrocution
Minor incidents must be reported within 48 hours of the incident.
Incident report forms must be provided to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager with 48 hours of the incident.
Incident investigation reports, including any corrective and preventative actions, must be provided to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager with 10 days of the incident.
Contractors must record all incidents on site in a log, and provide a copy of this
log to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager at each Site Meeting, between the Contractor and CSIRO. NOTE: Serious HSE Incidents should also be recorded on this log, but must have been reported to the CSIRO MRO Site Manager within 24 hours.
7.1.7 Risk Management – JSEA’s and SWMS’
Contractors must prepare JSEA for work undertaken in accordance with
Commonwealth and State legislative requirements, and likewise must prepare
SWMS for all high risk tasks to be undertaken at the construction site.
JSEA‘s and SWMS‘ must be available on site. CSIRO may ask to view these
documents, where any Stop Work or imminently unsafe actions have been
identified. A JSEA/SWMS template is available at Enclosure 10.
7.1.8 Safety Breaches
CSIRO treats breaches of safety procedures and safe work practices very
seriously. CSIRO expects the contractor in-control of the relevant worksite to
record and investigate safety breaches on their site(s).
7.1.9 Safety Signs
Safety signs are placed on site to protect the health and safety of staff and
others working on or visiting the site. Different colours and shapes of safety
signs mean different things. Contractors must display a safety signs, that
conform to the requirements of AS 1319 Safety Signs for the Occupational
Environment.
PROHIBITION SIGNS:
A RED CIRCLE with a LINE through it means that there is something that MUST NOT BE DONE.
WARNING SIGNS:
A YELLOW TRIANGLE is a DANGER or RISK TO PERSONAL HEALTH
MANDATORY SIGNS:
A BLUE CIRCLE means that persons working in